Wild Dog Adventure Riding

Technical Section => Make / Model Specific Discussions => Husqvarna => Topic started by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 09:15:06 am

Title: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 09:15:06 am
A week or so ago my HID stopped working again.

I installed the HID a few years ago a couple of months after I first got the bike.  I had a lot of trouble with ballasts at first but Adventurer helped out and eventually one of the replacements he supplied seemed to last.

In the interim, the bulb was taking strain.

I ride mostly off road, in quite technical terrain and the constant vibration, jumps and hammering etc was shaking it all to bits. 

The HID bulb was supposed to move in and out when you select brights or dims, but the vibration was wearing it all loose so you could see it wobbling around inside.  It eventually was flopping around quite badly - I was constantly expecting it to break.  The writing was on the wall because it was getting steadily worse.

Anyway as I said, last week it stopped working again.  But this time it seemed to be due to some bad connection some where because it switched on and off as I fiddled with the wires.

While trying to isolate the fault it seemed that I somehow damaged my instrument display which seemed to have blown something internal.  The instrument display itself had a few issues before that, mostly because it was filling up with dust internally which you could see lying on the display inside. 

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/oldinstrument.JPG)

In addition to all of that, the cable from the speed sensor was very flimsy and kept breaking.

Soooo... given all these little issues I decided to splash out and get new lights as well as a different instrument.

I settled on the new TrailTech Striker mainly because it had the ability to adjust the trip distance up or down via a remote handle bar switch, as well as being quite reasonably priced http://www.trailtech.net/striker.html.

In addition to that it had number of other useful features that my standard instrument panel lacked:
1) Water temp
2) Ambient temp
3) Time
4) Average speed
5) Voltage
6) Stop watch


The bonus was that the kit came with a new speedo cable which apparently fit 100% into the existing fittings at both ends.

The only thing it lacked was a rev display which wasn't a train smash.

I also ordered their clip-on warning light display.  http://trailtech.net/indicator_dashboards.html

It only had provision for 4 warning lights.  It came with a whole lot of little clip in lenses that would show different things.  I chose, low fuel warning, turn indicator, neutral indicator, and bright headlight indicator.  The original Husky instrument also had two more warning lights - rev limiter and headlight indicator.  The headlight indicator was redundant and the rev limiter light was useless because the Striker couldn't measure revs.  But I didn't ride the bike on the rev limiter ever so that didn't bother me.  In any event I doubt if you will be looking down at your instrument cluster as you hit the rev limiter - so I've always wondered about the usefulness of that light.

All told it came to about R1800.00 before shipping and VAT, not too bad. So far so good. 

And then I'm afraid I lost my head. 

I had decided to get a new headlight, because I was sick and tired of constantly wondering whether the HID light would or wouldn't still be working at the end of a ride.

I had seen in the Dakar thread on AdvRider that lots of the guys used LED lights, and had previously looked for the suppliers of those lights out of interest.  Neduro who rode the Dakar the year before last used Rigid Industries lights which I rather liked.  After lots of browsing around I decided that the Dually's looked like a good option, very solid and obviously high quality.  http://www.rigidindustries.com/Dually-LED-Light-Flood-p/dually-fl.htm 

They came in various patterns, spot, flood and diffuse.  One of the reasons why I settled on Rigid Industries is they gave proper believable specs on the light patterns of their lights, unlike most Chineses and other suppliers, who just quoted lumens (with the implication that the more the better, but gave no info on how that light was projected).

I needed to try and reproduce the quite complex light spread of an automotive headlight which had a hard "cut-off" in dim mode that kept the light down on the road and stopped glare blinding on-coming motorists.  I thought I could do this with a combination of one flood pattern light which I could angle, slightly downwards and then have a seperate spot pattern shine off into the distance when on brights.  I wasn't 100% sure that this would work, but was willing to give it a go, so I ordered one of each. 

This started a whole sequence of events that eventually would cost a hell of a lot of money!  :patch: :biggrin:

I thought initially I could get the two lights for the price of a pair which was cheaper, but sadly that was not to be - so that cost an extra $15, no big deal.  At that stage thery were about R1000 each before shipping, which was expensive, but OK given that cheap Chinese units locally went for about R700-800.

The real problem came in that each light was packaged in its own quite big box.

With high shipping costs from the US and the Rand/US exchange rate at an all time high, this ended up doubling the price of the lights once they arrived here - ouch!  Unfortunately I used Bongo to ship all the stuff from the states, and because it was the first time I used them I wasn't completely sure how their system worked, so I had difficulty working out what the shipping costs would be.

Oh well, an expensive lesson!

Anyway it all arrived last week  :thumleft:

Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 09:40:42 am
I had started the investigation on which pins in the plug at the back of the standard instrument cluster powered the various warning lights.

