Wild Dog Adventure Riding

General => General Bike Related Banter => Topic started by: Damaraland on January 10, 2018, 01:18:41 pm

Title: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 10, 2018, 01:18:41 pm
So, I'm biting the bullet and getting a 500 EXC to join my 990.  Idea is to use the 500 for stuff like Kaokoland, Botswana cut lines and Angola.  Tours will range from between 7 to 14 days and I want to be able to rough-camp where necessary.

I've decided not to sell my 990, as I'll keep that around for the odd longer gravel tour and because I just love it so much.  As for the 500, that'll be trailered to the start of the interesting bits and then ridden from there, so no long gravel stretches of I can help it.

Now, seeing as I'm not selling the 990 I'm going to have to operate on as much of a budget as I can.  This means that I'm looking for the items that are both indispensable for adventure riding on a 500 as well as the most economical in their class.  Would prefer to buy from SA distributors if possible, but importing is also not a huge problem.

Essentials in my opinion (would love to hear from other riders also what they think is essential):
- Larger tank (need to cater for about 400km range)
- Bash plate
- Luggage rack
- Possibly touring screen

Looking forward to your input!

Edit:

This thread has grown so much and is difficult to search - here is a link to the post where I detail what we bought http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg4038415#msg4038415 (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg4038415#msg4038415)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 01:39:45 pm
I'm assuming here you are talking already roadworthy bike - if not you will need roadworthy kit (ideally do not get mirrors on stalks but the ones that fold into handlebars)

Otherwise - Bashplate, bigger tank (get 19 litres) and handguards. If you plan Lesotho - hard rocks riding (which Kaokoland is not, unless you are going to go properly off) then I would recommend brake disk protectors.

What you do not need: screen (avoid at any cost - prevents airflow) and luggage rack - get backbone luggage like Giant Loop, Altrider or Mosko Moto. The best choice for luggage and no need for racks.

I've done so far 5,5k km on mine since April (minus 4 months between June and September when I was in Europe) - everything from Lesotho (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=217872.0 (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=217872.0)) to Bots cutlines (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=218987.0 (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=218987.0)) and you are not going to be disappointed! I suspect that your 990 will not get much mileage once you get 500 (my 690 has about 4.5 km this year - 500 5.5k km - and that was only because I had to take 690 to Bots along with 500 as I needed bike for my mate, otherwise the score would be 3k km vs 5.5km).

Heavy adventure bikes like 690 and 990 are so overrated    :peepwall: :ricky:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Ebredenhann on January 10, 2018, 01:50:11 pm
I will be watching this threat closely, as I am considering selling my 690 for a 500...

Damaraland, check the following 4 sites and video clips to make your mouth water...

•   THE SPIRIT OF MOTONOMAD - KTM 500EXC: (
&feature=youtu.be)
•   MOTONOMAD II - 1080H (
)
•   Motonomad III - Riders of the Andes (
)
•   http://therollinghobo.com/500exc
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 10, 2018, 01:52:45 pm
Good info thanks Xpat.

I'm buying new, will get the KTM roadworthy kit as well.

It was exactly my Kaokoland VZP Huanib Hoaruseb etc trip on my 990 that convinced me of the merits of smaller bikes for hardcore rides.  Will do VZP on 500 again, didn't break the 990 there so should be OK on 500 without disk protectors.

Surprised that I do not need luggage racks, definitely need to sharpen my research there.  Had a look at Mosko Moto previously, but it's too expensive for my budget now.  Was very happy with my Giant Loop so will probably go that route again.

For bashplate & handguards did you go hardparts route or aftermarket?  What brand fueltank?

Thanks again!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 10, 2018, 01:53:53 pm
@Ebredenhann Motonomad videos played a big part in my decision :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on January 10, 2018, 01:56:41 pm
we can help you with quite a few of the accessories to 'adventurize' your KTM 500 (I 'adventurized' my own 450...).


- Larger tank (need to cater for about 400km range)
an inexpensive solution if you can fit it is a hard 5L fuel cell, they are around R400, take 5L, and we have fitted them to MANY smaller bikes going up Africa (see pics). Otherwise a foldable/soft 5L fuel cell, we stock two different models, also affordable... (R695 - R895)-
Bash plate
If you chat to Paul/PSP, he can sort you out - shout if you need the details, HYDE may also have a solution...-

Luggage rack
If you chat to Paul/PSP, he MIGHT be able to help you...- Possibly touring screen
we fit a lot of the GIVI/Kappa universal screens to all types of bikes - including the KTM 6-days (see pic), but also DR 650's, Honda 650L and R, basically any naked bike that needs a screen... worth noting, this screen IS EASILY removed, leaving BOTH the handlebar brackets in place, simply loose 2 bolts, remove the screen, go play in the dunes (or wherever) and refit the screen in under 1 minute...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 01:59:02 pm
Fuel tank is KTM powerparts - which is the Acerbis tank, just rebranded. So just see which one is cheaper and get that (if you are buying new, you might get deal from KTM with the tank).

Handguards I have are very expensive (I think is HDB) from Chris - Zebra, because they have those integrated mirrors that fold into the handguards. I prefer to ride without mirrors in the way so I paid the money. But you might get cheaper handguards and get one of those Harley mirrors that are under handlebars? Or just ride without mirrors...

You definitely do not need luggage racks - just get one of those backbone luggages (I would personally probably go for Alt Rider holster system - similar to MM - that Chris - Zebra sells), and pack heavy stuff to the bottom. And you might need bigger backpack to carry some stuff on you like thos Motonomad guys did (and me as well).

I'm sure you have seen this, but here is MaxThePanda doing Damaraland + Kaokoland on 500: http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=215299.0 (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=215299.0)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 02:01:48 pm
we can help you with quite a few of the accessories to 'adventurize' your KTM 500 (I 'adventurized' my own 450...).


- Larger tank (need to cater for about 400km range)
an inexpensive solution if you can fit it is a hard 5L fuel cell, they are around R400, take 5L, and we have fitted them to MANY smaller bikes going up Africa (see pics). Otherwise a foldable/soft 5L fuel cell, we stock two different models, also affordable... (R695 - R895)- Bash plate
If you chat to Paul/PSP, he can sort you out - shout if you need the details, HYDE may also have a solution...- Luggage rack
If you chat to Paul/PSP, he MIGHT be able to help you...- Possibly touring screen
we fit a lot of the GIVI/Kappa universal screens to all types of bikes - including the KTM 6-days (see pic), but also DR 650's, Honda 650L and R, basically any naked bike that needs a screen... worth noting, this screen IS EASILY removed, leaving BOTH the handlebar brackets in place, simply loose 2 bolts, remove the screen, go play in the dunes (or wherever) and refit the screen in under 1 minute...


Sorry Chris - but those racks and fuel cells are definitely no-go for 500 in my book. It just kills the purpose of really lightweight bike and makes it way too wide.

Edit: And you will definitely break subframe if try to put anything that heavy that far back on 500, and ride it as it was designed to ride. All those bikes in the picture have subframes designed for passengers - 500 has minimalist enduro subframe.

For my money - as I said, backbone luggage (I would go AltRider Hemisphere holster - considering how hard and expensive it is to get MM my first choice) without any racks and big tank is the way to go.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 02:06:12 pm
Also - depending on how tall you are - you might consider getting 500 lowered (I did) as it is very tall. That makes a bit more stable as well. I had mine lowere by Hilton Hayward just by adjusting suspension (so no lowering links or such).

I know many who ride proper enduro/cross country will consider this a sacrilege, but for trips like Damaraland plans to do it makes bike much more friendly (stable and manageable in tricky terrain) and I haven't bottomed out yet, including riding whoops in DeWildt and juping rocks in Lesotho.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on January 10, 2018, 02:12:32 pm


Quote from: Xpat on Today at 02:01:48 pm (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg3977462#msg3977462)


>Quote from: zebra - Flying Brick on Today at 01:56:41 pm (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg3977455#msg3977455)>we can help you with quite a few of the accessories to 'adventurize' your KTM 500 (I 'adventurized' my own 450...).


- Larger tank (need to cater for about 400km range)
an inexpensive solution if you can fit it is a hard 5L fuel cell, they are around R400, take 5L, and we have fitted them to MANY smaller bikes going up Africa (see pics). Otherwise a foldable/soft 5L fuel cell, we stock two different models, also affordable... (R695 - R895)- Bash plate
If you chat to Paul/PSP, he can sort you out - shout if you need the details, HYDE may also have a solution...- Luggage rack
If you chat to Paul/PSP, he MIGHT be able to help you...- Possibly touring screen
we fit a lot of the GIVI/Kappa universal screens to all types of bikes - including the KTM 6-days (see pic), but also DR 650's, Honda 650L and R, basically any naked bike that needs a screen... worth noting, this screen IS EASILY removed, leaving BOTH the handlebar brackets in place, simply loose 2 bolts, remove the screen, go play in the dunes (or wherever) and refit the screen in under 1 minute...




Sorry Chris - but those racks and fuel cells are definitely no-go for 500 in my book. It just kills the purpose of really lightweight bike and makes it way too wide.

Edit: And you will definitely break subframe if try to put anything that heavy that far back on 500, and ride it as it was designed to ride. All those bikes in the picture have subframes designed for passengers - 500 has minimalist enduro subframe.
Fair enough - I accept your knowledge !

For my money - as I said, backbone luggage (I would go AltRider Hemisphere holster - considering how hard and expensive it is to get MM my first choice) without any racks and big tank is the way to go.


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ClimbingTurtle on January 10, 2018, 02:16:54 pm
Have you perhaps looked at the Husky 501? Comes standard with a roadworthy kit (fitted optionally at no extra charge) for around R126K new - I looked at one last month at Holeshot......

No idea on a long range tank for this tho.....
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on January 10, 2018, 02:42:57 pm
screen fitted to a KTM 6-days: (GIVI/Kappa Universal...)


(also fit them to X Challenge, etc).



Chris & Team
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 02:45:39 pm
Here are some pictures of my luggage set-up from Botswana and Lesotho (each of them mutliday trips, including tools, spare tubes, full camping gear - in Bots that means tent, food, water, etc.):

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4635/39243538381_ca26633d02_b.jpg)


(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4704/39583084402_4da339fd76_b.jpg)


(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4657/25741478068_f9a16043f5_b.jpg)


(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4723/38716227945_a4d4cb647a_b.jpg)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 02:46:54 pm
I've heard there are no KTM Power Parts tanks available yet for 2017 and onwards (mine is 2016). But Acerbis makes them - check with Runner if he might have Acerbis for newer model.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: m0lt3n on January 10, 2018, 02:48:55 pm
following this closely...
so don't take shortcuts, I want good rigs  >:D 8)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Offshore on January 10, 2018, 02:54:22 pm
 :sip:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 10, 2018, 02:54:28 pm
Have you perhaps looked at the Husky 501? Comes standard with a roadworthy kit (fitted optionally at no extra charge) for around R126K new - I looked at one last month at Holeshot......

No idea on a long range tank for this tho.....

No Husky dealer in Nam, also for once the KTM is cheaper:-)  Can get it for about 103K ex Vat.

That said, those Husky's are pretty sweet :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 10, 2018, 02:56:20 pm
I've heard there are no KTM Power Parts tanks available yet for 2017 and onwards (mine is 2016). But Acerbis makes them - check with Runner if he might have Acerbis for newer model.

Awesome thanks, will pm Runner!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on January 10, 2018, 02:56:48 pm
...and here is a pic of the ALTRider Hemisphere bag fitted to my 450...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 10, 2018, 03:00:26 pm
Fuel tank is KTM powerparts - which is the Acerbis tank, just rebranded. So just see which one is cheaper and get that (if you are buying new, you might get deal from KTM with the tank).

Handguards I have are very expensive (I think is HDB) from Chris - Zebra, because they have those integrated mirrors that fold into the handguards. I prefer to ride without mirrors in the way so I paid the money. But you might get cheaper handguards and get one of those Harley mirrors that are under handlebars? Or just ride without mirrors...

You definitely do not need luggage racks - just get one of those backbone luggages (I would personally probably go for Alt Rider holster system - similar to MM - that Chris - Zebra sells), and pack heavy stuff to the bottom. And you might need bigger backpack to carry some stuff on you like thos Motonomad guys did (and me as well).

I'm sure you have seen this, but here is MaxThePanda doing Damaraland + Kaokoland on 500: http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=215299.0 (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=215299.0)

MTP did their Kaokoland trip about a week before us, so was really cool reading the report (helps that the oke can write as well :deal:).  The fun he had on his bike was a stark contrast to the hard work I had to put in on the 990.

Happy to hear that FB sells these, I am a happy customer of theirs.  Will mail Chris and Co :thumleft:  Hopefully Chris remembers the "Economically" bit when he quotes me :ricky:

Thanks Xpat, really appreciate you sharing your experience.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Ebredenhann on January 10, 2018, 03:03:27 pm
Guys,

Just been on KTM & Husqvarna sites.  For the Husky it has a composite subframe.  And the KTM has extra-light subframe made of stable aluminum profiles. Both 2018 models.  My question, using luggage systems such as XPat recommends (which I also like although I have never used this), will these types of subframes be able to handle this?  I do not know much about these subframes, I have just copied the wording from the sites now...

XPat, what year model is your bike, what subframe?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Fransw on January 10, 2018, 03:03:58 pm
Good info thanks Xpat.

I'm buying new, will get the KTM roadworthy kit as well.

It was exactly my Kaokoland VZP Huanib Hoaruseb etc trip on my 990 that convinced me of the merits of smaller bikes for hardcore rides.  Will do VZP on 500 again, didn't break the 990 there so should be OK on 500 without disk protectors.

Surprised that I do not need luggage racks, definitely need to sharpen my research there.  Had a look at Mosko Moto previously, but it's too expensive for my budget now.  Was very happy with my Giant Loop so will probably go that route again.

For bashplate & handguards did you go hardparts route or aftermarket?  What brand fueltank?

Thanks again!

Damara, why not the Six Days!? O0
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 03:06:16 pm
...and here is a pic of the ALTRider Hemisphere bag fitted to my 450...

Thanks Chris. I would recommend to get just the holster with the two separate ATG bag - i.e. without the one piece U-bag. That one piece will get in the way IMO while the two separate ones give you much more flexibility. You still sell them like that Chris? I mean just holster with two separate bags as I bought some time ago?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on January 10, 2018, 03:10:19 pm
...and the odd customer is buying the Hemisphere holsters - ONLY the holsters, not the 1-piece inner, and then using ultra-light, waterproof dry bags in the left and right 'pocket',


...pics attached, these dry bag pics are illustration only, since they are not seated/pushed all the way down...


Chris
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 03:11:40 pm
Guys,

Just been on KTM & Husqvarna sites.  For the Husky it has a composite subframe.  And the KTM has extra-light subframe made of stable aluminum profiles. Both 2018 models.  My question, using luggage systems such as XPat recommends (which I also like although I have never used this), will these types of subframes be able to handle this?  I do not know much about these subframes, I have just copied the wording from the sites now...

XPat, what year model is your bike, what subframe?

I have 2016 with standard subframe - whatever it comes with. In my experience it handles the load over rough terrain just fine - ASSUMING you put the weight upfront and low down as much as possible. That is why I strongly recommend those frameless backbone bags that hold themselves. I carry about 20 kg at the back (sometimes maybe more) and try to ride to enjoy myself and so far after 5.5k km of DeWildt, Lesotho and Botswana sand, I had 0 problems.

One principle I would keep in mind Damaraland is - keep it simple!. Get only what you absolutely need and nothing more. Specifically I would steer clear of any windshields, fairings and stuff - you don't need them and in hot weather they are down right dangerous in my experience, promoting heatstroke big time. If you ride in cold, just put one more thermal layer on. You are not going to be riding this bike at 160 kmh for hours - then you doing it wrong and should take 990. You should be actively looking for the most remote/rugged tracks and will have time of your life!

Check also with MTP, he has a lot of experience with these bikes.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 03:13:54 pm
And don't waste on your money on 6days!

Standard is more than enough for what you are looking for and actually - at least in 2016 models (might have changed) - it was the better model because it had simpler suspension that is easier (and cheaper) to set-up and maintain.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 03:17:42 pm
You can also see in the last picture from Chris the handguards with integrated rearview mirror. They are costly (how much you need to ask Chris), but IMO worth it as you dont' have any stalks and stuff for mirrors up on the handlebars. Streamlined and simpler set-up.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on January 10, 2018, 03:32:10 pm
must add that I too do not use a screen, and up to 110km/h I have no need for one whatsoever...


Cheers
Chris


PS: around R4K for handguards and integrated mirrors and plastic covers, etc. Ex USA, so pricey, and over-engineered, but they are what they are...


Worth noting that you can get them - the HDB handguards - to integrate with the top clamp - so they clamp not to the bar itself, but rather the Billet top clamp (see pic)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 03:34:17 pm
following this closely...
so don't take shortcuts, I want good rigs  >:D 8)

Didn't I read somewhere that you want to buy 300? If so, may I ask why would you take 300 over 500, considering where you are living? If you are near Lesotho, sure its no brainer - 300 all the way. But for open desert like where you live - 500 all the way...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 10, 2018, 03:36:07 pm
Guys,

Just been on KTM & Husqvarna sites.  For the Husky it has a composite subframe.  And the KTM has extra-light subframe made of stable aluminum profiles. Both 2018 models.  My question, using luggage systems such as XPat recommends (which I also like although I have never used this), will these types of subframes be able to handle this?  I do not know much about these subframes, I have just copied the wording from the sites now...

XPat, what year model is your bike, what subframe?

I have 2016 with standard subframe - whatever it comes with. In my experience it handles the load over rough terrain just fine - ASSUMING you put the weight upfront and low down as much as possible. That is why I strongly recommend those frameless backbone bags that hold themselves. I carry about 20 kg at the back (sometimes maybe more) and try to ride to enjoy myself and so far after 5.5k km of DeWildt, Lesotho and Botswana sand, I had 0 problems.

One principle I would keep in mind Damaraland is - keep it simple!. Get only what you absolutely need and nothing more. Specifically I would steer clear of any windshields, fairings and stuff - you don't need them and in hot weather they are down right dangerous in my experience, promoting heatstroke big time. If you ride in cold, just put one more thermal layer on. You are not going to be riding this bike at 160 kmh for hours - then you doing it wrong and should take 990. You should be actively looking for the most remote/rugged tracks and will have time of your life!

Check also with MTP, he has a lot of experience with these bikes.

Great question and answer, was worried about the subframe also.  My packing comes in @ about 17kg with Giant Loop.  The Altrider solutions seems a lot more lightweight.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 10, 2018, 03:45:49 pm
must add that I too do not use a screen, and up to 110km/h I have no need for one whatsoever...


Cheers
Chris


PS: around R4K for handguards and integrated mirrors and plastic covers, etc. Ex USA, so pricey, and over-engineered, but they are what they are...


Worth noting that you can get them - the HDB handguards - to integrate with the top clamp - so they clamp not to the bar itself, but rather the Billet top clamp (see pic)

Shot thanks Chris - sent your team a mail.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on January 10, 2018, 03:48:55 pm
...and on SOME bikes, you can fabricate a simple part to tie-together/join any 'stub' of sub-frame, to further strengthen what little sub-frame there is...


(see pic)
Chris
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: m0lt3n on January 10, 2018, 03:53:09 pm
following this closely...
so don't take shortcuts, I want good rigs  >:D 8)

Didn't I read somewhere that you want to buy 300? If so, may I ask why would you take 300 over 500, considering where you are living? If you are near Lesotho, sure its no brainer - 300 all the way. But for open desert like where you live - 500 all the way...

a buddy has a 300. we can do a quick ride in the children's nap time and be back before mama gets difficult.
Yap, that is bread crumbs but we are taking it!

a 500 or 701 will be on the cards after I have eventually seen my ass in Namibia on the bigger bike.
Planning Namakwa 4x4 as soon as I can get logistics sorted.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 04:02:01 pm
following this closely...
so don't take shortcuts, I want good rigs  >:D 8)

Didn't I read somewhere that you want to buy 300? If so, may I ask why would you take 300 over 500, considering where you are living? If you are near Lesotho, sure its no brainer - 300 all the way. But for open desert like where you live - 500 all the way...

a buddy has a 300. we can do a quick ride in the children's nap time and be back before mama gets difficult.
Yap, that is bread crumbs but we are taking it!

a 500 or 701 will be on the cards after I have eventually seen my ass in Namibia on the bigger bike.
Planning Namakwa 4x4 as soon as I can get logistics sorted.

And why you would not be able to catch quick ride on 500? Probably easier than 300 as it can be plated so you don't need to trailer anywhere. 4 stroke plated 500 would just increase your area of operation greatly - even for quick rides.

But of course it is your decision and I respect it.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on January 10, 2018, 04:02:46 pm
Xpat, you have helped me make up my mind. I'm going to get a 500!  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 04:09:20 pm
Xpat, you have helped me make up my mind. I'm going to get a 500!  :thumleft:

I think for your kind of riding - at least the one you were doing up here, you will like it definitely better than 690. Just few months back I was singing praises on 690 to MTP who was deciding what to buy, but I have to say - if one is really deliberately looking for off the beaten track riding - the 500 is just so much better. To be fair, my 690 has rally fairing which in a hindsight was a dumb move and I'm getting it removed now. But even so the lightness and simplicity of 500, just inspires so much confidence, which is very welcome and needed by average bimbo like me.

But you have to be really looking for off the beaten track riding (not you Rossdog - I know you are - speaking generally here). If you want the Swiss knife that does everything well including tar passes and such (like for example Omninorm in his thread), 690 is better.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Offshore on January 10, 2018, 04:37:25 pm
What about Oil changes under normal Riding, forget about the 10 Hrs Stuff, what would be reasonable km's?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 04:52:20 pm
What about Oil changes under normal Riding, forget about the 10 Hrs Stuff, what would be reasonable km's?

I do oil every 1500 km. Valve check every 5k km.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Offshore on January 10, 2018, 04:56:54 pm
What about Oil changes under normal Riding, forget about the 10 Hrs Stuff, what would be reasonable km's?

I do oil every 1500 km. Valve check every 5k km.
Interesting Thread this, thank you for all the info.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on January 10, 2018, 05:36:02 pm
I am over 6 foot and I agree with Xpat, there is no shame in winding down the suspension. Both feet on the ground is a wonderful thing. If you are going to be on a bike all day plush is nice too. If I bottom out more than a couple of times in a ride I wind it up a click and check next time, once I ignore.  A screen, you only need it when you are riding home into driving rain just above zero, then you will do anything to have one! I have a piece of poly-carbonate that fits in my backpack that I can zip tie to the bike in such conditions. Best place for petrol is in a petrol tank, every other solution is a pain in the arse.

Rossdog. We all want one.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on January 10, 2018, 06:05:19 pm
Xpat, you have helped me make up my mind. I'm going to get a 500!  :thumleft:

I think for your kind of riding - at least the one you were doing up here, you will like it definitely better than 690. Just few months back I was singing praises on 690 to MTP who was deciding what to buy, but I have to say - if one is really deliberately looking for off the beaten track riding - the 500 is just so much better. To be fair, my 690 has rally fairing which in a hindsight was a dumb move and I'm getting it removed now. But even so the lightness and simplicity of 500, just inspires so much confidence, which is very welcome and needed by average bimbo like me.

But you have to be really looking for off the beaten track riding (not you Rossdog - I know you are - speaking generally here). If you want the Swiss knife that does everything well including tar passes and such (like for example Omninorm in his thread), 690 is better.

I think it will do the bread and milk runs just as well as a 690 - my bread and milk run includes a shocking 5km stretch of gravel. The 690 will probably do the back roads a little better, but with the 500, I can still do the odd extreme mountain (cattle pass type) outride and even the odd enduro. The 690 would be useless at this. Over the long term, I'll supplement the 500 with a 990 or 1090R. I had a 690, and really enjoyed it, but although it is probably the best jack of all trades, I found it was just too heavy for some of the trails I rode. If I had have filmed some of these rides, I could have sold the footage to the KTM marketing department for millions, because a 690 was certainly never designed to go where I took it!

I sold my belovered 300 out of frustration because of the lack of riding oppotunities down here in the SC.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: m0lt3n on January 10, 2018, 08:43:05 pm
on the 500, how many hours or km's will the engine do before needing to be redone and what will the costs involved be then?
If I buy, it will be a secondhand example in the R40 to 50k price bracket, what can one expect to get? Smiles or miles of issues?
(I think this is where the 300 2T shines, running costs)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on January 10, 2018, 09:13:39 pm
Reading this thread with much enthusiasm, been thinking about getting a 500 for some time now. I love my 610 Husky, but the 500 is at least 25kg lighter, can be fitted with a 400km range tank, and as said previously, the best place for fuel is in the tank.
On top of that it has the same power as my Husky and is much simpler. So yes there are maintenance issues, but I service after each trip anyway.
Now to buy new or good secondhand? Probably need R20k for upgrades, of which some might already be done on a used bike and I am sure to have the motor serviced cannot be a fortune, yes it is nice to buy a shining new bike, but the way I ride it wont stay that way for long anyway...the case for good used is getting better!!
The secret is out methinks, so good seconhand might be hard to find....its only money anyway!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on January 10, 2018, 09:33:56 pm
.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Runner on January 10, 2018, 09:58:19 pm
Only problem at the moment is that the biggest tank available for the 2017/2018 models is a 15.5 litre unit, so I do not think 400 km is possible, maybe 250 to 300 km.
For the 2012 till 2016 there is a 20 litre unit available, which we have in stock now.
I have built/prepped quite a few for customers, I think it is a very good hardcore choice.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 10:14:54 pm
on the 500, how many hours or km's will the engine do before needing to be redone and what will the costs involved be then?
If I buy, it will be a secondhand example in the R40 to 50k price bracket, what can one expect to get? Smiles or miles of issues?
(I think this is where the 300 2T shines, running costs)

To be honest I don't know. I have seen estimates between 10k - 20k km for top end. Mine is now on 5.5k km that I've put on it and the way it works now, I would expect at least 20k km on the current top end - but I ride like an old lady (which also means that I slip clutch a lot - at least in Lesotho). I don't know how much top end costs, but probably less than fixes of 1190 after single Lesotho trip  >:D - relax, just pulling your leg.

If I can stop procrastinating - which is big if, I will be heading for a trip to Mozambique on the weekend - going up the coast in sand from Marcuene all the way up to Vilanculos ant then back inland along Kruger. All together I would expect about 2.5 k km loop from Joburg. I'm going on 500 so will see in about 2 weeks how the bike looks/feels at abou 8k km. Then in Feb I want to go for another round in Lesotho, which will add probably less than 1000 km, but most of it slipping clutch in 1st and 2nd gear (which is what I did on the first Lesotho trip). So by the end of Feb we will see where we get. And then I am considering going Kaokoland (if Straatkat is ready to go) and on the way tackle those dunes in Bots north of you (molten) and then ideally on the way back I would like to explore Bushmanland straddling Nam and Botswana border. For that trip I will trailer the bike to the spots and then ride it in the area, but I will still put on it easily 2.5 - 3k km.

The moral of the story is that if you choose where you ride carefully, this bike will give you within 10k km (and I believe actually much more) before possible top end rebuild, density of riding experience that bigger bike has no chance to match in 100k km. And that is how I measure my return on a bike - not in km, but in number of trips/km it gave goosebumps.

With all that sales pitch - I cannot of course guarantee you that a second hand bike hasn't been abused. You will have to do your due diligence to decide for yourself. Generally, if you believe it wasn't abused or raced, I wouldn't be worried to buy bike with 100 hours or 5k km on the clock. It will give you at least 5k km before rebuild - possibly much more) and that is lots of km if you are going to use it for what it was designed for.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on January 10, 2018, 10:23:00 pm
I would say 20000-25000km on top end. Much more riding than most would do on these bikes. On a lower compression and longer service interval DRZ single I got 50000km before it started using oil.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 10:33:10 pm
Damaraland, I just remembered: you will most probably need new sprocket straight out of the box. My (new - 2016 model) for some reason came with 13/50 ratio, with which you basically can climb vertical walls, but it maxes out at about 90 kmh - not good for your intended use.

Different people gear them differently. For normal use - i.e. bush trips like DeWilds, Botswana cutlines, Kaokoland and such I use 14/50 (that one I'm comfortable with up to 120kmh - but I"m softie when it comes to mechanical sympathy - they can be geared to 160 kmh from what I've heard), for clutch slipping trips to Lesotho I use 14/52 (but I doubt you will need that in Nam, unless you have some rockfaces you want to climb).
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 10, 2018, 11:29:13 pm
Molten, just to drive home the point about 300 2t vs 500 4t  :pot:: to me the place where you live resembles much more Australian outback around Alice Springs than Lesotho. I.e. the place where famouns Finke desert rally is run. And what do you think they use to race there in the sand - 2t300 or 4t 450/500?

Have a look here on Toby Price's trial run at 185 kmh - no the video is not sped up. I cannot find what bike he is on, but I believe it to be 500 (maybe 450 though) but definitely 4t bike:

https://www.facebook.com/tprice87/videos/1068262086578182/ (https://www.facebook.com/tprice87/videos/1068262086578182/)

Ok, I'll leave you alone now  ;)

Edit: Disclaimer - if you are going to ride like that, you might need top end earlier than 10k km.  O0
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 11, 2018, 08:05:04 am
Damaraland, I just remembered: you will most probably need new sprocket straight out of the box. My (new - 2016 model) for some reason came with 13/50 ratio, with which you basically can climb vertical walls, but it maxes out at about 90 kmh - not good for your intended use.

Different people gear them differently. For normal use - i.e. bush trips like DeWilds, Botswana cutlines, Kaokoland and such I use 14/50 (that one I'm comfortable with up to 120kmh - but I"m softie when it comes to mechanical sympathy - they can be geared to 160 kmh from what I've heard), for clutch slipping trips to Lesotho I use 14/52 (but I doubt you will need that in Nam, unless you have some rockfaces you want to climb).

Thanks Xpat, will confirm with KTM what the sprocket size is on the '18 model.

Two things are happening as a result of this thread.
1.  There is nothing very economical about adventurizing a EXC 500
2.  I don't care - pretty convinced it's gonna be the best biking "investment" I've ever made.

 :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 11, 2018, 08:08:52 am
Damaraland, I just remembered: you will most probably need new sprocket straight out of the box. My (new - 2016 model) for some reason came with 13/50 ratio, with which you basically can climb vertical walls, but it maxes out at about 90 kmh - not good for your intended use.

Different people gear them differently. For normal use - i.e. bush trips like DeWilds, Botswana cutlines, Kaokoland and such I use 14/50 (that one I'm comfortable with up to 120kmh - but I"m softie when it comes to mechanical sympathy - they can be geared to 160 kmh from what I've heard), for clutch slipping trips to Lesotho I use 14/52 (but I doubt you will need that in Nam, unless you have some rockfaces you want to climb).

Thanks Xpat, will confirm with KTM what the sprocket size is on the '18 model.

Two things are happening as a result of this thread.
1.  There is nothing very economical about adventurizing a EXC 500
2.  I don't care - pretty convinced it's gonna be the best biking "investment" I've ever made.

 :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:

Buy the right stuff the first time and save money  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: AfricaOffroad on January 11, 2018, 09:01:39 am
Damaraland, I just remembered: you will most probably need new sprocket straight out of the box. My (new - 2016 model) for some reason came with 13/50 ratio, with which you basically can climb vertical walls, but it maxes out at about 90 kmh - not good for your intended use.

Different people gear them differently. For normal use - i.e. bush trips like DeWilds, Botswana cutlines, Kaokoland and such I use 14/50 (that one I'm comfortable with up to 120kmh - but I"m softie when it comes to mechanical sympathy - they can be geared to 160 kmh from what I've heard), for clutch slipping trips to Lesotho I use 14/52 (but I doubt you will need that in Nam, unless you have some rockfaces you want to climb).

Your maxed out speed with 13/50 is clearly a bit of poetic exaggeration no doubt.
My old 2012 with that gearing would show 160 km/h on the inaccurate odometer.
Agree for the kind of riding spoken of here, the 14/50 would be a much better choice ( although it's only 7.7% lower than the aforementioned, so gaining  one about 10 km/ h top speed)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 11, 2018, 09:12:50 am
As I said - I'm softie in terms of mechanical sympathy, so maybe I just back off way too early. But 1690 on 13/50 just seems impossible  :o

I'm sure I could have made 100 kmh with 13/50 maybe little more, but are you serious about 160kmh? Is it possible that gearing changed between 2012 and 2016? Maybe I still have a lot of that 1150GSA in my blood - that thing also could rev 7-8k RPM in its normal range, and yet it felt criminal to go aver 5,5k rpm. My understanding from MTP was that for fast Amageza stages people used 14/48 or some such to achieve those speeds.

But again - I ride like and old lady. Maybe that is the reason why I do not worry about the rebuild any time soon...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Buff on January 11, 2018, 09:17:01 am

I think it will do the bread and milk runs just as well as a 690 - my bread and milk run includes a shocking 5km stretch of gravel. The 690 will probably do the back roads a little better, but with the 500, I can still do the odd extreme mountain (cattle pass type) outride and even the odd enduro. The 690 would be useless at this. Over the long term, I'll supplement the 500 with a 990 or 1090R. I had a 690, and really enjoyed it, but although it is probably the best jack of all trades, I found it was just too heavy for some of the trails I rode. If I had have filmed some of these rides, I could have sold the footage to the KTM marketing department for millions, because a 690 was certainly never designed to go where I took it!

I sold my belovered 300 out of frustration because of the lack of riding oppotunities down here in the SC.

And the bonus is you can come do the Tankwa Rally with us in September, it's the PERFECT bike for that terrain  :ricky: :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Buff on January 11, 2018, 09:24:22 am
As I said - I'm softie in terms of mechanical sympathy, so maybe I just back off way too early. But 1690 on 13/50 just seems impossible  :o

I'm sure I could have made 100 kmh with 13/50 maybe little more, but are you serious about 160kmh? Is it possible that gearing changed between 2012 and 2016? Maybe I still have a lot of that 1150GSA in my blood - that thing also could rev 7-8k RPM in its normal range, and yet it felt criminal to go aver 5,5k rpm. My understanding from MTP was that for fast Amageza stages people used 14/48 or some such to achieve those speeds.

But again - I ride like and old lady. Maybe that is the reason why I do not worry about the rebuild any time soon...

At the last Tankwa Rally one of the laaities clocked a GPS speed of 167km/h on his Yamaha 250FX  :o The new 4T's are very fast  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 11, 2018, 09:32:14 am
As I said - I'm softie in terms of mechanical sympathy, so maybe I just back off way too early. But 1690 on 13/50 just seems impossible  :o

I'm sure I could have made 100 kmh with 13/50 maybe little more, but are you serious about 160kmh? Is it possible that gearing changed between 2012 and 2016? Maybe I still have a lot of that 1150GSA in my blood - that thing also could rev 7-8k RPM in its normal range, and yet it felt criminal to go aver 5,5k rpm. My understanding from MTP was that for fast Amageza stages people used 14/48 or some such to achieve those speeds.

But again - I ride like and old lady. Maybe that is the reason why I do not worry about the rebuild any time soon...

At the last Tankwa Rally one of the laaities clocked a GPS speed of 167km/h on his Yamaha 250FX  :o The new 4T's are very fast  :thumleft:

I don't doubt the top speed on 500 - though that is impressive for 250. Just my standard gearing on 500 was way too short - even for Lesotho (14/52 I use is still longer than 13/50). The first gear was basically unusable, and the bike was really wound up at 90-100 kmh. I was actualy very surprised by that as I knew that people ride these at 160kmh in Amageza.

But yes, I don't find myself often bouncing off rev limiter on any bike (I don't think I ever did on my 690 which I'm much happier to rev due to short stroke engine) - and if so, than it is usualy multicylinder bike - so I didn't really try hard enough.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: m0lt3n on January 11, 2018, 09:51:48 am
Molten, just to drive home the point about 300 2t vs 500 4t  :pot:: to me the place where you live resembles much more Australian outback around Alice Springs than Lesotho. I.e. the place where famouns Finke desert rally is run. And what do you think they use to race there in the sand - 2t300 or 4t 450/500?

Have a look here on Toby Price's trial run at 185 kmh - no the video is not sped up. I cannot find what bike he is on, but I believe it to be 500 (maybe 450 though) but definitely 4t bike:

https://www.facebook.com/tprice87/videos/1068262086578182/ (https://www.facebook.com/tprice87/videos/1068262086578182/)

Ok, I'll leave you alone now  ;)

Edit: Disclaimer - if you are going to ride like that, you might need top end earlier than 10k km.  O0

I will be looking at the 500 more seriously now.
its just slightly out of budget and then to expensive to take to the rocks we have. There is some calcrete stockpiles around town and then the plan is also to go to Prieska with a buddy. Some nice play area there.
But getting a 500 now will be good, then I can slowly start to make it ready for overlanding as well. A proper Namibia trip is still the ultimate aim.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Buff on January 11, 2018, 10:00:04 am
I'm exactly the same, I actually have way too much mechanical sympathy, probably because I don't like paying for new engines  ::) Even when racing my 690 at the Tankwa, I tended to short shift a lot, firstly to save the motor and 2ndly because it's got so much power it eventually wears me down. Of course it doesn't help if your mechanic (Dux) changes it to the "aggressive" mapping  :o

I've got 3 front sprockets for my 690, standard and 1 down and 1 up, depending on where I'm riding. I dropped it to a 13 when working on the Cape Epic and I enjoyed it so much I haven't taken it back to standard yet. It's great for traffic and playing in the local quarry.

I'm currently considering replacing my WR250 with a WR450 or 500 Husky as well, mainly to do the Tankwa Rally. The 690 was fine but hell, it was hard work in the tight river beds and mountain section The WR250 works there but I cannot ride my bike on the limiter for 15km at a time, there's no way my brain will allow that. I tried it for a short while when I marshaled a section last year and I felt like hugging my bike afterwards  :-[
The chances are good that I'll trade the 690 on a 700 Tenere or KTM790 when they eventually get launched so that I don't have two bikes so closely alike.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 11, 2018, 10:06:43 am
If you are primarily aiming for technical rock riding - 300 for sure. But is there enough of that kind of riding available around there ? If so and that is what you want to focus on, go 300.

Prieska seems very far from where you are, so you will have to trailer  (I wouldn't want to go 250 km one way on 2t) - that gets old for a day ride or even outride quickly. I am happy to trailer, but only for multiday rides - to go that distance for a day ride seems a bit too much for me. If that is the distance you are willing to travel to ride, I would much rather aim up to those dunes in Botswana. You can do it all on 500 - with an early start and a bit of push, you might be able to make it across them and back home even in one day on 500 (I would be much more conservative on bigger bike) - especially with your iron butt credentials.

Look - I'm not trying to sell you 500 - I had 300 and it is great bike, for intended purpose. It just seems to me that for where you live 500 will give you much more versatility to explore around even on quick day trips, while 300 will limit you to a quarry or some such (which 500 will also do, just not as well). But you know the place much better than me (I just assume it is in Kalahari and hence - sand - and you don't see any 2t on Dakar), if there is enough technical riding around to justify 300, by all means go for it, it is fantastic bike.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on January 11, 2018, 02:35:36 pm
I'm exactly the same, I actually have way too much mechanical sympathy, probably because I don't like paying for new engines  ::) Even when racing my 690 at the Tankwa, I tended to short shift a lot, firstly to save the motor and 2ndly because it's got so much power it eventually wears me down. Of course it doesn't help if your mechanic (Dux) changes it to the "aggressive" mapping  :o

I've got 3 front sprockets for my 690, standard and 1 down and 1 up, depending on where I'm riding. I dropped it to a 13 when working on the Cape Epic and I enjoyed it so much I haven't taken it back to standard yet. It's great for traffic and playing in the local quarry.

I'm currently considering replacing my WR250 with a WR450 or 500 Husky as well, mainly to do the Tankwa Rally. The 690 was fine but hell, it was hard work in the tight river beds and mountain section The WR250 works there but I cannot ride my bike on the limiter for 15km at a time, there's no way my brain will allow that. I tried it for a short while when I marshaled a section last year and I felt like hugging my bike afterwards  :-[
The chances are good that I'll trade the 690 on a 700 Tenere or KTM790 when they eventually get launched so that I don't have two bikes so closely alike.

Maybe I'll see you at the Tankwa on a 500  :biggrin:

Good plan to trade your WR250 in on a WR450 or a 500/501, seeing that you already have the 300 2T for the dity work.

I also agree with you that those FX 250 pull out like Catholics. I diced a mate of mine on tar road - I was on my Husaberg TE300 and he was on a FX with wet weather mapping (can't remember what sprocket combo he was on - probably 13/50), but he smoked me on top end. And Shaun is a big bloke, probably weighing a little more than my 105kg. I was hugely impressed!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Ebredenhann on January 11, 2018, 02:57:54 pm
I have seen all the different remarks on top-end rebuilds and kilometers on the engine etc.  So let me just ask a question viewed from a practicality perspective.

I have just spoken to a KTM dealership, and I appreciate the fact that they advised the following to me.  Awesome bike, and excellent for the purpose of this discussion, and power output versus a 690 is more or less the same even though it is a smaller capacity motor.  But all this is achieved simply because it is a race motor, using less oil and working a bit harder than a 690.  Which is all still fine, but it necessitates more frequent servicing and checking of the valves.  My understanding more or less…open for discussion…

I have not googled the exact detail, but it means the bike has to be serviced every 15 hours (valves checked and oil/filter changes, is that correct?), or at least the oil and filters changed.  And preferably the valve clearances also to be checked on the 15hour intervals, not to say it has to be adjusted, just checked at least.
My question, if you do the long 7 day trip (or longer) how do you manage this?  You can do 15hours in 2 days??  I have seen ride reports and guys doing oil changes in the bundus somewhere, but surely you do not carry 5L oil with you, or you might not find a shop selling any proper oil in the bundus etc.  What is the practical side of this?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on January 11, 2018, 03:37:32 pm
Those 10hr or 15hr service intervals are for racing conditions. High revs and high heat.
When you are touring/traveling I believe you can stretch those services way longer.
Anyway, the motor takes very little oil, so you can easily take oil along and do an oil change during the trip.

Btw, I get my 500 serviced every 8-10hrs by a local bike shop. Oil, filters, bike wash and chain lube amounts to around R500 each time. Not bad at all.
My riding is mostly social bush riding and the odd race...at a slow pace....
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 11, 2018, 03:59:53 pm
I have seen all the different remarks on top-end rebuilds and kilometers on the engine etc.  So let me just ask a question viewed from a practicality perspective.