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/610InstrumentPlug.JPG)


This is what I've found so far after studying the wiring diag in the manual as well as testing with a multimeter:

Pin1: empty
Pin2: Brown/white - +12V when key on - some sort of switching circuit?
Pin3: Grey - earthed when key off and +12V when the key is on?
Pin4: Blue - earth always
Pin5: Yellow/black - +12V always
Pin6: Black - speed input?
Pin7: empty
Pin8: empty

Pin10: Red/black - Turn signal
Pin11: Skyblue - Turn signal
Pin12: Red - Neutral indicator - switches to earth when in neutral
Pin13: Bright headlight indicator - switches to +12V when brights are on
Pin14: Black - speed input?
Pin15: empty
Pin16: empty
Pin17: Headlight indicator - earthed when key is off. +12V when key is on
Pin18: 9V when key on -I assumed this was the temp sensor but the wiring diag shows no link between the instrument panel and the temp sensor so maybe this is the fuel warning?

I'm reasonably sure about most warning lights except the low fuel indicator.

After some discussions with my partner who understands electronics more than I do, here is what I came up with in terms of wiring it all up.

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/instrumentdiag.JPG)

I had to modify little lugs so that they would fit into the plug.  I also had to add some diodes to the turn signal outputs so that both flickers wouldnt flash.

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/instrumentplug1.JPG)

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/instrumentplug2.JPG)

Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: madmike999 on June 02, 2013, 09:46:23 am
 :thumleft: :thumleft:
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: Rough Rider on June 02, 2013, 10:30:58 am
Sub  :happy1:
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: M3X3Z3 on June 02, 2013, 10:34:42 am
Nice post Alan.

I am sure you will post some pics when your done.
This could be an option for the 510.  :-\
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on June 02, 2013, 10:49:11 am
Sweet - love these kinds of meaningful mods. Waiting in anticipation.  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: Rough Rider on June 02, 2013, 10:51:26 am
All six ten owners glued  :laughing4:
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 11:00:31 am
The Husky 610 kit for the Striker comes with a high quality replacement speedo cable as well as an inline water temp sensor ( a high quality machined aluminium fitting)  :thumleft:.

I fitted the water sensor after much humming and haaing about where it should go.  Slicing into a perfectly good (and probably quite expensive) water hose was quite nerve wracking - although I told myself its was actually exciting  :P)

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/waterhosesensor.JPG)
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 11:30:49 am
At the last minute, before last year's Amageza I decided to take my windshield off (which it turned out, was a good decision  :thumleft:).  I hurriedly cobbled together a rather nasty looking set-up to hold the HID light in place.  It was only supposed to be temporary for the event but its been in place ever since (and surprisingly hasn't broken).  But it always annoyed me because it looked pretty crappy.

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/oldbracket.JPG)

I had an idea of what I actually wanted after lots of thought during the year and decided that now was a good time to try those ideas out.

I wanted something that would be strong enough to mount a roadbook to, without being a huge tower, as used in other rally bikes.  I don't like the whole rally tower idea, (even though I'm sure that's a race proven solution), because it makes the bike top heavy, and is prone to breaking on any sort of fall. 

In addition it needs to be very strong because all the weight of the instruments etc are held far out on a long lever arm which is just destined to crack and break from the harsh vibrations.  Getting something strong enough would require a lot of extra weight and engineering (as can be seen from any of the threads discussing the subject on AdvRider). 

I was hoping to keep things a lot simpler and smaller.  Mostly because I'm not really interested in the rally "look", and prefer a more ordinary dirt bike setup - which is more practical for the type of riding I do on most weekends.  I'll only use a road book once or twice a year - if that.

So during the week, in the evenings I had been working on some CAD drawings for a bracket to hold the lights and instrument.

I sent off the drawings to the local laser cutting company and hope to have the parts by Tuesday - looking forward to that  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 11:43:53 am
While I was shipping all the stuff from the states I took the opportunity to get a replacement for the crappy Husky gear lever head.  Its really cheap and nasty and has always made me wonder what they were thinking putting that on a bike that gets sold with some other really high quality bits and pieces.

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/oldGearHead.JPG)

HdMoto make some nice after market gear lever heads

http://www.hdmoto.com/SearchResults.asp?searching=Y&sort=2&cat=5&show=12&page=2

So I ordered one in a wild moment of excess  :P

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/hammerhead.JPG)

I got the 15mm short version (I have small feet  :biggrin:).  Its actually quite a big chunky thing, I needed to add three extra 8mm washers to get it to fit snugly on the gear lever.

But it looks a lot nicer and gives your foot more space :thumleft:

At $15 its quite expensive for what it is though so I wouldnt have bothered if I wasn't shipping a lot of other stuff and could just get it thrown in the box.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on June 02, 2013, 01:18:56 pm
Ja my sentiments entirely re the gear lever tip  :imaposer:  I also replaced mine with a Hammerhead unit some time back - went for the rubber tipped one and also got a blue one for the EishPeeTwee  ;) 
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 01:24:07 pm
I remove the old speedo cable and installed the TrailTech replacement.  Very easy, it screws into the same hole at the bottom and has the same connector at the top  :thumleft:

The new cable seems higher quality and its a bit longer at the top.  The old one was a bit short, which placed a lot of stress on the delicate wires just where they entered the connector.  As the forks moved in/out these wires would be worked back and forth and eventually break at that point.