I have just spoken to a KTM dealership, and I appreciate the fact that they advised the following to me.  Awesome bike, and excellent for the purpose of this discussion, and power output versus a 690 is more or less the same even though it is a smaller capacity motor.  But all this is achieved simply because it is a race motor, using less oil and working a bit harder than a 690.  Which is all still fine, but it necessitates more frequent servicing and checking of the valves.  My understanding more or less…open for discussion…

I have not googled the exact detail, but it means the bike has to be serviced every 15 hours (valves checked and oil/filter changes, is that correct?), or at least the oil and filters changed.  And preferably the valve clearances also to be checked on the 15hour intervals, not to say it has to be adjusted, just checked at least.
My question, if you do the long 7 day trip (or longer) how do you manage this?  You can do 15hours in 2 days??  I have seen ride reports and guys doing oil changes in the bundus somewhere, but surely you do not carry 5L oil with you, or you might not find a shop selling any proper oil in the bundus etc.  What is the practical side of this?

Those service intervals (15 hours oil change, I think valves every 30 hours or so - but not sure) are for race use. I.e. those are the most stringent KTM specs assuming you are going to abuse the machine properly, just be safe on their side should you like to pull Toby Price every weekend (I posted link to a video of his ride at 185kmh on I believe 500 on the prior page).

What are the safe service intervals for bimbo use like mine (but quite frankly also the Motonomad one - I don't think they ride for 9000 km the way you see in selected highlights), is anybody's guess. I have done some research prior to buying my 500 and the general consensus from people who actually use 500 for dual sport or even racing (Amageza) seemed to be that I should be safe to change oil every 1500 km and the valves at about 5k km. And so far so good.

This is from people who do this kind of DS riding (there are tons of people on advrider who love 500 for proper offroad dual sporting - I would say it is no1 modern EFI hard core dual sport there) as well as from people who race them (or their prior incarnation 525) in Amageza (MTP, Just Bend It, etc.). If you look on Amageza 2015 (I think - the one that run through Botswana) - which runs through the kind of terrain I like to ride - they have done 4900 km in less than 7 days if my memory serves me right. Now they probably changed the oil after every stage (i.e. every cca 700 - 800 km), but I doubt many of them bothered to check valves during the race (don't know this for sure - ir there is an Amageza warior here who knows, please chirp in).

Also look at Dakar (they ride 450s, but those are basically the same engine - roughly speaking - as 500 with different stroke - I think). They run 9000 km of very gruelling race on one engine nowadays and most of them don't end up with busted one. Now I'm sure they all change oil after every stage, but I doubt that Malle Moto guys check valves during the race (well, maybe yes on a rest day - that is still only once in 4500 km). I'm not sure if the top end gets touched on the factory bikes gets touched during the race, but would bet that it doesn't on Malle Moto. And that is proper brutal use of those machines. In other words these modern racing engines can withstand much more than the conservative KTM service specs.

In terms of logistics - I get the bike serviced before any longer trips (so far I've done 2 - Lesotho and Botswana - RRs in those links I posted earlier). In Lesotho I put a lot of hours on the engine and abused it probably more than racers due to lack of skill (i.e. I had to slip clutch a lot). Not so many km though. I had it serviced afterwards right before going to Bots at probably much less km than 1500, fully expecting that i will have to change clutch - yet all was perfectly fine.

Thenk in Botswana I trailered 500 and 690 up to Maun, where I hooked up with my mates who flew in. We then went for a 9 day 1500 km loop from Maun through Makgadikgadi, Hunters road up to Kasane and from there via cutlines along Chobe NP back to Maun. The whole loop was those 1500 km (about 400 km of which tar), and my mates flew out. I still wanted to circumnavigate Okavango delta on 500, so I just bought oil in Maun (they didn't have 10w50, but funnily enough had higher spec 10W60) and changed it myself together with oil filter I brought with me (it is small). And then merrily went for another 1500 km loop in deep sand in the middle of the Bots summer (it was late December).

So yes you need to plan a bit, to be able to change oil every 1500 km (I'm sure it is going to survive 2000 km in pinch as well), but it is not unsurmountable problem, especially if you trailer the bike - hence have car somewhere waiting with all the necessary suplies. And 1500 km in a terrain 500 was designed for is for most weekend warriors 2 years worth of riding.

BTW - in the same time as KTM is very conservative on their 500 service intervals, I believe they may be a bit too gung ho on 690 service intervals. I think if you use 690 properly, servicing every 10k km only is asking for trouble. My is serviced after every major trip (let's say 3000 km or more) or at least every 5000km. And yes, there is difference in oil capacity - if my memory serves me well - KTM 500 1.6 liter of oil, KTM 690 1.7 liter of oil.

Edit: while I was typing bud500 already answered some of it.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on January 11, 2018, 04:09:10 pm
Xpat, I agree, which is why I serviced both my 690 and 701 every 5000kays.

The 500, like the 450's factory quoted service intervals are really for when you hang off those throttle cables like in racing, and the engine works flat-out most of the time.

In fact, I would under normal touring conditions easily stretch the 500's service intervals to 5000kays.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 11, 2018, 04:15:42 pm
One more comment just to make sure that you don't think those easy intervals apply only for easy gravel road riding (690 is definitely better for that):

While I do ride as an old lady, I do like to ride quite challenging routes - for me anyway, like that Lesotho trip most of which was completely cross country (i.e. not even single track, just point your bike over the mountains and go) as well as the second part of that Bots trip (which I didn't yet write down in that report). About 160 km out of 220 km between Khwai village and Seronga look mostly like this (and ridden in Bots midday summer heat):


(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4591/39456461441_c1017e374d_b.jpg)


(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4736/27678809189_3d4b435a97_b.jpg)


(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4596/27678661799_a0471ab6d9_b.jpg)


And the beauty of 500 is that I was able to ride about 95% of that sitting while still maintaining around 40 kmh - conserving energy and avoiding heatstroke. On 690 I would have to turn back at the point when I was starting to feel heastroke creeping up on me, as I would have to stand most of the time and the fairing would prevent my cooling. On 500 I just opened up a bit more and cooled down nicely.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 11, 2018, 05:19:56 pm
Damaraland, I just remembered: you will most probably need new sprocket straight out of the box. My (new - 2016 model) for some reason came with 13/50 ratio, with which you basically can climb vertical walls, but it maxes out at about 90 kmh - not good for your intended use.

Different people gear them differently. For normal use - i.e. bush trips like DeWilds, Botswana cutlines, Kaokoland and such I use 14/50 (that one I'm comfortable with up to 120kmh - but I"m softie when it comes to mechanical sympathy - they can be geared to 160 kmh from what I've heard), for clutch slipping trips to Lesotho I use 14/52 (but I doubt you will need that in Nam, unless you have some rockfaces you want to climb).

So the guys over on advrider reckons the '18 models come out with 14/50.  Recommendation on there was 14 / 48 for comfortable cruising at 120 km/h,   Your ratio (stock on '18 model) gives a bit less speed (4%) but more torque, which I reckon is better for my application.
Title: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sycamore on January 11, 2018, 05:37:55 pm

Heavy adventure bikes like 690 and 990 are so overrated    :peepwall: :ricky:

There’s a lot of truth in that. But maybe it’s more diplomatic to say that the joys of simple, lean 450s (WR, CRF) and 500’s (EXC) are hugely underrated ..

For me simple goes with Japanese but that’s just my prejudice. EXC is a beauty. Love to see the adventure market embrace the basics again.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 11, 2018, 05:40:23 pm

Heavy adventure bikes like 690 and 990 are so overrated    :peepwall: :ricky:

There’s a lot of truth in that. But maybe it’s more diplomatic to say that the joys of simple, lean

Come on, that was clearly tongue in the cheek  ;)

I have 690 myself.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sycamore on January 11, 2018, 05:42:03 pm

Heavy adventure bikes like 690 and 990 are so overrated    :peepwall: :ricky:

There’s a lot of truth in that. But maybe it’s more diplomatic to say that the joys of simple, lean

Come on, that was clearly tongue in the cheek  ;)

I have 690 myself.

Oops I took it at face value and got all passionate about the lightweights :)

So passionate that I sent my post without finishing it
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sycamore on January 11, 2018, 06:00:37 pm
A friend of mine rode from Abu Dhabi to Sana’a in Yemen and back (5,000 km round trip) solo on the CRF450X on the right. That’s pretty much a race bike but he carried what he needed and I have no idea how. I’ll drink to that. The 450 / 500 class is a world of opportunities. I’ll shut up now :)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sycamore on January 11, 2018, 06:04:57 pm
Adventurizing  an ex-supermoto 500 EXC ...

http://www.texasadventure.net/bikes-and-gear/the-ktm-500-exc-build/


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 11, 2018, 07:07:52 pm
Xpat yeah, I was about to say you could probably do that terrain on the 690 by standing and maybe sitting a bit here and there. BUT....then I remembered you have the extra fairing and probably extra fuel and luggage in that fairing making it a bit more difficult - heavy. A great rider like you and some of the okes here should be able to do that with ease on a 690/701. imho there it won't be the bike but the rider. (NON fairing 690). Also I forget that you carry all the luggage. I reckon so probably 20kg altogether? Thats a lot of extra weight for that sand.
The 500 or better yet a 250 / 300 would breeze through that in comparison. I mean let's put it this way, when I get to that I'd rather be on a 500 than a 690, but i'd rather be on a 300/250 than a 500 in the same situation. All will be able to do it relatively sensibly, unlike something like a 1200GS/1200Tenere/800GS/Triump of course :)

On the maintenance part of the 500, just a little note. if you buy second hand and have no extended warranty - stretching the intervals are obviously fine.
If you buy new or nearly new and intend to keep a warranty of any kind you will have to stick to their schedules or risk voiding it.
I love the fact that the 500 has a backup kickstart though. This is where the 690 makes me a little nervous and why I carry a jump starter battery pack - just in case. But if the starter / battery  thing wants to pack up...... you can't even push start these new bikes :patch:

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 11, 2018, 07:55:51 pm
I was team manager of Team 525 at Amageza 2015 - we were a team of 6 riders - 4 on 525s , 1 on a 2014 FI 450 and 1 on a 2015 FI 500

My 525 was 8 years old, had 25 000 km and 320 hours on it and had never been opened ...I replaced all the valves with kibblewhites the week before the rally and obviously set the valve clearances and fitted new rings just because the cylinder head was off but used the same piston again because it was still in spec.

All the bikes were properly serviced and had valves checked before the race.

We did 5000 km in 7 days - some of my teammates changed oil and oil filters every day (average 700 km) ... I did my 525 every second day but we all changed air filters every day

Nobody in my team checked valve clearances during the race ... was just too much of a hassle and the pit conditions were not nice

I would guess the average total riding time in the week was 80 - 100 hours per bike ... but this was not all flat out ...there were long liasons at national speed limits where we sat for 100s of kms at 100 kph

I can't speak for the rest of my team but I checked my valves when we got back after the race ... all 4 were perfectly in spec.

I sold that bike at 32 000 km and it was still running strong ...the bottom end had never been touched.

I now have a 2015 KTM 500 that has done 9 000 km and almost 200 hours ...in my opinion the motor is perfect. I change the oil and filter every 1500 km, clean the air filter regularly and check valve clearances every 50 hours.

I am quite confident that my 500 will do the same, if not more, mileage and hours that my 525 did before any major work is required.

I sold my 950SE because I was tired of wrestling with a heavy monster in the rough stuff ...my 500 is 10 times more fun than my SE ever was

I run a 14/48 sprocket combo and have seen 179 kph on a GPS on the R355 gravel road between ceres and Calvinia on my way to Stonehenge in the Tankwa Karoo - the 500 is certainly no slouch

My bikes is stock standard except for the 19 litre Acerbis tank - no screen, no racks, nothing - I run TUBLISS in the wheels and carry everything I need for a multi day trip in a very small backpack - the less the better
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 11, 2018, 08:05:56 pm
Sorry Omninorm, I differ on most of your points.

Let's start with the easy one - warranty: as far as I know there is no warranty on dirt bikes, so that is a mute point. I may be wrong as I generally don't care about warranty on my bikes, but I don't think I am.

Now for the most suitable bike for that track - or rather Dual Sport trips on those kind of tracks as that is topic of this thread - out of those you mentioned by you of course. I agree that 500 is much more suitable for it than 690. One more aspect of 500 I didn't realize will be so important compared to 690 is that you can turn handlebars much more (sorry don't remember what is the technical term - basically 500 has much tighter turning circle). Not for actualy turning - one can always spin the rear wheel, but for saving dicy situation while riding. In that envirohment you have to ride in the deep sand track, while at the same time dodge constantly overgrowing bushes and trees. And you get thrown around over that middlemani..... (central divide) all the time. And it is just to easy to save it with full lock of handlebars on 500, while on 690 the steering stops would have seen me thrown into the bush many times - I know, I've done it before.

Now for the other two - there is no chance in the world they would be better there. I think you are looking at those tracks in isolation and comparing them probably to something like Atlantis (sorry I don't know the place but am under impression that that is favourite sand riding place near CT). I can understand that for joyride there 300 or 250 may seem like better option.m

However this track is really remote with nobody around for at least 160 km, requires at least 400 km range, need to carry full camping gear, lots of water (I was carrying 9 litres i think), tools, spares, yada-yada. The track from Maun included 150 km of dirt road along Moremi boundary to Khwai Village, the sand in the pictures for another 160km then 170 km of another dirt road before you get to Mohembo ferry over Okavango and then to Shakawe where you are back to civilizaiton (i.e. first petrol station from Maun).

In other words nice Dual Sport trip (there was more riding there afterwards, but let's keep it simple). 300 would be just useless there because of limited range (I do not believe anybody makes a tank that would give it 400 km range) and I would go bonkers on those 320 km of dirt road on 2T. They just suck at it.

250 on the other hand - even if one could get big enough tank (which I don't know if it is available) would be just too pap for that sand. The grunt and luggability of the 500 just made this so much easier and I would definitely not want to ride this on underpowered 250. This is not to say that it would be slow - I was riding mostly 40 kmh anyway, but you would have to be in the right gear all the time and it would just be so much more work.

So for DS purposes (i.e. riding off the beaten track with minimalistic luggage enabling to survive for day or three out there strapped to the back) - which is what Damaraland wants to do, in my opinion none of those bikes holds candle to 500.

For a rocky technical riding like Lesotho, that would be completely different story of course (but I have witnessed myself how limited range of 300 was seriously limiting exploring out there as well).
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Fransw on January 11, 2018, 08:31:57 pm
I was team manager of Team 525 at Amageza 2015 - we were a team of 6 riders - 4 on 525s , 1 on a 2014 FI 450 and 1 on a 2015 FI 500

My 525 was 8 years old, had 25 000 km and 320 hours on it and had never been opened ...I replaced all the valves with kibblewhites the week before the rally and obviously set the valve clearances and fitted new rings just because the cylinder head was off but used the same piston again because it was still in spec.

All the bikes were properly serviced and had valves checked before the race.

We did 5000 km in 7 days - some of my teammates changed oil and oil filters every day (average 700 km) ... I did my 525 every second day but we all changed air filters every day

Nobody in my team checked valve clearances during the race ... was just too much of a hassle and the pit conditions were not nice

I would guess the average total riding time in the week was 80 - 100 hours per bike ... but this was not all flat out ...there were long liasons at national speed limits where we sat for 100s of kms at 100 kph

I can't speak for the rest of my team but I checked my valves when we got back after the race ... all 4 were perfectly in spec.

I sold that bike at 32 000 km and it was still running strong ...the bottom end had never been touched.

I now have a 2015 KTM 500 that has done 9 000 km and almost 200 hours ...in my opinion the motor is perfect. I change the oil and filter every 1500 km, clean the air filter regularly and check valve clearances every 50 hours.

I am quite confident that my 500 will do the same, if not more, mileage and hours that my 525 did before any major work is required.

I sold my 950SE because I was tired of wrestling with a heavy monster in the rough stuff ...my 500 is 10 times more fun than my SE ever was

I run a 14/48 sprocket combo and have seen 179 kph on a GPS on the R355 gravel road between ceres and Calvinia on my way to Stonehenge in the Tankwa Karoo - the 500 is certainly no slouch

My bikes is stock standard except for the 19 litre Acerbis tank - no screen, no racks, nothing - I run TUBLISS in the wheels and carry everything I need for a multi day trip in a very small backpack - the less the better

Bendit, how difficult is it to do a valve clearance check? Can one do it in the field? Sorry for the silly questions, I'm no tech fundi..
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 11, 2018, 08:39:15 pm
A valve clearance check can be done anywhere

Seat off, tank off, tappet cover off, feeler gauge out and check the clearances

Changing or adjusting the valve clearances is another story ... the 500 has under bucket shims - this means the camchain must be split and the camshaft must come out to be able to access the shims and change them ...and of course you need to have the right new shims to replace the ones that are coming out

A 525 is much easier - it has old style overhead adjustable tappets - no shims required - loosen the locknut, adjust the clearance and nip up the locknut again.

Everybody is making a mountain out of a molehill ... for me the valve clearance check is a non issue - I ride like a granny and do it every 50 hours - if I go a few hours over then so what ...the bike is not gonna blow up or just stop dead all of a sudden
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 11, 2018, 08:49:04 pm
Sorry Omninorm, I differ on most of your points.

Let's start with the easy one - warranty: as far as I know there is no warranty on dirt bikes, so that is a mute point. I may be wrong as I generally don't care about warranty on my bikes, but I don't think I am.

Now for the most suitable bike for that track - or rather Dual Sport trips on those kind of tracks as that is topic of this thread - out of those you mentioned by you of course. I agree that 500 is much more suitable for it than 690. One more aspect of 500 I didn't realize will be so important compared to 690 is that you can turn handlebars much more (sorry don't remember what is the technical term - basically 500 has much tighter turning circle). Not for actualy turning - one can always spin the rear wheel, but for saving dicy situation while riding. In that envirohment you have to ride in the deep sand track, while at the same time dodge constantly overgrowing bushes and trees. And you get thrown around over that middlemani..... (central divide) all the time. And it is just to easy to save it with full lock of handlebars on 500, while on 690 the steering stops would have seen me thrown into the bush many times - I know, I've done it before.

Now for the other two - there is no chance in the world they would be better there. I think you are looking at those tracks in isolation and comparing them probably to something like Atlantis (sorry I don't know the place but am under impression that that is favourite sand riding place near CT). I can understand that for joyride there 300 or 250 may seem like better option.m

However this track is really remote with nobody around for at least 160 km, requires at least 400 km range, need to carry full camping gear, lots of water (I was carrying 9 litres i think), tools, spares, yada-yada. The track from Maun included 150 km of dirt road along Moremi boundary to Khwai Village, the sand in the pictures for another 160km then 170 km of another dirt road before you get to Mohembo ferry over Okavango and then to Shakawe where you are back to civilizaiton (i.e. first petrol station from Maun).

In other words nice Dual Sport trip (there was more riding there afterwards, but let's keep it simple). 300 would be just useless there because of limited range (I do not believe anybody makes a tank that would give it 400 km range) and I would go bonkers on those 320 km of dirt road on 2T. They just suck at it.

250 on the other hand - even if one could get big enough tank (which I don't know if it is available) would be just too pap for that sand. The grunt and luggability of the 500 just made this so much easier and I would definitely not want to ride this on underpowered 250. This is not to say that it would be slow - I was riding mostly 40 kmh anyway, but you would have to be in the right gear all the time and it would just be so much more work.

So for DS purposes (i.e. riding off the beaten track with minimalistic luggage enabling to survive for day or three out there strapped to the back) - which is what Damaraland wants to do, in my opinion none of those bikes holds candle to 500.

For a rocky technical riding like Lesotho, that would be completely different story of course (but I have witnessed myself how limited range of 300 was seriously limiting exploring out there as well).

Xpat we are in agreement actually. Maybe I explained my points incorrectly.

I did look at that sand bit in isolation when I made my reply, that's why I also said the 690 would be able to do it relatively easily (ALSO in isolation other than a few bits of tools and water.)). i.e The 690 without all the gear would do it ok ish, but now add the extra 20KG and it becomes heavy, where the 500 would then effectively be the weight of the 690 without gear.
Regarding the  300's and 250. No way I was saying that they will ride there and do the trip. Just, in that specific sand terrain they will imho be better than the 500 (not having ridden a 500 but a 450 or 2).
Where we don't agree maybe is that a well geared 250 would sail over that terrain. it wont be too pap at all. Again..in isolation, not getting there on the bike with 5 days of gear and stuff.
Having ridden Atlantis Dunes with 250 4t's and 2t's and other sand tracks with 250 4t's,  2t's 450's and then my Xchallenge, 690 a 800gs and a Vstrom (Yeah very stupid indeed but what did I know). Unless the 500 is a way different beast than other 450's I've ridden, Imho the 250's was better than all over that sand except for climbing the big dunes. It's not even something to think about. Ride off the road onto the sand...just go! On the 690 hitting deep sand like in your pics off dirt or road I'm like ....shit better get my shit together and saying to the bike and myself... "please dont fall on the whoops" I hate whoops on the 690. If its flatish its ok.  :)
But I digress.
For your riding the 500 seems to be the weapon of choice.
For me, although I seek out the 1 spoor or 2 spoor effectively on every ride, in the exploration of those you do sometimes have to do either tar or just regular old dirt roads.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Fransw on January 11, 2018, 08:49:04 pm
A valve clearance check can be done anywhere

Seat off, tank off, tappet cover off, feeler gauge out and check the clearances

Changing or adjusting the valve clearances is another story ... the 500 has under bucket shims - this means the camchain must be split and the camshaft must come out to be able to access the shims and change them ...and of course you need to have the right new shims to replace the ones that are coming out

A 525 is much easier - it has old style overhead adjustable tappets - no shims required - loosen the locknut, adjust the clearance and nip up the locknut again.

Everybody is making a mountain out of a molehill ... for me the valve clearance check is a non issue - I ride like a granny and do it every 50 hours - if I go a few hours over then so what ...the bike is not gonna blow up or just stop dead all of a sudden

Thanks! Also on your last sentence! :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TinusBez on January 12, 2018, 06:47:00 am
Damaraland, I just remembered: you will most probably need new sprocket straight out of the box. My (new - 2016 model) for some reason came with 13/50 ratio, with which you basically can climb vertical walls, but it maxes out at about 90 kmh - not good for your intended use.

Different people gear them differently. For normal use - i.e. bush trips like DeWilds, Botswana cutlines, Kaokoland and such I use 14/50 (that one I'm comfortable with up to 120kmh - but I"m softie when it comes to mechanical sympathy - they can be geared to 160 kmh from what I've heard), for clutch slipping trips to Lesotho I use 14/52 (but I doubt you will need that in Nam, unless you have some rockfaces you want to climb).

So the guys over on advrider reckons the '18 models come out with 14/50.  Recommendation on there was 14 / 48 for comfortable cruising at 120 km/h,   Your ratio (stock on '18 model) gives a bit less speed (4%) but more torque, which I reckon is better for my application.

Mine stock was 13/48 and will change to 14/50 purely to see what it feels like. Pulls like a tractor but certainly not a bike for cruising at 120, on a dirt highway yes sure but that gets boring after a while. See someone here clocked 170, I chicken out at 150 but yeah the bike can do it.

There's been many points of discussion on the "Cross training Enduro" channel on youtube for those following it. The author says take it as it comes out of the factory but then they also rave about the Beta and DR650 as an unprecedented training cheap do it all kinda bike.

Was thinking of suspension on the rear because I'm 100kg but I've never bottomed it out even after a 4ft drop/jump (don't know how they get that right) but will leave it. There's a 500 group in FB and some of the guys cite more than 500 hours with basic maintenance type stuff being done.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: m0lt3n on January 12, 2018, 07:55:42 am
Xpat you will like Tinus^.
He traded his 1190 in on a 500!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on January 12, 2018, 08:15:12 am
There's a 500 group in FB and some of the guys cite more than 500 hours with basic maintenance type stuff being done.

Could you please give me that group's name?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: andrew5336 on January 12, 2018, 08:20:29 am
Not sure if this has been shared but http://therollinghobo.com/500exc .

Wealth of first hand experience and some great ideas.

Also, some of the trips this boy has done are just insane.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 12, 2018, 08:43:24 am
Xpat, I agree, which is why I serviced both my 690 and 701 every 5000kays.

The 500, like the 450's factory quoted service intervals are really for when you hang off those throttle cables like in racing, and the engine works flat-out most of the time.

In fact, I would under normal touring conditions easily stretch the 500's service intervals to 5000kays.

This makes me happy.  I will stick to Xpat's recommendation but very good to know that you can push it out if you need to on longer / more remote trips.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on January 12, 2018, 09:04:37 am
I saw a Youtube video where Adam Rieman's 500 is stripped down after a full season's racing and other shenanigans. I can't remember the hours/km, but it was substantial, and Rieman doesn't ride like a girl. Everything; piston, rings, valve clearance, bottom end was still in spec.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on January 12, 2018, 09:13:42 am
I seem to recall that MTP had to rebuilt his after their one trip with something like 6-8k kms on the motor? Although I'm sure his was the exception
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on January 12, 2018, 09:14:34 am
Wait that may have been his 450
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 12, 2018, 09:35:57 am
I saw a Youtube video where Adam Rieman's 500 is stripped down after a full season's racing and other shenanigans. I can't remember the hours/km, but it was substantial, and Rieman doesn't ride like a girl. Everything; piston, rings, valve clearance, bottom end was still in spec.

After 75 hours yeah...of his riding.



Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 12, 2018, 09:46:27 am
Wait that may have been his 450

Yes, his was 450. Not sure what the difference is apart from stroke, but they have reputation to be more vicious/racy than 500, which is more torqey and relaxed and hence probably better for DS use, including longevity. But that is just my theory - never actually rode 450, so take it as that.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 12, 2018, 09:48:46 am
Wait that may have been his 450

yes it was his 450 ...because it sucked in sand

cleaning and properly greasing and sealing the air filter is critical to the longevity of these engines
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 12, 2018, 09:58:30 am
Xpat you will like Tinus^.
He traded his 1190 in on a 500!

Sure I like Tinus!

I like you as well. I might have leaned into you a bit here with the 500 vs 300 debate, probably crossing the boundaries - sorry if I did.

But I'm not bashing big bikes here - actually in your case I was advocating bigger over smaller (500 vs 300). I just believe that it is best to use best tool for intended purpose. If you want to ride two up, or really fast on easy gravel and tar, long distances in comfort, etc - big bikes are clearly the ticket and I would never recommend 500 or 690 for that. If on the other hand you want to climb rocks in Lesotho - 300 all the way (well I might even look on smaller 2 smoke if it has lower seat).

But if you are interested in the kind of off the beaten track DS riding (DS in the original american sense of the word - i.e plated dirt bike), exploring unkown paths in remote places of Africa, right now I believe 500 is the best bike for the job (at least from the ones still sold new).
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 12, 2018, 10:05:33 am
@Omninorm: I think we are on the same page, just one last comment. Maybe I'm wrong but I do get impression that you think 500 is much closer to 690 than to 250. That is not the case IMO - it is exact oposite. It is a dirtbike with absolutely minimum stuff on it and hence much closer in most aspects other than power to 250. Of course it is going to feel a bit heavier because of bigger moving masses in the engine, but it is still a dirt bike, not a dirt-worthy road bike like 690.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 12, 2018, 10:23:25 am
@Omninorm: I think we are on the same page, just one last comment. Maybe I'm wrong but I do get impression that you think 500 is much closer to 690 than to 250. That is not the case IMO - it is exact oposite. It is a dirtbike with absolutely minimum stuff on it and hence much closer in most aspects other than power to 250. Of course it is going to feel a bit heavier because of bigger moving masses in the engine, but it is still a dirt bike, not a dirt-worthy road bike like 690.

No no, I know the 500 is closer to the 250. :thumleft: I've had road legal 450. That's also the only reason anyone would think twice on taking a 500 now. Since it's a "race engine" <-- using the term loosely. I mean if it wasn't for that I would have considered it for sure. I might even have one in the garage someday. Even if I do seek out as much dirt as possible, unfortunately tar stretches are a reality for me and to put that mileage on a "Race bike" would have me doing a lot of maintenance work (preventative) because I'm kinda pedantic.
If the engineer said 50 hours i'll do 50 hours. Not push it to 75 because it should do it etc.
Even now, I reckon I'll replace rocker arms on 20 000km - 30 000km as a precaution even if they are fine.

So yeah...KTM 500 EXC - fantastic bike that can cover a lot of ground I think. Just not for me at this stage for those reasons.
Also remember I'm still in a fragile state of KTM trust at this stage. I needed something with a warranty....cause it's not a BMW, Honda, Suzuki  :lol8: :peepwall:



Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TinusBez on January 12, 2018, 10:27:18 am
There's a 500 group in FB and some of the guys cite more than 500 hours with basic maintenance type stuff being done.

Could you please give me that group's name?

Sure

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1075894689185624/

called "ktm500 exc and FE501"
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: m0lt3n on January 12, 2018, 10:31:48 am
Xpat you will like Tinus^.
He traded his 1190 in on a 500!

Sure I like Tinus!

I like you as well. I might have leaned into you a bit here with the 500 vs 300 debate, probably crossing the boundaries - sorry if I did.

But I'm not bashing big bikes here - actually in your case I was advocating bigger over smaller (500 vs 300). I just believe that it is best to use best tool for intended purpose. If you want to ride two up, or really fast on easy gravel and tar, long distances in comfort, etc - big bikes are clearly the ticket and I would never recommend 500 or 690 for that. If on the other hand you want to climb rocks in Lesotho - 300 all the way (well I might even look on smaller 2 smoke if it has lower seat).

But if you are interested in the kind of off the beaten track DS riding (DS in the original american sense of the word - i.e plated dirt bike), exploring unkown paths in remote places of Africa, right now I believe 500 is the best bike for the job (at least from the ones still sold new).


I don't mind.
I also don't mind much which one I get. I believe one adapts to what you have. You will start riding more and make more and more plans to ride the terrain suited to your bike. So there is little in it.
There is a lot of local amature enduro races which I would like to dabble in, I would like to get my skills up so believe that will be easier on 300 as well but still possible on the 500. Its a new area or genre of biking to explore, so there is no way to judge now which would be the more appropriate. The 300 will be the better 2 hour toy for me currently (family logistics) but the 500 as an extreme adv bike will also be good as it can do the 2hr stints with 300/250 2T friends around town but I can also start prepping it for multi day adv trips. There is no right or wrong decision for me on this currently.

Wrong decisions is when you buy a GS to fix up and sell at profit. Then it eats up time and money, so now my money is stuck till the GS sells and I cant buy the flippen dirt bike!
Sorry, another of my off-topic posts.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TinusBez on January 12, 2018, 10:39:13 am
The yanks classify the 500 as a DS bike and the FB page you'll a lot of this, none of the supposed magic less than 100 hours sell your bike shit there.

The Enduro training channel on youtube suggest adding stuff to adds weight and their focus is more on training (why I enjoy ti so much) as opposed to like Xpat calls it brand bashing. To prove a point in one race they had an elite guy on some 80's model which no mods done and he did better than most on the modern bikes (can't remember the name of the vid now).

Back to Damaraland's question which has been answered for the most part.

...This means that I'm looking for the items that are both indispensable for adventure riding on a 500 as well as the most economical in their class.  Would prefer to buy from SA distributors if possible, but importing is also not a huge problem.

Essentials in my opinion (would love to hear from other riders also what they think is essential):
- Larger tank (need to cater for about 400km range)
- Bash plate
- Luggage rack
- Possibly touring screen

Looking forward to your input!

Tank makes sense, also you don't need to fill it all the way, depends on riding and how technical it'll be.
Bash plate - essential but get those plastic or carbon ones, they're cheap and help keep weight down, the alu ones are tough yeah but heave compared to plastic ones and the plastic ones are pretty tough. Also the 500 has 355mm ground clearance. That is a lot
Luggage rack - skip it, like Xpat said get soft luggage like GL or Mosko (ordering my Mosko in Feb)
Touring screen - give it a skip, yes it looks cool and you can probably go the tower with all the rally gizmo's sometime in future, IMO you hardly to the sustained speed you'd do your 990.

Get the protection bits for discs front and back, swingarm and frame guard, fork guards and obviously hand guards and off you go. I also want to install the tubeliss system but don't have money right now, changing a tyre with rim lock isn't fun especially if it is ultra heavy duty which IMO is a sales gimmick, a nail will go through irrespective so I don't buy ultra HD anymore and easier to change a tyre with standard tubes but tubeliss solves this and you can run ultra low pressure in the gnarly stuff.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: m0lt3n on January 12, 2018, 10:45:22 am
on topic

Adventurising a 500

1. do you not need wider footpegs or are they fine standard? Or do you sit more than what would be case on bigger bike.
2. Tied to above, handlebar raisers? The little ride I did on a 501 was super tiring to stand in a short time. I know I had to get fitter but I also realised when I was forced to sit that sitting was more comfortable on the single track than on my 1190.
3. Power sources, can the alternator charge extra stuff? GPS and phones.
4. Tubliss conversion wasn't mentioned much. I wouldn't want to go without. How much is it?
5. comfort seat? or do you fit a little pillow? Don't tell me to man up or get saddle fit. it doesn't exist if you spend consecutive 12hour days in the saddle. What do you do to that ironing board on the back of the bike?
6. cost of bashplate? or do you stick with some cheapie plastic thing because the bike never bottoms out?
7. Radiator guards necessary?
8. Aftermarket rims? front only or strong enough OEM not to get bend on rocks?
9. How much is extra brake and gearlever or do they never break? (Xpat do you carry extra levers on your trips? I have never noticed)

AAAAND Edit: Tinus thanks for answering a lot of these already
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on January 12, 2018, 10:58:42 am
on topic

Adventurising a 500

1. do you not need wider footpegs or are they fine standard? Or do you sit more than what would be case on bigger bike.
2. Tied to above, handlebar raisers? The little ride I did on a 501 was super tiring to stand in a short time. I know I had to get fitter but I also realised when I was forced to sit that sitting was more comfortable on the single track than on my 1190.
3. Power sources, can the alternator charge extra stuff? GPS and phones.
4. Tubliss conversion wasn't mentioned much. I wouldn't want to go without. How much is it?
5. comfort seat? or do you fit a little pillow? Don't tell me to man up or get saddle fit. it doesn't exist if you spend consecutive 12hour days in the saddle. What do you do to that ironing board on the back of the bike?
6. cost of bashplate? or do you stick with some cheapie plastic thing because the bike never bottoms out?
7. Radiator guards necessary?
8. Aftermarket rims? front only or strong enough OEM not to get bend on rocks?
9. How much is extra brake and gearlever or do they never break? (Xpat do you carry extra levers on your trips? I have never noticed)

AAAAND Edit: Tinus thanks for answering a lot of these already

1. No
2. No - I'm 6'3" and I'm fine without. You can move the bars forward as there are 4 positions. Having the bars in the sky trains you in VERY BAD riding positions.
3. Yes - no problem.
4. I use Tubliss - it's a bit more maintenance than a normal tube or mousses and there are strong arguments both ways but I like it. I think it's about R1500 a wheel.
5. Just did the whole of northern Namibia on the standard seat and it was 100%. I had a Seat Concepts on my previous 450 but I'm not bothering now. 2017/8 model may be a little less comfortable.
6. Go Hyde - solid, quiet and doesn't catch on things.
7. Hmmm. personal preference. I have em, but probably wouldn't have bothered if the bike didn't come with them. Definitely have them on my rock bashing 300 though.
8. Don't aftermarket anything you really don't have to. The rims are 100s and so is everything else. I literally changed only the tank - to the Acerbis/KTM 20l.
9. I've never broken brake or gear pedals on any of my KTM enduros - even the 300 I chuck down mountains. I still carry spares wired into the airbox but never needed them. Hand levers are a good idea unless you have Cycras in which case I'd say they are optional.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 12, 2018, 11:04:34 am
on topic

Adventurising a 500

1. do you not need wider footpegs or are they fine standard? Or do you sit more than what would be case on bigger bike. I'm on standard pegs, no issue. And yes you will sit much more on this bike in tough terrain - you need to stand only for really gnarly fast stuff
2. Tied to above, handlebar raisers? The little ride I did on a 501 was super tiring to stand in a short time. I know I had to get fitter but I also realised when I was forced to sit that sitting was more comfortable on the single track than on my 1190. I have steering damper so they are probably raised little bit because of that. But nowadays I stay clear off raisers - my experience now is that you should either sit or stand in full attack position with bent knees and back almost horizontal to the seat. None of that merkat straight up standing for 100 km. But that is me - and I'm 179cm
3. Power sources, can the alternator charge extra stuff? GPS and phones. Yes I had one installed on the handlebars with cigarette lighter plug and USB plug. Works 100%
4. Tubliss conversion wasn't mentioned much. I wouldn't want to go without. How much is it? Don't know, I ride tubes
5. comfort seat? or do you fit a little pillow? Don't tell me to man up or get saddle fit. it doesn't exist if you spend consecutive 12hour days in the saddle. What do you do to that ironing board on the back of the bike? I ride standard. I think you might put exagerated importance to this because of your iron butt races. If you ride 12 hours on 500 you either doing it completely wrong - i.e. riding too easy route like tar or easy dirt for 12 hours, or if you are using it right and ride 12 hours - e.g. you are stuck in some dune field - the sore butt is going to be least of your problem, because you will be standing a lot or moving on the seat. My experience is that on my 690 with crap seat I can do easily 600 - 700 km a day in dirt, but on tar I'm hurting bad within 70 km - the reason, you move on the seat in dirt, while you static on tar. But again, that is me, you have to do what suits you - I'm sure somebody can adjust your seat in SA
6. cost of bashplate? or do you stick with some cheapie plastic thing because the bike never bottoms out? I have metal one from Power parts - sorry don't remember the cost. I'm sure some plastic Hyde product will also do good job - maybe check with Losper if it can withstand Lesotho rock bashing
7. Radiator guards necessary? Not for me - I have big tanks that protects them enough so far
8. Aftermarket rims? front only or strong enough OEM not to get bend on rocks? This is offroad bike with proper components. None of that cheap stuff they put on road bikes. In other words - strong enough  8)
9. How much is extra brake and gearlever or do they never break? (Xpat do you carry extra levers on your trips? I have never noticed) I do carry spare leveers - sorry don't remember the costs, check on Runners website or whoever sells them. Mine didn't break so far after 5,5k km, but as I said - I ride like old lady

AAAAND Edit: Tinus thanks for answering a lot of these already

Answers up in red.

Edit: Sorry, not sure why the red came up all glowing and stuff.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on January 12, 2018, 11:05:06 am
I agree with MTP, apart from point 1.
IMHO, for consecutive long days on the bike with lots of standing, bigger foot pegs make a massive difference. Just look at the pegs the Dakar bikes come with.

Oh, and I have bar raisers. I know of all the bad habits it teaches you, but I'm no pro and anything that makes me stand easier helps.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TinusBez on January 12, 2018, 11:32:15 am
Pegs - My standard pegs are almost the same as the standard ones I had on my 1190.
Tubes - Tubeliss system last I checked was R 1500 for one, think saw them at Flyingbrick and being a whore looking for best prices they are pretty much the same all over.
Radiator - Called radiator braces are bloody expensive at around 7k, don't know if you need to lose them when installing a bigger tank but I do know you lose the shrouds (cosmetic plastic piece running from the seat are to front of the radiator

KTM sold me a protection kit, effectively a box with all the protection bits for I think around 7k. Item for item it made a lot more sense buying the box then individual parts. That said I don't know whether it is a thing KTM offers or just the dealer I bought it from.



Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: m0lt3n on January 12, 2018, 01:35:19 pm
Thanks guys. some solid answers.
It would seem to be much better suited for an adventure than an Adventure bike is! Good news then.

No upgrades necessary like the ones the 690 needs?
Airbox is fine? Bolts on tank snapping or rusting off or whatever that issue is? Petrol pump good no need to carry a spare?

Found some nice info here:
http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/2017-ktm-500-exc-f-vs-2017-husqvarna-fe-501.1213701/
and from that, are the service intervals the same on the two (although from our discussion the service interval does not seem to matter much)


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 12, 2018, 02:04:52 pm
No issues out of the box I'm aware of. I ride it standard (including standard exhaust - which is also a must replacement on 690 otherwise it will melt luggage - as I want it as quiet as possible) and do not carry spare fuel pump or injector (I do for 690).

All I did is add those accessories I've mentioned and got suspension set-up for my weight and bike lowered in the pocess - I got different springs for my weight and suspension revalved.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 15, 2018, 01:09:45 pm
Just to drive point home about longevity of the modern 450/500 engines and to show that you don't need much to adventurize it. This is Czech chick Gabriela Novotna riding Dakar as we speak (and doing bloody good job for a newbie), riding on Husky 450:

(https://v2-medias.aso.fr/core_app/img-motorSports-dak-jpg/05118003-fg09066/8594/0:0,1800:1200-1000-0-70/f2a77)


(https://instagram.fath3-2.fna.fbcdn.net/vp/36cc22618f7d8ebf36635b4794dbd250/5AE699F0/t51.2885-15/s640x640/sh0.08/e35/23825141_149650065655914_4129595086415593472_n.jpg)

Apart from the obligatory roadbook, antenas and stuff upfront, iritrack sitting at the back behind the seat and bashplate with required spare water, the bike looks basically stock, just with bigger Acerbis tank. Now I'm sure they service it after each stage, but those stages are something different than our dual sporting, and in the marathon stage - when there was no support for one night - they rode almost 1000 km of special over two days, and probably upwards of 500 km of liaisons. So to me this confirms that these bikes clearly can do it and do not require that much modification.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on January 15, 2018, 01:22:47 pm
Interesting that she is on what looks like a '15/'16 model, not the latest model. Maybe something to do with the lack of aftermarket long range tanks for the '17 and up models?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 15, 2018, 01:25:09 pm
Interesting that she is on what looks like a '15/'16 model, not the latest model. Maybe something to do with the lack of aftermarket long range tanks for the '17 and up models?

I don't recognize the model, but I think you are right about the tank.

I think it is just plain dumb that they don't make the 20 litre tank for 2017 onwards - and you will have to take it into account Damaraland if you need, range, which I suspect you do.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 15, 2018, 01:37:28 pm
I've narrowed down my luggage options to the following:
- Altrider holster with two 25L Drybags
- Giant Loop Cayenne

I'm leaning towards the Altrider currently due to 12L more cacacity, also it's cheaper than the GL.  Another benefit is that it also has space for a 2L bottle on each holster.  I will compliment it with a fender bag but that's about it.

Anyone used one or both and have an opinion on it?