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/oldspeedo2.JPG)

The new wire was longer so it should be easier to arrange it so that all the stress wasnt concentrated right as the wires enter the connector.

Pics below show the old wire removed and the new wire installed

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/oldspeedo1.JPG)

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/newspeedo.JPG)
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 01:27:20 pm
Ja my sentiments entirely re the gear lever tip  :imaposer:  I also replaced mine with a Hammerhead unit some time back - went for the rubber tipped one and also got a blue one for the EishPeeTwee  ;) 

I went for the short non rubber tipped ones because they were on special  :biggrin:

But I'm glad I did because a longer version would maybe have been too long  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on June 02, 2013, 01:34:07 pm
Ja my sentiments entirely re the gear lever tip  :imaposer:  I also replaced mine with a Hammerhead unit some time back - went for the rubber tipped one and also got a blue one for the EishPeeTwee  ;) 

I went for the short non rubber tipped ones because they were on special  :biggrin:

But I'm glad I did because a longer version would maybe have been too long  :thumleft:

I would probably go for non- rubber tips if I were to do it again as even though they give you spare rubbers the ribs wear quite quickly with heavy boots.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on June 02, 2013, 01:41:31 pm
Alan are the Strikers replacing the Vipors? Seem to recall people saying they were not going  to get Vipors soon - this seemed to be quite a popular change-out on Husky Cafe. Is there a specific model you ordered ?
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 01:42:21 pm
Here's the old HID kit all stripped off, looking quite well used  8)

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/oldHID.JPG)

It was quite expensive when I bought it all originally, so its a bit disappointing that it didn't really last.  But it was gamble putting it on in the first place - live and learn!

IMO LED's are perfectly suited to offroad bikes and in a few years you'll get high quality cheap units that suite the application perfectly.

Right now though, the only options are cheap and nasty Chinese stuff, which puts out a lot of light but they are quite vague or un-inspiring when it comes to telling you how that light is projected, or expensive stuff from the states or Europe.

I tried to find the most reasonably priced units that at least seemed to have some believable specs which seemed to suite my requirements.

The Dually's certainly are very well made!  Quite hefty units at 500g each.  Coincidentally the two of them weigh almost exactly what the stripped off components of the HID system did (1.1kg).

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/Duallybottom.JPG)

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/duallyfront.JPG)

Although at their landed price they bloody well better be well made!

I fired the flood light unit up and it gives a lot of light even in bright day light!  What I really liked though was that there was a very well defined line between the brighter part of the beam and the periphery light which I hope will enable me to set it up so that it doesn't blind oncoming cars.  But I'll only be certain of this once its all mounted on the bike and adjusted. 
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 01:53:14 pm
Alan are the Strikers replacing the Vipors? Seem to recall people saying they were not going  to get Vipors soon - this seemed to be quite a popular change-out on Husky Cafe. Is there a specific model you ordered ?

No the Stiker replaces the Vector.  Its more or less the same thing but with the added feature of showing voltage.

I ordered this kit http://www.trailtech.net/71-102.html - I went for the black (they call it stealth) option - never being one for two much bling.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 02:21:30 pm
I wired the LED lights together so that when the normal headlights are on, only the flood light unit is on, but when the brights are selected then both the spot and the flood units would be on.  It was easy to do this. 

Just connect to the standard wires as normal and join the two positives with a diode that would allow both to be lit when the brights wire was positive.

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/LEDLightconnection.JPG)

So now I just have to wait for the brackets to get here on Tuesday to see how its all going work  :P
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on June 02, 2013, 02:51:36 pm
Alan are the Strikers replacing the Vipors? Seem to recall people saying they were not going  to get Vipors soon - this seemed to be quite a popular change-out on Husky Cafe. Is there a specific model you ordered ?

No the Stiker replaces the Vector.  Its more or less the same thing but with the added feature of showing voltage.

I ordered this kit http://www.trailtech.net/71-102.html - I went for the black (they call it stealth) option - never being one for two much bling.


Sorry I think I meant Vector ??? Striker looks cool in black  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on June 02, 2013, 02:56:14 pm
I must say the new generation Cree LED 's are amazing technology. Will you mount the flood into your existing headlight shroud?
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 04:37:08 pm
Just ran the bike with the temp sensor installed and checked that all is well  :thumleft:

I can report that the fan turns on at 87 C water temp.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 02, 2013, 04:40:45 pm
I must say the new generation Cree LED 's are amazing technology. Will you mount the flood into your existing headlight shroud?

Ja I'm going to have to cut it to get both lights to fit, but its old and buggered already from lots of different mods.

I might ask Blazes to coat it in sexy carbon if he's willing to and its not too pricey (hint, hint  :biggrin:).
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 03, 2013, 06:21:57 pm
I put some more fuel in the tank and expected to see the fuel warning light go off.  But it didn't!  So the wiring diag shown earlier isn't correct when it comes to the fuel warning light.