The Mosko Moto as used by Xpat looks pretty sweet but a bit too expensive for me, also do not want to battle with importing.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 15, 2018, 01:51:39 pm
Well as I said I have preference for holster backbone system like Altrider because it is more flexible in terms of getting in and out, being able to overpack a bit and allowing to push the bag siting on top of seat back giving me more space. I have Altrider (I bought it when I thought the Mosko Moto has been irretrievably lost somewhere before delivery), but didn't use it as MM eventualy arived and so far that is what I was using.

But many people use Cayene - Straatkat uses one, as well as MTP used one in that Kaokoland trip. So they clearly work as well - maybe check with those guys what they think.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Fransw on January 15, 2018, 01:59:01 pm
I've narrowed down my luggage options to the following:
- Altrider holster with two 25L Drybags
- Giant Loop Cayenne

I'm leaning towards the Altrider currently due to 12L more cacacity, also it's cheaper than the GL.  Another benefit is that it also has space for a 2L bottle on each holster.  I will compliment it with a fender bag but that's about it.

Anyone used one or both and have an opinion on it?

The Mosko Moto as used by Xpat looks pretty sweet but a bit too expensive for me, also do not want to battle with importing.

Damara, we demand some pictures! :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Fransw on January 15, 2018, 02:01:37 pm
Just to drive point home about longevity of the modern 450/500 engines and to show that you don't need much to adventurize it. This is Czech chick Gabriela Novotna riding Dakar as we speak (and doing bloody good job for a newbie), riding on Husky 450:

(https://v2-medias.aso.fr/core_app/img-motorSports-dak-jpg/05118003-fg09066/8594/0:0,1800:1200-1000-0-70/f2a77)


(https://instagram.fath3-2.fna.fbcdn.net/vp/36cc22618f7d8ebf36635b4794dbd250/5AE699F0/t51.2885-15/s640x640/sh0.08/e35/23825141_149650065655914_4129595086415593472_n.jpg)

Apart from the obligatory roadbook, antenas and stuff upfront, iritrack sitting at the back behind the seat and bashplate with required spare water, the bike looks basically stock, just with bigger Acerbis tank. Now I'm sure they service it after each stage, but those stages are something different than our dual sporting, and in the marathon stage - when there was no support for one night - they rode almost 1000 km of special over two days, and probably upwards of 500 km of liaisons. So to me this confirms that these bikes clearly can do it and do not require that much modification.

Xpat, are you from Czech? Isn't that where they train the Taliban troops?! :patch:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 15, 2018, 02:10:53 pm


Xpat, are you from Czech? Isn't that where they train the Taliban troops?! :patch:

Exactly, I personnaly groomed few of them.   8)

Where the f@CK you come up with this shit? I have already seen South Africans asking me if Germany was in South America, been called Russian, but this one I haven't heard before.

I suspect that you are talking about Chechnya, but still would like confirmation. I would say that Czech republic is result of split of Czechoslovakia, but then people would start commiserate me for the war in Yugoslavia, so I'm rather not going to. Let me say it this way - Czech republic is where your CZ guns comes from (and for older generation where Jawa used to come from and win MotoGP before communism put stop to that malarky). And it is stuck right between Germany and Austria.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on January 15, 2018, 02:25:05 pm


Xpat, are you from Czech? Isn't that where they train the Taliban troops?! :patch:

Exactly, I personnaly groomed few of them.   8)

Where the f@CK you come up with this shit? I have already seen South Africans asking me if Germany was in South America, been called Russian, but this one I haven't heard before.

I suspect that you are talking about Chechnya, but still would like confirmation. I would say that Czech republic is result of split of Czechoslovakia, but then people would start commiserate me for the war in Yugoslavia, so I'm rather not going to. Let me say it this way - Czech republic is where your CZ guns comes from (and for older generation where Jawa used to come from and win MotoGP before communism put stop to that malarky). And it is stuck right between Germany and Austria.

And it is an often overlooked tourist destination for us Saffers, both in affordability as well as BEER... :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 15, 2018, 02:35:45 pm
We are completely offtopic, so just last chirp: Yes, Czech's have the highest beer consumption per capita in the world. And you've heard about Pilsener type of beers? Well Pilsen is city in Czech republic.

And I was very surprised to read somewhere that one of the top destination (outside of the obvious ones like Australia and UK) for SA emigration. Not sure if it is true and cannot find the article now, and did find it surprising because the language is pretty difficult. On the other hand it makes a bit sense as Czech repulic is rated as one of the top 5 or 6 most peaceful countries in the world - very low crime and political unrest, democracy, one of the best health care systems in the world, great public schools and universities, tons of culture (there are probably more concerts of international artists in Prague in a week than in a year in whole of RSA), has very long industrial history (Czech Airlines are one of the oldest still operating airlines in the world, Tatra and Skoda one of the oldest still running car manufacturers in the world, you know probably about CZ, L410 and Albatros/Delphin/Zlin airplanes, Mitas tyres etc. Oh yes, and Bata, who used to be Henry Ford of shoe industry (now sadly just a shell of the former glory) is of course from Czech republic and build his empire there.

I find it actualy so settled and boring that I decided to rather relocate ro RSA as I find it much more exciting here - for the right and wrong reasons.

Ok, that is the end of my little Czech advert, apologies for that - it has been provoked
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on January 15, 2018, 02:51:56 pm


Quote from: Damaraland on Today at 01:37:28 pm (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg3980710#msg3980710)>
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Ebredenhann on January 15, 2018, 02:52:35 pm
So it seems that the biggest aftermarket fuel tank available currently for this conversion (2018 model) is the 11.5L tank, that correct?  Some guys also mentioned earlier that the 17/18 models do not have long range tanks available.

What now, that defeats the whole object for me, what are the options now?  Or did I miss the answer somewhere?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on January 15, 2018, 02:57:01 pm

I've used both, (the Giant Loop and the ALTRider system, but am also a Vendor! bearing that in mind, here goes!:

On my own 450, the GL Coyote was a pretty good fit, even though i have a rear Safari tank 'in the way'. I actually loved the bag, but was not a fan of the zip - it never ever gave me a days problem opening/closing (it was YKK zip - industy best), b-u-t if you put say plakkies in, then the zip battled to close over a heard-edged object. Minor issue, that.

So I then imported the ALTRider product, both for myself and others. I like it, again - on MY bike, the rear tank is slightly in the way, so I am not using the 2 clever - provided - attachment hooks that I should be using - rear Safari tank does not allow for it! But is works well.

Some riders who ride a lot suggested I consider using the ALTRider holster system with generic DRY BAGS, to keep weight even lower down, since the ALTRider inner obviously is one continuous bag that spans the seat in addition to reaching down. Conclusion: the dry bags will be my future go-to option.

NOTE! since i first bought and used both systems, Giant Loop now CHANGED both the Coyote and it s big brother: the Great Basin, to ROLL-TOP closures, removing one minor area I felt was tricky when zipping up the bag!

My choice now? Probably ALTRider in 1st place, but with DRY BAGS
then CLOSE behind, the GL Coyote.

YMMV!
Chris
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Fransw on January 15, 2018, 02:59:11 pm


Xpat, are you from Czech? Isn't that where they train the Taliban troops?! :patch:

Exactly, I personnaly groomed few of them.   8)

Where the f@CK you come up with this shit? I have already seen South Africans asking me if Germany was in South America, been called Russian, but this one I haven't heard before.

I suspect that you are talking about Chechnya, but still would like confirmation. I would say that Czech republic is result of split of Czechoslovakia, but then people would start commiserate me for the war in Yugoslavia, so I'm rather not going to. Let me say it this way - Czech republic is where your CZ guns comes from (and for older generation where Jawa used to come from and win MotoGP before communism put stop to that malarky). And it is stuck right between Germany and Austria.

 :lol8: :lol8: Martin, only pulling your leg! I'm well travelled and understand that!

I shot a couple of thousand rounds with the CZ75, very reliable workhorse pistol. Although I find the Glock more refined..

Back to the topic.. Where are the pics Damara?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 15, 2018, 02:59:43 pm
So it seems that the biggest aftermarket fuel tank available currently for this conversion (2018 model) is the 11.5L tank, that correct?  Some guys also mentioned earlier that the 17/18 models do not have long range tanks available.

What now, that defeats the whole object for me, what are the options now?  Or did I miss the answer somewhere?

Runner said earlier that he sell 15.5 litre tank for 2017/18. Not sure if that is good enough for you - will give you probably 300 -350 km per tank if ridden normaly.

But yes, it is a shame that there is not 20 litre tank as IMO they sold like hot cakes. They used to make 24litre tank for 525, then went to 20 litre for 500. Hopefully somebody (Acerbis or Safari Tanks) will realize wrongness of their ways and start making one - at the end of the day Adam Rieman is doing hell of a job promoting this bike for proper DS use.

Your option now is either to get 15.5 litre tank, or try to get second hand 2016 or earlier model and get 20 litre tank for that. There was an advert for Husky 501 in the Trade section with 20 hours on clock and big tank (not sure what size), so maybe check if it would work for you.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 15, 2018, 03:04:42 pm
So it seems that the biggest aftermarket fuel tank available currently for this conversion (2018 model) is the 11.5L tank, that correct?  Some guys also mentioned earlier that the 17/18 models do not have long range tanks available.

What now, that defeats the whole object for me, what are the options now?  Or did I miss the answer somewhere?

Runner said earlier that he sell 15.5 litre tank for 2017/18. Not sure if that is good enough for you - will give you probably 300 -350 km per tank if ridden normaly.

But yes, it is a shame that there is not 20 litre tank as IMO they sold like hot cakes. They used to make 24litre tank for 525, then went to 20 litre for 500. Hopefully somebody (Acerbis or Safari Tanks) will realize wrongness of their ways and start making one - at the end of the day Adam Rieman is doing hell of a job promoting this bike for proper DS use.

Your option now is either to get 15.5 litre tank, or try to get second hand 2016 or earlier model and get 20 litre tank for that. There was an advert for Husky 501 in the Trade section with 20 hours on clock and big tank (not sure what size), so maybe check if it would work for you.

Runner sells the 15L Acerbis tank above, advantage with this tank is you need no extra attachments or KTM parts (confirmed this with Runner).  Disadvantage according to a couple of inmates on ADVrider is that, because the screws go straight into the plastic, a couple of guys have experienced leaks.

The other option I found was IMS, which makes a 17L tank.  Quality is very good (once again, according to advrider) but you do have to order additional parts from KTM.  Website is here: https://www.imsproducts.com/Products/index.cfm?ManufacturerSet=KTM&maD=true&ModelSet=500%20EXC-F&modD=true&yeD=true&siD=true&TypeSet=Fuel%20Tank&SeriesSet=&sed=true&tyd=true&YearsSet=2017-2018&SizeSet=4.5%20gal (https://www.imsproducts.com/Products/index.cfm?ManufacturerSet=KTM&maD=true&ModelSet=500%20EXC-F&modD=true&yeD=true&siD=true&TypeSet=Fuel%20Tank&SeriesSet=&sed=true&tyd=true&YearsSet=2017-2018&SizeSet=4.5%20gal)

I did mail Safari, but at best they are only planning to bring one out third quarter of this year.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 15, 2018, 03:10:49 pm
I've narrowed down my luggage options to the following:
- Altrider holster with two 25L Drybags
- Giant Loop Cayenne

I'm leaning towards the Altrider currently due to 12L more cacacity, also it's cheaper than the GL.  Another benefit is that it also has space for a 2L bottle on each holster.  I will compliment it with a fender bag but that's about it.

Anyone used one or both and have an opinion on it?

The Mosko Moto as used by Xpat looks pretty sweet but a bit too expensive for me, also do not want to battle with importing.

Damara, we demand some pictures! :biggrin:

Will definitely do a build thread when everything arrives!  In the meantime I'm enjoying the wealth of information shared on this thread. :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 15, 2018, 03:10:58 pm
@Zebra- Flying Brick: Chris, did I just see you complain about zipper on soft luggage?  :peepwall: ;)

Just pulling your leg.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on January 15, 2018, 03:13:21 pm


Quote from: Xpat on Today at 03:10:58 pm (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg3980793#msg3980793)>@Zebra- Flying Brick: Chris, did I just see you complain about zipper on soft luggage?  :peepwall: ;)

Just pulling your leg.

Clever - you GOT me, and got me - g-o-o-d!  :thumleft:
I won't forget that in a hurry! hehe!
Cheers, Chris


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 15, 2018, 03:18:12 pm
I can't speak for the specific bag but I've recently bought a Giant Loop Mojavi (new ones) from Flying Brick, for tools, tubes, medkit and some fuel. I've gone on to quite "adventurous" rides in lots of terrain, sand mud dirt grasslands twice since buying it.  The bag didn't move or get in the way whatsoever.. completely waterproof by the looks of it as well...sealed zips. This thing is durable.
I have a offshore bag that I use as a main bag - same thick plastic / rubber material. I strap that on the back. (Did it on the Xchallenge and will now strap it to the Mojavi bag on longer trips). I looked at the others...but if it was me I'd take the Giant Loop Cayenne. But if it was me with a 500 me I'd rather take the Giant Loop Grat basin and a tank bag.

Like so.
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/f4/74/1f/f4741f0cae045c6c8c615962cc908dd0.jpg)

and a 690... can't help it...when I see this setup I want to go on trip.

(https://adventuriderz.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/KTM-690-Enduro-R-005.jpg)

Note Mosko bags. Sorry could not find a 500 pic in short notice so another 690 would have to do...  :biggrin:
(https://adventuriderz.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/thegeardude690-1492228555637.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: andrew5336 on January 15, 2018, 03:28:39 pm
We are completely offtopic, so just last chirp: Yes, Czech's have the highest beer consumption per capita in the world. And you've heard about Pilsener type of beers? Well Pilsen is city in Czech republic.

And I was very surprised to read somewhere that one of the top destination (outside of the obvious ones like Australia and UK) for SA emigration. Not sure if it is true and cannot find the article now, and did find it surprising because the language is pretty difficult. On the other hand it makes a bit sense as Czech repulic is rated as one of the top 5 or 6 most peaceful countries in the world - very low crime and political unrest, democracy, one of the best health care systems in the world, great public schools and universities, tons of culture (there are probably more concerts of international artists in Prague in a week than in a year in whole of RSA), has very long industrial history (Czech Airlines are one of the oldest still operating airlines in the world, Tatra and Skoda one of the oldest still running car manufacturers in the world, you know probably about CZ, L410 and Albatros/Delphin/Zlin airplanes, Mitas tyres etc. Oh yes, and Bata, who used to be Henry Ford of shoe industry (now sadly just a shell of the former glory) is of course from Czech republic and build his empire there.

I find it actualy so settled and boring that I decided to rather relocate ro RSA as I find it much more exciting here - for the right and wrong reasons.

Ok, that is the end of my little Czech advert, apologies for that - it has been provoked

And some of the hottest women on earth.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 15, 2018, 03:36:51 pm

And some of the hottest women on earth.

There are some, but I have to admit that I'd rather go a bit more east for that - Slovakia/Poland/Ukraine some such. And RSA is not bad either...

This perception is created by the fact that Czechs as one of the most atheistic people are very liberal on social issues, which allowed porn industry to blossom there, with Czech specific categories being prominent on most respectable porn websites ...  :imaposer:

OK, I am really going to stop with this crap now.  :peepwall:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 15, 2018, 03:41:46 pm
I can't speak for the specific bag but I've recently bought a Giant Loop Mojavi (new ones) from Flying Brick, for tools, tubes, medkit and some fuel. I've gone on to quite "adventurous" rides in lots of terrain, sand mud dirt grasslands twice since buying it.  The bag didn't move or get in the way whatsoever.. completely waterproof by the looks of it as well...sealed zips. This thing is durable.
I have a offshore bag that I use as a main bag - same thick plastic / rubber material. I strap that on the back. (Did it on the Xchallenge and will now strap it to the Mojavi bag on longer trips). I looked at the others...but if it was me I'd take the Giant Loop Cayenne. But if it was me with a 500 me I'd rather take the Giant Loop Grat basin and a tank bag.

Like so.


I have Mojavi and it is great solution for daily trips like bash through DeWildt for tools, spare tubes and such. It is not the right solution for longer multiday DS rides - too small (12 litres both bags if I remember correctly).

I wouldn't use tankbag on 500. I have tried in Lesotho and it really gets in the way, so I took it off and left it in the car. Chances are one is going to ride  500 much more like enduro bike (even on big DS trips) - that is the whole point of going for such light and capable bike - and in that kind of riding you move around much more, than even on 690. So for my money, I would steer clear of tankbag.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Richard Smit on January 15, 2018, 04:13:30 pm
Not sure if this has been posted before?

http://therollinghobo.com/500exc

Edit: I see it was. Sorry.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 15, 2018, 04:18:50 pm
I can't speak for the specific bag but I've recently bought a Giant Loop Mojavi (new ones) from Flying Brick, for tools, tubes, medkit and some fuel. I've gone on to quite "adventurous" rides in lots of terrain, sand mud dirt grasslands twice since buying it.  The bag didn't move or get in the way whatsoever.. completely waterproof by the looks of it as well...sealed zips. This thing is durable.
I have a offshore bag that I use as a main bag - same thick plastic / rubber material. I strap that on the back. (Did it on the Xchallenge and will now strap it to the Mojavi bag on longer trips). I looked at the others...but if it was me I'd take the Giant Loop Cayenne. But if it was me with a 500 me I'd rather take the Giant Loop Grat basin and a tank bag.

Like so.


I have Mojavi and it is great solution for daily trips like bash through DeWildt for tools, spare tubes and such. It is not the right solution for longer multiday DS rides - too small (12 litres both bags if I remember correctly).

I wouldn't use tankbag on 500. I have tried in Lesotho and it really gets in the way, so I took it off and left it in the car. Chances are one is going to ride  500 much more like enduro bike (even on big DS trips) - that is the whole point of going for such light and capable bike - and in that kind of riding you move around much more, than even on 690. So for my money, I would steer clear of tankbag.

Agree with comments on the size regarding the Mojavi - I wasn't saying he should get a Mojave, just commenting on the quality referring to the GL Great Basin as per pic. (25l )  I guess it also depends what you want to take. Some okes take 1 Tshirt 1 pair of underwear and 3 socks for 6 months - others take their DSTV dish on the back for 2 days.
In my case a properly secured and not overly massive tank bag placed way forward really doesn't get in the way unless you have a big boep...I don't see an issue with it.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 15, 2018, 04:25:34 pm
You are not taking DSTV dish on 500 anywhere. One of the good things about going 500 is that it forces you to go minimalist, and one usually finds great freedom in that.

Tankbag is personal preference of course - I used it for last few trips on 690 and it was OKish. I usee the smallest available Giant Loop one - don't remember the name now, it has 4 litres. But still, I am not going to use one on 500. Might still on 690, but to be honest, once you go minimal, it feels stupid to add stuff. I used it primarily for cameras to have them handy, but realized that for my purposes - which is basically ride reports posted on web - high end compact cameras (or even cell phones if one doesn't care about low ligth photos) that one can carry in the jacket pocket work just fine.

My 2c
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 15, 2018, 05:50:56 pm
I used a tankbag once on my 500 - never again - absolutely hated how it got in the way
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 15, 2018, 10:49:16 pm
I reckon with a Safari tank and a tank bag it could get in the way. If I look at the first pic...I'd also say that you are locked in place. The second pic the bag is quite forward, and its a bigish bag at that.

Do you guys ride with backpacks at all?

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 15, 2018, 11:21:21 pm
Yes, I ride with a backpack and actually bought bigger one (20 liter - used to carry 14) after I bought 500. I believ MTP also mentioned that he used bigger bakpack to increase luggage space on his Kaokoland trip. And if you look on Motonomad videos, they also carry pretty big backpacks - though they have to haul the filming stuff with them.
 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 16, 2018, 04:45:07 am
Do you guys ride with backpacks at all?

On my last trip with the 500 (3 days 2 nights) in early December 2017 I rode with small backpack only ...containing 3 litre water hydration pack, 1 change of clothes for evening (long sleeve top, t-shirt, pants, undies, socks,slip on shoes (all lightweight thin material stuff), minimal toiletries and few snacks) - this backpack weighed max 5 kg and with shoulder and waist strap properly adjusted I hardly felt it and it did not move or bounce around - I am confident this backpack will work for longer trips too because I won't take any more stuff with me ...snacks and water get replenished along the way of every ride

On the rear fender I have a very small toolbag that carries the basics I need to fix a puncture and deal with most things that could happen.

I was not carrying a tent because I slept inside at night - my tent would fit easily in a Giant Loop or Altrider type luggage system strapped to the bike
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Pistonpete on January 16, 2018, 05:45:56 am
Don't forget the Kriega gear ... I been using the tailpacks for years & they seriously robust...they are also now seriously expensive though but are keepers.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Runner on January 16, 2018, 12:18:29 pm
R85 000
2016
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 16, 2018, 12:28:52 pm
Thanks for the info on the backpack.
Yeah, I wear a 2l hydration bladder with a few bits and bobs in I also think packing a bigger one on the back and then the Mojavi and tank bag will be more than enough. The tent and sleeping bag on the back. My only concern on some rides might be a bit of fuel. other than the stock 690 tank, I have an extra 2l in 2 MSR fuel bottles that can easily fit. As soon as I need to add the 5L Desert Fox bladder it becomes a bit much. I mean it will fit strapped to the back but Ill want to empty it into the tank asap.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: andrew5336 on January 16, 2018, 12:49:59 pm
From reading this thread it seems that the 500 is fairly unstressed as thus type of motor goes.

I see that one can also get the 350 4 stroke often for a fair bit less cost 2nd hand which is always a factor. Powerparts tank also available for 350 I believe.

I only weigh 72 ish kgs and the 350 would definitely offer enough power for me for a bit of in town hooning and then short one day adventure rides and hopefully a few longer trips with trailering the bike to a starting point (no long tar sections).

Is the 350 likely to be a lot more "stressed" and need a lot more regular servicing and rebuilds?

Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: andrew5336 on January 16, 2018, 12:57:05 pm
Just to drive point home about longevity of the modern 450/500 engines and to show that you don't need much to adventurize it. This is Czech chick Gabriela Novotna riding Dakar as we speak (and doing bloody good job for a newbie), riding on Husky 450:

(https://v2-medias.aso.fr/core_app/img-motorSports-dak-jpg/05118003-fg09066/8594/0:0,1800:1200-1000-0-70/f2a77)


(https://instagram.fath3-2.fna.fbcdn.net/vp/36cc22618f7d8ebf36635b4794dbd250/5AE699F0/t51.2885-15/s640x640/sh0.08/e35/23825141_149650065655914_4129595086415593472_n.jpg)

Apart from the obligatory roadbook, antenas and stuff upfront, iritrack sitting at the back behind the seat and bashplate with required spare water, the bike looks basically stock, just with bigger Acerbis tank. Now I'm sure they service it after each stage, but those stages are something different than our dual sporting, and in the marathon stage - when there was no support for one night - they rode almost 1000 km of special over two days, and probably upwards of 500 km of liaisons. So to me this confirms that these bikes clearly can do it and do not require that much modification.

This is so cool - definitely seems that the barrier of cost in terms of bike at least is dropping. She's one of the Dakar Heroes on the daily highlights package.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: DCR on January 16, 2018, 01:01:28 pm
The longer this thread keeps going, the closer I get to a 500 as my second bike.


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 16, 2018, 01:03:43 pm
The longer this thread keeps going, the closer I get to a 500 as my second bike.


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Just Do it...then we can actually go ride then you will be waiting for me on the top of those nice rocky hills  :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: DCR on January 16, 2018, 01:24:23 pm
LOL, I am very tempted. We should also make a plan for a GS ride soon.


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 16, 2018, 01:28:01 pm
LOL, I am very tempted. We should also make a plan for a GS ride soon.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Yeah, come take the 690 for a spin.  ::angel9: laughing7:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: andrew5336 on January 16, 2018, 01:31:29 pm

And some of the hottest women on earth.

There are some, but I have to admit that I'd rather go a bit more east for that - Slovakia/Poland/Ukraine some such. And RSA is not bad either...

This perception is created by the fact that Czechs as one of the most atheistic people are very liberal on social issues, which allowed porn industry to blossom there, with Czech specific categories being prominent on most respectable porn websites ...  :imaposer:

OK, I am really going to stop with this crap now.  :peepwall:

Haha - I was there in 1999 and as a 14 year old my jaw was on the floor quite a lot.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Runner on January 18, 2018, 02:26:47 pm
R85 000
2016

Sold to Straatkat, thank you.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: m0lt3n on January 18, 2018, 02:44:30 pm
and a congrats then to Straatkat!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on January 19, 2018, 01:13:55 pm
Thanks to Xpat for alerting me so fast and Runner for selling me such a pristine fully farkled 500!...but that rimtape has to go!!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on January 19, 2018, 03:09:40 pm
Thanks to Xpat for alerting me so fast and Runner for selling me such a pristine fully farkled 500!...but that rimtape has to go!!
Virseker !
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 19, 2018, 03:18:05 pm
Thanks to Xpat for alerting me so fast and Runner for selling me such a pristine fully farkled 500!...but that rimtape has to go!!

Congrats Bertie ...your new bike is stunning
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on January 20, 2018, 08:43:18 am
Everybody is gushing so much over this bike, I just had to try it. Now for a nice long trip to Kaokoland! After reading Max the Panda's RR, and listening to Xpat way too much, it is bucketlist stuff! Methinks that the 500 is the new best choice for lightweight adventure riding. Now I just have to learn to pack with the same mindset! I have a GL Coyote and a nice small topbag from Toys to Go, and after reading about some guys not liking tankbags, I am a little loathe to get one, maybe it will work with my limited standing riding style, or maybe I just need to look for a really small one for essentials such as camera and snacks, but I already have a small handlebar bag for snacks...what say you guys? Tankbag or not?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on January 20, 2018, 08:49:48 am
Damaraland, you started this thread to economically adventurize your 500, I think I found the ultimate way to do it, buy fully farkled!!!
I was also debating the new vs used issue, but the current unavailability of 20l tanks for the '17/'18 models kinda settled that one and a '16 is has to be.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 20, 2018, 10:15:15 am
Bertie, try tankbag on 500 and decide based on that. MTP was using tankbag, so just because I don't like it doesn't mean it may not work for you.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on January 20, 2018, 02:07:17 pm
Hi everyone! We ride 500s to enjoy the riding, don't we, so the ideal is to make it as light and tough as possible. Most important is to tie everything down really well so you can ride the hell out of it and crash it without any issue.

With our Namibia trip, each person was carrying 8l water (plus 3 in camelbak), share of joint food and cooking equipment, a fuel bag for the few sections when we'd need to do more than the range of the 20l tank, a tent inner without fly sheet (normally I sleep out) and one's personal effects. The water was a safety issue - it's really fucking hot out there and a long way between water supplies in winter. It is heavy and takes a lot of space, and we wanted 3-4 days self sufficiency between water or food supplies, which is quite a lot, but that enhances how remote one can go dramatically.

I think the tank bag issue relates directly to one's body position on the bike. In a more 'enduro' position you really are not going to notice it, because your arse is back. I needed it for camera equipment, but if I hadn't been carrying that it wouldn't have been necessary.

I always ride with a back pack these days. We are all using a camelbak anyway, and I just don't really notice a bit of extra weight on my back when riding. It's nice to have the bike lighter and tighter, which allows jumps and wheelies, and limits the chance of swapping ends over really rough and loose terrain.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 20, 2018, 06:47:59 pm
You also get tank bags and then you get tank bags. I.e If of each doesn't work it doesn't mean another one would think.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: YoungGSer on January 22, 2018, 01:04:04 am
So it seems that the biggest aftermarket fuel tank available currently for this conversion (2018 model) is the 11.5L tank, that correct?  Some guys also mentioned earlier that the 17/18 models do not have long range tanks available.

What now, that defeats the whole object for me, what are the options now?  Or did I miss the answer somewhere?

Runner said earlier that he sell 15.5 litre tank for 2017/18. Not sure if that is good enough for you - will give you probably 300 -350 km per tank if ridden normaly.

But yes, it is a shame that there is not 20 litre tank as IMO they sold like hot cakes. They used to make 24litre tank for 525, then went to 20 litre for 500. Hopefully somebody (Acerbis or Safari Tanks) will realize wrongness of their ways and start making one - at the end of the day Adam Rieman is doing hell of a job promoting this bike for proper DS use.

Your option now is either to get 15.5 litre tank, or try to get second hand 2016 or earlier model and get 20 litre tank for that. There was an advert for Husky 501 in the Trade section with 20 hours on clock and big tank (not sure what size), so maybe check if it would work for you.

Sorry to tag on an old post here guys but I’m pretty sure iv seen an 4.1 gallon Acerbis tank for the 17’ KTM models advertised in the US. It’s just shy of 19L but that’s not to considering what the standard one is.

Looks like you can bolt the standard tank covers onto it as well.


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 22, 2018, 01:55:57 am
I don't thik so - here is their official catalog:

https://acerbisusa.uberflip.com/i/771033-15-fueltank-2017/2?m4= (https://acerbisusa.uberflip.com/i/771033-15-fueltank-2017/2?m4=)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Richard Smit on January 22, 2018, 07:03:16 am
And, here’s a link to the IMS webpage. It’s arguably, a better product than Acerbis.

https://www.imsproducts.com/Products/index.cfm?ManufacturerSet=KTM&maD=true&ModelSet=500%20EXC-F&modD=true&yeD=true&siD=true&TypeSet=Fuel%20Tank&SeriesSet=&sed=true&tyd=true
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on January 22, 2018, 08:11:02 am
Just like the Dakar KTM have been dominating the lightweight TDS (technical dual sport market). They have the best offerings by far. Six gears, huge aftermarket support, many come street legal and yes they are reliable. Mine included 2006 525 with 25 L Acerbis, 2007 with 25 L Acerbis (best of the lot) and a 2009 530 with think was a 13 L Acerbis. The 530 was a massive let down, don' buy this model too much issues. The 500 by all accounts are rock solid. Used Giant Loop luggage on all of them. Servicing have never been a problem I did a bash which included 2100km of dirt and tar and the bike came back with zero adjustment needed on the valves, even the oil still looked good. You really only need a bigger tank on these bikes all the other equipment are top notch and it has more than enough protection as stock.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on January 22, 2018, 08:18:18 am


Quote from: Straatkat on January 20, 2018, 08:43:18 am (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg3984780#msg3984780)>...what say you guys? Tankbag or not?

As Omninorm says, you get small tankbags, that work on the smaller tanks, and dont inhibit moving around on the bike, either at all, or very little compared to the larger tankbags...what helps a little is if they are vertically expandable, meaning they still don't interfere with riding position.
the smallest one from SW Motech/bags Connection - the Enduro Lite, is very compact, and does not get in the way, is just big enough for a few essentials.
Chris
Cheers, Chris


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on January 22, 2018, 08:42:06 am
I use a small little bag from Mr Price as a tank bag. I think it cost me 100 bucks or something. I like the Enduristan Sandstorm X4 too but it's a lot of money for a tiny little bag. I like having a tank bag for easy access to phone, ciggies, access card etc. especially when riding with MX kit
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: YoungGSer on January 22, 2018, 11:41:17 am
I don't thik so - here is their official catalog:

https://acerbisusa.uberflip.com/i/771033-15-fueltank-2017/2?m4= (https://acerbisusa.uberflip.com/i/771033-15-fueltank-2017/2?m4=)
One I saw on YouTube. Hope the link works.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1CTuCVhWRdw


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 22, 2018, 11:57:46 am
I don't thik so - here is their official catalog:

https://acerbisusa.uberflip.com/i/771033-15-fueltank-2017/2?m4= (https://acerbisusa.uberflip.com/i/771033-15-fueltank-2017/2?m4=)
One I saw on YouTube. Hope the link works.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1CTuCVhWRdw


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Well you seem to be right. It is weird that they don't have it on their own website and catalog.

I have to say that I don't understand the overcomplicated design - why they (and IMS) are trying to incorporate those plastic fins is beyond me. It looks crap to my eye, is going to get damaged (and can damage tank I suppose as those need to be attached to the tank. Really don't get it and hope they will come up with similar tank as current 19-20 liter one for 2016 and before, with simple and streamslined design.

But yes - good catch - it seems to be the only option (together iwth IMS) for bigger-ish tank for 2017 and onwards.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on January 22, 2018, 12:21:27 pm
Even Grant Langston rides a 500  :deal:

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 22, 2018, 12:39:25 pm
Damaraland, you started this thread to economically adventurize your 500, I think I found the ultimate way to do it, buy fully farkled!!!
I was also debating the new vs used issue, but the current unavailability of 20l tanks for the '17/'18 models kinda settled that one and a '16 is has to be.

This is true :laughing4: 

Unfortunately there's not a lot of these available 2nd hand in Namibia.  In this case I do not really mind buying new, as this will no doubt be my weapon of choice for the next couple of years.  Bit bummed that there's no proper large tanks available, but it is what it is and I'll just make a plan.  And it's still a bargain compared to what a 1x90 or GS will cost you, and for me I get infinitely more value.  Plus if I get any gravel highway urges the 990 is also still in the garage.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Runner on January 22, 2018, 01:45:49 pm
I don't thik so - here is their official catalog:

https://acerbisusa.uberflip.com/i/771033-15-fueltank-2017/2?m4= (https://acerbisusa.uberflip.com/i/771033-15-fueltank-2017/2?m4=)
One I saw on YouTube. Hope the link works.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1CTuCVhWRdw


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These are the 15.5 litre one I was refering to, my stock should be in by middle Feb again. I am all sold out on the first batch.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 23, 2018, 08:55:02 am
Getting this bad boy back on Topic.  The overriding advice from everyone who owns a 500 is KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid).  In this vein I will initially do the following modifications.

Luggage:
Altrider Holster System with 2 x 25L Dry Bags
2 x Fender packs
Back Pack

I have also considered the GL Coyote and the Mosko Moto.  Issues were capacity and price, respectively.  Also, after riding  with GL Great Basin the last 6 years I am ready to experiment with a different system.  Other advantage with the Altrider is that it's got holders for 2 x 2L bottles, which is handy considering limited fuel capacity.  Fender packs will store tools etc.  I am also replacing my Camelback with a proper backpack, which will allow me to use a larger bladder (3L) as well as store lighter items on my back.

Fuel
Acerbis 15.5L tank

Now this is a bit of a problem, only two options available for the '18.  Acerbis being one and IMS the other.  Cons with Acerbis were isolated QC issues (guy on ADV rider had a leaking issue where screw turns into plastic) and limited capacity, compared to the IMS (17.1L).  In the end I was swayed by the fact that I can get Acerbis from a reputable dealer in SA (this means you @Runner :-)) as opposed to having to import the IMS.  With the IMS one also needs additional KTM parts to install.

Items still for Consideration
Tubliss conversion.  I don't have a problem with swapping and fixing tubes, also not sure if there's anyone in NA that can install it for me
Larger foot pegs.  Have to ride and see how the stock pegs are.
Steering damper.  No idea if it's necessary, will have to ride and see.
FMF pipe.  Possible weight savings.  Mostly just because I love the sound.
Clutch, disk etc guards.  Not convinced that it's necessary, adds weight.

Questions

What tyres do they come out with stock?  Are they any good?  What tyres do you guys run on it?  I care little about behaviour on tar, they must just be very effective in sand and mud.

What air filters do you use?

Feedback and opinions very welcome.




Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ChrisL - DUSTRIDERS on January 23, 2018, 10:15:56 am
Damaraland some products from Enduristan that would work very well on the 500.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ChrisL - DUSTRIDERS on January 23, 2018, 10:19:00 am
Enduristan Hurricane and Hydrapacks avialable soon. Can be ordered with or without hydrapack. Avialable in 15 and 25 lt. Lyndon Poskitt used one in the Dakar.



Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on January 23, 2018, 10:22:54 am
Even Grant Langston rides a 500  :deal:



Nice looking bike.
I just hope they didn't do all that bling and just ride it on the terrain shown in the video.
Even a R1 can ride there.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on January 23, 2018, 12:09:01 pm
Even Grant Langston rides a 500  :deal:



Nice looking bike.
I just hope they didn't do all that bling and just ride it on the terrain shown in the video.
Even a R1 can ride there.
Yes mostly punting the accessories he sells via Langston Racing
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on January 23, 2018, 12:28:47 pm
For those who're thinking of the new models have a look here: http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/ktm-500-oz-adventure-bikes.1196072/ (http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/ktm-500-oz-adventure-bikes.1196072/) - don't remember how far in but they get on the 2017s.

Downsides - Acerbis is 15.5l and IMS 17l so no really big tanks, and the seat is a thin plank, although the previous gen seat is fine, so maybe it's better than they look.

Upsides - longer service intervals, even more economical (so maybe tank is less of an issue), and handle even better - although for touring that's less of an issue. Oh, and they look even better with those plastic shrouds over the tank.

Motonomad used the new ones in S-Am recently and were raving.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: husky on January 23, 2018, 02:13:12 pm
Horrible bikes - sell yours immediately and show no interest in buying such an evil thing! >:D

Seriously, very interesting thread and maybe I need a replacement for my venerable 640 and 525 after all.

One question - I haven't seen any mention of a cush drive or sprocket (sorry if it;has been covered).  What do the knowledgeable think about the necessity for this?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on January 23, 2018, 02:24:53 pm
Horrible bikes - sell yours immediately and show no interest in buying such an evil thing! >:D

Seriously, very interesting thread and maybe I need a replacement for my venerable 640 and 525 after all.

One question - I haven't seen any mention of a cush drive or sprocket (sorry if it;has been covered).  What do the knowledgeable think about the necessity for this?
Don't need it unless you plan on only riding tar
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: YoungGSer on January 23, 2018, 03:27:26 pm
Why are people saying that the largest Acerbis and IMS are 15.5L and 17l respectively?!. 4.1 Gallons = 18.6l, unless the full pump takes up a lot of space!


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 23, 2018, 03:51:50 pm
@Damaraland: my 2c: I would stick with standard pipe - better for DS use IMO, because of lower noise - which is desirable in off the beaten track areas. The pipe isn't particularly quiet anyway. Also, this is not 690, which pipe has catalytic converter in it and has to be changed because it would melt the rear end if not rectified. And, not sure if you will not need to change the map with new pipe. And yours is EXC, which are made deliberately difficult to change the map (unlike XC-W), in order to keep them 'legal'.

I have steering damper - helps probably a bit with fatigue in deep sand, rocks, but not absolutely necessary. I have standard pegs, so far didn't feel need for change.

@YoungGSer: Don't know about the tanks size, but what I know is that my tank is advertised as 20 liter tank by Acerbis (`5.3 gallon) and as 19 liter tank by KTM in their Powerparts catalog. Exactly the same tank - I'm assuming 1 litre is taken by fuel pump assembly. It will be probably similar with the 4.1 gallon tank. Not sure if the volume advertised by IMS is with or without fuel pump.

Edit: By the way 4.1 gallon according to my google-fu = 15.5 litre. (that is US gallon, not british one). Are you sure you are calculating it right?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: YoungGSer on January 23, 2018, 04:03:59 pm
@Damaraland: my 2c: I would stick with standard pipe - better for DS use IMO, because of lower noise - which is desirable in off the beaten track areas. The pipe isn't particularly quiet anyway. Also, this is not 690, which pipe has catalytic converter in it and has to be changed because it would melt the rear end if not rectified. And, not sure if you will not need to change the map with new pipe. And yours is EXC, which are made deliberately difficult to change the map (unlike XC-W), in order to keep them 'legal'.

I have steering damper - helps probably a bit with fatigue in deep sand, rocks, but not absolutely necessary. I have standard pegs, so far didn't feel need for change.

@YoungGSer: Don't know about the tanks size, but what I know is that my tank is advertised as 20 liter tank by Acerbis (`5.3 gallon) and as 19 liter tank by KTM in their Powerparts catalog. Exactly the same tank - I'm assuming 1 litre is taken by fuel pump assembly. It will be probably similar with the 4.1 gallon tank. Not sure if the volume advertised by IMS is with or without fuel pump.

Edit: By the way 4.1 gallon according to my google-fu = 15.5 litre. (that is US gallon, not british one). Are you sure you are calculating it right?
Ah that must be my mistake, I live in the UK so always assume things to be in metric !, bloody Americans and their stupid measuring systems


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 23, 2018, 04:05:39 pm
On my 500 I run the standard exhaust and I love it - nice and quiet (but defintely not silent) and it is very light

My brother has a Husky 501 (exact same engine as KTM 500) with FMF pipe and it is so loud it is horrible - defintely not recommended for DS riding because besides annoying others it fatigues the rider considerably

I had a steering damper on my ex 525 (only because I bought it like that). I kept the damper when I sold the bike with plans to fit it on my 500 but so far there has been no need - my bike is very stable in all terrain including thick soft sand at Atlantis dunes where I ride regularly

I was fortunate enough to get a set of KTM wide rally pegs for free off a 990 that I sold - they are nice but I would not pay R2K plus for them - the std pegs work great

I have TUbliss on my 500 and I really like it - I rode 5000 km during Amageza 2015 with this on my 525 with no problems whatsoever. Once you get to grips with fitment and pressures then it is awesome - I run 1 bar on the road if I need to go fast but otherwise front and back wheels sit at 0,5 bar all the time ...I have even deflated the rear to 0 bar in soft chewed up sand and the extra traction given is awesome

I went to look at all kinds of soft luggage yesterday and decided on the new GL Coyote with roll top (R5000)...the ALTRIDER system is R1000 more and in my opinion you get a lot less ...in comparison the quality and finish of the GL looks far superior to me (FFS when did bike bags cost R5000 plus ...I nearly shat myself)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 23, 2018, 04:06:09 pm
@Damaraland: my 2c: I would stick with standard pipe - better for DS use IMO, because of lower noise - which is desirable in off the beaten track areas. The pipe isn't particularly quiet anyway. Also, this is not 690, which pipe has catalytic converter in it and has to be changed because it would melt the rear end if not rectified. And, not sure if you will not need to change the map with new pipe. And yours is EXC, which are made deliberately difficult to change the map (unlike XC-W), in order to keep them 'legal'.

I have steering damper - helps probably a bit with fatigue in deep sand, rocks, but not absolutely necessary. I have standard pegs, so far didn't feel need for change.

@YoungGSer: Don't know about the tanks size, but what I know is that my tank is advertised as 20 liter tank by Acerbis (`5.3 gallon) and as 19 liter tank by KTM in their Powerparts catalog. Exactly the same tank - I'm assuming 1 litre is taken by fuel pump assembly. It will be probably similar with the 4.1 gallon tank. Not sure if the volume advertised by IMS is with or without fuel pump.

Edit: By the way 4.1 gallon according to my google-fu = 15.5 litre. (that is US gallon, not british one). Are you sure you are calculating it right?
Ah that must be my mistake, I live in the UK so always assume things to be in metric !, bloody Americans and their stupid measuring systems


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So the potentially annoying bit is - if Acerbis follows the same logic as with 20 liter tank - i.e. specs volume without fuel pump, the 4.1 gallon one will have only about 14.5 litres of real fuel as about liter will be taken by fuel pump.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on January 23, 2018, 04:22:23 pm
I cannot see the electric fuel in-tank fuel pump on these bikes displacing more than a total of 300cc.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on January 23, 2018, 10:59:31 pm
I see you're keeping an eye on this Dan. I suspect like me you are more than just a little bit jealous of these lucky buggers on their man sized 500's. 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 24, 2018, 04:01:10 am
I cannot see the electric fuel in-tank fuel pump on these bikes displacing more than a total of 300cc.

100%

I had to remove my fuel pump from my std tank to refit in my big tank - the entire pump assembly could easily fit into a small coffee cup
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: KTM Liep on January 24, 2018, 06:43:02 am
Good morning,
My 500 xcw with all the extras is up for sale,and I did what you want to do for the same reason on a smaller bike.
My phone is 083 280 4886
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on January 24, 2018, 07:11:14 am
I think the difference between KTM’s 19l and Acerbis’ 20l is just the level they measure it to. It’s the same tank and I think the 20l is more accurate.

Agreed with Justin - definitely don’t need steering damper for dual sport - did entire northern Namibia in river beds without missing one - but would fit for rally racing.

My advice: don’t fit any extra crap you don’t need. The standard pegs are really fine, so is the exhaust and pretty much everything else.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 24, 2018, 07:11:46 am
Good morning,
My 500 xcw with all the extras is up for sale,and I did what you want to do for the same reason on a smaller bike.
My phone is 083 280 4886

Here are pics of KTM Liep's bike (108 hours and 5 900 km) - price is R90 000 - please call him on 083 280 4886
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on January 24, 2018, 07:15:19 am

I went to look at all kinds of soft luggage yesterday and decided on the new GL Coyote with roll top (R5000)...the ALTRIDER system is R1000 more and in my opinion you get a lot less ...in comparison the quality and finish of the GL looks far superior to me (FFS when did bike bags cost R5000 plus ...I nearly shat myself)

You bought new????? Are you running a fever?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 24, 2018, 07:18:55 am

I went to look at all kinds of soft luggage yesterday and decided on the new GL Coyote with roll top (R5000)...the ALTRIDER system is R1000 more and in my opinion you get a lot less ...in comparison the quality and finish of the GL looks far superior to me (FFS when did bike bags cost R5000 plus ...I nearly shat myself)

You bought new????? Are you running a fever?

I have not actually paid for it and collected it yet ...I'm feeling quite ill at the thought of parting with so much money for a fucken bag
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on January 24, 2018, 07:19:57 am
What will KTMLiep be using from now on for his adventure riding, or is he buying a new 500?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on January 24, 2018, 07:23:05 am

I went to look at all kinds of soft luggage yesterday and decided on the new GL Coyote with roll top (R5000)...the ALTRIDER system is R1000 more and in my opinion you get a lot less ...in comparison the quality and finish of the GL looks far superior to me (FFS when did bike bags cost R5000 plus ...I nearly shat myself)

You bought new????? Are you running a fever?

I have not actually paid for it and collected it yet ...I'm feeling quite ill at the thought of parting with so much money for a fucken bag

Obviously a bumper Gumtree month. You can buy me lunch too then while you're not right in the head.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 24, 2018, 07:27:20 am
What will KTMLiep be using from now on for his adventure riding, or is he buying a new 500?

He has a number of other bikes and bought the 640 from me that you see in the background
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 24, 2018, 07:27:56 am

I went to look at all kinds of soft luggage yesterday and decided on the new GL Coyote with roll top (R5000)...the ALTRIDER system is R1000 more and in my opinion you get a lot less ...in comparison the quality and finish of the GL looks far superior to me (FFS when did bike bags cost R5000 plus ...I nearly shat myself)

You bought new????? Are you running a fever?

I have not actually paid for it and collected it yet ...I'm feeling quite ill at the thought of parting with so much money for a fucken bag

Obviously a bumper Gumtree month. You can buy me lunch too then while you're not right in the head.

Gumtree saved my life
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 24, 2018, 09:12:41 am
On my 500 I run the standard exhaust and I love it - nice and quiet (but defintely not silent) and it is very light

My brother has a Husky 501 (exact same engine as KTM 500) with FMF pipe and it is so loud it is horrible - defintely not recommended for DS riding because besides annoying others it fatigues the rider considerably

I had a steering damper on my ex 525 (only because I bought it like that). I kept the damper when I sold the bike with plans to fit it on my 500 but so far there has been no need - my bike is very stable in all terrain including thick soft sand at Atlantis dunes where I ride regularly

I was fortunate enough to get a set of KTM wide rally pegs for free off a 990 that I sold - they are nice but I would not pay R2K plus for them - the std pegs work great

I have TUbliss on my 500 and I really like it - I rode 5000 km during Amageza 2015 with this on my 525 with no problems whatsoever. Once you get to grips with fitment and pressures then it is awesome - I run 1 bar on the road if I need to go fast but otherwise front and back wheels sit at 0,5 bar all the time ...I have even deflated the rear to 0 bar in soft chewed up sand and the extra traction given is awesome

I went to look at all kinds of soft luggage yesterday and decided on the new GL Coyote with roll top (R5000)...the ALTRIDER system is R1000 more and in my opinion you get a lot less ...in comparison the quality and finish of the GL looks far superior to me (FFS when did bike bags cost R5000 plus ...I nearly shat myself)

Thanks for the feedback, especially re the FMF pipe.  Also not going to bother with a damper for now then, will see how it rides.

As far as the luggage system is concerned, am going for the Altrider but quoted prices is around R1500 less than the GL, as I'm just using the holster system with dry bags.  No issue with GL, have been using their GB the last 6 years (testament to GL build quality!), but GL for me is getting cumbersome and I'm ready to try something else.  Apart from price the other thing that swayed me was the 11L extra capacity on the Altrider, as well as the abaility to carry 4L fuel extra.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on January 24, 2018, 09:46:38 am

I went to look at all kinds of soft luggage yesterday and decided on the new GL Coyote with roll top (R5000)...the ALTRIDER system is R1000 more and in my opinion you get a lot less ...in comparison the quality and finish of the GL looks far superior to me (FFS when did bike bags cost R5000 plus ...I nearly shat myself)

You bought new????? Are you running a fever?
Some idiots needs to buy new for others to buy 2nd hand bargains  :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on January 30, 2018, 08:16:37 pm
Collected my 500 today from Runner. Once I got it home I went for a short ride, it feels MUCH lighter than my 610 Husky, and goes like hell. I am probably going to have to do some riding before I feel comfortable on it, but at the moment it is the favourite bike in my stable. I can get used to it in no time.
Just a few questions for all the old hands out there, what are your views about neoprene boots for fork stantions?
Saw Xpats 500 at Runner and he had a new Mitas CO2 tyre on the back, fuuuck it looks like it could rotate the earth!
From what I read the only weak point of this bike is dirty fuel that messes with the fuel pump and injector, but the guys at EMD says there is a filter in the tank before the pump, so that would in theory take care of bad fuel. Was looking for an in tank filler filter, but apparently Twin Air made one but it is no longer available. Most generators have one in their filler necks. In my mind it is better to catch dirty fuel before it enters the tank,  not after the pump and before the injector,  which is a high pressure line. Would like to hear some views on that.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 30, 2018, 09:09:32 pm
Neoprene boots to fork stanchions are great - I have just fitted a pair to my 500 and have had them on all my previous dirt bikes - they are excellent at keeping sand and grit away from fork seals and thus preventing the seals from not seating properly on the stanchions and causing fork oil to leak - in my opinion it is a must

This is my "pooratech" solution to fuel filtration

Because of the FI and the pump inside the tank it is very difficult to add another filter before the pump ... I'm holding thumbs that the std filter before the pump will be okay and especially if I use disposable paper coffee filters when filling up in dodgy ares with suspect fuel quality ...in this way I am filtering the fuel before it goes into the tank

Don't waste your money on those mini Golan fuel filters after the pump before the injector ...I have had experience with them and they are overpriced and shit

The real "weak link" in the fuel system is the fuel injector itself - it has the most tiny spray nozzles in the injector that get blocked up with shit in the fuel

The efficiency of a filter is directly related to the size of the surface area of the filtration material - I have opened the Golan and it has the filtration surface area about the size of a R1 coin ... very small

On my 500 I use the smallest high pressure fuel injection fuel filter from a car that I could find (with a paper filtration surface area at least 100 times bigger than the Golan) and it cost me less than R100 from my local spares shop

Car filters like this easily do up to 50 000 km in cars before they are changed

I have done 3000 km on my bike since I fitted this and it works beautifully - I replaced a section of fuel hose from tank outlet to throttle body - I made it longer with a nice big loop to avoid any chance of kinks in the hose
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 30, 2018, 09:23:15 pm
I will get the neoprene socks as well. Talied to Hilton, who is not fan, but recons they will help mostly with sand. I had leaking forks on my last trip in bots, but that was from cotton mud. Neoprene is probably not going to help with that as that stuff hardens into concrete, but should help in sand which is majority of my riding.

Hilton recommended, to use only half the length of the sock, so ona can still spot a leak early enough.

I forgot to ask runner today - Bertie, is he selling the socks?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: exkdx on January 30, 2018, 09:41:00 pm
I got this product from Runner. "Seal doctor".
I saw it on Lyndon Poskitt's bike. You use it to clean the seal if you pick up a leak due to dirt behind the seal.
A better solution imo
https://shop.riskracing.com/products/seal-doctor
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 30, 2018, 09:50:56 pm
I got this product from Runner. "Seal doctor".
I saw it on Lyndon Poskitt's bike. You use it to clean the seal if you pick up a leak due to dirt behind the seal.
A better solution imo
https://shop.riskracing.com/products/seal-doctor

Ehm, i dont think so - that is if you meant that this is better solution than socks. Two different solutions to two different problems. Socks basically extend the life of your seals by preventing sand/dirt getting to the seals - up to a point of course. Ie they are prevention.

While the tool you posted is used to fix already leaking fork - ie once the problem already occured. I agree it is handy thing to have once you are in trouble already - but it complements the sock and doesnt provide prevention. I may take one with me on next trip, but i already bought feeler gauges in maun when my fork started leakung and tgey worked as well, cleaning the grit stuck in the seals.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: exkdx on January 30, 2018, 10:18:04 pm
I got this product from Runner. "Seal doctor".
I saw it on Lyndon Poskitt's bike. You use it to clean the seal if you pick up a leak due to dirt behind the seal.
A better solution imo
https://shop.riskracing.com/products/seal-doctor

Ehm, i dont think so - that is if you meant that this is better solution than socks. Two different solutions to two different problems. Socks basically extend the life of your seals by preventing sand/dirt getting to the seals - up to a point of course. Ie they are prevention.

While the tool you posted is used to fix already leaking fork - ie once the problem already occured. I agree it is handy thing to have once you are in trouble already - but it complements the sock and doesnt provide prevention. I may take one with me on next trip, but i already bought feeler gauges in maun when my fork started leakung and tgey worked as well, cleaning the grit stuck in the seals.

Correct Martin - Its a cure and do not prevent the dirt to enter.
I have used neoprene socks before on my enduro bike and stopped because it just becomes another trap for dirt and needs to be cleaned regularly too.
Now I just clean my seals after every ride and very rarely have leaking seals.
The Seal doctor is just easier to use than feeler gauge.. :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on January 30, 2018, 10:18:33 pm
On our last Swazi hardcore ride we also encountered that thick black cotton mud, and it is there that my Husky forks started leaking, the mud was caked on the wheel and it scoured its way past the stanchions, the sock would definitely have helped there, even if it was stuffed afterwards, Runner keeps them, got some today, he has short ones and long ones, I prefer the long ones as they protect the whole leg. On a previous Swazi trip, Mark Taylor saw the socks on my Husky and told me to cut them off because dirt apparently gets into them and scours away at the legs, but when I cut them off it was perfectly clean inside, go figure! He must have some experience with them that was not good, but anything that protects the legs and the seal is a winner in my books. Will be fitting mine soon on the 500.
Also bought one of those cleaning thingy's and will clean the Husky forks that have a bad leak and report back on how it worked. Also check the surface of the legs for marks of course. That black mud is bad news!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on January 30, 2018, 10:23:53 pm
On the Seal Doctor, it is a plastic profile that you have to push in behind the lips of the seal, and those lips are rather fragile and damage easily, so repeated use would definitely at some stage damage those fragile lips of the seal. Might work once or twice.....
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on January 30, 2018, 10:27:00 pm
I got this product from Runner. "Seal doctor".
I saw it on Lyndon Poskitt's bike. You use it to clean the seal if you pick up a leak due to dirt behind the seal.
A better solution imo
https://shop.riskracing.com/products/seal-doctor

Ehm, i dont think so - that is if you meant that this is better solution than socks. Two different solutions to two different problems. Socks basically extend the life of your seals by preventing sand/dirt getting to the seals - up to a point of course. Ie they are prevention.

While the tool you posted is used to fix already leaking fork - ie once the problem already occured. I agree it is handy thing to have once you are in trouble already - but it complements the sock and doesnt provide prevention. I may take one with me on next trip, but i already bought feeler gauges in maun when my fork started leakung and tgey worked as well, cleaning the grit stuck in the seals.

Yes those are for cleaning already leaking fork seals, but I suppose they can also be used for cleaning the dust seals to prevent grit reaching the fork seals?

In place of those I have used the plastic from a milk carton cut to a similar profile.  Works ok but gets bent out of shape later. I suppose you can also use a piece from a 2l coke bottel which you can get anywhere.

Cleaning the mud when you stop before it dries with water from your hydration pack or whatever source goes a long way to keep the seals clean.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 30, 2018, 10:28:22 pm
@exkdx: im sure the thingy is much better than the gauges - for some reason the seal doctor wasnt available in maun - go figure  ;)

Though im not sure about clearing my seals after every ride. In my experience when you stick those things there, you are going to get small oil leak as they open gap between fork ans seal - however small. Not a big deal if seal is already leaking, but why induce your own leak, if there isnt one in the first place? Or are you able to clean those seals without letting oil out of fork - admitedly small amount?

Just curious - i may have been doing it wrong with those gauges, but runner also sad that cleaning will inevitably let some oil out.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 30, 2018, 10:30:37 pm
And i agree with you on the grit getting caught in socks, and potentially exacerbrating the problem. They need to be kept clean.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on January 30, 2018, 11:21:53 pm
And i agree with you on the grit getting caught in socks, and potentially exacerbrating the problem. They need to be kept clean.

This is the thing, diirt gets caught in the socks while on a trip and sits there like 1200 grit emerypaper, slowly scouring away at the forks. I won't fit them.

I use a feeler guage for cleaning out fork seals, very seldom needed.

Also watch out for small rocks being thrown into the frame, etc and bouncing back into the rear of the fork, causing small pitmarks. This is often mistaken for leaking oil seals.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 30, 2018, 11:37:47 pm
And i agree with you on the grit getting caught in socks, and potentially exacerbrating the problem. They need to be kept clean.

This is the thing, diirt gets caught in the socks while on a trip and sits there like 1200 grit emerypaper, slowly scouring away at the forks. I won't fit them.

I use a feeler guage for cleaning out fork seals, very seldom needed.

Also watch out for small rocks being thrown into the frame, etc and bouncing back into the rear of the fork, causing small pitmarks. This is often mistaken for leaking oil seals.

Fair point. It depends little bit on intended rifing. If it is mostly dry, i think socks work alright. I would be much more cautios if riding in wet, and doubt they will do much good in cotton mud.

But we are heading to kaokoland in march, where i think they will help - as you know it is mostly dry there.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on January 31, 2018, 03:59:08 pm
Seeing as the '18 does not come with a bashplate, what are you guys running?

The KTM one (pn 79603090044) is plastic, not sure if that is strong enough to take hits from rocks etc?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on January 31, 2018, 04:24:03 pm
I have the aluminium (or is it steel?) one from KTM Powerparts. But I believe plastic Hyde or similar will work just fine - I used one on TE630 and it survived number of rock bashings in Lesotho and Kaokoland just fine.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on January 31, 2018, 05:19:49 pm
My preference is the the thick black plastic bashplates from HYDE - not the prettiest but they do the job very well and don't dent and deform like the metal ones when you hit something hard because they flex and bounce back into shape ... and they are also quiet ...for me there is nothing worse than the ping ping from stones hitting a metal bashplate or a horrid resonance that often develops from metal bashplate mounted to frame below buzzing engine also mounted to same frame ... drives me mad

and the HYDE parts are usually cheaper than the fancier less functional bling
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: exkdx on January 31, 2018, 09:48:25 pm
@exkdx: im sure the thingy is much better than the gauges - for some reason the seal doctor wasnt available in maun - go figure  ;)

Though im not sure about clearing my seals after every ride. In my experience when you stick those things there, you are going to get small oil leak as they open gap between fork ans seal - however small. Not a big deal if seal is already leaking, but why induce your own leak, if there isnt one in the first place? Or are you able to clean those seals without letting oil out of fork - admitedly small amount?

Just curious - i may have been doing it wrong with those gauges, but runner also sad that cleaning will inevitably let some oil out.
@ Xpat
While you are busy with the cleaning process there is a few drops of oil coming out, especially if there is a air pressure build-up inside the fork, but the amount of oil is minute. Once you remove the feeler gauge (or seal dr) the seal lip returns to original position, and if you are careful no damage will occur.
Ive been doing it on my enduro bike for more than 2 years with no problems and saving a few sets of seals in the process...my experience
I don't do it as often on my DS bike because of riding conditions...usually less mud. IMO is mud biggest the culprit for getting dirt behind the seal
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on January 31, 2018, 10:53:04 pm
Did a quick trip to Magaliesburg today, it is only about 12km from where I live, all off-road, wow it really stops well and is so light compared to my other bikes, unexpectedly came up on a culvert next to the railway line and it was full of water and mud...doing about 80km/h and it stopped before I went swimming, quite impressive how much better a light bike stops. On the way back I klapped it on a tar stretch and saw 160 on the clock! Felt like it ran into a soft limiter at 160.When I got home I checked the gearing, it is 14/50. Feels really comfortable cruising at 120-135. Found myself doing 120 on some dirt sections and it was a non-event.
Does anybody know how to work the speedo, mine shows hours in the right window, what other functions does it show and how to change it?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 01, 2018, 05:11:36 am
On all of Team 525s Amageza bikes we ran a 14 48 sprocket combo and this works really well for all conditions - I have this gearing now on my 500 and I have seen 176 kph on a GPS flat out in 6th gear on the R355 gravel road between Ceres and Calvinia  (I don't usually ride like this but I had to find out how fast it could go ...I don't like riding light bikes like this so fast because they dance and weave around a lot and it makes me nervous)

There were 2 or 3 different instrument clusters depending on year of your bike - usually the far right button is used to scroll through hours, total mileage, trip 1, trip 2 and stopwatch and if you hold it down on trip 1, 2 and stopwatch it resets to zero

My 500 is one of the first - my cluster only shows total hours and total mileage 

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 01, 2018, 08:11:45 am
My preference is the the thick black plastic bashplates from HYDE - not the prettiest but they do the job very well and don't dent and deform like the metal ones when you hit something hard because they flex and bounce back into shape ... and they are also quiet ...for me there is nothing worse than the ping ping from stones hitting a metal bashplate or a horrid resonance that often develops from metal bashplate mounted to frame below buzzing engine also mounted to same frame ... drives me mad

and the HYDE parts are usually cheaper than the fancier less functional bling

Thanks, none of my usual vendors seems to sell the Hyde for the 500, anyone you can recommend?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 01, 2018, 08:34:59 am
My bike has one of those ridiculously expensive back sprockets on, so I probably won't change it now, but next time when I need sprockets probably go with a 49 or 48 rear. It will definitely be less brutal and be more relaxed on long stretches.
As for my instrument cluster, figured most stuff out, what is A1 and S1/S2. Didn't start the bike, one is probably revs? A1revs and S1 and S2 stopwatches...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 01, 2018, 08:39:33 am
My preference is the the thick black plastic bashplates from HYDE - not the prettiest but they do the job very well and don't dent and deform like the metal ones when you hit something hard because they flex and bounce back into shape ... and they are also quiet ...for me there is nothing worse than the ping ping from stones hitting a metal bashplate or a horrid resonance that often develops from metal bashplate mounted to frame below buzzing engine also mounted to same frame ... drives me mad

and the HYDE parts are usually cheaper than the fancier less functional bling

Thanks, none of my usual vendors seems to sell the Hyde for the 500, anyone you can recommend?


Try EMD racing or Runner(Off Road Cycles) or even Hyde directly, seem to remember they have them on their website.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Mooch on February 01, 2018, 08:48:44 am
sub...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on February 01, 2018, 09:23:53 am


Quote from: Damaraland on Today at 08:11:45 am (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg3992390#msg3992390)


>Quote from: JustBendIt on Yesterday at 05:19:49 pm (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg3992107#msg3992107)
My preference is the the thick black plastic bashplates from HYDE - not the prettiest but they do the job very well and don't dent and deform like the metal ones when you hit something hard because they flex and bounce back into shape ... and they are also quiet ...for me there is nothing worse than the ping ping from stones hitting a metal bashplate or a horrid resonance that often develops from metal bashplate mounted to frame below buzzing engine also mounted to same frame ... drives me mad

and the HYDE parts are usually cheaper than the fancier less functional bling



Thanks, none of my usual vendors seems to sell the Hyde for the 500, anyone you can recommend?

thanks for your e-mail, have quoted you on the 500 Hyde bashplate
(I think black is in stock, but Orange (or red or blue) needs to be ordered in...)
Chris & Team



Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 01, 2018, 09:37:06 am


Quote from: Damaraland on Today at 08:11:45 am (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg3992390#msg3992390)


>Quote from: JustBendIt on Yesterday at 05:19:49 pm (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg3992107#msg3992107)
My preference is the the thick black plastic bashplates from HYDE - not the prettiest but they do the job very well and don't dent and deform like the metal ones when you hit something hard because they flex and bounce back into shape ... and they are also quiet ...for me there is nothing worse than the ping ping from stones hitting a metal bashplate or a horrid resonance that often develops from metal bashplate mounted to frame below buzzing engine also mounted to same frame ... drives me mad

and the HYDE parts are usually cheaper than the fancier less functional bling



Thanks, none of my usual vendors seems to sell the Hyde for the 500, anyone you can recommend?

thanks for your e-mail, have quoted you on the 500 Hyde bashplate
(I think black is in stock, but Orange (or red or blue) needs to be ordered in...)
Chris & Team


No sane person would put an orange skid plate on a bike  :pot:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 01, 2018, 09:37:34 am
My bike has one of those ridiculously expensive back sprockets on, so I probably won't change it now, but next time when I need sprockets probably go with a 49 or 48 rear. It will definitely be less brutal and be more relaxed on long stretches.
As for my instrument cluster, figured most stuff out, what is A1 and S1/S2. Didn't start the bike, one is probably revs?
I still see rim tape  ;)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on February 01, 2018, 09:44:42 am
Sidetrack wrote: 'No sane person would put an orange skid plate on a bike "

HeHe - since we are in the business of S-A-L-E-S, we sell ANY colour, take this Snap Jack for Skinny van Schalkwyk, for example....!
Chris






Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 01, 2018, 09:49:16 am
Sidetrack wrote: 'No sane person would put an orange skid plate on a bike "

HeHe - since we are in the business of S-A-L-E-S, we sell ANY colour, take this Snap Jack for Skinny van Schalkwyk, for example....!
Chris

I know some people take orange to the extreme
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TK on February 01, 2018, 09:51:37 am
Just bend it. Please give Tony (TK) 082 850 3456 a call urgently.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 01, 2018, 11:30:01 pm
Tony, something is whispering in my ear that you are about to make a subtle move over to the dark side. Just remember, motorcycles are dangerous!...and orange ones kill you outright if not careful.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Runner on February 02, 2018, 07:02:19 am
My preference is the the thick black plastic bashplates from HYDE - not the prettiest but they do the job very well and don't dent and deform like the metal ones when you hit something hard because they flex and bounce back into shape ... and they are also quiet ...for me there is nothing worse than the ping ping from stones hitting a metal bashplate or a horrid resonance that often develops from metal bashplate mounted to frame below buzzing engine also mounted to same frame ... drives me mad

and the HYDE parts are usually cheaper than the fancier less functional bling

Thanks, none of my usual vendors seems to sell the Hyde for the 500, anyone you can recommend?

Morning

We have the Enduro Engineering Alli bashplates in stock, both options, and can order from Hyde.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: WildWood on February 02, 2018, 09:34:53 am
I'm still trying to be convinced the 500's are a better option than the 690/701's for hardcore dual sport adventures. Obviously for hectic rocks in Lesotho but for stuff like Kaokoland, Hondeklip Bay, Botswana etc the 690 is a breeze. Perhaps a tad slower on the rocks of van Zyls but touring ain't racing. The reality for me is no matter how tough your chosen adventure there is always a lot of easier easier dirt and often roads between the rough bits and the race oriented newer 500's are just a ball-ache on road.

I'll gladly do 800km in a day on a 690 but on a 500 it's a chore.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on February 02, 2018, 09:40:12 am
I'm still trying to be convinced the 500's are a better option than the 690/701's for hardcore dual sport adventures. Obviously for hectic rocks in Lesotho but for stuff like Kaokoland, Hondeklip Bay, Botswana etc the 690 is a breeze. Perhaps a tad slower on the rocks of van Zyls but touring ain't racing. The reality for me is no matter how tough your chosen adventure there is always a lot of easier easier dirt and often roads between the rough bits and the race oriented newer 500's are just a ball-ache on road.
I'll gladly do 800km in a day on a 690 but on a 500 it's a chore.

It is all about the application.  A 500 is not for an 800km a day trips. 
For me it is more a case of having a road legal enduro bike and ride enduro type terrain, but one that can do a 100km-200km dirt road if need to.

Edit: In future maybe a 450/500 class bike combined with a 790 or similar would be ideal for me.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 02, 2018, 09:49:03 am
I'm still trying to be convinced the 500's are a better option than the 690/701's for hardcore dual sport adventures. Obviously for hectic rocks in Lesotho but for stuff like Kaokoland, Hondeklip Bay, Botswana etc the 690 is a breeze. Perhaps a tad slower on the rocks of van Zyls but touring ain't racing. The reality for me is no matter how tough your chosen adventure there is always a lot of easier easier dirt and often roads between the rough bits and the race oriented newer 500's are just a ball-ache on road.

I'll gladly do 800km in a day on a 690 but on a 500 it's a chore.

You're not wrong, that said, anyone that gets a 500 to do 800km highway a day needs to get his or her head read.

Personally I find our Namibian gravel highways that everyone loves so much a bit boring.  If I feel the urge to do it I have the 990, which again is an much better touring machine than the 690.  So if I do VZP I will for example trailer to Okangwati and have a blast over the rocks and in the rivers.  Obviously if highway touring is a big thing for you then the 690 makes more sense.  Personally I am not going to let the easy sections influence my decision as that is exactly the sections I want to avoid.

I just find it awesome that there are machines to cater for almost every requirement nowadays, and despite the above, if I had more money there would be a 701 keeping the 990 and 500 company.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 02, 2018, 10:07:05 am
I'm still trying to be convinced the 500's are a better option than the 690/701's for hardcore dual sport adventures. Obviously for hectic rocks in Lesotho but for stuff like Kaokoland, Hondeklip Bay, Botswana etc the 690 is a breeze. Perhaps a tad slower on the rocks of van Zyls but touring ain't racing. The reality for me is no matter how tough your chosen adventure there is always a lot of easier easier dirt and often roads between the rough bits and the race oriented newer 500's are just a ball-ache on road.

I'll gladly do 800km in a day on a 690 but on a 500 it's a chore.

Yes, that is what I thought and even said to MaxThePanda, when he was deciding what to buy before their Kaokoland trip.

I don't think so anymore. Since I started riding after my broken leg mended sufficienly about last April (minus 4 months between June and September when I was in Europe), I've done 5.5k km on 500 and about 4.5k km on 690 (and would have done only 3 if I wouldn't have to give 500 to my mate on our last trip in Bots). This includes weekend stints in DeWildt (my preferred enduro loop in Gauteng of about 200 km including commute there and back), Lesotho exploration and Botswana cutlines. As we speak I'm getting ready to go for another two weeks to Lestoho and after that Kaokoland again. Both on 500 - not even thought about taking 690. LIghtweight, ease of maintenance - reliability, suspension - all play strongly in 500 favor.

Yes, I could do most of it on 690 (bar Lesotho though). But it is bitch of heavy work, and as I ride often solo, can get quite risky in terms of exhaustion and heatstroke (I made mistake of buying 690 with rally kit - which doesn't help - I'm getting rid of the kit now). 500 allows me to sit down even in toughest sand and at the same time to keep going fast enought to cool down sufficiently. You say Kaokoland is easy on 690? Sure, but quite frankly on your tours you stick to the very well throtten routes and ride relatively short time a lot of it on C roads (going up to Epupa) Throw in Robbies pass, Little Serengeti and such along the way, all doable on 690 - and see how tired your customers will become very quickly and how much less they will enjoy the trip. You say Botswana is easy - well do that Okavango delta circumnativation between Khwai village and Seronga and then explore the double tracks along the western border of Namibia (i.e. Busmanland) and let's see what you think then. Or try to do 600 km of this in Mozambique on 690 (which I did aoubt 300 to be fair, as I chickened out of the rest due to exhaustion) and you will see the point straight away (second half of the video):




690 is a great bike and - at least for the time being - I'm keeping it should a longer trip pop up. But most of my trips are focused on technical riding and generally within 3000 km range (that is very very juicy 2 - 3 week trip if done right). And for that 500 is the ticket for me every time.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 02, 2018, 10:12:00 am
I have 3 bikes now, a 500 EXC KTM, a 610 TE Husky, and a 950SE KTM, the weights are 114,140 and probably 185 dry, and that should tell you everything right there.
The weight difference relates directly to how we use them. The SE for long trips where you do mostly gravel highways, hell even tar is fine at 160.
The 500 will be used for more technical rides, and time will tell, maybe the Husky will be left in the cold somewhat, (it would be your 690).
Doubt I would sell it because it is always nice to have an extra bike available if mates visit.
My off roading has also changed over the years, getting older and not wanting to battle a heavy bike over rougher terrain has brought on the 500. The 690/610 is a great intermediate bike and can do both ends at a stretch, but it is a compromise both ways. If I had to buy the perfect stable right now it would probably be a 990R and a 500.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 04, 2018, 09:13:13 am
Just watched an excellent Youtube vid about the Husky 501 vs KTM 500, check it out!
&feature=em-subs_digest-vrecs
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Amsterdam on February 04, 2018, 05:56:44 pm
@JustBendIt - One word of caution with the way you have installed the extra fuel filter in case you are not aware of it.  There is a small inline filter (part number 14 on http://www.ktmonlineparts.com.au/partFinder/fiche/ktm/2017/500-exc-f-eu/fuel-pump#partFinderBar) in the dry quick coupling in the fuel line.  With your installation (unless you removed it) it now sits in front of the big filter and will block well before the automotive filter is dirty.

How do I know about this?  Well, installation on my 701 is the same and the little filter plugged up nicely.





Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 04, 2018, 06:12:55 pm
Yes I am aware of that and have actually changed the quick coupler fitting - the one you see on my bike now is not the original
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 04, 2018, 07:46:21 pm
Thanks Amsterdam, vital information.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 05, 2018, 12:44:17 pm
I'm still trying to be convinced the 500's are a better option than the 690/701's for hardcore dual sport adventures. Obviously for hectic rocks in Lesotho but for stuff like Kaokoland, Hondeklip Bay, Botswana etc the 690 is a breeze. Perhaps a tad slower on the rocks of van Zyls but touring ain't racing. The reality for me is no matter how tough your chosen adventure there is always a lot of easier easier dirt and often roads between the rough bits and the race oriented newer 500's are just a ball-ache on road.

I'll gladly do 800km in a day on a 690 but on a 500 it's a chore.

Yes, that is what I thought and even said to MaxThePanda, when he was deciding what to buy before their Kaokoland trip.

I don't think so anymore. Since I started riding after my broken leg mended sufficienly about last April (minus 4 months between June and September when I was in Europe), I've done 5.5k km on 500 and about 4.5k km on 690 (and would have done only 3 if I wouldn't have to give 500 to my mate on our last trip in Bots). This includes weekend stints in DeWildt (my preferred enduro loop in Gauteng of about 200 km including commute there and back), Lesotho exploration and Botswana cutlines. As we speak I'm getting ready to go for another two weeks to Lestoho and after that Kaokoland again. Both on 500 - not even thought about taking 690. LIghtweight, ease of maintenance - reliability, suspension - all play strongly in 500 favor.

Yes, I could do most of it on 690 (bar Lesotho though). But it is bitch of heavy work, and as I ride often solo, can get quite risky in terms of exhaustion and heatstroke (I made mistake of buying 690 with rally kit - which doesn't help - I'm getting rid of the kit now). 500 allows me to sit down even in toughest sand and at the same time to keep going fast enought to cool down sufficiently. You say Kaokoland is easy on 690? Sure, but quite frankly on your tours you stick to the very well throtten routes and ride relatively short time a lot of it on C roads (going up to Epupa) Throw in Robbies pass, Little Serengeti and such along the way, all doable on 690 - and see how tired your customers will become very quickly and how much less they will enjoy the trip. You say Botswana is easy - well do that Okavango delta circumnativation between Khwai village and Seronga and then explore the double tracks along the western border of Namibia (i.e. Busmanland) and let's see what you think then. Or try to do 600 km of this in Mozambique on 690 (which I did aoubt 300 to be fair, as I chickened out of the rest due to exhaustion) and you will see the point straight away (second half of the video):




690 is a great bike and - at least for the time being - I'm keeping it should a longer trip pop up. But most of my trips are focused on technical riding and generally within 3000 km range (that is very very juicy 2 - 3 week trip if done right). And for that 500 is the ticket for me every time.

That's pretty typical Cape  West coast terrain that. The quarry rider videos should show that as well.
It does get tiring to ride a big bike and the 500 would be a ton easier yes. I do however feel that your 690 with the fairing and loaded fuel does make it more difficult that what a lightly modded 690 would be, so not really a fair comparison in this case.
Great video though.  :thumleft:  I enjoyed watching it.
I do see a 500 or 501 in my future sometime.  500 and a 690 and a 1090R seems to be about right :D

Check this out, okes on KTM 500, Husky 501, KTM 690 just messing about.  The terrain they ride is pretty typical for me once I find a track or trail to explore. But yeah twisty or bad tar roads to get there.  The 500 makes it looks so easy though. The guy on the 690 does seem to be more cautious. He is also a bit more out of shape than the other guy on the 500 by the looks of it :D







Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 06, 2018, 08:39:19 pm
TK came to visit this afternoon and we discovered my bike has mooses in the tyres.  Anybody have any experience with these things? I am wondering how I will know how long they will last, not having fitted them myself, but rather bought the bike like that. I understand they need to be lubed every so often and also there are good and bad ones....I just don't know enough!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on February 07, 2018, 07:53:48 am
TK came to visit this afternoon and we discovered my bike has mooses in the tyres.  Anybody have any experience with these things? I am wondering how I will know how long they will last, not having fitted them myself, but rather bought the bike like that. I understand they need to be lubed every so often and also there are good and bad ones....I just don't know enough!

What do you want to know?
Yes they need to be lubed often, if you do any sort of high speed riding. Otherwise they overheat due to friction and basically end up boiling and thus collapsing. They are quite heavy, so add to your bike's unsprung weight. At operating temp they equate to about 0.8BAR. Which means amazing grip without the worry about pinch flats.

I run them in my 500, but I don't use my bike for Dual sport riding. My riding is mostly tight and twisty semi technical riding with the odd GXCC thrown in.

I'm no expert, but I know the Michelin Bib mousses are top class. Also, new on the market, Nitro mousse, brought in by the Mitas people, have received rave reviews and astonishing accounts of mileage. Currently I am on Goldentyre mousses, purely due to getting them on a special.

Mousses have added loads to my enjoyment of my riding, more grip, less worrying about flats due to my weight and being able to run any line I like.

The big but for me, I don't think they are well suited to the type of adventure riding you guys are contemplating here.

In that case, take them out, lube them well and wrap in some sort of clingwrap, ready for future use or for sale.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TK on February 07, 2018, 08:29:30 am
Or give them to your mate.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on February 07, 2018, 08:31:15 am
TK came to visit this afternoon and we discovered my bike has mooses in the tyres.  Anybody have any experience with these things? I am wondering how I will know how long they will last, not having fitted them myself, but rather bought the bike like that. I understand they need to be lubed every so often and also there are good and bad ones....I just don't know enough!

What do you want to know?
Yes they need to be lubed often, if you do any sort of high speed riding. Otherwise they overheat due to friction and basically end up boiling and thus collapsing. They are quite heavy, so add to your bike's unsprung weight. At operating temp they equate to about 0.8BAR. Which means amazing grip without the worry about pinch flats.

I run them in my 500, but I don't use my bike for Dual sport riding. My riding is mostly tight and twisty semi technical riding with the odd GXCC thrown in.

I'm no expert, but I know the Michelin Bib mousses are top class. Also, new on the market, Nitro mousse, brought in by the Mitas people, have received rave reviews and astonishing accounts of mileage. Currently I am on Goldentyre mousses, purely due to getting them on a special.

Mousses have added loads to my enjoyment of my riding, more grip, less worrying about flats due to my weight and being able to run any line I like.

The big but for me, I don't think they are well suited to the type of adventure riding you guys are contemplating here.

In that case, take them out, lube them well and wrap in some sort of clingwrap, ready for future use or for sale.

As Bud says, except, I weighed a heavy duty tube with slime in (puncture preventative), and much to my surprise, the Michelin BIB weighed less. Although obviously, a mousse will be heavier than a standard tube.

My take is also: tight/slow/technical = mousse. Fast/flowing/long distance/hot = tube or a tubeless convertion.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 07, 2018, 08:34:21 am
Thanks guys, appreciate the insight.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: tulips on February 07, 2018, 08:50:23 am
Quick Hijack
I see Mitas C02's fitted (120/90 ?)
General perception on the tyre and how are they in deep sand ?
Thanks
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rough Rider on February 07, 2018, 09:03:57 am





690 is a great bike and - at least for the time being - I'm keeping it should a longer trip pop up. But most of my trips are focused on technical riding and generally within 3000 km range (that is very very juicy 2 - 3 week trip if done right). And for that 500 is the ticket for me every time.

That's pretty typical Cape  West coast terrain that. The quarry rider videos should show that as well.
It does get tiring to ride a big bike and the 500 would be a ton easier yes. I do however feel that your 690 with the fairing and loaded fuel does make it more difficult that what a lightly modded 690 would be, so not really a fair comparison in this case.
Great video though.  :thumleft:  I enjoyed watching it.
I do see a 500 or 501 in my future sometime.  500 and a 690 and a 1090R seems to be about right :D

Check this out, okes on KTM 500, Husky 501, KTM 690 just messing about.  The terrain they ride is pretty typical for me once I find a track or trail to explore. But yeah twisty or bad tar roads to get there.  The 500 makes it looks so easy though. The guy on the 690 does seem to be more cautious. He is also a bit more out of shape than the other guy on the 500 by the looks of it :D



The terrain in this video is very easy to ride, I'm sure I would keep up with these guys on my SM, so you can't really see the benefits of a 500 over a 690.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rough Rider on February 07, 2018, 09:13:59 am





690 is a great bike and - at least for the time being - I'm keeping it should a longer trip pop up. But most of my trips are focused on technical riding and generally within 3000 km range (that is very very juicy 2 - 3 week trip if done right). And for that 500 is the ticket for me every time.

That's pretty typical Cape  West coast terrain that. The quarry rider videos should show that as well.
It does get tiring to ride a big bike and the 500 would be a ton easier yes. I do however feel that your 690 with the fairing and loaded fuel does make it more difficult that what a lightly modded 690 would be, so not really a fair comparison in this case.
Great video though.  :thumleft:  I enjoyed watching it.
I do see a 500 or 501 in my future sometime.  500 and a 690 and a 1090R seems to be about right :D

Check this out, okes on KTM 500, Husky 501, KTM 690 just messing about.  The terrain they ride is pretty typical for me once I find a track or trail to explore. But yeah twisty or bad tar roads to get there.  The 500 makes it looks so easy though. The guy on the 690 does seem to be more cautious. He is also a bit more out of shape than the other guy on the 500 by the looks of it :D



The terrain in this video is very easy to ride, I'm sure I would keep up with these guys on my SM, so you can't really see the benefits of a 500 over a 690.

This is me on my 610 on a proper whooped out track, a 690 should be even better. BTW it is a 500 behind me.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 07, 2018, 09:36:20 am
If wanting to use Bib mousses on your 500/Adventure you should look at the M02

(http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/668839tarifbibmousse.jpg)

Ps Good luck fitting without tire change machine 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on February 07, 2018, 09:51:28 am
The terrain in this video is very easy to ride, I'm sure I would keep up with these guys on my SM, so you can't really see the benefits of a 500 over a 690.

Would also say a 500 and 690 is equally suited to that terrain. It is the area where they overlap. Then tar and gravel highways the 690 would be better and more enduro the 500 would be.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on February 07, 2018, 09:57:49 am
As Bud says, except, I weighed a heavy duty tube with slime in (puncture preventative), and much to my surprise, the Michelin BIB weighed less. Although obviously, a mousse will be heavier than a standard tube.
My take is also: tight/slow/technical = mousse. Fast/flowing/long distance/hot = tube or a tubeless convertion.

Was amazed when I picked up the michelin mousse and felt how light it is. Is it just the enduro version of the michelin mousse that is so light or are all mousses light?