While the tank was off I did verify that the wire leading from the tank sensor did indeed connect to pin 18 so I'm sure about that.  I'm just not sure how they have setup the signal to light the lamp, because the wiring diagram shows its also connected to another live circuit via a 68 ohm resistor

So after scratching my head a bit and trying different options this seems to work

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/wiringdiag2.JPG)

Its quite difficult to verify because I have to keep filling and draining the tank.  Also the switch seems to need a bit of a nudge to activate.  But I've seen it switch off when it should and switch on when it should.  So hopefully that's sorted now.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: sidetrack on June 03, 2013, 10:10:14 pm
The stock fuel switch is dodgy as is, mine was epoxied / pratley steel modified when I got it as I understand this is a common failure as the will leak and break off the sender wires. Have you manually activated the switch to test ? Will be easier than filling / draining etc.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 04, 2013, 09:05:43 am
The stock fuel switch is dodgy as is, mine was epoxied / pratley steel modified when I got it as I understand this is a common failure as the will leak and break off the sender wires. Have you manually activated the switch to test ? Will be easier than filling / draining etc.

Ja after a bit of actual thought last night I drained the fuel until it was just enough to activate, deactivate the switch by rocking the bike from one side to another.

The switch activates very slowly for some reason you need to hold it in position for quite a while before its switches on/off.

But it does seem to work now as far as I can tell.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: Rough Rider on June 04, 2013, 09:08:31 am
The stock fuel switch is dodgy as is, mine was epoxied / pratley steel modified when I got it as I understand this is a common failure as the will leak and break off the sender wires. Have you manually activated the switch to test ? Will be easier than filling / draining etc.

Ja after a bit of actual thought last night I drained the fuel until it was just enough to activate, deactivate the switch by rocking the bike from one side to another.

The switch activates very slowly for some reason you need to hold it in position for quite a while before its switches on/off.

But it does seem to work now as far as I can tell.

Does it not have a time delay built into it, to stop false alarms when the fuel level is on the cusp.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 04, 2013, 10:04:31 am
The stock fuel switch is dodgy as is, mine was epoxied / pratley steel modified when I got it as I understand this is a common failure as the will leak and break off the sender wires. Have you manually activated the switch to test ? Will be easier than filling / draining etc.

Ja after a bit of actual thought last night I drained the fuel until it was just enough to activate, deactivate the switch by rocking the bike from one side to another.

The switch activates very slowly for some reason you need to hold it in position for quite a while before its switches on/off.

But it does seem to work now as far as I can tell.

Does it not have a time delay built into it, to stop false alarms when the fuel level is on the cusp.

I suspect it got more to do with two opposing forces overcoming each other.  I'm actually not sure how it actually works.

I think its designed to ensure that there are no sparks in the tank (a good thing I think  :thumleft:).  I think what happens is that when the switch closes it sets up an alternate path for the current to flow, but that happens gradually - I'm guessing I only have the vaguest understanding of electronics.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 04, 2013, 12:03:57 pm
OK just managed to get my business partner to have a look at the theory and he is reasonably sure this is how the fuel warning works:

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/fuelwiring3.JPG)

It seems the switching device in the tank isnt a conventional switch but a thermal resistor which is heated all the time by the current flowing through the 68 ohm resistor.

When is immersed in fuel it remains cool and its resistance is high so no or very low current flows through it.

But when its not in fuel it heats up and its resistance drops and thus current flows through it lighting the lamp.

Seems to match the facts and explains why the light comes on so slowly.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 05, 2013, 07:50:58 pm
Yesterday I got the cut plates back from the laser cutters  :thumleft:

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/rawbrackets.JPG)

My idea was to have one vertical bracket to hold the lights that bolted onto holes in the lower fork bracket.  It extends up to an another bracket that extends forwards from the handle bar mounts (ie it replaces the existing instrument mounting plate).  The two join and support each other giving each other strength and rigidity while not being too large or heavy a structure.  (Together they weigh 600g)

I spent most of last night till the early hours bending them and fitting all the components.

Here's the light bracket bent into shape (3mm aluminium very light and quite strong).

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/lightbracket1.jpg)

Here's the instrument bracket bent into shape.  Its 2mm stainless.  Which I needed because some of the sections around the key switch were quite thin and fiddly, I wasnt sure that aluminium would last.  Stainless is a lot harder to work with than aluminium and I battled with the key switch dog leg!  It started off with gentle well considered taps with the hammer and bends in the vice and ended with me hammering the hell out of the thing!  I could have got the laser company to do the bending but have found that getting them to understand what I want can be quite challenging when it comes to bends and this needed lots of little bends and things.  So I thought it would be easier to do myself - I was wondering of I had bitten off more than I could chew at a few points.  But I eventually got it to the right shape more or less.

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/instrument.JPG)

This would be replacing the existing instrument mounting bracket to enable the mounting of the TrailTech Striker as well as extending forward to support the light bracket.

Here's the old and new instrument bracket side by side.