Would it be possible to do a tubeless conversion and run a mousse in a tyre. You can run on the mousse or a fairly flat tyre when enduro riding and pump up the pressure when on longer distances.
In my mind when inflated there will be less flex or compression of the mousse (and less heat buildup) but it will also fit a bit looser inside the tyre and maybe move a bit more (but it is lubed)?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on February 07, 2018, 10:01:00 am
There is a big difference between a quick Sunday morning ride and doing consecutive long technical days. We are not athletes and any little bit of energy conserved on long rides helps and that's why in Xpat's case at least a 500 is ideal
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 07, 2018, 10:05:42 am

That's pretty typical Cape  West coast terrain that. The quarry rider videos should show that as well.
It does get tiring to ride a big bike and the 500 would be a ton easier yes. I do however feel that your 690 with the fairing and loaded fuel does make it more difficult that what a lightly modded 690 would be, so not really a fair comparison in this case.
Great video though.  :thumleft:  I enjoyed watching it.
I do see a 500 or 501 in my future sometime.  500 and a 690 and a 1090R seems to be about right :D

Check this out, okes on KTM 500, Husky 501, KTM 690 just messing about.  The terrain they ride is pretty typical for me once I find a track or trail to explore. But yeah twisty or bad tar roads to get there.  The 500 makes it looks so easy though. The guy on the 690 does seem to be more cautious. He is also a bit more out of shape than the other guy on the 500 by the looks of it :D

...

I thought we have been through this...

No, nothing in CT or WC comes close to that terrain. To say that that terrain is the same as west coast (at least west coast you ar talking about - i.e. around CT) is like showing a picture of Valley of the Waves in Sun city and saying that terrain is the same as English channel. Well, yes - both of them are water with some waves. But I would definitely come prepared differently if I want to have a dip in that pool than if I want to swim across the channel.

I said clearly - 600 km or that terrain and posted the video just for visuals. And long distance trips through sticks into the unknown (I generally have no idea if the track I take leads somewhere or is going to end up in 30 km of dune field, etc.) is exactly where 500 is going to beat 690 every day. Simply because it is much less tiring to ride (as I said, In my experience by far the biggest risk/constraint for this kind of trips is exhaustion and heat stroke) which allows one to conserve energy much better, and should that dune field pop up late in the afternoon after hard day of riding, one has much better chance (bigger margin) to make it through on 500 than on 690. You will see that difference clearly on day 2 and onwards of any proper juicy trip. That is the reason why I managed to ride only about half of that distance on those tracks and in double the time I have planned - on 500 my chances to finish the whole thing would be hugely increased.

And the notion that my version of 690 was just too heavy for that is wrong. While I agree that I could do without the rally fairing, I needed all the petrol I could get (I actually did run out of petrol on that trip - my first), and I needed the luggage and water I was carrying - it was 3 week trip at the end of the day, not a Sunday breakfast run. In other words you will need big tank upfront anyway, the same luggage, etc - this is not weekend ride in Atlantis or quary.

Yes, for day trips around CT (or even general purpose bike for someone who likes to explore dirt anywhere else), 690 is most probably better choice. But for proper exploration into unknown (which I suspect Damaraland is after following what kind of riding he likes to do - check his videos of riding riverbeds in Namibia linked in his signature), where one needs quite  a bit more of a margin for error (in terms of energy conservation and ability to negotiate unkonwn obstacled ahead), in my experience 500 beats it heads down. And yes, I was singing your tune just 7 months ago to MTP, but whenever I think about trip now I think straight away about 500 completely forgetting I have 690 parked somewhere. So much so actually, that I lost all the interest in the upcoming 790, which I was very keen on just few months back.

I now ride for density of experience, not km ridden. To use extreme example that is probably going to get some  people going - would I rather ride in 12 days from Cairo to CT, or spent 12 days riding Damaraland & Kaokoland? Well, Damaraland & Kaokoland - no contest whatsoever by any stretch of imagination. And 500 fits the bill perfectly for me right now and believe will also for Damaraland who started this thread (especially as he is keeping 990). But of course I'm outlier and most people would be better off with 690 rather than 500 - actually I think most people would be better with multi cylinder bike as those can do better for the kind of riding majority prefers.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rough Rider on February 07, 2018, 12:20:23 pm
The terrain in this video is very easy to ride, I'm sure I would keep up with these guys on my SM, so you can't really see the benefits of a 500 over a 690.

Would also say a 500 and 690 is equally suited to that terrain. It is the area where they overlap. Then tar and gravel highways the 690 would be better and more enduro the 500 would be.

In my opinion the 690 would definitely be the better choice in that type of terrain, for me anyway. As the sand gets thicker and the whoops start to form the 500 comes more into it's own.
I learned to ride in the sand so my experience may be different to somebody who is not as familiar with riding in sand.

On gravel roads or easy fire trails there is no compassion the 690 will trump the 500 every time. When the speed picks up you want a bit of weight for stability.  Having said that I don't find the 690 to be a particularly stable bike, the 610 is much better.

In the sand the 690 will trump the 610 due to it's shorter stroke and its extra freer revving power and the 500 will trump both for the same reason.



 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rough Rider on February 07, 2018, 12:23:59 pm

That's pretty typical Cape  West coast terrain that. The quarry rider videos should show that as well.
It does get tiring to ride a big bike and the 500 would be a ton easier yes. I do however feel that your 690 with the fairing and loaded fuel does make it more difficult that what a lightly modded 690 would be, so not really a fair comparison in this case.
Great video though.  :thumleft:  I enjoyed watching it.
I do see a 500 or 501 in my future sometime.  500 and a 690 and a 1090R seems to be about right :D

Check this out, okes on KTM 500, Husky 501, KTM 690 just messing about.  The terrain they ride is pretty typical for me once I find a track or trail to explore. But yeah twisty or bad tar roads to get there.  The 500 makes it looks so easy though. The guy on the 690 does seem to be more cautious. He is also a bit more out of shape than the other guy on the 500 by the looks of it :D

...

I thought we have been through this...

No, nothing in CT or WC comes close to that terrain. To say that that terrain is the same as west coast (at least west coast you ar talking about - i.e. around CT) is like showing a picture of Valley of the Waves in Sun city and saying that terrain is the same as English channel. Well, yes - both of them are water with some waves. But I would definitely come prepared differently if I want to have a dip in that pool than if I want to swim across the channel.

I said clearly - 600 km or that terrain and posted the video just for visuals. And long distance trips through sticks into the unknown (I generally have no idea if the track I take leads somewhere or is going to end up in 30 km of dune field, etc.) is exactly where 500 is going to beat 690 every day. Simply because it is much less tiring to ride (as I said, In my experience by far the biggest risk/constraint for this kind of trips is exhaustion and heat stroke) which allows one to conserve energy much better, and should that dune field pop up late in the afternoon after hard day of riding, one has much better chance (bigger margin) to make it through on 500 than on 690. You will see that difference clearly on day 2 and onwards of any proper juicy trip. That is the reason why I managed to ride only about half of that distance on those tracks and in double the time I have planned - on 500 my chances to finish the whole thing would be hugely increased.

And the notion that my version of 690 was just too heavy for that is wrong. While I agree that I could do without the rally fairing, I needed all the petrol I could get (I actually did run out of petrol on that trip - my first), and I needed the luggage and water I was carrying - it was 3 week trip at the end of the day, not a Sunday breakfast run. In other words you will need big tank upfront anyway, the same luggage, etc - this is not weekend ride in Atlantis or quary.

Yes, for day trips around CT (or even general purpose bike for someone who likes to explore dirt anywhere else), 690 is most probably better choice. But for proper exploration into unknown (which I suspect Damaraland is after following what kind of riding he likes to do - check his videos of riding riverbeds in Namibia linked in his signature), where one needs quite  a bit more of a margin for error (in terms of energy conservation and ability to negotiate unkonwn obstacled ahead), in my experience 500 beats it heads down. And yes, I was singing your tune just 7 months ago to MTP, but whenever I think about trip now I think straight away about 500 completely forgetting I have 690 parked somewhere. So much so actually, that I lost all the interest in the upcoming 790, which I was very keen on just few months back.

I now ride for density of experience, not km ridden. To use extreme example that is probably going to get some  people going - would I rather ride in 12 days from Cairo to CT, or spent 12 days riding Damaraland & Kaokoland? Well, Damaraland & Kaokoland - no contest whatsoever by any stretch of imagination. And 500 fits the bill perfectly for me right now and believe will also for Damaraland who started this thread (especially as he is keeping 990). But of course I'm outlier and most people would be better off with 690 rather than 500 - actually I think most people would be better with multi cylinder bike as those can do better for the kind of riding majority prefers.

I agree with everything you said. The problem is how many people adventurizing their 500's ride that sort of terrain?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: badseed on February 07, 2018, 12:30:33 pm
I'm no riding god and do regular trips to Kaokoland  (8 times in the past 24months). We ride all the sandy riverbeds, often with less experienced Euro clients and the 690's / 701's we re rent do it with ease.
Although most of the trips are done without bike luggage and a support van we've done it a few times loaded. In fact we've taken 990's loaded. I pride myself that our WildWood Tours do all the recognised tough routes and a couple of secret tracks we've pioneered over the years.We've had a couple of clients on their own 501's and 500exc's and other than the odd bit the 690's are a better choice.

I find the newer 500 class to sharp for a touring option and if I went that way I'd rather look to the older 525 KTM. Another great option is the carb model Beta 480/450 .

I guess if you trailer your bike from rough section to the next the 500's are good but no matter where you ride there are just about always liaison sections on good open tracks which are a ball-ache on the little bikes.
 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: badseed on February 07, 2018, 12:33:36 pm

That's pretty typical Cape  West coast terrain that. The quarry rider videos should show that as well.
It does get tiring to ride a big bike and the 500 would be a ton easier yes. I do however feel that your 690 with the fairing and loaded fuel does make it more difficult that what a lightly modded 690 would be, so not really a fair comparison in this case.
Great video though.  :thumleft:  I enjoyed watching it.
I do see a 500 or 501 in my future sometime.  500 and a 690 and a 1090R seems to be about right :D

Check this out, okes on KTM 500, Husky 501, KTM 690 just messing about.  The terrain they ride is pretty typical for me once I find a track or trail to explore. But yeah twisty or bad tar roads to get there.  The 500 makes it looks so easy though. The guy on the 690 does seem to be more cautious. He is also a bit more out of shape than the other guy on the 500 by the looks of it :D

...

I thought we have been through this...

No, nothing in CT or WC comes close to that terrain. To say that that terrain is the same as west coast (at least west coast you ar talking about - i.e. around CT) is like showing a picture of Valley of the Waves in Sun city and saying that terrain is the same as English channel. Well, yes - both of them are water with some waves. But I would definitely come prepared differently if I want to have a dip in that pool than if I want to swim across the channel.

I said clearly - 600 km or that terrain and posted the video just for visuals. And long distance trips through sticks into the unknown (I generally have no idea if the track I take leads somewhere or is going to end up in 30 km of dune field, etc.) is exactly where 500 is going to beat 690 every day. Simply because it is much less tiring to ride (as I said, In my experience by far the biggest risk/constraint for this kind of trips is exhaustion and heat stroke) which allows one to conserve energy much better, and should that dune field pop up late in the afternoon after hard day of riding, one has much better chance (bigger margin) to make it through on 500 than on 690. You will see that difference clearly on day 2 and onwards of any proper juicy trip. That is the reason why I managed to ride only about half of that distance on those tracks and in double the time I have planned - on 500 my chances to finish the whole thing would be hugely increased.

And the notion that my version of 690 was just too heavy for that is wrong. While I agree that I could do without the rally fairing, I needed all the petrol I could get (I actually did run out of petrol on that trip - my first), and I needed the luggage and water I was carrying - it was 3 week trip at the end of the day, not a Sunday breakfast run. In other words you will need big tank upfront anyway, the same luggage, etc - this is not weekend ride in Atlantis or quary.

Yes, for day trips around CT (or even general purpose bike for someone who likes to explore dirt anywhere else), 690 is most probably better choice. But for proper exploration into unknown (which I suspect Damaraland is after following what kind of riding he likes to do - check his videos of riding riverbeds in Namibia linked in his signature), where one needs quite  a bit more of a margin for error (in terms of energy conservation and ability to negotiate unkonwn obstacled ahead), in my experience 500 beats it heads down. And yes, I was singing your tune just 7 months ago to MTP, but whenever I think about trip now I think straight away about 500 completely forgetting I have 690 parked somewhere. So much so actually, that I lost all the interest in the upcoming 790, which I was very keen on just few months back.
If wanting to use Bib mousses on your 500/Adventure you should look at the M02

(http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/668839tarifbibmousse.jpg)

Ps Good luck fitting without tire change machine 

I now ride for density of experience, not km ridden. To use extreme example that is probably going to get some  people going - would I rather ride in 12 days from Cairo to CT, or spent 12 days riding Damaraland & Kaokoland? Well, Damaraland & Kaokoland - no contest whatsoever by any stretch of imagination. And 500 fits the bill perfectly for me right now and believe will also for Damaraland who started this thread (especially as he is keeping 990). But of course I'm outlier and most people would be better off with 690 rather than 500 - actually I think most people would be better with multi cylinder bike as those can do better for the kind of riding majority prefers.

I agree with everything you said. The problem is how many people adventurizing their 500's ride that sort of terrain?

Absolutely.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 07, 2018, 03:42:08 pm

That's pretty typical Cape  West coast terrain that. The quarry rider videos should show that as well.
It does get tiring to ride a big bike and the 500 would be a ton easier yes. I do however feel that your 690 with the fairing and loaded fuel does make it more difficult that what a lightly modded 690 would be, so not really a fair comparison in this case.
Great video though.  :thumleft:  I enjoyed watching it.
I do see a 500 or 501 in my future sometime.  500 and a 690 and a 1090R seems to be about right :D

Check this out, okes on KTM 500, Husky 501, KTM 690 just messing about.  The terrain they ride is pretty typical for me once I find a track or trail to explore. But yeah twisty or bad tar roads to get there.  The 500 makes it looks so easy though. The guy on the 690 does seem to be more cautious. He is also a bit more out of shape than the other guy on the 500 by the looks of it :D

...

I thought we have been through this...

No, nothing in CT or WC comes close to that terrain. To say that that terrain is the same as west coast (at least west coast you ar talking about - i.e. around CT) is like showing a picture of Valley of the Waves in Sun city and saying that terrain is the same as English channel. Well, yes - both of them are water with some waves. But I would definitely come prepared differently if I want to have a dip in that pool than if I want to swim across the channel.

I said clearly - 600 km or that terrain and posted the video just for visuals. And long distance trips through sticks into the unknown (I generally have no idea if the track I take leads somewhere or is going to end up in 30 km of dune field, etc.) is exactly where 500 is going to beat 690 every day. Simply because it is much less tiring to ride (as I said, In my experience by far the biggest risk/constraint for this kind of trips is exhaustion and heat stroke) which allows one to conserve energy much better, and should that dune field pop up late in the afternoon after hard day of riding, one has much better chance (bigger margin) to make it through on 500 than on 690. You will see that difference clearly on day 2 and onwards of any proper juicy trip. That is the reason why I managed to ride only about half of that distance on those tracks and in double the time I have planned - on 500 my chances to finish the whole thing would be hugely increased.

And the notion that my version of 690 was just too heavy for that is wrong. While I agree that I could do without the rally fairing, I needed all the petrol I could get (I actually did run out of petrol on that trip - my first), and I needed the luggage and water I was carrying - it was 3 week trip at the end of the day, not a Sunday breakfast run. In other words you will need big tank upfront anyway, the same luggage, etc - this is not weekend ride in Atlantis or quary.

Yes, for day trips around CT (or even general purpose bike for someone who likes to explore dirt anywhere else), 690 is most probably better choice. But for proper exploration into unknown (which I suspect Damaraland is after following what kind of riding he likes to do - check his videos of riding riverbeds in Namibia linked in his signature), where one needs quite  a bit more of a margin for error (in terms of energy conservation and ability to negotiate unkonwn obstacled ahead), in my experience 500 beats it heads down. And yes, I was singing your tune just 7 months ago to MTP, but whenever I think about trip now I think straight away about 500 completely forgetting I have 690 parked somewhere. So much so actually, that I lost all the interest in the upcoming 790, which I was very keen on just few months back.
If wanting to use Bib mousses on your 500/Adventure you should look at the M02

(http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/668839tarifbibmousse.jpg)

Ps Good luck fitting without tire change machine 

I now ride for density of experience, not km ridden. To use extreme example that is probably going to get some  people going - would I rather ride in 12 days from Cairo to CT, or spent 12 days riding Damaraland & Kaokoland? Well, Damaraland & Kaokoland - no contest whatsoever by any stretch of imagination. And 500 fits the bill perfectly for me right now and believe will also for Damaraland who started this thread (especially as he is keeping 990). But of course I'm outlier and most people would be better off with 690 rather than 500 - actually I think most people would be better with multi cylinder bike as those can do better for the kind of riding majority prefers.

I agree with everything you said. The problem is how many people adventurizing their 500's ride that sort of terrain?

Absolutely.
Not many that is why everyone loves the idea of a small light DS bike but the first time they get a numb bumb, rides all twitchy down a normal dirt road or wants to sit at 160km/h to get home you soon realize it's not the best option. Again not the bikes fault you are just not riding the correct terrain.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 07, 2018, 04:06:39 pm

I agree with everything you said. The problem is how many people adventurizing their 500's ride that sort of terrain?

Well I would say that if people are adventurizing 500s and not riding that sort of terrain here in Southern Africa, they are doing it wrong and should buy something else. However I really do not believe there are masses of people doing that - I think the people that are looking at 500 already know exactly why, as it is definitely not considered an obvious choice for dual sport riding currently (I would bet most people on this forum are wondering what the heck are we on about in this thread, completely ignorant of the fact that original definition of dual sport is plated enduro bike, not an SUV designed to tick off bucket list in comfort and style).

But that is completely out of context here. Damaraland decided to buy 500 exactly for the type of riding I like as well - multiday trips off the beaten track deep into the sticks. If you look on his preferred riding (check RRs in his signature) he likes to focus mostly on Namibian riverbeds and similar (Damaraland, please correct me if I got it wrong, but I feel pretty confident on this, seeing your reports and comments on WD). So within the context of this thread I maintain that 500 is much better choice than 690 for him right now.

For other purposes - for example Omninorm's preference for combining chasing supersports on tar one day and then hitting Atlantis next, 690 is much better choice (provided one has to have one bike). And I said in my prior post that I believe for most people on WD, even 690 - leave alone 500 - is too much and they are probably better off on twin (hence so many 690s for sale with relatively low km readings).
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 07, 2018, 04:25:52 pm
I have owned plenty "adventure" bikes, from an overweight 1150GS to buzzy 800GS to crap KLR650 to massive 990S and potent 950SE, rallied a 525 and ridden plenty 690s to know that none of them even come close to my 500 for the type of riding I currently enjoy

It can run flat out at 180 kph but will explode if held at that speed ...but is quite happy from 60 - 140 kph all day long

When the "long liason" section starts I turn off my brain and engage my Kaoko throttle lock and sing songs to myself in my helmet

but when the going gets tough the 500 bares its tits like a drunk teenage stripper and begs me for a good spanking - and that is why it is the bike for me
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 07, 2018, 04:39:22 pm
I'm no riding god and do regular trips to Kaokoland  (8 times in the past 24months). We ride all the sandy riverbeds, often with less experienced Euro clients and the 690's / 701's we re rent do it with ease.
Although most of the trips are done without bike luggage and a support van we've done it a few times loaded. In fact we've taken 990's loaded. I pride myself that our WildWood Tours do all the recognised tough routes and a couple of secret tracks we've pioneered over the years.We've had a couple of clients on their own 501's and 500exc's and other than the odd bit the 690's are a better choice.

I find the newer 500 class to sharp for a touring option and if I went that way I'd rather look to the older 525 KTM. Another great option is the carb model Beta 480/450 .

I guess if you trailer your bike from rough section to the next the 500's are good but no matter where you ride there are just about always liaison sections on good open tracks which are a ball-ache on the little bikes.

Not to diminish your tours in any way - as far as I have seen you do hit most of the good spots between Epupa Falls and Sesfontein, but for my preference you guys do spent a lot of time on dirt highways getting up there (i.e. up to Epupa Falls). Please correct me if I'm wrong here but you usually gun it up from Windhoek (or whatever is the starting point) up to Epupa on main dirt highways (which now sadly includes the Kunene river track, which used to be much more entertaining before it was graded as I'm sure you will agree). So basically half of the what - 3000 km (assuming you start and ride back to Windhoek) - you spent on the dirt highways. This is not a criticism in any way - I understand perfectly well why on paid tour with limited time where you have responsibility for clients with varying skills, you have to take that approach.

So in reality on your tour you have about 4 - 5 days of proper riding between Epupa Falls and Sesfontein, plus maybe day in Damaraland (between Twyfelfontein and Brandberg), but you have quite a few days - maybe 3 - 4 of dirt highways. Again - if I'm getting it wrong, apologies and let me know where I'm going wrong.

If I'm right, then you get relatively short period of time in the really tiring stuff (and you can have rest day in Purros or somewhere to break it up) and lots of kms covered on highways - and for that 690 is perfectly fine. But once the schedule gets a bit more busy with more riding off the highways, the 690 with luggage will become significantly more tiring than 500.

I'm planning trip up there in March where we have 11, max 12 days of riding (including rest days) as we have only 14 days for the whole trip including geting there and back from Joburg/CT. We will leave cars in Uis and do loop from there. On the way down from Epupa, we will probably follow similar route like you do (with some exceptions - BTW how are you going to modify your routes now that Hoanib seems to be officially off the limits to bikes?), but on the way up we want to stay off the main C roads as much as possible. So from Uis I want to head up Ugab to Dorros crater and up the tracks to Palmwag. From there I would like to do LIttle Serengeti I haven't done yet) up to Sesfontein. From there I would like to ride up to Opuwo either following the Huarusib river all the way from Purros or following little tracks through mountains via Robbie's pass to Kaoko Otavi. All of this is potentially more tiring than the loop back from Epupa down. So by the time we will be in Epupa where your tough bit starts, we will most probably be already properly cooked - I know I will.

So 500 will give us much better chance to manage as much of our planned route as possible. While I agree that all of it can be done on 690 (most probably - haven't seen some of the paths), I would bet a lot of money that should I try to use it for this route, I am guaranteed to start cutting nice tracks out and regressing to the highways at some point.

One of the main motivators for me to get 500 was that on most of my trips in last few years I failed to actually ride some of the highlights I came for. In that Mozambique trip on 690 I managed only half of the sandy tracks I planned to do (and had to cut out most of the Zambian and Zim tracks), on trip to dunes north of Molopo river in Bots I had to turn back due to heatstrike and exhaustion, on my first attempt to circumnavigate Okavango delta on 690 I had to turn back (while I have managed to do it in December on 500) and on my last trip to Kaokoland when I tried to ride up the VZP I had to turn back half way up as I killed the clutch (that one was admitedly on Tenere, but 690 clutch is also not known to be bulletproof - unlike 500's one).

500 just gives me much more confidence that I will be able to accomplish what I came for safely. Or will enable me to plan even more ambitious tracks and fail again as I did in Lesotho  :imaposer:

My 2c
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ClimbingTurtle on February 08, 2018, 07:41:23 am
Having ridden my GSA Fuel Bowser all over the place for the last 7 years, I have realised that I am starting to shy away from anything more than a good gravel road these days - mainly because I am tired of picking up the behemoth when it falls over on mildly technical single-track. Case in point was the Old Mill Route from the East side - couldn't get the Lump past the first long boulder-strewn section above the river, after the farm. Had to turn around, that took 30 minutes.
This is disappointing.
I have always believed that a 500 was too high-maintenance, and the 690/701 was the answer for me, being 1/2 the weight of the big Beemer.
The comments here are leading me to think that a 500 is going to be an even better option for me - I am not shy to trailer a ride to a starting point to save time either...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on February 08, 2018, 07:52:25 am
I'm on the hunt for a 500 now  :biggrin:. A question for the 500 boffins: Are there any major engineering differences between a 2012 500 and a 2016? I know with the 2 strokes (I've had many 300's) there was a change to DDS clutch in 2013 and subtle changes in the forks and plastics.

Should rather walk away from a clean, low hour 2012 500? At this stage I plan to buy with cash, so a 2017 and up is not really an option.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Kamanya on February 08, 2018, 08:31:23 am
Have to laugh. Anywhere there are boys discussing toys, it's a, "But I respectfully disagree brother, this one is better". I suspect that conversation started when the first stone tool was made.

But let this insight not stop me....

Having ridden the 525 in both racing and touring, the 690 in technical play and the 990 everywhere, my brain is going;

If I had all three, I'm pretty certain that the 690 would spend the most time in the garage. Currently the 525 is not working - needs new bearings - but I found that I was spending much more time on it than the 990.

I certainly think that manufactures have missed gap in the market - the slightly adventurised 500 class. If KTM brought out a 500 EXE with the only difference being a bigger tank, really good lights, a very small screen, a better touring seat, upgraded generator and 2 USB charging points, they'd sell. Sadly, they will always be hounded by the safety nazi's who'll insist on ABS, airbags, Auto SPOT locator and industrial grade pannier systems.

Perversely, one area that hasn't been mentioned for the 500 class is getting in and out of rush hour town. I found myself going to meetings on it over the 990. Even on Michelin Deserts, it is a laugh factory in rush hour. They're very high, light, nippy and excellent brakes. Also, I regularly take to the shortcuts through bush and sand at every opportunity.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 08, 2018, 08:43:38 am

I agree with everything you said. The problem is how many people adventurizing their 500's ride that sort of terrain?

Well I would say that if people are adventurizing 500s and not riding that sort of terrain here in Southern Africa, they are doing it wrong and should buy something else. However I really do not believe there are masses of people doing that - I think the people that are looking at 500 already know exactly why, as it is definitely not considered an obvious choice for dual sport riding currently (I would bet most people on this forum are wondering what the heck are we on about in this thread, completely ignorant of the fact that original definition of dual sport is plated enduro bike, not an SUV designed to tick off bucket list in comfort and style).

But that is completely out of context here. Damaraland decided to buy 500 exactly for the type of riding I like as well - multiday trips off the beaten track deep into the sticks. If you look on his preferred riding (check RRs in his signature) he likes to focus mostly on Namibian riverbeds and similar (Damaraland, please correct me if I got it wrong, but I feel pretty confident on this, seeing your reports and comments on WD). So within the context of this thread I maintain that 500 is much better choice than 690 for him right now.

For other purposes - for example Omninorm's preference for combining chasing supersports on tar one day and then hitting Atlantis next, 690 is much better choice (provided one has to have one bike). And I said in my prior post that I believe for most people on WD, even 690 - leave alone 500 - is too much and they are probably better off on twin (hence so many 690s for sale with relatively low km readings).

Hi @Xpat .  Spot-on.  First major trip with the 500's will be in June.  A 14 day jaunt through South Western Angola, up the Doodsakker Lubango way, heading east and looping down back to Namibia.  690-class is an awesome bike, but as @Dwerg also said, if you're doing that many consecutive days of tough technical riding with bush-camping thrown in, you really want to have the most focused tool for the job, no compromise.  I've done eg. the whole VZP thing on a fully loaded 990, yes it can be done no worries, but why wrestle a pig when you can have riding nirvana on a bike built for it.

Yes the 690 can do it.  Yes the 990 can do it.  But it's a compromise in the wrong direction FOR ME (and for you and a couple of other like-minded individuals).  Yes it buzzes, yes it's unstable at highway speeds, yes it's not as comfortable.  This does not matter FOR ME as I will actively seek out and ride seeking the bits where the 500-class excel.  I will not plan a route with 600km liasons on the 500, that would just be stupid.

Horses for courses and all that.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on February 08, 2018, 08:52:02 am
I'm on the hunt for a 500 now  :biggrin:. A question for the 500 boffins: Are there any major engineering differences between a 2012 500 and a 2016?

I don't think there is any mechanical difference. But "500 boffin" I'm not.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 08, 2018, 08:55:40 am
You guys fit cush hubs ?

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 08, 2018, 09:03:43 am
Just bend It is really your guy to speak to about the models, but as I heard the 2012 to 2016 models are the same and then changed in 2017/18 KTM has a 4 year cycle.
Also heard that if you run full knobblies like Mitas CO2 you don't need cush drive as the knobbs perform that function, the whole 500 mindset is minimalist so don't add shit you don't need. All it does is make it heavy....
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on February 08, 2018, 09:07:00 am


Quote from: JustBendIt on Yesterday at 04:25:52 pm (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg3996848#msg3996848)

"but when the going gets tough
the 500 bares its tits like a drunk teenage stripper and begs me for a good spanking - and that is why it is the bike for me..."
Justin! you've missed your 'calling', and should turn -
immediately - to writing crime novels, like Deon Meyer, or better still, Hunter S. Thompson (deceased), brilliant - LOVED the imagery!  :thumleft:
Chris

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 08, 2018, 11:23:57 am





690 is a great bike and - at least for the time being - I'm keeping it should a longer trip pop up. But most of my trips are focused on technical riding and generally within 3000 km range (that is very very juicy 2 - 3 week trip if done right). And for that 500 is the ticket for me every time.

That's pretty typical Cape  West coast terrain that. The quarry rider videos should show that as well.
It does get tiring to ride a big bike and the 500 would be a ton easier yes. I do however feel that your 690 with the fairing and loaded fuel does make it more difficult that what a lightly modded 690 would be, so not really a fair comparison in this case.
Great video though.  :thumleft:  I enjoyed watching it.
I do see a 500 or 501 in my future sometime.  500 and a 690 and a 1090R seems to be about right :D

Check this out, okes on KTM 500, Husky 501, KTM 690 just messing about.  The terrain they ride is pretty typical for me once I find a track or trail to explore. But yeah twisty or bad tar roads to get there.  The 500 makes it looks so easy though. The guy on the 690 does seem to be more cautious. He is also a bit more out of shape than the other guy on the 500 by the looks of it :D



The terrain in this video is very easy to ride, I'm sure I would keep up with these guys on my SM, so you can't really see the benefits of a 500 over a 690.

This is me on my 610 on a proper whooped out track, a 690 should be even better. BTW it is a 500 behind me.



Hehe ride that area about every other weekend.
I must admit the WR250 makes it way easier than the 690. But yes, typical terrain I find myself with the 690 on. Only a lot of the times 100km from home etc.
I have even had the 800GS and a Vstrom 650 on that track in your video ;D
No I didn't say i was a clever person.


I agree with everything you said. The problem is how many people adventurizing their 500's ride that sort of terrain?

Well I would say that if people are adventurizing 500s and not riding that sort of terrain here in Southern Africa, they are doing it wrong and should buy something else. However I really do not believe there are masses of people doing that - I think the people that are looking at 500 already know exactly why, as it is definitely not considered an obvious choice for dual sport riding currently (I would bet most people on this forum are wondering what the heck are we on about in this thread, completely ignorant of the fact that original definition of dual sport is plated enduro bike, not an SUV designed to tick off bucket list in comfort and style).

But that is completely out of context here. Damaraland decided to buy 500 exactly for the type of riding I like as well - multiday trips off the beaten track deep into the sticks. If you look on his preferred riding (check RRs in his signature) he likes to focus mostly on Namibian riverbeds and similar (Damaraland, please correct me if I got it wrong, but I feel pretty confident on this, seeing your reports and comments on WD). So within the context of this thread I maintain that 500 is much better choice than 690 for him right now.

For other purposes - for example Omninorm's preference for combining chasing supersports on tar one day and then hitting Atlantis next, 690 is much better choice (provided one has to have one bike). And I said in my prior post that I believe for most people on WD, even 690 - leave alone 500 - is too much and they are probably better off on twin (hence so many 690s for sale with relatively low km readings).

Agreed.

Except that the terrain in oyur video looks like terrain I ride, even if you say its not. in fact that terrain that Rough Rider posts looks more hectic than the one in your video.
But we are talking semantics now i guess since we are not seeing everything.
I think we are all saying the same thing essentially.
I think we are just arguing a bit about how much the overlap is.

Anyway, I will either be on a 800gs than a 1200 in sand, but I'll rather be on 690 than a 800 in sand, but I'll rather be on a 500 vs 690 insand, but I'll rather be on a 300/250 than a 500 in sand :D

I also agree a lot of people moan about the seat and wind blast etc on a F800GS or some other bikes, they have no business being on a 690, 500, etc then.

To touch on what Rough Rider has said though. Most people riding 500's trailer it and then ride around. I HATE that. I hate having to trailer and leave a vehicle somewhere since then the real exploration is not there as you always have to go back. To me that's a cop out in fact of an "Adventure" bike. Title thread says "Adventurising the 500". Since now if trailering is an option for you - you could be on a 350 or 300 2t etc. and thats even better in the rough stuff than a 450/500.
In the same vein one can suck it up on the 500 on tar I guess we can suck it up on the 690 when it gets to be hectic sand etc. The 500 must be chosen though because it CAN do tar. Otherwise one would rather be on a 300 2t right?
i.e to me the lighter the bike in real tough areas the better it will be.

Imho it seems that the 500 is actually the perfect exploring DS bike. You just have to be ok with what it lacks in other areas.

Again, i'm not saying  that this is your case. But i would bet 80% of the people out there ride like this. i.e I've never seen a 500 on a bit of tar to get to the riding spot.
I've seen 1 WR 450 and a few BMW 450's but generally they also just go 5 km down the road and then onto the riding spots and back. They dont actually go explore.
Maybe the key is to get more out there so that more people can see that it's very viable.

The Beta 480 also intrigues me as an option for this type of riding.Where are the Japs here? Seems EU is doing some good for the DS market and improving.
But yes...... the 500/501 seems like I what I need in the garage as well. I do think the 690/ 701 makes a better do it all bike if you could only have 1.


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 08, 2018, 11:42:43 am
Having ridden my GSA Fuel Bowser all over the place for the last 7 years, I have realised that I am starting to shy away from anything more than a good gravel road these days - mainly because I am tired of picking up the behemoth when it falls over on mildly technical single-track. Case in point was the Old Mill Route from the East side - couldn't get the Lump past the first long boulder-strewn section above the river, after the farm. Had to turn around, that took 30 minutes.
This is disappointing.
I have always believed that a 500 was too high-maintenance, and the 690/701 was the answer for me, being 1/2 the weight of the big Beemer.
The comments here are leading me to think that a 500 is going to be an even better option for me - I am not shy to trailer a ride to a starting point to save time either...

If more people realise this I think they will be having more fun exploring the less traveled places. There is a space for the big bikes though. Did a fantastic trip with my wife over lots of gravel and passes etc. Loaded up on the 1200GS. No way to do that on the 690. However if I was on my own I'd do that again but take all the little tracks I can but I'd still hit a nice scenic bit of tar and play on the 690.

Either the 500 or the 690/701 will feel like twinkle toes offroad vs your 1200gs.
Forget the trailer. It's a crap option unless you stay over at a place.
I'm sure the others here will agree - If you keeping your 1200gs, consider the 500, seems people are loving it. If you are selling the 1200gs. Get the 690/701 it's a blast to ride. :)



Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ClimbingTurtle on February 08, 2018, 12:55:47 pm
Having ridden my GSA Fuel Bowser all over the place for the last 7 years, I have realised that I am starting to shy away from anything more than a good gravel road these days - mainly because I am tired of picking up the behemoth when it falls over on mildly technical single-track. Case in point was the Old Mill Route from the East side - couldn't get the Lump past the first long boulder-strewn section above the river, after the farm. Had to turn around, that took 30 minutes.
This is disappointing.
I have always believed that a 500 was too high-maintenance, and the 690/701 was the answer for me, being 1/2 the weight of the big Beemer.
The comments here are leading me to think that a 500 is going to be an even better option for me - I am not shy to trailer a ride to a starting point to save time either...

If more people realise this I think they will be having more fun exploring the less traveled places. There is a space for the big bikes though. Did a fantastic trip with my wife over lots of gravel and passes etc. Loaded up on the 1200GS. No way to do that on the 690. However if I was on my own I'd do that again but take all the little tracks I can but I'd still hit a nice scenic bit of tar and play on the 690.

Either the 500 or the 690/701 will feel like twinkle toes offroad vs your 1200gs.
Forget the trailer. It's a crap option unless you stay over at a place.
I'm sure the others here will agree - If you keeping your 1200gs, consider the 500, seems people are loving it. If you are selling the 1200gs. Get the 690/701 it's a blast to ride. :)

Zactly...
And I am keeping the 1200 - 2-up to Golden gate for the weekend, it's a blast on the gravel roads - but the 500 seems to be creeeping up ahead of the 690/701 options......
Lets see what finances are like later this year....
 :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rough Rider on February 08, 2018, 01:24:55 pm


Agreed.

Except that the terrain in oyur video looks like terrain I ride, even if you say its not. in fact that terrain that Rough Rider posts looks more hectic than the one in your video.
But we are talking semantics now i guess since we are not seeing everything.
I think we are all saying the same thing essentially.
I think we are just arguing a bit about how much the overlap is.

Anyway, I will either be on a 800gs than a 1200 in sand, but I'll rather be on 690 than a 800 in sand, but I'll rather be on a 500 vs 690 insand, but I'll rather be on a 300/250 than a 500 in sand :D

I also agree a lot of people moan about the seat and wind blast etc on a F800GS or some other bikes, they have no business being on a 690, 500, etc then.

To touch on what Rough Rider has said though. Most people riding 500's trailer it and then ride around. I HATE that. I hate having to trailer and leave a vehicle somewhere since then the real exploration is not there as you always have to go back. To me that's a cop out in fact of an "Adventure" bike. Title thread says "Adventurising the 500". Since now if trailering is an option for you - you could be on a 350 or 300 2t etc. and thats even better in the rough stuff than a 450/500.
In the same vein one can suck it up on the 500 on tar I guess we can suck it up on the 690 when it gets to be hectic sand etc. The 500 must be chosen though because it CAN do tar. Otherwise one would rather be on a 300 2t right?
i.e to me the lighter the bike in real tough areas the better it will be.

Imho it seems that the 500 is actually the perfect exploring DS bike. You just have to be ok with what it lacks in other areas.

Again, i'm not saying  that this is your case. But i would bet 80% of the people out there ride like this. i.e I've never seen a 500 on a bit of tar to get to the riding spot.
I've seen 1 WR 450 and a few BMW 450's but generally they also just go 5 km down the road and then onto the riding spots and back. They dont actually go explore.
Maybe the key is to get more out there so that more people can see that it's very viable.

The Beta 480 also intrigues me as an option for this type of riding.Where are the Japs here? Seems EU is doing some good for the DS market and improving.
But yes...... the 500/501 seems like I what I need in the garage as well. I do think the 690/ 701 makes a better do it all bike if you could only have 1.

[/quote]

Actually the best bikes of all for very deep whooped out sand tracks are the 2T 250 MX bikes, they are light, have very explosive power and firm suspension. My favorite of these was the RM250 with sand tires fitted. I would love to try the new KTM 250 SX in Atlantis or Parklands.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 08, 2018, 02:16:52 pm
"To touch on what Rough Rider has said though. Most people riding 500's trailer it and then ride around. I HATE that. I hate having to trailer and leave a vehicle somewhere since then the real exploration is not there as you always have to go back. To me that's a cop out in fact of an "Adventure" bike. Title thread says "Adventurising the 500". Since now if trailering is an option for you - you could be on a 350 or 300 2t etc. and thats even better in the rough stuff than a 450/500.
In the same vein one can suck it up on the 500 on tar I guess we can suck it up on the 690 when it gets to be hectic sand etc. The 500 must be chosen though because it CAN do tar. Otherwise one would rather be on a 300 2t right?
i.e to me the lighter the bike in real tough areas the better it will be."

@Omninorm  I am going to selectively quote you, as it is a good example of how adventure means different things to different people, and how that influences our choice of bike.

Take my upcoming Angola trip as an example.  I will trailer the bike up to the border and ride from there, because my adventure starts where the road ends.  Wasting four days riding gravel or tar highways up and down makes zero sense to me.  It's boring and is four days I could've spent either with my family or doing something that appeals to my sense of adventure.  Even though I trailer I will still spend two weeks and a couple of thousand km's off the beaten track having the time of my life. 

Can you do the Angola loop on a 300 two-stroke?  I've got no clue and not sure it's something I'd want to try.  We also need to understand that with adventure riding every single bike is a compromise in one way or another.  Whether it be weight, speed, power, reliability, carrying capacity, off-road capability, service intervals or comfort.  Taking into account my view on what constitutes ADV riding (and I speak only for myself) the 500 is the best combination of compromises for me.  For you it's different, because your definition of adventure (Not a adventure if you have to ride back to a trailer) is different than mine, thus you need something that's comfortable doing gravel highways (for example).

We tend to often debate a specific model of bike, without exploring the reasoning behind a riders choice.

What I appreciate about this thread is that it has evolved into a wonderful discussion around lightweight motorcycling, something that does not often happen here, at least not without copious brand-bashing or handbags about how shit and ill-suited for adventure the >1000cc class bikes are.



Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on February 08, 2018, 02:32:31 pm
I agree, this thread is great.

On some of the earlier points, I also agree, adventure can mean so many different things. But most important to me is, to actually go and do it, what ever it is, never mind what bike you use. But yes, some bikes are better suited and will make it more enjoyable.

I mean, you can go and research okes that did the Dakar in the 80's on XT's and even R80S(not GS) bikes. One of those crazies were quoted as saying(paraphrasing), "where else can you go and tour through Africa with food, fuel and medical support all the way?"

Also, the trailering and having to circle back is a moot point, as most of us have to circle back on all our trips. Only a lucky few can go cross continents etc.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rough Rider on February 08, 2018, 02:40:24 pm
We always end up back at the equation for the ideal number of bikes required in our garage (N+1) with N being the number we already have ;D  :3some:

I wish I still owned every single bike I have ever owned because in some way or another I miss each of them.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 08, 2018, 03:01:26 pm
To me trailering means there is a destination in mind and then a playground to play in. You are probably passing a ton of awesome spots and riding areas on the way that you dont know about.
Riding there means exploring finding areas to go and ride. I suppose if one have a destination you want to go ride at the trailer makes sense on some levels.

I agree this thread has really been good so far. Nice to see it being about bikes for a change ;)

@ roughrider  Having had a 250 Exc 2t - it was a blast, should have never sold it a hoot everywhere in atlantis..  Although I do think I'm a better rider on my WR 250 4t which is also a ton of fun. And that thing is plated so I can ride around fine. Won't do along highway stint though.


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 08, 2018, 06:49:02 pm
I am going to trailer my 500 on my next trip - I am driving 1800 km from home along the straightest most boring roads in the world to get to my start point - then I'm going to leave my bakkie there and ride almost 3000 km in 2 weeks in places where my bakkie can't go - and then I'm going back to my bakkie to drive 1800 km home again

Define trailering ? Is that 20 km to Atlantis or nearly 2000 km deep into another country ?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on February 08, 2018, 07:26:42 pm
I am going to trailer my 500 on my next trip - I am driving 1800 km from home along the straightest most boring roads in the world to get to my start point - then I'm going to leave my bakkie there and ride almost 3000 km in 2 weeks in places where my bakkie can't go - and then I'm going back to my bakkie to drive 1800 km home again

Define trailering ? Is that 20 km to Atlantis or nearly 2000 km deep into another country ?