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/newoldinstrument.jpg)

Here's the lights mounted on their bracket.

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/lightsonbracket.JPG)

And here's it all mounted on the bike

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/LEDfrontview.JPG)

I must admit it worked quite well!

Its very rigid overall, more than I thought it would be!  And plenty strong enough to mount a roadbook to - as and when.


Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 05, 2013, 08:13:49 pm
I'm afraid at 1:30 in the morning I couldn't resist setting the lights and testing them by riding up and down my road.  My neighbours must have been cursing!

I have to say I'm very happy with them!

I can get the flood unit to light the area immediately in front of the bike quite nicely while the light shines down quite a lot and thus I don't think it will blind oncoming drivers.  And the spot unit has quite a long reach so when you to switch brights you can see quite far.  So at least the hefty expense wasn't in vain  :thumleft:  

I didnt take any photo's because it was late and I was trying to get it all done with the least disturbance possible.   In any event, photos of lights never can be easily interpreted because cameras are designed to equalise exposures regardless of the light levels.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on June 06, 2013, 01:05:12 am
Awesome Alan  :thumleft: Excellent mod taking shape. I would probably have been tempted to relocate the ignition switch a bit although I know there is not much play in the wiring ... just find it's positioning very irritating and would love a keyless solution.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 08, 2013, 08:29:37 pm
I cut the standard plastic headlight shroud to suite the new lights, and bolted it onto the new aluminium bracket using a whole bunch of rubber tap washers as spacers.  Worked better than I hoped  :thumleft:

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/frontfin.JPG)

Here's a front view with the flood headlight on.  It doesn't blind you when you stand in front of the bike  :thumleft:

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/fin1lighton.JPG)

Here's both lights on - quite dazzling if you look into the beam!

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/fin2lightson.JPG)

I just took it for another spin around the neighbourhood in the dark, nobody complained about the light dazzling them - a good sign.  The light pattern is very nice, very clear and even white light.  Not fantastically bright but more than enough light to see properly.  On brights you can see quite far.  All good IMO  :thumleft:

Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 08, 2013, 08:40:21 pm
Here's the cockpit

(http://www.abolton.co.za/upload/cockpit.JPG)

I've got mixed feelings at the moment about the TrailTech Striker.  It has some very nice functionality and is very simple to set up.

But I'm experiencing two problems at the moment.

1) The remote switch after working initially, now only works intermittently!   >:(.  This was the whole reason I decided to change instruments, so I could have this feature together with the ability to change the trip distance via the remote switch while you were riding.  It looks like its some sort of fault in the wire or the connector, because every now and then it works again.  I'm currently in correspondence with TrailTech - hopefully they will rectify the situation.  I was very careful when I installed it so I'm sure it wasn't an installation fault.  Besides it did work initially and then suddenly stopped.

2) The display on the unit doesn't have a wide angle of view.  As it is currently mounted when I'm standing you cant see anything on the screen.  I have to squat right down to see anything.  A bit irritating!

Lets hope it all gets sorted out.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: buzzlightyear on June 08, 2013, 08:55:52 pm
Does the angle not get better when you remove the protective cover, I see it is still on?

Otherwise it is looking great, bar your niggles.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: Jacobsroodt on June 08, 2013, 09:03:40 pm
This is really Impressive Alan! I just installed a pair of Mk 3 LED spotlights on my new F800GS and they work very well!
Apologies if this looks like hijacking your thread, but is it easy to bend aluminium? You are definitely the expert!
I have a Givi top box mount that weighs 2kg - much too heavy. I read that aluminium weighs a 1/3rd of mild steel and I want to make a new base plate. It will have 90' bends like your spotlight mounting plate. Can one bend aluminium at 90' (and how) or should one rather weld? Repairing bent levers means heating them in a flame and bend while hot. Is this the same with aluminium?
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 08, 2013, 09:14:15 pm
Does the angle not get better when you remove the protective cover, I see it is still on?

Otherwise it is looking great, bar your niggles.

Good point!

I'm always loath to remove those things because I hate the thought of new stuff getting scratched.  I'll bite the bullet tomorrow and see if its better.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 08, 2013, 09:20:50 pm
This is really Impressive Alan! I just installed a pair of Mk 3 LED spotlights on my new F800GS and they work very well!
Apologies if this looks like hijacking your thread, but is it easy to bend aluminium? You are definitely the expert!
I have a Givi top box mount that weighs 2kg - much too heavy. I read that aluminium weighs a 1/3rd of mild steel and I want to make a new base plate. It will have 90' bends like your spotlight mounting plate. Can one bend aluminium at 90' (and how) or should one rather weld? Repairing bent levers means heating them in a flame and bend while hot. Is this the same with aluminium?

Hell I would hardly call myself an expert!

I just put it in a vice and hit it with a hammer!  If that doesn't work I use anything else I can (it gets ugly at times  :biggrin:).

You do get stretch marks on the bend and I think 3mm is about the limit before the stretch marks turn into tears.