This is just a longer version of a day out at Atlantis.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 08, 2018, 07:38:50 pm
I am going to trailer my 500 on my next trip - I am driving 1800 km from home along the straightest most boring roads in the world to get to my start point - then I'm going to leave my bakkie there and ride almost 3000 km in 2 weeks in places where my bakkie can't go - and then I'm going back to my bakkie to drive 1800 km home again

Define trailering ? Is that 20 km to Atlantis or nearly 2000 km deep into another country ?

This is just a longer version of a day out at Atlantis.

You deserve that spoon
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on February 08, 2018, 07:42:21 pm
 :laughing4:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: boland on February 08, 2018, 07:57:24 pm
You guys know where I can find a thread about exonomically adventurizing a EXC500? :lol8:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: lone riderer on February 08, 2018, 10:36:01 pm
You guys know where I can find a thread about exonomically adventurizing a EXC500? :lol8:

 :spitcoffee:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 08, 2018, 10:41:57 pm
I am going to trailer my 500 on my next trip - I am driving 1800 km from home along the straightest most boring roads in the world to get to my start point - then I'm going to leave my bakkie there and ride almost 3000 km in 2 weeks in places where my bakkie can't go - and then I'm going back to my bakkie to drive 1800 km home again

Define trailering ? Is that 20 km to Atlantis or nearly 2000 km deep into another country ?

This is just a longer version of a day out at Atlantis.

 :lol8:

Yeah I see benefits of a trailer on some places. Of course if there is no great exploring to do for 1800km then I'll trailer as well but now let's take something in the middle and this is just an example to explain my point of view:

250 - 300km somewhere. Are you going to trailer or ride?

I'll take my 690 no problem. I mean I'm sure the 500 can do it, but many don't want to I suppose. Lets say you want to ride from your place to Atlantis? You going to trailer?
You may as well leave the adventuring and ride it as it comes off the floo if you are going to trailer it.

I'm genuinely interested in how you guys ride them because I'm open to possibility of getting one someday. I didn't listen about the 690 at the time and I am so happy I decided to do it. I never see a 500 on the road anywhere. 
I can't dismiss the fact that I do have to do tar a lot of the time to get to riding areas. If I didn't need to do more than say 30km's my WR will do whatever dirt riding I need it to do. I do tar and hence the 690, that I now ride more than my 250 and 1200GS to any place where the tar stops and beyond. In the sand and rocks the 690 can get heavy but it copes. I can always do better though :)

We obviously all have different riding criteria although we have big overlaps in some peoples cases, and that's cool - I see every weekend a bunch of people trailer to Zone 7 ride an hour, drink beers for 3 and ride back. As long as they enjoy it, but it just goes to show that one will have to think about this stuff carefully before opening your wallet on a bike on what type of riding we think we will want to do and what we actually do.

In fact ones should have a 250 / 300  / 500  / 690 / 1090 / 1290 A.R / 1290 Superduke  and be done with it. Then you can decide whatever is the best tool for the job.  :D
Amazing that KTM actually caters for us all.

@boland -   :lol8: I think you need to throw on a bigger Fuel tank, some charge points a gps bracket and some luggage and its done. Not going to get more economical that that.


Anyway, lets see more adventurized 500's.  :ricky:

Reimans 500 with customized fairing.

(http://www.brake-magazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/51_BD__MG_0362.jpg)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TinusBez on February 09, 2018, 04:32:04 am
You guys fit cush hubs ?

I don't but been thinking about it. You really only need it for tar driving. Was attending some corporate training near RAD and popped in there to browse and asked about this, spares guy said there isn't enough space on the stock rim so you need another rim. I left it there and didn't research cush any further because my liaison to happy place is less than 5km or I put it on the bakkie, enjoy the brief comfort of air conditioning and listening to the radio before the afkak starts at Heidelberg for example. Like so



Yes I can ride there but on back roads it takes an hour and I don't know whether I'll be in a state to ride back after Heidelberg. This is of course weekend warrior where one can't get out of GP to go do a multi day trip in some gnarly terrain.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 09, 2018, 07:44:44 am
Man this is nice!

(http://www.brake-magazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/51_BD__MG_0362.jpg)


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ClimbingTurtle on February 09, 2018, 07:45:30 am
You guys fit cush hubs ?

I don't but been thinking about it. You really only need it for tar driving. Was attending some corporate training near RAD and popped in there to browse and asked about this, spares guy said there isn't enough space on the stock rim so you need another rim. I left it there and didn't research cush any further because my liaison to happy place is less than 5km or I put it on the bakkie, enjoy the brief comfort of air conditioning and listening to the radio before the afkak starts at Heidelberg for example. Like so
Yes I can ride there but on back roads it takes an hour and I don't know whether I'll be in a state to ride back after Heidelberg. This is of course weekend warrior where one can't get out of GP to go do a multi day trip in some gnarly terrain.

On AdvRider there is a thread similar to this one - however they have explored the Cush drive options as well - in te US there is a version of the standard Cush Drive with rubbers in the hub available, as well as a Cush Sprocket - there are rubbers etc. inbetween  the Standard Hub and aftermarket sprocket system..... Will look for it....
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 09, 2018, 08:24:30 am
@TinusBez

(http://lc8ty.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/KTM-530-EXC/003/833293172_DpnKg-L.jpg)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ClimbingTurtle on February 09, 2018, 08:54:02 am
The Beta 480 also intrigues me as an option for this type of riding.

Any idea what these cost....?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on February 09, 2018, 08:54:41 am
@TinusBez

Tinus, are you the same Tinus as on 500/alpha group on FB?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 09, 2018, 09:31:25 am
The Beta 480 also intrigues me as an option for this type of riding.

Any idea what these cost....?

There is the 480 RR version with 3500km on the clock going for R69K at Cayenne. So no idea what they cost new. Maybe give them a call out of interest sake.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Beetman on February 09, 2018, 09:49:15 am
Man this is nice!

(http://www.brake-magazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/51_BD__MG_0362.jpg)

I like this bag, where can i get one?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 09, 2018, 10:11:12 am
The baggage that the Motonomad crew used is also a one-off design. “I’ve packed my life onto a dirt bike many times, but never before has it all been so perfectly harnessed. These soft pannier bags are handcrafted masterpieces, fabricated specifically for the 500EXC by Scott Britnell. The durable bags are just another skill Scotty brings to the table.  They’re designed to carry a one-man tent, air mattress and sleeping bag, two spare tubes, 4 litres of water, shoes, jeans, a Fox hoodie, two Fox tees, toiletries case, brake and clutch lever, spark plug, air filter, brake pads, 14T front sprocket, oil filter kit, and enough free space to cram 2kg of food.”
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 09, 2018, 10:19:41 am
Man this is nice!

(http://www.brake-magazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/51_BD__MG_0362.jpg)

I like this bag, where can i get one?

It's very similar imho to the Giant Loop Coyote bag.

http://www.giantloopmoto.com/product/coyote-saddlebag-roll-top/

Flying Brick sells these.


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 09, 2018, 10:21:08 am
But i'm sure Nomad could make for you
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 09, 2018, 10:26:15 am
The baggage that the Motonomad crew used is also a one-off design. “I’ve packed my life onto a dirt bike many times, but never before has it all been so perfectly harnessed. These soft pannier bags are handcrafted masterpieces, fabricated specifically for the 500EXC by Scott Britnell. The durable bags are just another skill Scotty brings to the table.  They’re designed to carry a one-man tent, air mattress and sleeping bag, two spare tubes, 4 litres of water, shoes, jeans, a Fox hoodie, two Fox tees, toiletries case, brake and clutch lever, spark plug, air filter, brake pads, 14T front sprocket, oil filter kit, and enough free space to cram 2kg of food.”

You can pack that no problem into quite a few bags availabke on the market - i did many times. Go for the. Backbone reckless type such as giant loop, altrider or mosko moto. Actually if you want cheapest option, AlanB is selling out his u bags at trade section. Just not sure how they will handle exhayst heat - check with him.

I have to say, that fairing on 500 in the picture is just plain hideous. If you feel you need fairing on 500, you are looking at wrong bike imo. You need all tge airflow you can get where these bikes should be ridden, and tgere is no need for it ti cruise at 100-120 kmh
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on February 09, 2018, 11:04:21 am
 
The Beta 480 also intrigues me as an option for this type of riding.

Any idea what these cost....?

There is the 480 RR version with 3500km on the clock going for R69K at Cayenne. So no idea what they cost new. Maybe give them a call out of interest sake.


I checked out that add. It seems it is a 2015 model, i.e. pre-fuel injected. Still a nice bike though. Watched a few reviews, and it seems the 480RR comes standard sprung for a 95kg rider, which is nice. The KTM is probably a better option though simply because there are more dealers, and they hold their value better.

All the 300's and a single 350 I've had over the years were spring for light weights, and it cost north of R6000 to have the springs changed out and the suspention tuned for my unique physique. This is another cost to bear in mind if you plan to adventurise your 500, particularly if you plan to carry extra fuel and camping gear. If you weigh 95kg, carry and extra 5 litres of fuel, a tent, sleeping bag,change of clothes, tools, Camelback, etc., you will be exceeding the standard suspensions design capabilities by about 30%. OK if you putter all over the place, but potentially disastrous if you hit an unexpected erosion ditch at 120km/h.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 09, 2018, 11:11:05 am
The baggage that the Motonomad crew used is also a one-off design. “I’ve packed my life onto a dirt bike many times, but never before has it all been so perfectly harnessed. These soft pannier bags are handcrafted masterpieces, fabricated specifically for the 500EXC by Scott Britnell. The durable bags are just another skill Scotty brings to the table.  They’re designed to carry a one-man tent, air mattress and sleeping bag, two spare tubes, 4 litres of water, shoes, jeans, a Fox hoodie, two Fox tees, toiletries case, brake and clutch lever, spark plug, air filter, brake pads, 14T front sprocket, oil filter kit, and enough free space to cram 2kg of food.”

You can pack that no problem into quite a few bags availabke on the market - i did many times. Go for the. Backbone reckless type such as giant loop, altrider or mosko moto. Actually if you want cheapest option, AlanB is selling out his u bags at trade section. Just not sure how they will handle exhayst heat - check with him.

I have to say, that fairing on 500 in the picture is just plain hideous. If you feel you need fairing on 500, you are looking at wrong bike imo. You need all tge airflow you can get where these bikes should be ridden, and tgere is no need for it ti cruise at 100-120 kmh

I kinda like it and it has function


(http://www.brake-magazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/51_BD_Tower_MG_0320.jpg)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 09, 2018, 11:14:50 am


8:24
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 09, 2018, 11:19:08 am
Terrain covered is actually incredible

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 09, 2018, 11:20:46 am
If you want to adventurise anything, stay clear of beta. There are no accessories available for it - just look up bigger tank which is must. We have one in our ridding circle and while im sure great bike - not ready for tge kind of trips this thread is about.

Suspension - yes you has to fet that sorted, we talked about it. And it is true more or less for any bike, for me that is just ticket to the game.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 09, 2018, 11:31:52 am
Terrain covered is actually incredible



I want those tyres on my 690  :ricky:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ClimbingTurtle on February 09, 2018, 11:44:20 am


I kinda like it and it has function


(http://www.brake-magazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/51_BD_Tower_MG_0320.jpg)

Kinda concerning that this bike has to have a T-Wrench Allen Key so close at hand......
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 09, 2018, 11:47:05 am
and spare bolts in bar pad :)

probably for camera mounts etc
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 09, 2018, 11:48:28 am
If you want to adventurise anything, stay clear of beta. There are no accessories available for it - just look up bigger tank which is must. We have one in our ridding circle and while im sure great bike - not ready for tge kind of trips this thread is about.

Suspension - yes you has to fet that sorted, we talked about it. And it is true more or less for any bike, for me that is just ticket to the game.
+1 like a reviewer said riding even out of sight of your bakkie you better need extra fuel. I'm sure first and 2nd Motonomad they used Giant Loop bags.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TinusBez on February 09, 2018, 11:54:15 am
On AdvRider there is a thread similar to this one - however they have explored the Cush drive options as well - in te US there is a version of the standard Cush Drive with rubbers in the hub available, as well as a Cush Sprocket - there are rubbers etc. inbetween  the Standard Hub and aftermarket sprocket system..... Will look for it....

Thank you. Will be helpful if they also explain the risk of not doing it. Guy at RAD explained that tar riding without cush is heavy on the gearbox especially if you ride hard, stop/start, especially stopping.

@TinusBez

(http://lc8ty.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/KTM-530-EXC/003/833293172_DpnKg-L.jpg)

Looks nice, do you know cost and where?

I certainly won't pack up and ride anywhere more than 10-20km's on tarmac so begs the question whether cush is "economic" but against the backdrop of not doing i.e. new gear, it may be small price to pay if you plan on doing longish liaisons between the fun stuff.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 09, 2018, 12:02:33 pm
Cush drive - this is what i was able to establish when i was looking into this (Justin/MTP/ Kamanya, pls correct me if i remember it wrong):

There is some kind of cush drve or some such in gearbox, so the gearbox itself should be fine - at least if you dont do 100 km a day on tar. You will still probably get higher sprockets and chain wear. The cheapest solution fir that is getting old rear wheel from ktm 640 with the cush drive.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Buff on February 09, 2018, 12:16:01 pm
Cush drive sprocket would be the cheaper alternative  :thumleft:

http://www.cushdrive.com/
https://www.motomox.co.nz
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on February 09, 2018, 12:29:55 pm
.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ClimbingTurtle on February 09, 2018, 12:31:01 pm
Cush drive sprocket would be the cheaper alternative  :thumleft:

http://www.cushdrive.com/
https://www.motomox.co.nz

Thats the ones I saw - cheers Buff
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 09, 2018, 12:33:12 pm


I kinda like it and it has function


(http://www.brake-magazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/51_BD_Tower_MG_0320.jpg)

Kinda concerning that this bike has to have a T-Wrench Allen Key so close at hand......

THis is a KTM we are talking about after all....  :lol8: Embrace it.

But the KTM's come with a proper toolkit actually. Nice little bag with propper tools. That T Wrench allen is one of the things in the bag.
Maybe a reason  :patch:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on February 09, 2018, 12:46:49 pm
But the KTM's come with a proper toolkit actually. Nice little bag with propper tools. That T Wrench allen is one of the things in the bag.
Maybe a reason  :patch:

I always struggled to get that T wrench back in the bag with the other tools.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 09, 2018, 12:58:51 pm


I kinda like it and it has function


(http://www.brake-magazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/51_BD_Tower_MG_0320.jpg)

Kinda concerning that this bike has to have a T-Wrench Allen Key so close at hand......

THis is a KTM we are talking about after all....  :lol8: Embrace it.

But the KTM's come with a proper toolkit actually. Nice little bag with propper tools. That T Wrench allen is one of the things in the bag.
Maybe a reason  :patch:
Even spare bolts in the bar pad, this guy is prepared
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 09, 2018, 01:23:43 pm
But the KTM's come with a proper toolkit actually. Nice little bag with propper tools. That T Wrench allen is one of the things in the bag.
Maybe a reason  :patch:

I always struggled to get that T wrench back in the bag with the other tools.
HA! I thought it was just me :D
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rough Rider on February 09, 2018, 02:13:01 pm

[/quote]Even spare bolts in the bar pad, this guy is prepared
[/quote]

It is a KTM after all.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TK on February 09, 2018, 08:19:32 pm
If you want to adventurise anything, stay clear of beta. There are no accessories available for it - just look up bigger tank which is must. We have one in our ridding circle and while im sure great bike - not ready for tge kind of trips this thread is about.

Suspension - yes you has to fet that sorted, we talked about it. And it is true more or less for any bike, for me that is just ticket to the game.

Hey Martin.....beta me and you talk.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 12, 2018, 03:35:01 pm
Where do you guys mount the GPS? best spot for me seems  to the left of the steering head and fastened to the handguard bracket (Cycra)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 12, 2018, 03:56:45 pm
Like so:

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4739/39215196922_3560eb7633_b.jpg)

What gps you are trying to mount Bertie, that you need to brace it on handguard? I have etrex and that one is mounted on handlebar  only.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 12, 2018, 04:11:40 pm
Oh look Xpat's fav terrain.......................off camber  :pot:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 12, 2018, 04:18:19 pm
Like so:

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4739/39215196922_3560eb7633_b.jpg)

What gps you are trying to mount Bertie, that you need to brace it on handguard? I have etrex and that one is mounted on handlebar  only.

Got the exact same GPS and exact same GPS holder at the exact same spot on my 690.  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 12, 2018, 05:04:24 pm
I am loving this thread. Thanks to everyone who contributed so far.

There is another option, much more economic than Mousses/Tubliss: Use 2 tubes, one inside the other in both wheels. No more snake bites, and 80% less punctures guaranteed. Also you don't need those thick tubes, you can get away with the normal ones. :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 12, 2018, 05:25:52 pm
My GPS is mounted via RAM mount just left of my handlebar clamps
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Amsterdam on February 12, 2018, 05:43:29 pm
I am loving this thread. Thanks to everyone who contributed so far.

There is another option, much more economic than Mousses/Tubliss: Use 2 tubes, one inside the other in both wheels. No more snake bites, and 80% less punctures guaranteed. Also you don't need those thick tubes, you can get away with the normal ones. :thumleft:

I have been thinking about that for many years but never bothered.  Since I get punctures all the time (just the other day on the way to Cederberg I already had a puncture before turning off the N1 near Stellenbosch) my riding mates might appreciate this.  But one question, doesn't it move a create friction rubs which lead to punctures?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 12, 2018, 05:57:16 pm
I am loving this thread. Thanks to everyone who contributed so far.

There is another option, much more economic than Mousses/Tubliss: Use 2 tubes, one inside the other in both wheels. No more snake bites, and 80% less punctures guaranteed. Also you don't need those thick tubes, you can get away with the normal ones. :thumleft:

I have been thinking about that for many years but never bothered.  Since I get punctures all the time (just the other day on the way to Cederberg I already had a puncture before turning off the N1 near Stellenbosch) my riding mates might appreciate this.  But one question, doesn't it move a create friction rubs which lead to punctures?

Not in my experience. I have also used this system on my 800GS and had no problems apart from sometimes having balancing issues which you might feel on a smooth tarred road at certain speeds. I supposed you could balance your tyres if you were so inclined but the vibration experienced disappeared if I rode faster :ricky:

On my 450 I used this system with great success and never had the balanced wheel issue...probably because its hard to feel it at slower speeds and/or on dirt roads.

Note you will still get a puncture from time to time, but I found I got a noticeably less punctures with this pooratech approach.

Another advantage is if you do get a flat you can ride up to quite a distance and speeds of up to 80km/hr on the flat because there is more rubber in there. I have ridden 80km on a flat like this without any real issue apart from the bike being a little more "squirrely" than usual.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TK on February 12, 2018, 05:57:36 pm
I am loving this thread. Thanks to everyone who contributed so far.

There is another option, much more economic than Mousses/Tubliss: Use 2 tubes, one inside the other in both wheels. No more snake bites, and 80% less punctures guaranteed. Also you don't need those thick tubes, you can get away with the normal ones. :thumleft:

I have been thinking about that for many years but never bothered.  Since I get punctures all the time (just the other day on the way to Cederberg I already had a puncture before turning off the N1 near Stellenbosch) my riding mates might appreciate this.  But one question, doesn't it move a create friction rubs which lead to punctures?
I do the same as BB here but lube the tubes with silicon paste. Good results so far.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 12, 2018, 06:46:08 pm
Thanks for all the advice guys, really learning lots here!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on February 12, 2018, 07:10:25 pm
I did the tube inside a tube trick for many years and it does work as BlueBull2007 says, and if you do have a puncture there is usually enough rubber inside the tyre to keep you going. I did a 2nd 60km loop in an enduro with a completely flat tyre once. However, it does make the wheel heavier and more of a pain in the arse to change so now I can stop and change a tube without a time penalty I've given up on it.

I have to say, looking at some of pictures of kitted out KTM's with their enormous towers and dangling tools, that some of these people are spending too long holding on to their cock.

GPS goes here:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 13, 2018, 08:15:15 am
On the handlebar with a normal RAM mount
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 13, 2018, 11:55:13 am
These HBD units are very cool

(http://mastermarine.smugmug.com/photos/i-mwgCS4z/0/XL/i-mwgCS4z-XL.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Constantinople on February 13, 2018, 01:27:35 pm
I also borrowed the tube in tube technique from BB. Got a flat on my 250 rally during some bushwakking (long thorn probably) in kaokoland, without noticing. Got on the dirt road towards Opuwo and only noticed after 15-20 km of riding at 110-120 km/hr that the front tyre is making a funny noise. Stopped. And it was completely flat, however handling was not affected much. Fortunately only a slow leak, pumped up and finished the last bit to the campsite before dark.  :ricky:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 15, 2018, 01:27:52 pm
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 16, 2018, 02:08:12 pm
So the 990's stablemate has arrived...

Will spend the weekend taking off all the roadworthy crap, fitting the bashplate and test-fitting the luggage.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/fbRDRpePAJpPumP-r5GbAYAuyAiQIWnTw2_PS-3mhU3xkz5A3SDsnLA428xZWCVXVNjAlcBn83W0JBlmH9ukv5CzFFH28mUpTePci07vulLPajdWRBxjRHQ1Zd-jPu1c0JOrDtxBmgoB0M_ZWy_f-JHGetkudZIaplgJanungTkz8diXqf9UTNnF8hWIEOZuPa7inlcFl2_NfF43xiNaHZ5SYI0qHO-53lrm-ftmHo496lLM6CH7K_DZVSvu6nEe2NcOQzr6sBh9Edyc1ZyzCNzwO2-ZxRNbi8Oh2VBvvJHSAnuSq9nQCKeIUaDAE84NcvPlzeQP1AF-lWqIuo5GQGtcFxDJVp0B0wvhKzaHA4-Vg1nkWEVmvram04LmfqujD9aldwPS5vrQ8rrmGNBwnomL9DhyNO6Q0d57FkI-IJDVohgQrg-iyJhc_9uNwkSBu5CffsM3gtEJ05Z3JGlT8lFI9DK5kiossvodlDI7oZh4wQ-FEvyZXr6k9TSIly-BbaXG016li_DYRKhSQwvV6Zpp02CoC6DdNppvYgdIRsbYlHfmutfKl5PIbVg3PpeohfbmBMUSxTvn1osAFW4mTdFiKp81DTawgfr6jTo=w1304-h978-no)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on February 16, 2018, 02:26:48 pm
looks good, Damaraland!  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 16, 2018, 02:40:35 pm
Mooi man.......... suppose it depends what/where you plan on riding it.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 16, 2018, 02:44:25 pm
So the 990's stablemate has arrived...

Will spend the weekend taking off all the roadworthy crap, fitting the bashplate and test-fitting the luggage.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/fbRDRpePAJpPumP-r5GbAYAuyAiQIWnTw2_PS-3mhU3xkz5A3SDsnLA428xZWCVXVNjAlcBn83W0JBlmH9ukv5CzFFH28mUpTePci07vulLPajdWRBxjRHQ1Zd-jPu1c0JOrDtxBmgoB0M_ZWy_f-JHGetkudZIaplgJanungTkz8diXqf9UTNnF8hWIEOZuPa7inlcFl2_NfF43xiNaHZ5SYI0qHO-53lrm-ftmHo496lLM6CH7K_DZVSvu6nEe2NcOQzr6sBh9Edyc1ZyzCNzwO2-ZxRNbi8Oh2VBvvJHSAnuSq9nQCKeIUaDAE84NcvPlzeQP1AF-lWqIuo5GQGtcFxDJVp0B0wvhKzaHA4-Vg1nkWEVmvram04LmfqujD9aldwPS5vrQ8rrmGNBwnomL9DhyNO6Q0d57FkI-IJDVohgQrg-iyJhc_9uNwkSBu5CffsM3gtEJ05Z3JGlT8lFI9DK5kiossvodlDI7oZh4wQ-FEvyZXr6k9TSIly-BbaXG016li_DYRKhSQwvV6Zpp02CoC6DdNppvYgdIRsbYlHfmutfKl5PIbVg3PpeohfbmBMUSxTvn1osAFW4mTdFiKp81DTawgfr6jTo=w1304-h978-no)

Lekker!  :ricky:
Safe travels!

Why remove the roadworthy stuff? You not taking it on the road at all?

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on February 16, 2018, 02:46:38 pm
Won't take you long to remove all the roadworthy stuff! haha 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 16, 2018, 03:10:04 pm
Re roadworthy - replacing the crappy tailpiece with a neater, smaller piece with integrated LED flickers.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/JLrZoZgq-BG--ZeGjJ6jpp9vJW6f-ofu5lx-TgqHLBReO58vRPrlujKIsQ8cZDU7T5N-c2M69eNBRI7n6d1-gNeJV-p-nRNxCeKvAmqzNTn03w6Gwq0AqHcrAumVDh4TMU3UsYeSNYDXy5ITGfG_YLHmP4ALCjg2qsMa7ojwi6t2o81xgbwcsHCjHmaq5N1xf4gMXsSEY8S329_hAc0GhWuOPLxh2rOb5jBGjxoYQCnQItETiyrCIjOO6n4fLfKtxD-2xU7H3HZsGM9Z01VaF6_Hwhwcw0yMsWcOSInjkJwE47AalvUaJMZXmcxhrv7eIFc_nb-vikHHJksfUxKdcoym178-X3ZHrziz1hzvLBVTyiy1WSLHVOGeV27romlM8oFtzeaA1XzB4d7wAMXXJ2_vX6gu1zXuLtzvrTJs2ocaZUcI651pFmLOwEBb5e9jADUxeupIgvj8eUgtqYAh97vWsp7Ox0XLDpvDpo6dgtlAbEKTfK1QqUVx59Wk6oPaChp1sVMAgcxwo3khR5vghEPaz-_MNCStg7M8HOZE9-684LYwJiEW99A_WgcjFIbYNoritcVb_z7iHp16gIIYJgtRbKGbUX8MpHY7818=w1120-h369-no)

Front Flickers will be replaced by this, fits to Cycra handguards:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/lQuVgByYO62H6ARLEFCGq_FzJC-Qas4Jo721-joRTZuL6kdEm6Zkt3G8CaMPz7OcCVgzCTb3ShP0S7_3C6gSqcYk9domX2ScpjdxxD_nkb92TEOpXt5uwQBP9Px1WuuQHhX2UBXorE3x22a0NYdaKO2QYsgPIlj1hKs7kUJujqQHT3R-KqW7p6nH9eoQFPCCu-7w9GodC5dtVVeoX5QFdbXwZLPdWE_dPZoxAc9-uxE3QZk9QB5e3ezxuEpAmAc_CPT_K-B4ZH4DJ9S2oQ_OLlokNanpFPGIo_VcKSoByGLRLhkgY_nkbe3Peb9cAerRyTP-dOfiS2fPtxyGx6zFa9BDSGYuF3pyVqfdwjo7GoDcYduj2bPXjabslpi3dj89jJSVW4hMOiIxGghX9DmDfpBW-ZfnwhEeGK9oDPe-lyY_png2UIKdeLz8yILoE8oZK_fnYjDWT53FBKnOCzS6vFK46hfACd6mN9avxh2-unGZrGlsKz77JX2i4zDOPpO-vUyAtXCi5oFk7yYMx8iHohnxDFWgf_SsfJzF7GCC2z0lG5-b620gZRaXZk-yXF6hSn-A-HVwv0sE9dUK5LSEisHzVnabIBs5SqToOKk=w310-h359-no)

The stock mirrors will get replaced by something cheap, nasty, foldable and easily removable.  Something like this https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B074QP9J9V?tag=pda0fc-20 (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B074QP9J9V?tag=pda0fc-20)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 16, 2018, 03:14:34 pm
Re roadworthy - replacing the crappy tailpiece with a neater, smaller piece with integrated LED flickers.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/JLrZoZgq-BG--ZeGjJ6jpp9vJW6f-ofu5lx-TgqHLBReO58vRPrlujKIsQ8cZDU7T5N-c2M69eNBRI7n6d1-gNeJV-p-nRNxCeKvAmqzNTn03w6Gwq0AqHcrAumVDh4TMU3UsYeSNYDXy5ITGfG_YLHmP4ALCjg2qsMa7ojwi6t2o81xgbwcsHCjHmaq5N1xf4gMXsSEY8S329_hAc0GhWuOPLxh2rOb5jBGjxoYQCnQItETiyrCIjOO6n4fLfKtxD-2xU7H3HZsGM9Z01VaF6_Hwhwcw0yMsWcOSInjkJwE47AalvUaJMZXmcxhrv7eIFc_nb-vikHHJksfUxKdcoym178-X3ZHrziz1hzvLBVTyiy1WSLHVOGeV27romlM8oFtzeaA1XzB4d7wAMXXJ2_vX6gu1zXuLtzvrTJs2ocaZUcI651pFmLOwEBb5e9jADUxeupIgvj8eUgtqYAh97vWsp7Ox0XLDpvDpo6dgtlAbEKTfK1QqUVx59Wk6oPaChp1sVMAgcxwo3khR5vghEPaz-_MNCStg7M8HOZE9-684LYwJiEW99A_WgcjFIbYNoritcVb_z7iHp16gIIYJgtRbKGbUX8MpHY7818=w1120-h369-no)

Front Flickers will be replaced by this, fits to Cycra handguards:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/lQuVgByYO62H6ARLEFCGq_FzJC-Qas4Jo721-joRTZuL6kdEm6Zkt3G8CaMPz7OcCVgzCTb3ShP0S7_3C6gSqcYk9domX2ScpjdxxD_nkb92TEOpXt5uwQBP9Px1WuuQHhX2UBXorE3x22a0NYdaKO2QYsgPIlj1hKs7kUJujqQHT3R-KqW7p6nH9eoQFPCCu-7w9GodC5dtVVeoX5QFdbXwZLPdWE_dPZoxAc9-uxE3QZk9QB5e3ezxuEpAmAc_CPT_K-B4ZH4DJ9S2oQ_OLlokNanpFPGIo_VcKSoByGLRLhkgY_nkbe3Peb9cAerRyTP-dOfiS2fPtxyGx6zFa9BDSGYuF3pyVqfdwjo7GoDcYduj2bPXjabslpi3dj89jJSVW4hMOiIxGghX9DmDfpBW-ZfnwhEeGK9oDPe-lyY_png2UIKdeLz8yILoE8oZK_fnYjDWT53FBKnOCzS6vFK46hfACd6mN9avxh2-unGZrGlsKz77JX2i4zDOPpO-vUyAtXCi5oFk7yYMx8iHohnxDFWgf_SsfJzF7GCC2z0lG5-b620gZRaXZk-yXF6hSn-A-HVwv0sE9dUK5LSEisHzVnabIBs5SqToOKk=w310-h359-no)

Ah of course, that makes sense  :thumleft: Alsmost wondered what the point of the thread was  :lol8:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: YoungGSer on February 16, 2018, 03:20:03 pm
Congrats, great looking bike. Don’t forget to take it for a ride this weekend as well


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on February 16, 2018, 03:22:30 pm
I tried mounting flickers on my bush guards. When you do you will be amazed at how many trees and bushes you push through that are just strong enough to break indicator plastic. I gave up and put one on each side of the headlamp number board.   
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 16, 2018, 03:24:43 pm
Congrats, great looking bike. Don’t forget to take it for a ride this weekend as well


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Thanks :thumleft: 

I'm a sink or swim kind of guy, competing in my first enduro this weekend.  OK it's kind of a fun day, but in my mind I will be Marc Coma :ricky:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 16, 2018, 03:28:17 pm


Ah of course, that makes sense  :thumleft: Alsmost wondered what the point of the thread was  :lol8:
[/quote]

I think the thread has long since evolved into something more than a build thread :thumleft:

Having said that, once I'm done I will edit my original post with everything I've did, part numbers, pics etc. so that there is value for someone who wants do do something similar.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 16, 2018, 03:35:50 pm

Quote

Ah of course, that makes sense  :thumleft: Alsmost wondered what the point of the thread was  :lol8:


I think the thread has long since evolved into something more than a build thread :thumleft:

Having said that, once I'm done I will edit my original post with everything I've did, part numbers, pics etc. so that there is value for someone who wants do do something similar.

Please keep at it. :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 16, 2018, 03:37:41 pm
Congrats - looks good! But desperately needs bigger tank...

I tried mounting flickers on my bush guards. When you do you will be amazed at how many trees and bushes you push through that are just strong enough to break indicator plastic. I gave up and put one on each side of the headlamp number board.

+1

Leave the front flickers you have on - much better IMO - less vulnerable in crash (especially once you put the big tank on) and especially against the branches and bushes. Here are handguards on my 690 after one of the trips:

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4211/34944053543_d53f6a95a7_b.jpg)

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4283/35584499712_f46e67c529_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 16, 2018, 03:51:50 pm
Gonna fit the Acerbis 15.5L tank. Really bummed that you don't get the proper 20L ones anymore for the 2017 and up bikes.

Already ordered the handguards flickers, fortunately they're cheap enough to take a chance on plus can easily revert to stock if they turn out to be shit.

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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 16, 2018, 04:00:35 pm
Do that tail tidy, but then IMO the priority should be getting suspension set-up right. I had both front and back springs changed for my weight (I was fat and needed to cater for luggage) and I had the bike lowered a bit (I'm 179cm) which makes it more stable and manageable in gnarly situations (you will not have too many of those though in Namibia - it's required more for Lesotho and such). That said, I have lost about 15 kgs since and still use the same springs, so maybe you can get away with whatever standard they come with. But at minimum, get the sag right.

That 15 liter tank is bummer. How do you plan to increase range for Doodsakker? I think you need at least 700 - 800 km range there, which is bitch even with big tank. Will you have support vehicle?

If you need to run it in, pop into Brandberg lodge on Monday 5th of March. There will 3 other 500s setting off for the loop of your namesake and Kaokoland...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on February 16, 2018, 04:02:23 pm
Congrats very nice  :thumleft:

Are the long range tanks available for the 350s too? Toying with the idea of getting a 350 for racing and the odd adventure trip
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 16, 2018, 04:05:07 pm
Congrats very nice  :thumleft:

Are the long range tanks available for the 350s too? Toying with the idea of getting a 350 for racing and the odd adventure trip
Dwerg I would lie if I tell you, but do know earlier in the thread @xpat shared a Acerbis catalogue with all their tanks.

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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on February 16, 2018, 04:08:33 pm
"I'm a sink or swim kind of guy, competing in my first enduro this weekend.  OK it's kind of a fun day, but in my mind I will be Marc Coma"

I promised my wife I would never, ever,ever enter another enduro and I'm doing the Natal WFO enduro tomorrow. She still hasn't found out, I told her I'm going for a ride with Stuart Joyner which is in itself quite true.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 16, 2018, 04:14:31 pm
Do that tail tidy, but then IMO the priority should be getting suspension set-up right. I had both front and back springs changed for my weight (I was fat and needed to cater for luggage) and I had the bike lowered a bit (I'm 179cm) which makes it more stable and manageable in gnarly situations (you will not have too many of those though in Namibia - it's required more for Lesotho and such). That said, I have lost about 15 kgs since and still use the same springs, so maybe you can get away with whatever standard they come with. But at minimum, get the sag right.

That 15 liter tank is bummer. How do you plan to increase range for Doodsakker? I think you need at least 700 - 800 km range there, which is bitch even with big tank. Will you have support vehicle?

If you need to run it in, pop into Brandberg lodge on Monday 5th of March. There will 3 other 500s setting off for the loop of your namesake and Kaokoland...
Stock springs are rated for 85, so am investigating other springs. Would appreciate it if you could share some details around your suspension, spring rates, oil weight etc? I'm 180 and also need to cater for luggage & fuel so my requirements should pretty much be similar to yours.

Regarding fuel, we'll need 45l (so 50 to be safe), meaning about 35l extra on the bike. No support vehicle going so we're going to have to work something out. Looking at taking collapsible containers (testing platy bottles with fuel now as we speak, look it up).

We've got a Brandberg loop planned for the weekend of the 24th, will chat to my mates and see if we can't move it to co-incide with your visit. Really looking forward to buying you a beer in return for all your advice. If I can't make it we can meet up in Windhoek, if you're passing through here?

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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 16, 2018, 05:22:45 pm
Sorry, I don't actually know what the specs of the suspension set-up are - as a typical consumer I just paid money to Hilton Hayward to deal with it, to me it is all black magic.

We will most probably pass through Windhoek at least one way, but may be in a bit of a hurry. I will let you know closer to the date - we still have some unknowns to iron out.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: YoungGSer on February 16, 2018, 07:19:29 pm
Congrats very nice  :thumleft:

Are the long range tanks available for the 350s too? Toying with the idea of getting a 350 for racing and the odd adventure trip
As far as I’m aware, the one tank fits the 350, 450 and 500 as they all use the same platform.


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 16, 2018, 08:01:23 pm
Sorry, I don't actually know what the specs of the suspension set-up are - as a typical consumer I just paid money to Hilton Hayward to deal with it, to me it is all black magic.

We will most probably pass through Windhoek at least one way, but may be in a bit of a hurry. I will let you know closer to the date - we still have some unknowns to iron out.

There is a definitely an art to it and it makes riding so much more fun and easier if its done properly. Generaly suspension is big secret though it seems among many ;D
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 16, 2018, 08:03:03 pm
Do that tail tidy, but then IMO the priority should be getting suspension set-up right. I had both front and back springs changed for my weight (I was fat and needed to cater for luggage) and I had the bike lowered a bit (I'm 179cm) which makes it more stable and manageable in gnarly situations (you will not have too many of those though in Namibia - it's required more for Lesotho and such). That said, I have lost about 15 kgs since and still use the same springs, so maybe you can get away with whatever standard they come with. But at minimum, get the sag right.

That 15 liter tank is bummer. How do you plan to increase range for Doodsakker? I think you need at least 700 - 800 km range there, which is bitch even with big tank. Will you have support vehicle?

If you need to run it in, pop into Brandberg lodge on Monday 5th of March. There will 3 other 500s setting off for the loop of your namesake and Kaokoland...
Stock springs are rated for 85, so am investigating other springs. Would appreciate it if you could share some details around your suspension, spring rates, oil weight etc? I'm 180 and also need to cater for luggage & fuel so my requirements should pretty much be similar to yours.

Regarding fuel, we'll need 45l (so 50 to be safe), meaning about 35l extra on the bike. No support vehicle going so we're going to have to work something out. Looking at taking collapsible containers (testing platy bottles with fuel now as we speak, look it up).

We've got a Brandberg loop planned for the weekend of the 24th, will chat to my mates and see if we can't move it to co-incide with your visit. Really looking forward to buying you a beer in return for all your advice. If I can't make it we can meet up in Windhoek, if you're passing through here?

Sent from my VTR-L29 using Tapatalk


Check out the Angola - its not like they said Ride report in the Roll of Honour section, you will see what the boys did for fuel containers there. Amazingly still worked quite well.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 16, 2018, 09:26:01 pm


Check out the Angola - its not like they said Ride report in the Roll of Honour section, you will see what the boys did for fuel containers there. Amazingly still worked quite well.

Definitely read that RR if you haven't - it is the reason why I joined here eventually foolishly thinking that Doodsakker was considered golden standard of adv riding on WD (no, sadly its not), but I don't think their fuel carrying solution will work for you Damaraland. They were all on big bikes with proper subframes - 640 Adventure being the smallest bike.

Given the fact that 500 basically doesn't have any subframe worth talking about, I would try to put as much weight as possible upfront. So I would buy some kind of tank bags that hang on the side to put at least 10 more litres upfront hanging on the side of the tank.

That way you might just be able to put another 20 litres into the saddle bags. But you will need another 10 or so litres of water (I may be wrong on this - check with Beserker or 2SD, they did the same route with XRR and XT600). That is cca 25 kgs at the back before you add any luggage - and that is assuming you have a space to put it somewhere. You might need to bring big backpack with, but you will most probably still struggle to pack everything in.

I would recommend to test your bike's consumption thoroughly beforehand (I've read somewhere that they are very frugal if ridden conservatively) - that will hopefully allow you to have to take less fuel (if for example you can keep it to 4l/100km, you can get away with 30 litres which is much more manageable). That report from Metaljockey is quite dramatic, mostly because they didn't time crossing of Doodsakker at low tide right, but from all that I have seen, it doesn't seem like very technical ride (again, check with 2SD or Beserker - they cruised through without any problems - check their RR in the Roll of Honor section - Trees cabaleros or some such). So if you keep your right hand in check, you should be able to make it through with much less fuel than Metaljockey and company needed for their bikes (especially LC950).
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on February 18, 2018, 10:29:55 am
Suspension too soft? Dialing in suspension.

I've read so much bleating about suspension being too soft for you big, tough adventure riders that I thought I should write a post on it. Suspension is there to maintain the contact between the wheel and the ground and maintain it's traction. There are 3 vector forces involved, we are aware of forward and lateral but remember vertical, the contact pressure. I have ridden out too many bikes recently being used by 85kg wannabees which are set up for for a mountain gorilla on Benzedrine. Get your bike to work for you, you paid for all that travel!  If you are pogo-ing around you are not getting traction. A handy test is to put a zip tie at the top of the fork tube. If it doesn't finish up as in the picture your suspension is not working for you or you need to ride harder! Don't worry if you hear a couple of clunks on landing, it won't harm it.  Wind it down!   
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 18, 2018, 11:03:07 am
Ian, most of us load the bike on the back, being with a GL type bag or saddle bags that hang on the side, so for trips surely the back spring has to be upgraded before going after the forks. The standard spring on the back is rated for 85kg and mine has been upgraded to 100+ kg but I will probably end up putting close to 130kg on the bike fully laden for our upcoming trip to Kaokoland. I am close to 100 without kit and 8liters water and 5 petrol leaves very little for other essentials. Doing adventure riding with a 500 is sure to teach me to pack mimimalistically!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on February 18, 2018, 12:28:33 pm
Too much kit Straatkat! What happened to header tanks, that was an easy 5 liters? When I went into Lesotho recently with Iain McDonald on his 530exc he had a pretty well packed giant loop and it didn't affect the bike handling and he didn't need to diddle with anything. His bike is pretty well standard apart from the fact that he's f#cked it up with so much riding!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 18, 2018, 12:54:15 pm
How many days, km's between stops ?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 18, 2018, 01:21:45 pm
Not sure if this was covered but a big problem on all enduro bikes is lights or lack thereof. The stock unit is useless when the sun sets and normally any upgrades needs a rewound uprated stator. I now see Baja designs makes a drop in LED light for the KTM's even running on the stock stator. The pricing is fair too.

 https://www.bajadesigns.com/products/Squadron-Sport-LED-KTM-2014-2016-Kits.asp

Edit ok just been through the thread and cant believe no discussion on the lights yet. Exploring unknown tracks and areas you are bound to ride at night at some point. My friend and I ran into a farm fence at night on our 450's at around 40 kmh because of poor headlights luckily my 530 flattened most of it but we could have been seriously hurt.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 18, 2018, 03:35:29 pm
How many days, km's between stops ?