The bent material wont be as strong as the unworked metal (and is probably prone to cracking if highly stressed and subject to cyclic loads), but its strong enough for my purposes IMO, those lights weigh 1 kg in total.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on June 09, 2013, 08:04:56 am
What alan is saying is spot on regarding the bend being the weak point on alu - I have seen this time and again with Touratech stuff ... they love alu and when it gives it cracks and breaks on the bend. And is then difficult or impossible to repair. A metal working engineering firm will have a plate bender that can easily bend straight even bends. You also get different grade alu incuding a hardened type. I am not sure of the structural importance of the plate on your rack but feel sure part of its purpose is to restrict the plastic flexing ... when this happens the topbox exits the carrier... not nice for youm...or mecriding behind  :eek7: Personally I would stick with the existing setup. Hijack off  ;D

Alan I see you seem to have angled the dash a bit more vertically which one would expext to allow better viewing but is probably putting a more acute angle on the screen. Regarding those plastic covers that come with electrical goods be wary of leaving on as they can bond to the acrylic glass due to heat and UV and when they then start perishing you shit to get them off as now brittle and bonded.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 09, 2013, 11:28:02 am
Quote
Alan I see you seem to have angled the dash a bit more vertically which one would expext to allow better viewing but is probably putting a more acute angle on the screen. Regarding those plastic covers that come with electrical goods be wary of leaving on as they can bond to the acrylic glass due to heat and UV and when they then start perishing you shit to get them off as now brittle and bonded.

In the photo it may seem that way but its supposed to be at the same angle as the original. I bent the plate to mach the original in any event - and during installation I didnt have to push and shove too much to get the holes to line up so I think it should be more or less the same.

I'll take the little plastic cover sheet off before I go ride today  :P  :biggrin:
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: DeepBass9 on June 09, 2013, 11:37:24 am
Quote
Alan I see you seem to have angled the dash a bit more vertically which one would expext to allow better viewing but is probably putting a more acute angle on the screen. Regarding those plastic covers that come with electrical goods be wary of leaving on as they can bond to the acrylic glass due to heat and UV and when they then start perishing you shit to get them off as now brittle and bonded.

In the photo it may seem that way but its supposed to be at the same angle as the original. I bent the plate to mach the original in any event - and during installation I didnt have to push and shove too much to get the holes to line up so I think it should be more or less the same.

I'll take the little plastic cover sheet off before I go ride today  :P  :biggrin:

On my Vector I have the unit, probably about 20 degrees from vertical and it is fine to read. Maybe the flat angle is causing sun glare from above which makes it less visible?

Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: Rough Rider on June 09, 2013, 06:43:47 pm
This is really Impressive Alan! I just installed a pair of Mk 3 LED spotlights on my new F800GS and they work very well!
Apologies if this looks like hijacking your thread, but is it easy to bend aluminium? You are definitely the expert!
I have a Givi top box mount that weighs 2kg - much too heavy. I read that aluminium weighs a 1/3rd of mild steel and I want to make a new base plate. It will have 90' bends like your spotlight mounting plate. Can one bend aluminium at 90' (and how) or should one rather weld? Repairing bent levers means heating them in a flame and bend while hot. Is this the same with aluminium?

I would use stainless steel for that, it is a little bit heavier, but a whole lot easier to bend.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 09, 2013, 06:57:40 pm
Took the bike for nice shake down ride. Taking the protective film off the display seems to have worked!

I could see the screen reasonably well while standing.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: Jacobsroodt on June 09, 2013, 09:50:43 pm
What alan is saying is spot on regarding the bend being the weak point on alu - I have seen this time and again with Touratech stuff ... they love alu and when it gives it cracks and breaks on the bend. And is then difficult or impossible to repair. A metal working engineering firm will have a plate bender that can easily bend straight even bends. You also get different grade alu incuding a hardened type. I am not sure of the structural importance of the plate on your rack but feel sure part of its purpose is to restrict the plastic flexing ... when this happens the topbox exits the carrier... not nice for youm...or mecriding behind  :eek7: Personally I would stick with the existing setup. Hijack off  ;D


Thanks Gentlemen. This plate supports the Givi luggage rack at the bended lips so the bended areas do carry stress. Thanks for all the advice. Top box weighs 3.7kg and the plate assembly 2kg. So 5.7kg to have the benefit of a top box (which is a huge benefit in normal city use). My bike just felt so much nimbler before fitting 23kg's worth of farkles. I guess I will just have to live with it...
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: Mzee on June 10, 2013, 05:51:06 am
You are a genius.  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: TK on June 10, 2013, 10:58:13 pm
Hey Alan........now I see why you got that USB charging port from me. Nice touch.
Also for future reference. If you guys are having something laser cut and need to bend you can ask to have (and want of a better word)a bending slots cut where you would bend the plate.......bend by hand to the right angle and then have it tacked in place.
Also if you are going to use ali plate to make  something up go for a softer type......the harder the ali the more likely it will crack. Note that S/S also has a tendancy to crack and I therefore prefere to use mild steel plate
Just my 2 cents worth.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on June 11, 2013, 07:18:58 am
Agreed on the hardened alu and also SS ... which also does not like vibration esp at welds where it is often weakened.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 13, 2013, 10:36:35 am
Rode out to Dullstroom for the week. 

Took the bike for a ride down a a dark road at night.  The lights work very well!  The flood unit provides more than enough light on its own actually but it it doesnt shine that far the way I have it set up now, more or less the same as a car's lights on dims. 

On brights you can see nice and far.

Given the expense of the lights though I would say you don't really need the spot unit.  A single flood unit would be enough as an upgrade on most dirt orientated bikes like the 610 that are sold with useless headlights.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 15, 2013, 09:14:12 am
Had a nice ride back from Dullstroom yesterday, sticking mostly to dirt via Loskop Dam.

The TrailTech Striker had another little issue though.  At one point when I was doing about 120 (on the GPS) it started to read all sorts of different speeds ranging from zero to 50, 90, 70, 120, 50 (not exactly those numbers but that sort of thing), and then got stuck on zero for a few k's and then suddenly came back to life again.

I'll have to check whether the speedo cable is either broken or has a loose connection or something!

BTW TrailTech are sending me a replacement remote switch  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: sidetrack on June 24, 2013, 09:26:13 am

 :thumleft:

Another headlight upgrade worth reading

http://www.motoiq.com/magazine_articles/id/2842/project-husqvarna-te610-part-7-baja-designs-racelight-with-boatman-h4-conversion.aspx
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on June 24, 2013, 11:58:20 am

 :thumleft:

Another headlight upgrade worth reading

http://www.motoiq.com/magazine_articles/id/2842/project-husqvarna-te610-part-7-baja-designs-racelight-with-boatman-h4-conversion.aspx

Interesting - I have the Baja Design 8" and fitted it on my HP2 and converted it to H4 and fitted a HID unit. I showed on ADVRider how I did this without reverting to a 7" fitting (why lose 1" of reflector???). I am not sure if I left the details on AdvRider as Boatman complained as he was selling his 7" conversion - detailed in this link. My conversion was very simple - you carefully remove the H4 fitting from a standard bike reflector (in my case my standard HP2 headlight) and fit it to the Baja Design reflector.  :thumleft:  I will look if I can find the link.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 24, 2013, 05:40:47 pm
I think modern LED's are a  better solution for dirt bikes because:

1) They are far  less sensitive to vibration and knocks - should last as long as the bike
2) Smaller and potentially lower mass
3) Draw less current for the same or more light (the units I have draw 17W each and  each produce twice the light output of a standard 50W halogen).  This lower power draw while giving lots of light is often a big advantage for dirt bikes with small alternators.  Not really an issue with the 610 though.
4) Unbreakable polycarbonate lenses in most LED lights
5) If you choose a good unit, the light pattern is very clean and even.  In comparison, my old reflector that I had installed a HID unit into had all sorts of blotches and "hot spots" in its projected pattern - whereas the new lights are very evenly and cleanly projected onto the road - just nice even white light  :thumleft:  But this is definitely a function of the quality of the LED reflectors used.  Cheaper units may not necessarily have this.

The only point against LED's is that the level of development is getting to the point that they are probably going to get a lot cheaper in the next few years - so it may pay to wait - but then my HID stopped working forcing me to make a decision.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: DeepBass9 on June 24, 2013, 05:49:50 pm
I think modern LED's are a  better solution for dirt bikes because:

1) They far are less sensitive to vibration and knocks - should last as long as the bike
2) Smaller and potentially lower mass
3) Draw less current for the same or more light (the units I have draw 17W each and together each produce twice the light output of a standard 50W halogen).  This lower power draw while giving lots of light is often a big advantage for dirt bikes with small alternators.  Not really an issue with the 610 though.
4) Unbreakable polycarbonate lenses in most LED lights
5) If you choose a good unit, the light pattern is very clean and even.  In comparison, my old reflector that I had installed a HID unit into had all sorts of blotches and "hot spots" in its projected pattern - whereas the new lights are very evenly and cleanly projected onto the road - just nice even white light  :thumleft:  But this is definitely a function of the quality of the LED reflectors used.  Cheaper units may not necessarily have this.

The only point against LED's is that the level of development is getting to the point that they are probably going to get a lot cheaper in the next few years - so it may pay to wait - but then my HID stopped working forcing me to make a decision.

Agreed, with the speed that LEDs are developing, I think HID will soon go the same way as a betamax video tape.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on June 24, 2013, 07:19:08 pm
Also agree - pity though as the Baja desert look is great.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on June 24, 2013, 09:15:41 pm
Baja Designs also do a very good LED solution but its hellish pricey!

http://www.bajadesigns.com/ProductDetail?ItemNumber=497001BK

Apparently it puts out twice the light of the Rigid Industries equivalents - but its more than twice the price.  :P

A long thread on LED lights on ADVRider here http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=848904
which descends into name calling etc but has some good points in amongst the usual internet arguments.  Lot of debate about whether its worth going for cheap Chinese stuff as opposed to the much more expensive US options - IMO this is a personal choice - some people will always go for the cheap stuff, others will always go for quality and pay more accordingly.  I tend to be in the latter camp being an engineer, not a trader. 