Jacques, we will be doing 12 days with max distance probably 550km without fuel. The 20l tanks can do 400 so we need fuel for extra 150km at the most. That is 7.5L at fuel consumption of 20km/l. Obviously adding the fuel as soon as the tank drops.
That is aside from the water we need to carry. Luckily Xpat has been there more than a few times and maybe we can get fuel in strange places out of a drum.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 18, 2018, 03:46:18 pm
How many days, km's between stops ?

Jacques, we will be doing 12 days with max distance probably 550km without fuel. The 20l tanks can do 400 so we need fuel for extra 150km at the most. That is 7.5L at fuel consumption of 20km/l. Obviously adding the fuel as soon as the tank drops.
That is aside from the water we need to carry. Luckily Xpat has been there more than a few times and maybe we can get fuel in strange places out of a drum.
Quite a stretch, pity about the tank. I remember on the 525 with 25L I could do over 500km. Following with interest.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 18, 2018, 05:00:54 pm
The Lights

My 500 is a 2013 model and came out with the same crap headlight as the 525 and 530 - big bayonet filament bulb that has less candle power than a lit fart

I fitted HIDs to my ex 950SE - worked nicely but got super hot and after a while the reflector in the headlight got discoloured and started to turn black from the heat ...so I did not want to go HID again

I had a spare headlight shroud that came off my brother's 2015 Husky TE300 that I recently sold - this part can take a H4 halogen globe which is already a huge upgrade over the original.

I modified the shroud to fit and did some wiring mods and it worked lekker ...but then I got thinking about H4 LED bulbs ... so I bought a pair with built in fans (and the little park light LED bulbs too) and fitted both my 500 and 950SM with these LED bulbs

What a difference ...super bright white light and everything is still in stock headlight shrouds and the bikes still look original which is very important to me - I hate all these spots with extra mountings and switches etc - the simpler the better

Baja Designs want 200 US dollars = R2400 for their light per bike - mine may not be as bling and as bright as theirs but cost me R420 for 2 bikes = R210 per bike (LED bulbs were only sold in pairs for cars where I bought from) and these bulbs have all the transformer regulator rectifier mcgyvers built into them - they are designed and made to be simply plug 'n play into your car's headlight

The first 5 pics are of my 500 and the last 3 pics show my 950SM headlight
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 18, 2018, 05:45:27 pm
Must say those Baja lights are awesome. JustBendit's idea is a great alternative.

One thing I quickly realized is that you want to be able to have a lower power switch for them too. They are so bright if you happen to be riding towards a car you will blind them completely.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 18, 2018, 05:47:29 pm
Another thought is that riding at night with these new bright lights certainly increases your insect hit rate and may dazzle/startle animals into your path more easily as well.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on February 18, 2018, 06:00:32 pm
Another thought is that riding at night with these new bright lights certainly increases your insect hit rate and may dazzle/startle animals into your path more easily as well.

At least you should see them. :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on February 18, 2018, 06:03:39 pm
How many days, km's between stops ?

Jacques, we will be doing 12 days with max distance probably 550km without fuel. The 20l tanks can do 400 so we need fuel for extra 150km at the most. That is 7.5L at fuel consumption of 20km/l. Obviously adding the fuel as soon as the tank drops.
That is aside from the water we need to carry. Luckily Xpat has been there more than a few times and maybe we can get fuel in strange places out of a drum.

Some of us here in Stellenbosch are planning a Kaokoland trip in June/July on small 2strokes, as in DT175/AG100/TS185, and fuel is a big thing.  But what we have seen over the last few years is that many

little villages, kukashops and lodges now carry extra petrol. So we are going to take a chance and rely on smelling out these hoarders. :ricky:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 18, 2018, 06:39:23 pm
Whilst on the subject of petrol, what is one supposed to use in the 500? 93 or 95 up here in Gauteng?
Justin that LED globe idea is great, are they available at car spares shops such as Midas?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 18, 2018, 07:13:51 pm
Whilst on the subject of petrol, what is one supposed to use in the 500? 93 or 95 up here in Gauteng?
Justin that LED globe idea is great, are they available at car spares shops such as Midas?

Your 500 can run on any RON unleaded or even leaded petrol if you really can't get unleaded  - there is no catalytic converter

but the higher the RON the bigger and longer the wheelies

Not sure about your local spares shop - I bought these from a car accessories shop in China Town complex in Ottery Cape Town

You have to grind out / modify the back of the H4 bulb holder because this LED globe has a built in fan and is thus bigger at the rear of the bulb - but a man with your skills and intellect will work it out easy - if not just call me and I will talk you through it

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 18, 2018, 08:10:07 pm
So they work straight off the AC circuit ? Unless the 500 now has DC at the lights, I know the stator is more powerfull than what the 525 530 had.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 18, 2018, 08:16:25 pm
Bertie, take it easy with those mods. I dont want to be problem tracking in the nam riverbeds...

Keep it simple. We are not going to ride in the dark - there are crikets there that i do not want to bump into in the dark.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 19, 2018, 04:52:53 am
So they work straight off the AC circuit ? Unless the 500 now has DC at the lights, I know the stator is more powerfull than what the 525 530 had.

YES - plug and play
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 19, 2018, 07:25:41 am
So they work straight off the AC circuit ? Unless the 500 now has DC at the lights, I know the stator is more powerfull than what the 525 530 had.

YES - plug and play
Good to know  :thumleft: You don't have a pic of the beam at night do you ?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 19, 2018, 07:51:00 am
So they work straight off the AC circuit ? Unless the 500 now has DC at the lights, I know the stator is more powerfull than what the 525 530 had.

YES - plug and play
Good to know  :thumleft: You don't have a pic of the beam at night do you ?

No I don't have a night pic but will take some for this thread tonight

I almost never ride at night - in my opinion you are just looking for trouble if you do that - the only reason I did this mod is for "in case" because I am joining some guys here on a ride in a very remote area that could see us riding in the dark if we really have to
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 19, 2018, 08:15:29 am
So they work straight off the AC circuit ? Unless the 500 now has DC at the lights, I know the stator is more powerfull than what the 525 530 had.

YES - plug and play
Good to know  :thumleft: You don't have a pic of the beam at night do you ?

No I don't have a night pic but will take some for this thread tonight

I almost never ride at night - in my opinion you are just looking for trouble if you do that - the only reason I did this mod is for "in case" because I am joining some guys here on a ride in a very remote area that could see us riding in the dark if we really have to
Nobody wants to ride at night but somehow with unknown tracks you never know how long it will take or even a puncture or two and the whole planning goes out the window. Rode into Tzaneen one night at 10pm looking for camping  on a TE610 and 530 with candle power headlights :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 19, 2018, 08:45:24 am
Bertie, take it easy with those mods. I dont want to be problem tracking in the nam riverbeds...

Keep it simple. We are not going to ride in the dark - there are crikets there that i do not want to bump into in the dark.


Martin, not to worry, I am more concerned with my luggage arrangements, not touching the lights before we go, riding at night is avoidable as we can simply camp if things don't work out as planned. I will be doing stuff like loctite on all bolts, make sure brake pads are fine, change oil etc. The last thing I want is making a modification that will leave me in the lurch. Reliability is the most important thing, I had a motor seize on me before and it spoilt a marvelous trip on day 1. Still miffed about that!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: espresso on February 19, 2018, 03:39:55 pm
So they work straight off the AC circuit ? Unless the 500 now has DC at the lights, I know the stator is more powerfull than what the 525 530 had.
My experience with LED lights is that they work fine for a while on A/C, but then suddenly crap out.
I opened a few and found that they have a diode on the input wire to protect the circuit from incorrect connections, but the diode is tiny and can't handle the full current.
Always burns out after a while.
Much better is to fit a decent external diode on the wiring before the light.
This didn't seem to reduce the lighting power at all.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Cdp13 on February 19, 2018, 05:29:55 pm
Regarding fuel. I fitted the KTM Powerparts/Acerbis 20 liter tank to my '17 501. Long story short - we ordered Husky 18liter(might be 17liters can't remember) tanks but the dealer stuffed up big time (my blood boils again). So 3 days before the Badlands rallye we were tankless.

Luckily WDT and Hentie lent us their KTM tanks and we made it fit. Now at first I also cringed at the prospect of cutting up a 20hour odd bike, but we were out of options...

It worked out perfectly -just needed to weld a moer to the frame to bolt the tank on. And because the seat did not work with the tank, we tied the seat down with a rope. This boer-maak-plan plan held up without issues for 2000+km in some pretty hostile terrain. And in fact the extra 2/3 liters (thats +/- 60km) came in handy more than once.

So, Damaraland - this is also an option. Yes it probably doesn't look as slick, but functions well. An extra 5 liters (over the 15liter tank currently available) is 100km range.

Just my 2 cents.

Baie geluk met jou 500 - gooi bietjie fotos van jou bike! 

Off topic: waar in Nam ry julle enduro?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Cdp13 on February 19, 2018, 05:30:48 pm
Nog foto
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Cdp13 on February 19, 2018, 05:31:27 pm
Laaste
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 20, 2018, 06:15:01 am
Regarding fuel. I fitted the KTM Powerparts/Acerbis 20 liter tank to my '17 501. Long story short - we ordered Husky 18liter(might be 17liters can't remember) tanks but the dealer stuffed up big time (my blood boils again). So 3 days before the Badlands rallye we were tankless.

Luckily WDT and Hentie lent us their KTM tanks and we made it fit. Now at first I also cringed at the prospect of cutting up a 20hour odd bike, but we were out of options...

It worked out perfectly -just needed to weld a moer to the frame to bolt the tank on. And because the seat did not work with the tank, we tied the seat down with a rope. This boer-maak-plan plan held up without issues for 2000+km in some pretty hostile terrain. And in fact the extra 2/3 liters (thats +/- 60km) came in handy more than once.

So, Damaraland - this is also an option. Yes it probably doesn't look as slick, but functions well. An extra 5 liters (over the 15liter tank currently available) is 100km range.

Just my 2 cents.

Baie geluk met jou 500 - gooi bietjie fotos van jou bike! 

Off topic: waar in Nam ry julle enduro?

That's an excellent story. You could probably store stuff in that space there too! Love these boer-maak-n-plan mods!

Are you still riding it like this or did you convert back after the rally?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 20, 2018, 08:07:42 am
Regarding fuel. I fitted the KTM Powerparts/Acerbis 20 liter tank to my '17 501. Long story short - we ordered Husky 18liter(might be 17liters can't remember) tanks but the dealer stuffed up big time (my blood boils again). So 3 days before the Badlands rallye we were tankless.

Luckily WDT and Hentie lent us their KTM tanks and we made it fit. Now at first I also cringed at the prospect of cutting up a 20hour odd bike, but we were out of options...

It worked out perfectly -just needed to weld a moer to the frame to bolt the tank on. And because the seat did not work with the tank, we tied the seat down with a rope. This boer-maak-plan plan held up without issues for 2000+km in some pretty hostile terrain. And in fact the extra 2/3 liters (thats +/- 60km) came in handy more than once.

So, Damaraland - this is also an option. Yes it probably doesn't look as slick, but functions well. An extra 5 liters (over the 15liter tank currently available) is 100km range.

Just my 2 cents.

Baie geluk met jou 500 - gooi bietjie fotos van jou bike! 

Off topic: waar in Nam ry julle enduro?

I've got the 15.5L Acerbis on the way, otherwise I would've definitely investigated your approach!  Come to think, didn't come across anyone modding a older tank on the newer models, not even on advrider, so good original thinking!  Will gooi some pics this weekend after I've installed the tank and bash plate. :thumleft:

Enduros are mostly around Windhoek, with two being further afield in Uis and Karibib respectively.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 20, 2018, 08:19:23 am

Check out the Angola - its not like they said Ride report in the Roll of Honour section, you will see what the boys did for fuel containers there. Amazingly still worked quite well.

BB what are you talking about, thought that RR was obligatory reading before even joining the forum:-)  I've actually got that as a pdf on my phone, using that as a reference for planning along with the other Angola RR's in the RoH.

They were quite ingenious with their use of papsak inners, definitely gonna trial that.  a Slightly more expensive solution (which doesn't involve drinking 5L boxes of wine) that I'm investigating is the Platy bottles.  It's 2L collapsible containers that basically fold up into nothing.  Then will also look at getting tank holsters made.

Fuel and water for the Angola route is a big challenge, but one we're looking forward to solving and we'll be sure to share our methods.  Best part is we get to trial our half-witted ideas doing a couple of trips in Damaraland before we hit Angola :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 20, 2018, 08:34:17 am
You had better post an RR - that's the deal. :deal:

Very, very jealous! Have good trip man.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 20, 2018, 08:46:44 am
With enough time one can even modify the seat pan and redo the seat and the tank fit will be even less of a problem. Good find  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 20, 2018, 09:03:08 am
This sure works nicely on the new bikes

(http://advrider.com/index.php?attachments/img_20170211_171959192_hdr-jpg.751354/)

(http://advrider.com/index.php?attachments/img_20170211_171948912-jpg.751353/)

17lt
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Cdp13 on February 20, 2018, 09:13:44 am
Regarding fuel. I fitted the KTM Powerparts/Acerbis 20 liter tank to my '17 501. Long story short - we ordered Husky 18liter(might be 17liters can't remember) tanks but the dealer stuffed up big time (my blood boils again). So 3 days before the Badlands rallye we were tankless.

Luckily WDT and Hentie lent us their KTM tanks and we made it fit. Now at first I also cringed at the prospect of cutting up a 20hour odd bike, but we were out of options...

It worked out perfectly -just needed to weld a moer to the frame to bolt the tank on. And because the seat did not work with the tank, we tied the seat down with a rope. This boer-maak-plan plan held up without issues for 2000+km in some pretty hostile terrain. And in fact the extra 2/3 liters (thats +/- 60km) came in handy more than once.

So, Damaraland - this is also an option. Yes it probably doesn't look as slick, but functions well. An extra 5 liters (over the 15liter tank currently available) is 100km range.

Just my 2 cents.

Baie geluk met jou 500 - gooi bietjie fotos van jou bike! 

Off topic: waar in Nam ry julle enduro?

That's an excellent story. You could probably store stuff in that space there too! Love these boer-maak-n-plan mods!

Are you still riding it like this or did you convert back after the rally?

BB I had to give Willem his tank back. But if there isn't a 20liter tank for my bike developed before the Tankwa, will buy the KTM tank and go this route again for sure.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Cdp13 on February 20, 2018, 09:17:13 am
Regarding fuel. I fitted the KTM Powerparts/Acerbis 20 liter tank to my '17 501. Long story short - we ordered Husky 18liter(might be 17liters can't remember) tanks but the dealer stuffed up big time (my blood boils again). So 3 days before the Badlands rallye we were tankless.

Luckily WDT and Hentie lent us their KTM tanks and we made it fit. Now at first I also cringed at the prospect of cutting up a 20hour odd bike, but we were out of options...

It worked out perfectly -just needed to weld a moer to the frame to bolt the tank on. And because the seat did not work with the tank, we tied the seat down with a rope. This boer-maak-plan plan held up without issues for 2000+km in some pretty hostile terrain. And in fact the extra 2/3 liters (thats +/- 60km) came in handy more than once.

So, Damaraland - this is also an option. Yes it probably doesn't look as slick, but functions well. An extra 5 liters (over the 15liter tank currently available) is 100km range.

Just my 2 cents.

Baie geluk met jou 500 - gooi bietjie fotos van jou bike! 

Off topic: waar in Nam ry julle enduro?

I've got the 15.5L Acerbis on the way, otherwise I would've definitely investigated your approach!  Come to think, didn't come across anyone modding a older tank on the newer models, not even on advrider, so good original thinking!  Will gooi some pics this weekend after I've installed the tank and bash plate. :thumleft:

Enduros are mostly around Windhoek, with two being further afield in Uis and Karibib respectively.

Ons was in kakstraat so moes maar plan maak.

My clean parents live in Windhoek and I used to take my 300 but never quite knew where to go and ride. But now I know a guy with a 500 I might just load the bike again...

Sal graag fotos van jou build wil sien. Cheers
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on February 20, 2018, 09:18:14 am


...fresh 'plastic' on it's way...!


Cheers
Chris & Team
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 20, 2018, 09:37:05 am
Pity these are so expensive 

(http://www.rebelxsports.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Rear-Fuel-Tank-for-KTM-EXC.jpg)

(http://www.rebelxsports.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/KTM-EXC-Rear-Fuel-Tank.jpg)

€2,789.00   :o

The only rear tank for KTM EXC and HUSQVARNA FE models.

Fuel Capacity: 14.5 Liters
Made in plastic it come with a complete rear subframe, full airbox and carbon fiber airbox cover. Easy to install, does NOT require additional pumps.

Super B 2600 Battery needed
Rear fender requires to be cut

The only rear tank for KTM EXC and HUSQVARNA FE models.

Fuel Capacity: 14.5 Liters
Made in plastic it come with a complete rear subframe, full airbox and carbon fiber airbox cover. Easy to install, does NOT require additional pumps.

Super B 2600 Battery needed
Rear fender requires to be cut
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 20, 2018, 09:51:54 am
Well that plus the front 17 and you will have a handy 31 odd liters. But yes very expensive.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 20, 2018, 09:56:46 am
At today's exchange rate that is just under R41 000 before shipping

fuck me sideways but that is p03s expensive
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on February 20, 2018, 10:13:30 am
...sure DOES seem pricey...
RADE tanks also prices in Euro's, and their 690/701 UNDER-seat tank - by way of comparison, sell for under R7K, incl VAT and shipping....and airfilter and mini-replacement airbox, etc...


I have (this morning, as a result of this thread...) asked RADE if they would even THINK of making something similar, that takes 12 months from inception IF they were willing to undertake it, but worth asking them...


Pic attached of underseat tank, (6L) for comparison of costs...


Chris
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Amsterdam on February 20, 2018, 11:24:45 am
Don't know much about the 500's but have a look at this.  Could this be an option?

http://www.albertodottori.net/ktm%20exc.htm
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 20, 2018, 11:50:22 am
This is what my 500 looks like loaded for a 2 week unsupported trip to Kaokoland with Xpat and Straatkat - we start our trip on Monday 5 March so my preparations are well underway

Giant Loop Coyote filled with 3 X 2l plastic coke bottles with water, 3 X 2l bottles of petrol, Tent with mattress, sleeping bag and pillow, gas stove and eating utensils, 3 days food, toiletries and 1 change of clothes - total weight 18 kg

In the tailpack behind the GL bag is a 12 volt compressor and puncture repair kit

On my back will be small backpack with 3l water in bladder, first aid kit, satellite phone and basic tools - total weight 5 kg
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on February 20, 2018, 12:01:17 pm

Giant Loop Coyote filled with 3 X 2l plastic coke bottles with water, 3 X 2l bottles of petrol, Tent with mattress, sleeping bag and pillow, gas stove and eating utensils, 3 days food, toiletries and 1 change of clothes - total weight 18 kg


WOW! 7kg for  the Coyote, tent, mattress, sleeping bag, pillow, stove, utensils, food, toiletries and clothes. That is seriously light weight.

My luggage bag, tent, mattress, sleeping bag and pillow weigh 7kg already.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 20, 2018, 12:09:39 pm
This is what my 500 looks like loaded for a 2 week unsupported trip to Kaokoland with Xpat and Straatkat - we start our trip on Monday 5 March so my preparations are well underway

Giant Loop Coyote filled with 3 X 2l plastic coke bottles with water, 3 X 2l bottles of petrol, Tent with mattress, sleeping bag and pillow, gas stove and eating utensils, 3 days food, toiletries and 1 change of clothes - total weight 18 kg

In the tailpack behind the GL bag is a 12 volt compressor and puncture repair kit

On my back will be small backpack with 3l water in bladder, first aid kit, satellite phone and basic tools - total weight 5 kg

Check chain tension Sir

Looks on the tight side......... would hate for you to get a counter shaft seal leak.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 20, 2018, 12:26:59 pm
Thanks for your concern

The current chain and front sprocket is fucked

New sprockets and chain going on this week before I depart for Nam
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 20, 2018, 01:00:57 pm
That's looking really sharp, Justin!

Question re the 12V compressor: Are you not concerned about killing your battery with that thing - these bikes batteries just seem so small?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 20, 2018, 01:05:00 pm
That's looking really sharp, Justin!

Question re the 12V compressor: Are you not concerned about killing your battery with that thing - these bikes batteries just seem so small?

Not at all - my compressor will inflate my wheel to 1 bar (I run Tubliss in the wheels) in less than 60 seconds

And the beauty of the old KTM 500 vs the Husky 501 is that the KTM has a kickstart and happy button - the Husky has electric start only
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 20, 2018, 03:03:18 pm
Don't know much about the 500's but have a look at this.  Could this be an option?

http://www.albertodottori.net/ktm%20exc.htm
May get in the way of soft luggage
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Cdp13 on February 20, 2018, 06:15:42 pm
That's looking really sharp, Justin!

Question re the 12V compressor: Are you not concerned about killing your battery with that thing - these bikes batteries just seem so small?

Not at all - my compressor will inflate my wheel to 1 bar (I run Tubliss in the wheels) in less than 60 seconds

And the beauty of the old KTM 500 vs the Husky 501 is that the KTM has a kickstart and happy button - the Husky has electric start only

This is a big concern of mine, not having kickstart. Suppose it means a new battery before every big trip like you are doing now. But even that is no guarantee.

Awesome setup Justin  :thumleft: I am 50 shades of green at this point.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on February 20, 2018, 07:47:26 pm
Justin, is that the same 500 that went back to Cape Town on the Mazda? Lot different now if it is  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 20, 2018, 07:50:32 pm
Justin you are really anxious to go, sommer packed and all! I am still gathering stuff and my bike is without wheels as I will take them for new rubber on Thursday.
Will probably only pack a day before. Still have to do so much to the bike, mount GPS, mount Steering damper, fit shock sox, inline fuel filter etc etc.
This trip will be one to remember, that is for sure!
Xpat said in one of his ride reports that before each trip he goes on a shopping spree and buys ten types of shit he does not need, I am trying very hard not to do that, but there are such cool stuff at Cape Union Mart! Not to mention Runner's shop!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 20, 2018, 08:01:51 pm
Justin, is that the same 500 that went back to Cape Town on the Mazda? Lot different now if it is  :thumleft:

Yes it is the same bike

I love it - so light and easy to ride

And it will be catching another piggyback ride on the Mazdarati to meet Xpat and Straatkat at the start of our ride almost 2000 km from home
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 20, 2018, 08:06:03 pm
Justin you are really anxious to go, sommer packed and all! I am still gathering stuff and my bike is without wheels as I will take them for new rubber on Thursday.
Will probably only pack a day before. Still have to do so much to the bike, mount GPS, mount Steering damper, fit shock sox, inline fuel filter etc etc.
This trip will be one to remember, that is for sure!
Xpat said in one of his ride reports that before each trip he goes on a shopping spree and buys ten types of shit he does not need, I am trying very hard not to do that, but there are such cool stuff at Cape Union Mart! Not to mention Runner's shop!

Im doing “sea trials” with loaded bike  to make sure I can keep up with you guys
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 20, 2018, 08:13:57 pm
I accept your challenge to pack lighter! :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 21, 2018, 04:16:07 am
Where r you guys going to start from?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 21, 2018, 04:32:08 am
Where r you guys going to start from?

The beginning
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 21, 2018, 09:40:32 pm
Preparation in full swing....literally.  Hate going on a long trip with a new to me bike. One always wonder what surprises lurk.
Found a slight oil leak on the right forkleg, cleaned the seal with that super duper forkseal cleaner thingy. Must take bike on short ride to see if it is cured.
Tomorrow new tyres, Maxxis front and Mitas CO2 on rear....and try not buy too many other "necessities"
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 21, 2018, 10:35:16 pm
What’s up with all the hectic preparations? We are going for a ride, not zombie apocalypse...

I for one am still on holiday:(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180221/f01ff346d03abeb67dd4263a001dcfcd.jpg)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 21, 2018, 10:51:16 pm
Just making sure, Martin, just making sure.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: m0lt3n on February 22, 2018, 08:24:05 am
Where r you guys going to start from?

The beginning

This ride sounds epic.

So, where is the begininning?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 22, 2018, 08:36:31 am
Where r you guys going to start from?

The beginning

This ride sounds epic.

So, where is the begininning?

Uis in northern Nam
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 22, 2018, 08:45:29 am
Preparation in full swing....literally.  Hate going on a long trip with a new to me bike. One always wonder what surprises lurk.
Found a slight oil leak on the right forkleg, cleaned the seal with that super duper forkseal cleaner thingy. Must take bike on short ride to see if it is cured.
Tomorrow new tyres, Maxxis front and Mitas CO2 on rear....and try not buy too many other "necessities"

lol  full swing
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 22, 2018, 09:06:17 am
We need a "friend" with a small cargo carrier plane like this to load 4-5 bikes and riders

(https://espo.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/images/IMG_8594.jpg)


Sure will save a lot of time for trips
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 23, 2018, 08:18:42 am
What?? and miss out on a 4 day roadtrip through Botswana! Every sport has its casualties.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 23, 2018, 08:45:42 am
What’s up with all the hectic preparations? We are going for a ride, not zombie apocalypse...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Straatkat does not want a DNF ! This is going to be a good trip, bring back lots of pics.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 23, 2018, 09:14:07 am
What?? and miss out on a 4 day roadtrip through Botswana! Every sport has its casualties.

True,but not everybody has the "time" if they want to get to remote places.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 23, 2018, 09:25:35 am
Slapping on the Acerbis 15.5L tank tonight :thumleft:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ttAnG_-FgG4-gL32_1iEnSFaJPD7iHptJNja0JqEalzcxqH6whhHMGJuIojFc43lheE64eyMshsSvEOc-YPAg_bW82EaDYendBYWJfURATYJUEyAyJXeJUlvBmvOakljfl4zEjItbuRixPSE40-nlw7Rs5-QiLIUStrdAfOb0A8N93LFXJf5V11AOHlRDFdeF_1f5EBSF-YT-RytNCqcvvToMxLGtKwTKJFLQ0UeUL5eiUT37UgxRVxqeMATDiaHgCn0Mg9st7nPZvYdCur1QIN4DboiNYj0sEAXH6smxFymQPBim1n2iV15dZmlTpOLA_moJZAch1UlLV-WrdkrK4kRSEQoYB-FK5jz52A7TEj5uZD9kMjLFysNZSmbVdPURjRU6WfMLzXvx4RbK6EEOYcAcmNcLB9uLzuTYNG2E0qlZ5jI7_vr8PqR4NGOIKusHIeacyF-trZh55S9SzUulr04ROL5gGG4CakjURK1Pj9pGTSczZJ_Q36eWokwQMPmZV7v0inMqgvApvMGF_rGXiUNpNvmgqDzVr6fc43nIBLZopjxAde3hafGf4zVc6G46e0iv_JmfUVD054ArsOvI-zfgqIH-wrbIeWWNLQ=w1304-h978-no)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 23, 2018, 09:27:45 am
How far would 15l take you on a 500?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 23, 2018, 09:40:52 am
How far would 15l take you on a 500?

Not far enough:-) 

Looking at 20km/l so that would give you 310 on a 15.5L tank.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Fransw on February 23, 2018, 10:17:33 am
We need a "friend" with a small cargo carrier plane like this to load 4-5 bikes and riders

(https://espo.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/images/IMG_8594.jpg)


Sure will save a lot of time for trips

Armpump, that's not really a 'small' cargo plane anymore. Not many of those around.  That thing sips ±300litre of jet fuel per hour @ R11/litre.. It will cost R15 000+ per hour to rent one.

What's your plan? Maybe I can direct you a little..
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 23, 2018, 11:43:19 am
I see you can now even buy a 500 in the old SA colours  :deal:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 23, 2018, 12:11:15 pm
We need a "friend" with a small cargo carrier plane like this to load 4-5 bikes and riders

(https://espo.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/images/IMG_8594.jpg)


Sure will save a lot of time for trips

Armpump, that's not really a 'small' cargo plane anymore. Not many of those around.  That thing sips ±300litre of jet fuel per hour @ R11/litre.. It will cost R15 000+ per hour to rent one.

What's your plan? Maybe I can direct you a little..

To Fly 4/6 people with bikes and kit from Lanseria to far Northern Namibia/Malawi etc etc and back



Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Fransw on February 23, 2018, 12:36:12 pm
Armpump,

For 5 guys + bikes and gear that's about the type of aircraft you will need. Something like a Dornier , Twin otter, etc..

All of that type are owned by big companies or countries. The cost of charter one is R15k++ per hour. Lanseria to Northern Nam 6+ hours one way and 6 back.  It can be more that R200k for the aircraft, definitely not less! I'm not a cargo specialist but it will cost more than 200k..

Much cheaper and easier to send a bakkie with trailer upfront
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 23, 2018, 12:43:59 pm
Well that's not gonna happen then

Might as well take blue train option  :imaposer:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 23, 2018, 03:17:08 pm
Doing a Kaokoland trip by driving to Uis (around 1600km from Gauteng, and 1800 from CT) with a bakkie, plus the costs of the actual trip would leave little change from R30k, that also includes prepping the bike and some equipment upgrades, then loss of earnings for 2 weeks not even considered, assume it is holiday. We will probably drive 3 days altogether there and back, so the plane costs of R200k+ to save 2 days is a little over the top. Of course we have to multiply driving  costs by the amount of people, say 3 as some might share, still way out of the ballpark. Interesting exercise though.
All worth it, experience of a lifetime!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on February 23, 2018, 03:25:02 pm
Well that's not gonna happen then

Might as well take blue train option  :imaposer:

The downside of the Blue train is that you cannot do an airdrop. :ricky:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 23, 2018, 03:38:11 pm
They can do an airdrop?.....might reconsider then!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 23, 2018, 03:49:25 pm
How far would 15l take you on a 500?

Not far enough:-) 

Looking at 20km/l so that would give you 310 on a 15.5L tank.
I suppose a pair of 2L MSR's could easily fit in the luggage part and push that up to almost 400km.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 23, 2018, 04:00:46 pm
How far would 15l take you on a 500?

Not far enough:-) 

Looking at 20km/l so that would give you 310 on a 15.5L tank.
I suppose a pair of 2L MSR's could easily fit in the luggage part and push that up to almost 400km.

Sure. But he needs 700-800 km range for doodsakker. So every liter in tank counts.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 23, 2018, 04:00:54 pm
Another option for you guys using 500's

(http://thekneeslider.com/images/motopod.jpg)

(http://thekneeslider.com/images/motopod4.jpg)

Now just need to arrange 4 small planes and friendly landing strips :)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 23, 2018, 04:06:51 pm
What’s up with all the hectic preparations? We are going for a ride, not zombie apocalypse...


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Straatkat does not want a DNF ! This is going to be a good trip, bring back lots of pics.

That is the concern. On last trip Bertie being man of reason prepared his bike thoroughly end it bombed on day 1 (not due to anything Bertie did). So im trying to steer him more towards mystical approach to maintenance i practice. Ie surrender and dont touch your bike unless it is absolutely broken. Dont even wash it... :peepwall: :lol8:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 23, 2018, 10:18:00 pm
Martin, I suppose it is a matter of choosing your workshop....I prefer to do my "fixing" in my well equipped workshop at my leisure, with the Violent Femmes playing in the background, not in 40 deg heat under some tree in the desert, but in your defense, your system works remarkably well too, although I think it is largely based on the good work Runner does on your bike after trips. So at the end of the day you also prepare well, or have it prepared well. :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 06:41:55 am
Busted🤪! While technicaly i dont touch my bike much (except in the bush), i do often hand over good money and avert my eyes in mystical absorption while it is being maintained by somebody else.

And i do some preparation even now getting some things out of the way before we start. As you know Bertie, on our last trip i got stung in the face by some insect within first 50 km and my face then resembled soccer ball for next week or so. Well this time i got it out of the system already in Lesotho and hopefully by the time we ho i should be beautifull again. Dont want to be a thorn between roses in our hansome lineup...

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180224/8c9748b8c87fa48936f4c9df2a042e4a.jpg)


I will desist from polluting this nice thread any further.


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 24, 2018, 08:11:06 am
You should rather stay out of bar fights Xpat................. :)


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 08:45:38 am
You should rather stay out of bar fights Xpat................. :)

No, this one is actually warning to you about risks of riding in open face helmet without proper eye protection!

Though - to be fair - you ride open face only in freezing temperatures, when there arent too many insects around...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 24, 2018, 08:58:49 am
lol..........yip best to have some goggles on when moving.

Suppose rally tower and screen also has its perks deflecting insects ;)

 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 09:02:56 am
lol..........yip best to have some goggles on when moving.

Suppose rally tower and screen also has its perks deflecting insects ;)

Nope, it doesnt. The prior incident i mentioned with Bertie was on 690 with rally kit...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 24, 2018, 09:17:11 am
I know you don't like screens and pannier racks but did you see these

(http://www.richgibbens.com/Adventure/Motorcycles-1/KTM-500-EXC/i-dS8sDrG/0/7642762a/L/_MG_0004-L.jpg)

(http://www.richgibbens.com/Adventure/Motorcycles-1/KTM-500-EXC/i-Kd2XG5b/0/4e990722/L/P2120046_47_48_49_50-L.jpg)

(http://www.richgibbens.com/Adventure/Motorcycles-1/KTM-500-EXC/i-8jxj4JS/0/c7315e72/L/P4080023-L.jpg)

(http://www.richgibbens.com/Adventure/Motorcycles-1/KTM-500-EXC/i-DMxPnxz/0/c9c48565/L/_MG_0002-L.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 24, 2018, 09:25:03 am
Total load of crap

The screen looks like it comes off a cheap chinese indian chemist cowboy delivery bike

I think Xpat and I agree - there is absolutely no need for a screen on these bikes - they will seldom see 100 kph where we ride them because of the technicality of the terrain and because of the slow speeds and the heat any and all airflow over your upper body and head is most welcome ...the screen prevents that

If you need a screen on a 500 then you are on the wrong bike for what you are doing with it

The pannier racks are barely acceptable - I don't like them but I can see their purpose - I use a GL Coyote that does not require any racks

The owner of this bike obviously rides mostly "pavement" as they call it in the States if he needs a screen but can do without a bashplate

The purpose of using a 500 as an adventure bike is LESS IS MORE ...less of absolutely everything - keep the weight down and the fun up
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 24, 2018, 09:48:30 am
can read here

 http://www.texasadventure.net/bikes-and-gear/the-ktm-500-exc-build/

He fitted one of these protectors

(http://www.richgibbens.com/Adventure/Motorcycles-1/KTM-500-EXC/i-6N7NSLd/0/ecc64ef3/L/P2240004-L.jpg)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 24, 2018, 09:53:25 am
Nice thing about MRA screen is that it can be removed easy depending on terrain you plan on traveling.

(http://www.richgibbens.com/Adventure/Motorcycle-Adventure/Hill-Country-ride-April-2017/i-ZTBrqfh/0/adc92266/L/P4090087-L.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 24, 2018, 10:59:31 am
Fitted the Acerbis 15.5L tanks last night.  As someone used to working on a 990 it's so refreshing how easy these bikes are to take apart.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/eFbvE1f6Sisv4B-p1iMuQMa-gnEn4mIANutriL82Jzof4sEmiMS_dzG94t9RsaQYqrLeZf74ACzFs6P7Vp2aEYKO9ASGokYHorEEfruM7OQHldydISUiT12T-Jwhu5bnECYLkZDRvLg3BKmlnp4Qgdcni3wJo9Stp_VfPdWXjGOJT06KKay8YvVSgFWcmDlAUi5ZcCLE2I25KWGu7IXaACwerD3gKxV-3ah2upYBHC1Olg7-JVaPXzkShlsGbJ0Vp3nwIGmeb5g5BI_1TLj1XbQpP119zn6ygg_nYSrqtkAq4qlE4GS08cBacmX_BVGp31TgP2lpEn2TdHlA0Fj3E8ZJCaQt063nVLpybgjrSvARrK_woE0bHmJVAZshtl0XTLafWv6aC7jOOYe6U6pUDdd-MX6Twc1-zzJ-ipV_YlJCPyfNinAUgW_hb2XTZeKqwJYoxgMvblFnfGztvKYdqti-a53mPRSMS33tcusqsR8WJzjRWDaYh6Xp8_Nyt_fvdWO8dgYu8ptt4OC1oFUqHepm4PzV7E9JAfSDPqZBk2zkruRWk3Z-O0PBRiSfmx2Q6giZZq3IokhAQx21r2y2x6UQw_rGSI2014yPN_A=w1259-h944-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/g0P_xOYNG-4R2jhQjQzPv6T2qPanPSvqIE-Z041-IPIlkX7k7XXwqQsGSe02tpLdcIg8G_gdnm6x6S7Vb7V3_kuiPNiFbArambgGw0Hur8atdzApQeUVtHYhZo0lpCq3N5gKRxoAc5h_8pbmoLY1zzwOCrGIoNmUg_WbndxCdcuvnmAs218awTGdgMB1VgC4ed2B3dp3KWUy2f6qdeMC3y26FemQTy82r_-nxZzXQKZMUVbYybnRmCsdAckNB0MlVkuHrR4qKlLhBGn32V7J_qL4gYnZQkdyesdOFrCQvMAIgKvfY3uuGO4owarsjxpkG-0cE_lbqDgDs_ch2Ng9TQaYdcaSu4KBrLdT4aFzR7vtTQRCtzk-NvGUA78RkdKIEvXH7tOFuIZA6lEjD-GUT_O9jsZ49q802etzEnNFOPz0DZW6MXFsZZRoGP7ZfTHVj3hdm4aydWCSTB-NOsx-4U7x-8PeFUy6DgifBMX-oPwI9HWsCZWHARX85eB5Ehp8pgdbiPbdA0uT7FJu8kGfUC56QBoQRFuaxzkpnLKZ5E1zV9etVXDXq3qF_ZI5t2JWhs_wqoISx8mZnmNZfOWjnWQexaX3SSJpcGbSBsk=w1259-h944-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/JuxSUWswe_n6UP_JL4nit3zzJHepyDrgXPLLaWGgUg8SspfvNqPSSaXDjWWUGXpV1l7wMMyOG26YRlfz5Q5e3ooTdTJBwpsyuTRn7Jaq46rC2pPEBBkkiQGXmmkHEtk8jpolPImSlwxPVEKp4oezhcmN0S-3TtEnNcozG_C4SaJsjGIBQuoNxieq6LEqEQQ5Qd1nMh87DOAlQSnUxcvZUPz4yGYaxPUGVj3ffjiTLPB8cnyUoF7cyNBLEOhclZtX2dcSswAMDvTbtkf2fVKpkWz1UZTUnfmlLnXEB6JAU1UjSXbCUm48JR_pbTKAbbVmJ1q-8wJgtUC2N_1j-nFoZkgkwKzbfv2tBEq60BUz5AxbncX2YbvGJEvVM1ovNIsepDY74Ixcb8MNJ6w5W9fJpeTP_KJZ64A_uvGXQzheL7LF7hMvfxqUd08Cr0VQhpWEkB0HiWPFmtwFayzbfoqOrVSASVmsfhQIbaJKXmbjf0h5hcTXW2-tBLmviw5ltOR9uirMzecAyGBllYTco5zIoDfFuXaFQqxMmodJtQIdzTEqEzzi_TTDYFx5n5o9dxpZeRcQyknn2-LrMeJTK8amfsZIjhCyMKbLwvlEUzU=w1259-h944-no)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 11:22:19 am
Yes, Im with Justin. And im not against windscreens at all - only against windscreens for offroad use - i.e single/double/no-track riding. they are downright dangerous, annoying and unnecessary in offroad due to tisk of serious injury, vibration, and relayively sliw speeds involved. Just jump at your 1190 (or other smaller boke you might have with windscreen) and do the whooped out section between police station and watertower in dewildt. And tell me how you felt each time windscreens sharp end came flying few cm within your nose or throat. Granted, 1190 is not right bike for that, but 500 is - relatively speaking. I have ridden that section few times on tenere, and cannot explain hiw much better it felt once i shortened original screen to get rid of buffeting.

But for general purpose adventuring prefered by most - ie long distance touring on tar and dirt roads i would take screen each time. I just wouldnt in my wildest dreams condider doing tgat on 500. Hence no need for screen in 500 whatsoever and i agree with Justin that it indicates wrong use/expectation from the user. Trying ti convert 500 into comfortable adv cruiser is as pointless as trying to turn one of the behemoths like your bike into focusef offroad machine.

As for the frames - to me they seem pointless making the bike wider and heavier. I would only consider some such if i would need to carry excessive weight there (like Damaraland might need to fo in angola), but then i dont see how this particular solution is better than stock. It looks like it triangulates on the original subframe at the weakest point at the back,so how much more load can it really take?

Armpump, why are you actually interested in 500? Im first to tell that it is the best bike fir my current riding, but also the first to say that it is wtong bike fir majority of adv riders. If you are considering it for standard long distance adv riding i can guarantee it is going to be a failure - no matter what accesdories you are going to hang on it.


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 11:37:38 am
Fitted the Acerbis 15.5L tanks last night.  As someone used to working on a 990 it's so refreshing how easy these bikes are to take apart.



Nice. Have you figured out where to put other petrol you will need in angola?

And what are your initial riding impressions?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 24, 2018, 12:54:08 pm
I have just come back from "sea trials" on my loaded bike in preparation for my upcoming Kaokoland trip with Xpat and Straatkat - damn it feels terrible with so much extra shit on board

In the GL bag I have 6l water, 6l petrol, my "house" (tent, mattress, sleeping bag, pillow), my "kitchen" (gas stove, pot, pan, enamel mug and cutlery), 1 change of clothes, toiletries and 3 days food

On my back I have small backpack with 3l water, tools, basic first aid kit, satellite phone, windbreaker, wallet and camera

Everything held up well and nothing fell off or got fucked up (except me)

The whoops are terrible to ride with so much weight on board

I did get stuck on a steep loose sandy uphill ...took me 30 minutes to dig the back wheel out, flip the bike over and drag it around to ride it back down
Title: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 01:26:46 pm
You shouldnt be riding it without luggage in the first place - just screws up your baseline

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180224/b26b0ef8780f94477427fdd20fe4bde8.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 01:32:51 pm
.(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180224/9a752587c12a8154e0ee12a1c17bbecc.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180224/b6e8585eb0d11266390c752bc8c3b7eb.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180224/0668a11bdcf8d416968f31509112c9f1.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180224/35dd51a6a5fb4da786e7bf0cd6b8c317.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180224/fe511dee8388a1a8dc4d0aa4b3cfab86.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 24, 2018, 03:00:44 pm
Rotopax will fit on that support frame
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: KarooKid on February 24, 2018, 03:11:35 pm
Justin - Where is Sea Trails?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 24, 2018, 03:11:46 pm
And if you ride the bike off-road like it’s supposed to be ridden that full rotopax container will break that frame fucked up in no time

My extra fuel is carried in 2l plastic coke bottles (almost indestructible and available anywhere for R20 each including 2l of free coke inside) and are carried low down on the sides in the GL bag ... not high up like this bouncing about

Have you ever seen what happens if you bend a piece of wire back and forth over and over?