Cheap Chinese stuff just annoys me for a whole lot of unrelated reasons.

In any event these lights are being sold/bought in very much the same way that digital camera's were in the early days - all anyone seems interested in is the lumen number.  The more the better (just like pixels were in cameras).  But I think that's just a red herring.  The quality of light is about a hell of a lot more than just how bright the LED is (which is all lumens really tells you).    Eventually with cameras you had these cameras with unbelievably high pixel ratings that took crap photo's (problem called noise caused by the pixels being too small on the sensor) - and still people wanted more pixels - so the OEM's gave people what they wanted - so image quality actually declined for a few years until only recently people have finally understood more pixels isn't always better and recently some brave OEM's have actually reduced the number of pixels to give us better cameras.

I can see the same thing happening with these lights over the next few years.  You don't need ten times more light than a standard 50W halogen bulb - but that's where this is going IMO  :biggrin:  But still, these lights are the future IMO.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on July 12, 2013, 05:54:57 pm
I must admit I'm not having a great experience with TrailTech Striker.

So far having the following issues:
1). The remote switch works sporadically
2). The speedo goes through periods where it reads nonsense. Randomly showing much lower values than actual speed or even being stuck on zero for a while before recovering 
3) one of the four LEDs for the warning lights didn't work

TrailTech have shipped me replacement leds which sorted that out. They also sent me a replacement remote switch but that problem persists.

Latest suggestion is for me to send it all back for testing. Which is going to cost money for postage as well as mean not having a speedo etc for a while. Worst is because it's an intermittent problem they might switch it all on, see that it works and ship it back without tracing the real problem. Leaving me back at square one  :-\

I'm going to have to do that because it's useless having instruments you cant trust.

Been a bit of a pain in the arse all told to be honest!
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: sidetrack on July 12, 2013, 06:59:36 pm
Must admit I have heard of alot of failures on the Trailtech speedo replacement stuff. Granted offroad riding tends to beat up everything but stock electronic speedo's and old school mechanical ones tend to last longer. Not really any other options on the market though.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: BiG DoM on July 12, 2013, 08:55:35 pm
Shit sorry to hear this as looked grand and a neat solution.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: sidetrack on August 22, 2013, 05:44:37 pm
The Baja Designs Squadron LED's, $319  :o
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: swart skaap on August 25, 2013, 08:16:38 pm
At that price, I'll just camp one more night.
:)
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on September 17, 2013, 08:27:29 pm
Seeing as I was speaking the devil yesterday (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=133875.0 (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=133875.0)), my TrailTech Striker finally turned up in the post  :thumleft: after being returned via normal post from TrailTech after "testing".

Whats interesting is that despite their denials that there is anything wrong, they sent me back both remote switches plus an extra speedo cable - which I really appreciate - shows some level of sympathy for the predicament I'm in.  

Although they managed to scratch the screen  ::)

I remounted it all on the bike again.

As expected, the remote switch worked for a couple of presses of the button, and then just like before, stopped responding.  >:(

The speedo cable was worse.

The first one I installed didn't work at all!

I resorted to re-installing the Husky cable (which has the same fittings top and bottom, only being a bit shorter and mine has been repaired repeatedly from a broken wire and tends to stop working every so often.  So I was hoping to replace it - this is one of the reasons I bought the TrailTech unit in the first place).  Lo and behold it worked fine!  I should have tried this before because that at least points towards the TrailTech cable being the problem with the distance readout.

On the off chance, I tried the other cable they sent and it worked too  :thumleft:  :ricky: ....so far.

So maybe at least half the problem is sorted?

Touch wood.

IMO they should implement better quality controls, because the evidence seems to be pointing towards a high percentage of faulty bits and pieces that make up their system:

1) 1 of 4 Led bulbs not working
2) 1 of 2 speedo cables faulty
3) Something wrong inside the unit with regard to the remote switch (that's the only reason I can see why it works for while and then stops, something intermittent is happening inside the unit, maybe at a logic level?).
  
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: swart skaap on September 18, 2013, 01:35:27 pm
You can't fault the Americans on service
 :thumleft:

I didn't read your elaborate post about the speedo issues  :-\
I've fault tested my units before by fabricating a pickup with a radio shack magnetic switch.
Title: Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
Post by: alanB on September 26, 2013, 07:52:26 am
OK after a long ride up to Vaalwater and back this last weekend, I can report that the TrailTech Striker seems to be behaving itself - finally!

Both the speedo and distance readings seem to be consistent and are not behaving erratically anymore  :thumleft:  Looks like the new speedo cable sorted the problem.

And for some reason the remote switch works all the time as well  :thumleft: :ricky:

I dont understand why the remote switch is suddenly OK now, but hey I'm not complaining.