It breaks

Same thing will happen to this rack
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 24, 2018, 03:12:34 pm
Justin - Where is Sea Trails?

Macassar

I call it sea trials - because that’s what you do with a new boat on the sea to check everything is OK before you sail and suck off into the funset
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on February 24, 2018, 04:05:40 pm
And if you ride the bike off-road like it’s supposed to be ridden that full rotopax container will break that frame fucked up in no time

My extra fuel is carried in 2l plastic coke bottles (almost indestructible and available anywhere for R20 each including 2l of free coke inside) and are carried low down on the sides in the GL bag ... not high up like this bouncing about

Have you ever seen what happens if you bend a piece of wire back and forth over and over?

It breaks

Same thing will happen to this rack

Absolutely true.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 24, 2018, 06:03:17 pm
Fitted the Acerbis 15.5L tanks last night.  As someone used to working on a 990 it's so refreshing how easy these bikes are to take apart.



Nice. Have you figured out where to put other petrol you will need in angola?

And what are your initial riding impressions?

It's a revelation, really, without trying to sound dramatic.

We'll need around 45-50L to get to Flamingo, which means 30-odd Litres on the bike.  Will look at having around 10L each side in the Altrider and 10L in my backpack, with backpack being emptied first as we ride.  Risky but it is what it is.  There is an outside chance of having fuel stored by a friend of a friend of a friend that's doing some mining exploration thing near Foz do Cunene.  If we get that sorted it will make logistics a lot easier.

We're three guys on 500's so will think up different methods and try out something different on each bike.  Doing a Damaraland trip around the 24th of March which we'll use as an "installation" trip to see what works and what doesn't in a relatively safe environment.

Then of course hoping we can meet up while you're in these parts so that we hear what first-hand what worked for you :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: KarooKid on February 24, 2018, 06:11:09 pm
Justin - Where is Sea Trails?

Macassar

I call it sea trials - because that’s what you do with a new boat on the sea to check everything is OK before you sail and suck off into the funset

Ah - haven't been there in years. 

Shall make a plan to go there soon.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 06:34:02 pm
Fitted the Acerbis 15.5L tanks last night.  As someone used to working on a 990 it's so refreshing how easy these bikes are to take apart.



Nice. Have you figured out where to put other petrol you will need in angola?

And what are your initial riding impressions?

It's a revelation, really, without trying to sound dramatic.

We'll need around 45-50L to get to Flamingo, which means 30-odd Litres on the bike.  Will look at having around 10L each side in the Altrider and 10L in my backpack, with backpack being emptied first as we ride.  Risky but it is what it is.  There is an outside chance of having fuel stored by a friend of a friend of a friend that's doing some mining exploration thing near Foz do Cunene.  If we get that sorted it will make logistics a lot easier.

We're three guys on 500's so will think up different methods and try out something different on each bike.  Doing a Damaraland trip around the 24th of March which we'll use as an "installation" trip to see what works and what doesn't in a relatively safe environment.

Then of course hoping we can meet up while you're in these parts so that we hear what first-hand what worked for you :thumleft:

Hmmm, doesnt sound like ideal solution to me. Where you are going to put water? Your back will be basically just petrol. I would recommend to investigate tank panniers solution. Here is one example from giant loop (i thin runner or zebra sells them:

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180224/ed263614ac063347871e62b0e765c404.jpg)

They may be pricey fir one trip use, so as an alternative talk to PK here on the forum who makes also custom luggage. He can make something like that for you - in fact i seem to remember that he may have done holster that can carry 3 coke bottles each side. Check with him. Also chesk with Beserker, who did it on xr650r. Similar problem to you - weak subframe and unlike you huge consumption.


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 06:44:10 pm
Also, test your consumption thoroughly in different riding modes. I suspect it may be pretty llow if ridden conservatively - lets say 4.5l per 100km, at which case you should need less than 40l- probably way less. Flamingo is about 700 km, right?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 24, 2018, 06:48:33 pm
Damaraland you guys are doing some serious riding there, the preparation is part of the fun, finding what works and what does not. Testing is the name of the game, or as Just Bendit says "sea trials"  ;)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 06:56:13 pm
@Straatkat: Bertie, check your Whatsup.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Amsterdam on February 26, 2018, 08:28:20 pm
Also, test your consumption thoroughly in different riding modes. I suspect it may be pretty llow if ridden conservatively - lets say 4.5l per 100km, at which case you should need less than 40l- probably way less. Flamingo is about 700 km, right?

If you cross at Ruacana (head West and then North along the beach) then the distance to Tombwa is approx 650 kms.  There is a big fuel station at Tombwa.  We had enough fuel with us and did not look for it but you can most probably get a few more litres at Oncocua.  There were several forms of motorised transport buzzing about there.  (September 2017)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on February 27, 2018, 10:27:26 am
Have you ever seen what happens if you bend a piece of wire back and forth over and over?

It breaks

Same thing will happen to this rack

Like so on my 690..... And that was just from my small basic tool kit plus one tube. To be fair the rack could've been mounted better but still.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 27, 2018, 11:23:50 am
I see they have a brace type thing ...... but i would want to tie into main frame somehow.

(http://andreshoumatoff.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/2010-KTM-450-XC-W-Six-Days/i-62qnpTx/0/L/1012-L.jpg)

Best is to keep major weight in front or level with rear hub i recon.............hanging out back just breaks shit.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 27, 2018, 11:31:23 am
Bloody hell

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/3b/3e/e8/3b3ee8d9a85645c38227349b29a72dce.jpg)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 27, 2018, 12:47:47 pm
Seems if you planning a long trip and need "stuff" 500's can be loaded  :imaposer:


(http://i950.photobucket.com/albums/ad345/hunt4steve/Adventure/2015_QSR/Dual-Sport_Bike_Setup.jpg)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 27, 2018, 12:50:38 pm
Seems if you planning a long trip and need "stuff" 500's can be loaded  :imaposer:


(http://i950.photobucket.com/albums/ad345/hunt4steve/Adventure/2015_QSR/Dual-Sport_Bike_Setup.jpg)

Wow, so much for lightweight.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 27, 2018, 12:54:58 pm
Completely defeats the object if you ask me. Armpump you are looking at the wrong bike, can I steer you toward a 1200GSA. What is the point of going 500 with minimal weight if you load it like a seaworthy tanker?? :eek7:
Half the stuff, double the money!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 27, 2018, 01:02:18 pm
I have my tank that can carry weight.

I'm just showing that the rack i posted earlier can be made to carry long haul fuel and stuff if you need.

 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 27, 2018, 01:05:03 pm
Bloody hell

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/3b/3e/e8/3b3ee8d9a85645c38227349b29a72dce.jpg)

This is a 525 not a 500 ...those are the same tanks we used for TEAM 525 at Amageza 2015
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 27, 2018, 01:06:06 pm
Bloody hell

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/3b/3e/e8/3b3ee8d9a85645c38227349b29a72dce.jpg)

How much fuel does those Double D's carry?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 27, 2018, 01:32:30 pm
25 i think
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on February 27, 2018, 01:45:56 pm
" I'm just showing that the rack i posted earlier can be made to carry long haul fuel and stuff if you need."

I've just come back from Vernon Perry's where for some reason they were stripping the rear end of a Husky 501. Looking at the composite rear end and the number of mounting points it has, especially for the bit under the mudguard and tail tidy(2), it sends a definite message and the message is - leave the stuff at home! Love the diddy Lithium battery though!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 27, 2018, 02:01:37 pm
Bloody hell

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/3b/3e/e8/3b3ee8d9a85645c38227349b29a72dce.jpg)

How much fuel does those Double D's carry?
And best of all since the bike is so light to start with 112kg the 25L tank even full is really manageable and easy to ride
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 27, 2018, 02:16:11 pm
Just had a look at Angola R/R

(http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj26/Beserker_bucket/Final_00028_1.jpg)

(http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj26/Beserker_bucket/Final_00138_1.jpg)

I recon a 500 packed right would be a awesome bike to take that way :)

But man seems you need plenty fuel
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on February 27, 2018, 02:34:38 pm
Jesus. I go tear a tendon and stop riding for a couple months and you goons throw 20 pages on this thread!!!! Don't any of you do any work??

This is the most unmitigated tale of faffing and waffling I've ever come across. It's all bullshit. A 500 is the simplest adventure bike available You throw on a big tank and go ride. OK, you change sprockets if you want to go fast, and a Giant Loop if you want to go long. And that's it. Seriously boys!!! All the rest of the shit - screens, racks, bits and pieces is just unnecessary and asking for trouble.

And there's no better bike on the planet. The rest is all paralysis by analysis - once you get a 500 and start using it, the entire argument disappears. Just ask XPat. It does everything - even 500+km days if you really want to. And it simply destroys a 690 in the dirt. Really.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on February 27, 2018, 02:44:40 pm
 :laughing4:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 27, 2018, 02:46:56 pm
Jesus. I go tear a tendon and stop riding for a couple months and you goons throw 20 pages on this thread!!!! Don't any of you do any work??

This is the most unmitigated tale of faffing and waffling I've ever come across. It's all bullshit. A 500 is the simplest adventure bike available You throw on a big tank and go ride. OK, you change sprockets if you want to go fast, and a Giant Loop if you want to go long. And that's it. Seriously boys!!! All the rest of the shit - screens, racks, bits and pieces is just unnecessary and asking for trouble.

And there's no better bike on the planet. The rest is all paralysis by analysis - once you get a 500 and start using it, the entire argument disappears. Just ask XPat. It does everything - even 500+km days if you really want to. And it simply destroys a 690 in the dirt. Really.
Have you been living under a rock, the latest trend is for 250/300cc ADV bikes weighing 188kg. Oh and you need to add spoked wheels and protection as well but it's no biggie. Get with the times Max !
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 27, 2018, 02:52:40 pm
This is what an adventurised 500 should look like ...regardless if your trip is 2 weeks or 2 years

The title and operative word of this thread is "econonomically" ...all these racks and screens and shit is just a waste of good drinking money
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 27, 2018, 03:00:19 pm
Bloody hell

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/3b/3e/e8/3b3ee8d9a85645c38227349b29a72dce.jpg)

How much fuel does those Double D's carry?
And best of all since the bike is so light to start with 112kg the 25L tank even full is really manageable and easy to ride

True, a full 500 is as light as an empty 690.
It probably feels even lighter when riding it
But I agree with MaxthePanda. I want to see more economical farkling and more okes showing areas where they have ridden, other than Xpat's last pics one could have used a KLR  :peepwall:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 27, 2018, 03:23:41 pm
Bloody hell

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/3b/3e/e8/3b3ee8d9a85645c38227349b29a72dce.jpg)

How much fuel does those Double D's carry?
And best of all since the bike is so light to start with 112kg the 25L tank even full is really manageable and easy to ride

True, a full 500 is as light as an empty 690.
It probably feels even lighter when riding it
But I agree with MaxthePanda. I want to see more economical farkling and more okes showing areas where they have ridden, other than Xpat's last pics one could have used a KLR  :peepwall:
It may feature a dodgy 530 but close enough to a 500 we had on our trip. Some places they had to drag the bikes over the rocks, good luck doing that with a heavy bike.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 27, 2018, 03:25:13 pm
Now thats what I'm talking about. Wow, where is that?

And why is the 530 dodgy?
Is it the 525 that has separate oil for the clutch or the 530?

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 27, 2018, 03:26:00 pm
 :ricky:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 27, 2018, 03:28:17 pm
525 single track
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 27, 2018, 03:30:19 pm
Riverbeds
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 27, 2018, 03:31:35 pm
Make our own tracks !
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on February 27, 2018, 03:32:36 pm
Hey Sidetrack, I think I recognise that area - Bewaarskloof by any chance? Ridden there many, many times. Awesome spot! Respect for tackling it on a 530!

We got to know that river so well, we would cross the hectic section in less than 20 minutes, but that was on 300's. I really miss the Lowveld riding.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 27, 2018, 03:54:55 pm
Bloody hell

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/3b/3e/e8/3b3ee8d9a85645c38227349b29a72dce.jpg)

How much fuel does those Double D's carry?
And best of all since the bike is so light to start with 112kg the 25L tank even full is really manageable and easy to ride

True, a full 500 is as light as an empty 690.
It probably feels even lighter when riding it
But I agree with MaxthePanda. I want to see more economical farkling and more okes showing areas where they have ridden, other than Xpat's last pics one could have used a KLR  :peepwall:

 Dude, 2sd is rubbing off on you fast! You just refuse to listen. Just out of interest - have you ever done lets say week or longer dedicated offroad trip? If so, pls give us an idea of route.

I tell you how to resolve this: why dont you join Justbendit, Straatkat and myself on Sunday in Uis with your KLR, ie 690. We will take you for 12 days through damaraland and kaokoland  - arguably the best riding on planet in terms of balance of scenery, wildlife and native culture.

All of the tracks we are going to do are perfectly doable on 690 - indeed many people on this thread including myself have done many of them on big bikes. The only thing is, we are going to be pushing to squeeze in as much as possible to leverage those pink slips as far as possible. Lets see how you feel on day 5 or 6?

I have just done three day loop from Katse to Mohale to Thaba Tseka and back to Katse most of it cross country. I am completely knackered and will have to rest intensely to recover sufficiently for namibia. Now, i do believe that someone like Losper probably could have done the route on 690. Heck, even i could have done last two days on 690 technically, just not on consecutive days (and at massive damage to the bike).Would i want to do it just because i theoretically can? No way.

you just dont grasp how much tiring these multiday offroad trips are and how much easier 500 makes them - yo the point that many of them are not doable on 690 within realistic timeline, even if it can do each individual bit technically.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/84e15afed2fb01de63d8ce9afd1b8923.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/46fc28deef80b0dfb7935b8ed8acdbae.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/5afdfdff734f60f8bba36e911bc3b5ea.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/4c1866feb135c602e512259cfe0b3c1b.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/2476dc63f2474f4bcc034a3b82ff432b.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/8ed9edb70535a6e878a7b2d0b68d57b3.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/8e7bacd751f97c0adcc37220319eb8cb.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 27, 2018, 03:55:19 pm
I remember seeing those pics a long time ago.

Limpopo
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 27, 2018, 03:58:58 pm
Some nice pictures again Xpat.

Off camber seems to be working for you :)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 27, 2018, 04:10:01 pm
Some nice pictures again Xpat.

Off camber seems to be working for you :)

Well right now im thinking about you every time i try to raise a fork to my mouth. That armpump s a bitch  :o
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 27, 2018, 04:12:19 pm
This is what an adventurised 500 should look like ...regardless if your trip is 2 weeks or 2 years

The title and operative word of this thread is "econonomically" ...all these racks and screens and shit is just a waste of good drinking money

You probably right............. what do you recon your max range is as it sits including water and chow etc

Price on tank ?   
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 27, 2018, 04:14:49 pm
Now thats what I'm talking about. Wow, where is that?

And why is the 530 dodgy?
Is it the 525 that has separate oil for the clutch or the 530?
Cause they tried to copy the CRF trick of separating the engine and gearbox oil but being KTM and not Japanese failed miserably. The 530 is awesome if you like to carry 5L of spare oil with you. The 525 has a single oil system just like the 500 and has no such problems. Some 530 owners converted their motors to single sump as well at great cost.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 27, 2018, 04:26:01 pm
Now thats what I'm talking about. Wow, where is that?

And why is the 530 dodgy?
Is it the 525 that has separate oil for the clutch or the 530?
Cause they tried to copy the CRF trick of separating the engine and gearbox oil but being KTM and not Japanese failed miserably. The 530 is awesome if you like to carry 5L of spare oil with you. The 525 has a single oil system just like the 500 and has no such problems. Some 530 owners converted their motors to single sump as well at great cost.

Correct

The 525 (2003 - 2007) was an evolution of the 520 and had the same bulletproof and awesome RFS (racing four stroke) engine design with overhead adjustable style tappets so you could adjust valve clearances without the need for shims and the hassle of removing camshafts

The 530 (2008 - 2011) had the XC4 engine with split engine and gearbox oil supply - great engine when it worked but not known for its longevity. The frame and suspension were much better than the 525

The "new" 500 (2012 - 2016) has a great engine and very good suspension - I love mine - it is strong, light and fast

My 500 has 20 litre tank available from KTM Powerparts or directly from Acerbis because it is made by Acerbis - price between R5K- R7K depending on where you get it and the strength of the rand vs USD at the time ...good for 400 km range

My EFI 500 is only 2 or 3 more bhp stronger than my old carb fed 525 ...both use on average 5l per 100 km (20 km per litre) ...but it is the way the 500 makes and delivers its power that sets it apart and makes it so much better than the old school 525
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 27, 2018, 04:32:46 pm
Bloody hell

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/3b/3e/e8/3b3ee8d9a85645c38227349b29a72dce.jpg)

How much fuel does those Double D's carry?
And best of all since the bike is so light to start with 112kg the 25L tank even full is really manageable and easy to ride

True, a full 500 is as light as an empty 690.
It probably feels even lighter when riding it
But I agree with MaxthePanda. I want to see more economical farkling and more okes showing areas where they have ridden, other than Xpat's last pics one could have used a KLR  :peepwall:

 Dude, 2sd is rubbing off on you fast! You just refuse to listen. Just out of interest - have you ever done lets say week or longer dedicated offroad trip? If so, pls give us an idea of route.

I tell you how to resolve this: why dont you join Justbendit, Straatkat and myself on Sunday in Uis with your KLR, ie 690. We will take you for 12 days through damaraland and kaokoland  - arguably the best riding on planet in terms of balance of scenery, wildlife and native culture.

All of the tracks we are going to do are perfectly doable on 690 - indeed many people on this thread including myself have done many of them on big bikes. The only thing is, we are going to be pushing to squeeze in as much as possible to leverage those pink slips as far as possible. Lets see how you feel on day 5 or 6?

I have just done three day loop from Katse to Mohale to Thaba Tseka and back to Katse most of it cross country. I am completely knackered and will have to rest intensely to recover sufficiently for namibia. Now, i do believe that someone like Losper probably could have done the route on 690. Heck, even i could have done last two days on 690 technically, just not on consecutive days (and at massive damage to the bike).Would i want to do it just because i theoretically can? No way.

you just dont grasp how much tiring these multiday offroad trips are and how much easier 500 makes them - yo the point that many of them are not doable on 690 within realistic timeline, even if it can do each individual bit technically.


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 :lol8:
The KLR is not that bad.
Xpat, I think you need calm down. I wanted more pics of where  guys ride the 500. Some great pics in the thread now to show where one would ride if one had a 350/500/501/525 etc. I'm really enjoying this thread and are not coming from an antagonizing angle.  People around here are wound up way too tight imho. Not sure if its the VAT, the government reshuffle or people not riding enough.

About the 500 - I'm completely sold on a 500 for the rough stuff. There is no getting around the weight and suspension benefits and have been saying over and over how I think it will do offroad way better than a 690. I don't need to be convinced of it and you don't have to defend it to me - seems that is all people are doing these days. Defending their brand vehemently , their choice their bike and god forbid the rest of the people who takes any other viewpoint or does any other riding that THEY do.
I like the 500 / 525 perhaps even. (Before Team 525 did the Amageza I was at Justin's place and he told me about the merits of the 525/500 class bike.  So I'm not only learning this info now,  but I'm not going to run and sell my 690 and get a 500 - for my current riding the 690 is great. Once I've ended up getting bored of places I can go with that I'll decide if I want a 500.

Dont be so hard on KLR's
(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fi.ytimg.com%2Fvi%2FTmHKbDqlg6Y%2Fmaxresdefault.jpg&f=1)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 27, 2018, 04:36:12 pm
The reason we are getting "uptight" is because at every turn you post pics of racks and screens and other shit that doesn't work and defeats the object of riding a 500 in the first place

We have these bikes, we have ridden them a lot and continue to do so AND we have also come off big fat lazy bikes with screens and racks and shit so I think we know what works for us and does not work - trust us when we say all that shit does not work
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: billy-joe on February 27, 2018, 04:37:17 pm
sidetrack, is there a ride report for that ride?  looks epic!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 27, 2018, 04:38:02 pm
The reason we are getting "uptight" is because at every turn you post pics of racks and screens and other shit that doesn't work and defeats the object of riding a 500 in the first place

We have these bikes, we have ridden them a lot and continue to do so AND we have also come off big fat lazy bikes with screens and racks and shit so I think we know what works for us and does not work - trust us when we say all that shit does not work

I'm posting racks and shit?
Maybe check again. I think you have me confused with Armpump and flying brick perhaps.


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 27, 2018, 04:51:00 pm
sidetrack, is there a ride report for that ride?  looks epic!
Yes bottom of my signature links to most but Photobucket only works with the pics if you use the Photobucket hotlink fix for the Chrome browser

http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=134175.0
http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=70199.msg1436196#msg1436196
http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=160849.msg3041866#msg3041866
http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=172330.msg3222080#msg3222080
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on February 27, 2018, 04:53:22 pm
The reason we are getting "uptight" is because at every turn you post pics of racks and screens and other shit that doesn't work and defeats the object of riding a 500 in the first place

We have these bikes, we have ridden them a lot and continue to do so AND we have also come off big fat lazy bikes with screens and racks and shit so I think we know what works for us and does not work - trust us when we say all that shit does not work

I'm posting racks and shit?
Maybe check again. I think you have me confused with Armpump and flying brick perhaps.

My apologies - I'm sorry

We are passionate about these bikes and their simplicity and live the whole LESS IS MORE mantra ...I have thought about every addition and gram that I have added to my bike - I do not want to turn it into a 690 / 990 / 1200GS / etc or anything near that because I have had those bikes and been lots of places with them but choose to go to more remote places on my 500 and often choose the most technical and challenging route of getting there

You can get by and survive quite comfortably with very little ...we were all born naked and when we die we can't take anything with us ...so I don't see the point of carrying any excess unnecessary shit in my life to my grave
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 27, 2018, 05:04:31 pm
I must say for me it's not just about riding technical or difficult places. I enjoy the lighter bikes just about anywhere off road. If you do come across these difficult places (which we add in on trips as much as possible) you certainly don't have to turn back and can ride it just about anywhere with confidence. On the 660Z I was very hesitant to do anything tricky as it was a real mission to pick up. With the lighter bikes you end up seeing and experiencing a lot more.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 27, 2018, 05:35:35 pm
The reason we are getting "uptight" is because at every turn you post pics of racks and screens and other shit that doesn't work and defeats the object of riding a 500 in the first place

We have these bikes, we have ridden them a lot and continue to do so AND we have also come off big fat lazy bikes with screens and racks and shit so I think we know what works for us and does not work - trust us when we say all that shit does not work

I'm posting racks and shit?
Maybe check again. I think you have me confused with Armpump and flying brick perhaps.

My apologies - I'm sorry

We are passionate about these bikes and their simplicity and live the whole LESS IS MORE mantra ...I have thought about every addition and gram that I have added to my bike - I do not want to turn it into a 690 / 990 / 1200GS / etc or anything near that because I have had those bikes and been lots of places with them but choose to go to more remote places on my 500 and often choose the most technical and challenging route of getting there

You can get by and survive quite comfortably with very little ...we were all born naked and when we die we can't take anything with us ...so I don't see the point of carrying any excess unnecessary shit in my life to my grave

No worries.  :thumleft:
I agree 100% with you.  I think that's also why I am enjoying this thread so much as one can learn and see what works and what doesn't and that can actually work for many bikes not just 500's since every bit saved works out better.


I'm interested to find out about Lightweight Lithium batteries actually. Some claim up to 5kg savings with those.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on February 27, 2018, 06:22:19 pm
I don't think there's anywhere in Namibia a 500 will go that a 690 can't. I mean the 690 is pretty capable, and it's serious rocks, step ups and single track that will force the issue between the two. My mate Gav downgraded his 990 to a 690, with all the fairing thingiemabingie's on - it looked sexy as hell but those bits rattled off and fell to pieces. Anyway... he is new to offroad riding, and although we weren't doing anything particularly hectic there was a lot of sand. When we got to this soft sand riverbed in Damaraland I saw the look on his face and gave him my 500.

(http://thinkteam.co.za/photos/namibia2017/day5-42.jpg)

I knew it was going to happen, but I couldn't get the damn thing back. This riverbed is wide open - you can ride most of it at 80kph, but there are some biggish drop-offs... perhaps half a metre in places. The 690 is like a high powered barge after the 500. You lean back, grip it with your thighs and get on the throttle hard, and it's still a hoot, powersliding from side to side. The suspension isn't bad for sand, but it's a long way behind the 500. And that's the thing - the 500 is just much easier to ride when the going gets tough.

And if you don't need easier, it's a hell of a lot more fun too.

Sorry. Um. No... I'm keeping this now:

(http://thinkteam.co.za/photos/namibia2017/day5-50.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 27, 2018, 06:28:38 pm
You light riders must chill out a little

Only sharing options as there might be some people who would like to see available things to make there 525/500 capable of doing more than just the rough stuff.No dought a light as possible bike is best for tech.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 27, 2018, 06:44:55 pm
@Omninorm: MTP & sidetrack said it already, so this is a bit redundant, but i’ll say it anyway.

I dont mind robust discussion if it is based in solid facts and in the context of the thread. I admit i do get irritated though when people talk past each other and out of context. And i do believe that in this specific thread it is you who is out of context. Let me explain.

Your replies in this thread repeatedly said something along the lines that the terrain shown in the pictures can be done on more universal bigger bikes and therefore does not call for 500. That statement is already out of context as this thread is not ’which bike’, but how to adventurize specifically 500 for longer trips.

 But leaving that aside, your statement seem to indicate your belief that people buy 500 primarily to ride more hard core terrain. I have pointed out repeatedly to you that it is not the case - at least in my case, and from other replies also in the case of other 500 owners. The main driver is to make terrain we have already ridden more enjoyable and to be able to get maximum out of each trip.

You havent answered my question about your longer offroad trips. That wasnt dickswinging, but a genuine question. unless you have done such trips and experienced first hand hiw tiring they can be on suboptimal bike, you just dont have right point if reference for this thread. Th whole Damaraland’s move to 500 is driven by his less then optimal prior experiences on bigger bikes - ie not primarily because he wants to do different riding, but because he wants to enjoy the riding he does more.

Sure, 500 does open potentially new teritories for exploration like lesotho in my case, but that is not the main driver behind most why people here get it in the first place.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on February 27, 2018, 07:10:59 pm
Xpat let’s not forget that not so long ago it took a bit of convincing to get you to try a 690 which was a stepping stone to where you are now. Same for a lot of the guys here. Don’t be too hard on people’s personal journeys. I very seldom have the time to do multi day hard trips and I’m super envious of the riding you guys do but at the same time I need something that works in GP but doesn’t make me shy away from tech which is why I stick with my 690. In dreaming of trips like yours I almost did trade my 690 on a 350 this morning though  :lol8:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Omninorm on February 27, 2018, 07:29:58 pm
@Omninorm: MTP & sidetrack said it already, so this is a bit redundant, but i’ll say it anyway.

I dont mind robust discussion if it is based in solid facts and in the context of the thread. I admit i do get irritated though when people talk past each other and out of context. And i do believe that in this specific thread it is you who is out of context. Let me explain.

Your replies in this thread repeatedly said something along the lines that the terrain shown in the pictures can be done on more universal bigger bikes and therefore does not call for 500. That statement is already out of context as this thread is not ’which bike’, but how to adventurize specifically 500 for longer trips.

 But leaving that aside, your statement seem to indicate your belief that people buy 500 primarily to ride more hard core terrain. I have pointed out repeatedly to you that it is not the case - at least in my case, and from other replies also in the case of other 500 owners. The main driver is to make terrain we have already ridden more enjoyable and to be able to get maximum out of each trip.

You havent answered my question about your longer offroad trips. That wasnt dickswinging, but a genuine question. unless you have done such trips and experienced first hand hiw tiring they can be on suboptimal bike, you just dont have right point if reference for this thread. Th whole Damaraland’s move to 500 is driven by his less then optimal prior experiences on bigger bikes - ie not primarily because he wants to do different riding, but because he wants to enjoy the riding he does more.

Sure, 500 does open potentially new teritories for exploration like lesotho in my case, but that is not the main driver behind most why people here get it in the first place.


I haven't done multi day rides in that type of terrain no. I've done day rides in that type of terrain. I am very aware of how crap it can be on a suboptimal bike and how the right bike can change it. Riding sand with an 800 vs a YZ250 - of course it's a different ball game.  I've had lots of different cc's and weights of bikes.
It doesn't stop me from trying it though.

From your post you seem to have the opinion that I am saying the 690 or KLR will go where a 500 goes. I have never said that and it will be daft for anyone to think that.
But I do see what you are saying. I did come from a standpoint where I was under the impression that you actually do more hardcore terrain hence the 500. I still don't think I'm wrong there though,  as is evident from some pics eventually posted.

Regarding adventurising  specifically for longer trips. Thats where I think some confusion possibly came in when I look at Justbendit's comments as well. I was also saying keep it light and fast since thats why you have the 500, and others seem to want to load it etc. which imho defeats the purpose of the bike.
I'm open to being wrong there...and thats why there is a discussion forum. Maybe someone can convince me of the merits of a rack and screen on a 500. Not something I'll do, but I can try and see the argument at least - I don't have to accept it though.

If I buy a 500 I would want to ride terrain where I can't go with a 690 otherwise for me, the 690 would be better bike for various reasons.
So it is from my perspective more about a bike suited for terrain so then I guess I was out of context, but it was purely as a genuine interest about the 500 as an option for me.
A mate and I discussed this the other day, he comes from a bigger adventure bike (Twin) he is debating a 500 vs 690, I actually said to him that I would love it if he gets a 500 then we can compare it, and we can go exploring where I guess I'll find my limits soon because of bike weight. Since bike weights DOES effect where you WANT to ride. Not where you possibly could ride.
However for majority of the riding I doubt the 500 would be the ticket since, yes, its not multi-day trips with tents in another African Country so far out of civilization.
Although I'm jealous of that riding I don't even get the time to do multi day trips out of Western Cape currently.

It was just then confusing to me why someone would adventurise a 500 if they arent really going to ride in those terrains more than anyone with a (tongue in cheek joke) KLR.
The fact is that there was then photos posted that made me realize ok yeah, THATS why they ride the 500.  So all in all sensible and not completely off topic and I'm sure its a question or a thought on a lot of the peoples minds reading this.

Justbendit's, and MTP's post actually makes complete sense and I get it. And agree with it.
Anyway, lets let it be then. I won't post questions here anymore. And since I don't have a 500 I suppose I can't contribute either since I don't have actual riding experience with it.
I will just read.








Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 27, 2018, 07:46:57 pm
 :thumleft:

Im not trying to shut you or anybody up - please ask questions or contribute as you see fit. I was just pointing out where i think we were missing each other. To be fair, this thread grew legs and arms and got much wider than original context, so it is easy to get lost - myself included. I dont mind diversions and disagreements - just get frustrated when we talk past each other.

Anyway, back to 500 - i’ll post some more pics since you asked for them (not very hc though ;))
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 27, 2018, 07:50:32 pm
.(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/405b0db0323a92da5408d72dcd0a9ac5.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/d28edb10ee3cf8482e72a7f13d682947.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/d8a3b2117605711f8dfc12b5c89ea231.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/e47a5f9ac64c5fde5ece8793d0e0c72a.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: KarooKid on February 27, 2018, 09:25:10 pm
Xpat you really make me want to ride Lesotho. Love the pics.

I have asked the question on another thread but there seems to be litlle response - is the Etrex worthwhile?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: billy-joe on February 27, 2018, 09:36:18 pm
.(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/405b0db0323a92da5408d72dcd0a9ac5.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/d28edb10ee3cf8482e72a7f13d682947.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/d8a3b2117605711f8dfc12b5c89ea231.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/e47a5f9ac64c5fde5ece8793d0e0c72a.jpg)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I reckon I could take a 1100GS over that!

 :pot: :pot:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 27, 2018, 10:54:51 pm
Xpat you really make me want to ride Lesotho. Love the pics.

I have asked the question on another thread but there seems to be litlle response - is the Etrex worthwhile?

To be honest, i dont know if it is worth it. But im dumb generation 1 gps user - i dont use any automatic navigation functions and basically use gps as a map that shows me where i am in relation to a track i loaded. And from that perspective etrex is almost worthless, because its screen is so small and it is very slow (maybe my memory is full or something). On this trip i basically used it to record my actual track and for navigation i used iphone with  offline lesotho map and loaded tracks. The main advantage of iphone is bigger screen and flexibility to check surroundings terrain for alternative routes quickly. Works fine if you have plenty time to stop every km or few, take iphone from your pocket and see where are you - wouldnt probably work that well if you need to navigate while on move. Unless you have it mounted on handlebars, which in lesotho is no go due to vobrations and potential crash damage. Etrex in that metal holder survived even bike somersault with few scratches.

But i have seen some roof finishers using etrex quite effectively. But you need to learn the functions and prepare routes upfront - i dont think it is ideal for ongoing route review and changes - screen too small.

Which bike you want gps for? If it is big adv bike like at (or dven 690) id much rather get something with bigger easily readable screen and fast refresh on the move - like Montana.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 27, 2018, 10:59:47 pm

I reckon I could take a 1100GS over that!

 :pot: :pot:

You’re welcome to. I will post the gps tracks in my lesotho RR once back in joburg. Take a lot of pics to remember your bike by and get good helivac cover...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 28, 2018, 06:50:06 am
Seems like they have had some good rain

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180227/d28edb10ee3cf8482e72a7f13d682947.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: billy-joe on February 28, 2018, 06:55:17 am

I reckon I could take a 1100GS over that!

 :pot: :pot:

You’re welcome to. I will post the gps tracks in my lesotho RR once back in joburg. Take a lot of pics to remember your bike by and get good helivac cover...

 ;)  All tongue in cheek of course, mate.  Really does look like you had a good time.  I think a boxer engine would've caused the bike to topple over down the hill it was so steep!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 28, 2018, 07:28:43 am
When you look back at what some people have ridden and the journeys done you can understand when they say go light

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-zWdS4sAH9V0/VC22vIMJl9I/AAAAAAAABuc/M8WOf0bHxv4/s912/051015%2520113-36.jpg)

 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on February 28, 2018, 07:38:43 am
 :laughing4: :laughing4:

 :eek7:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on February 28, 2018, 07:59:00 am


Quote from: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 06:34:02 pm (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg4008807#msg4008807)



Hmmm, doesn't sound like ideal solution to me. Where you are going to put water? Your back will be basically just petrol. I would recommend to investigate tank panniers solution. Here is one example from giant loop (i think runner or zebra sells them:

>(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180224/ed263614ac063347871e62b0e765c404.jpg)

They may be pricey fir one trip use, so as an alternative talk to PK here on the forum who makes also custom luggage. He can make something like that for you - in fact i seem to remember that he may have done holster that can carry 3 coke bottles each side. Check with him. Also check with Beserker, who did it on xr650r. Similar problem to you - weak subframe and unlike you huge consumption.


Just remember, Damaraland, that since you'll be riding with ALTRider HEMISPHERES, there is an in-built extra pocket on EACH side, it comfortably tales a 1.5L Coke bottle, though IIRC I have had a 2L in their before...
The reason for using the (returnable/refundable) 1.5L PLASTIC Coke bottle is that it is nearly unbreakable; it is 3x the strength and sidewall thickness of the 'normal' 2L plastic coke bottles....
Cheers, Chris


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 28, 2018, 08:37:56 am


Quote from: Xpat on February 24, 2018, 06:34:02 pm (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg4008807#msg4008807)



Hmmm, doesn't sound like ideal solution to me. Where you are going to put water? Your back will be basically just petrol. I would recommend to investigate tank panniers solution. Here is one example from giant loop (i think runner or zebra sells them:

>(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180224/ed263614ac063347871e62b0e765c404.jpg)

They may be pricey fir one trip use, so as an alternative talk to PK here on the forum who makes also custom luggage. He can make something like that for you - in fact i seem to remember that he may have done holster that can carry 3 coke bottles each side. Check with him. Also check with Beserker, who did it on xr650r. Similar problem to you - weak subframe and unlike you huge consumption.


Just remember, Damaraland, that since you'll be riding with ALTRider HEMISPHERES, there is an in-built extra pocket on EACH side, it comfortably tales a 1.5L Coke bottle, though IIRC I have had a 2L in their before...
The reason for using the (returnable/refundable) 1.5L PLASTIC Coke bottle is that it is nearly unbreakable; it is 3x the strength and sidewall thickness of the 'normal' 2L plastic coke bottles....
Cheers, Chris


One can easily fit a 2L bottle in there, so that's 4L right there, already tested. :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on February 28, 2018, 08:52:09 am
Have anybody experimented with Steg Pegz on the 500?
I have used a set for offroad/enduro riding and found them a bit of a distraction. But in that type of riding you move around a lot on the bike.
They might be better suited to adventure riding or rallye racing where you maintain a body position for longer.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: m0lt3n on February 28, 2018, 09:05:42 am
^ also saw this the other day but forgot to ask the guy's opinions on it.

This is an awesome thread! And it just gets better and better.
I would like to share what was a revelation to me in this thread. I am always thinking I will take my 1190 also there or there if I see pics. But what I realised here is that for me its an event, and may take a while to get over, and if you check the thread on my bike the costs in maintenance is very high. On the 500 its a non event. You can do the difficult stuff over and over and do it tomorrow again. I also got reminded on how tired I am after 3 or 4 days on a hard and technical trip. Never thought about how the riding would be much more maintainable on a highly technical level with a 500 to continue day after day.

Good thread guys, you will make good salesmen!

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: blauth on February 28, 2018, 10:47:52 am
Jeez, you okes can really fuckup a good thread with your handbags.....

I haven't ridden a performance bike in some time and reading through this thread and looking at the pictures makes me wonna get a 500 (my last KTM was a 525). The only thing I'm not really a fan of is the PDS suspension.  Maybe that's why the Husky would be the bike for me.

Has anyone spent a lot of time on both the KTM500 and Husky501? If so, have you felt a noticeable difference in the high speed stability on the Husky?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on February 28, 2018, 12:46:50 pm
Another setup
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ClimbingTurtle on February 28, 2018, 12:50:59 pm
Including the holstered accessory above the pot set.....?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on February 28, 2018, 01:16:54 pm
Following on my previous post about hanging things on the composite rear frame of the Husky I looked past Vernon Perry's place after checking the post box and they still had a bike in bits, have a look at what you are going to rest your stuff on: 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on February 28, 2018, 01:30:40 pm
I've just joined the ranks of the 500 Owners Club. Super-chuffed! Thanks GR Racing for parting with your 500.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on February 28, 2018, 01:44:48 pm
I've just joined the ranks of the 500 Owners Club. Super-chuffed! Thanks GR Racing for parting with your 500.

 8)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 28, 2018, 01:52:36 pm
Following on my previous post about hanging things on the composite rear frame of the Husky I looked past Vernon Perry's place after checking the post box and they still had a bike in bits, have a look at what you are going to rest your stuff on: 

Can just hear the sales blurb ............ lighter and stronger, modern design !
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on February 28, 2018, 01:57:42 pm
I've just joined the ranks of the 500 Owners Club. Super-chuffed! Thanks GR Racing for parting with your 500.

Pics!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 28, 2018, 02:11:26 pm
Another setup

Off topic but i liked that original decal kit......... copied it for my 04 3hunny :)



Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on February 28, 2018, 03:40:18 pm
Here's a pic, still in GT's garage:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: onderbroek on February 28, 2018, 04:19:44 pm
500 advenduro


Nice


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 28, 2018, 04:21:40 pm
Lekker , enjoy the bike.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 28, 2018, 04:44:41 pm

Hmmm, doesnt sound like ideal solution to me. Where you are going to put water? Your back will be basically just petrol. I would recommend to investigate tank panniers solution. Here is one example from giant loop (i thin runner or zebra sells them:

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180224/ed263614ac063347871e62b0e765c404.jpg)

They may be pricey fir one trip use, so as an alternative talk to PK here on the forum who makes also custom luggage. He can make something like that for you - in fact i seem to remember that he may have done holster that can carry 3 coke bottles each side. Check with him. Also chesk with Beserker, who did it on xr650r. Similar problem to you - weak subframe and unlike you huge consumption.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

@Xpat Good suggestion regarding tank panniers.  GL has a small 3 bag solution carrying 6L total for something like US$230, not value in my opinion (no doubt as to the quality though, as is usual for GL).  Something that looks like it will work perfect is the Wolfman tank panniers https://www.atomic-moto.com/collections/wolfman/products/wolfman-tank-panniers (https://www.atomic-moto.com/collections/wolfman/products/wolfman-tank-panniers).

These babies take 7L a side, which gives one a lot more freedom when distributing the combined weight of the water and fuel we'll have to carry.  They're also relatively cheap at US$104.99.  My only concern is that they'll interfere with my legs since I know that will irritate the crap out of me.  Will ask for feedback on advrider also.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on February 28, 2018, 05:59:20 pm
Here's a pic, still in GT's garage:


Nice Ross!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 28, 2018, 08:24:08 pm
I am wondering what those 7liter tank panniers will do to the sand handling. I am trying to keep the front of my bike as light as possible, 27 liters upfront is quite a lot of weight.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on February 28, 2018, 08:34:41 pm
Not sure if mentioned but you get these in 5 lt

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on February 28, 2018, 08:39:31 pm
I am wondering what those 7liter tank panniers will do to the sand handling. I am trying to keep the front of my bike as light as possible, 27 liters upfront is quite a lot of weight.

It's to be used in a pinch as a once off solution - not permanent one. Let's face it, there aren't many place where you need 700 km range. they will of course pout the petrol from the tank panniers into the tank as soon as they burned enough petrol in the tank.

Plus, from what I have seen in RRs, there isn't brutal sand there for first 300 or so km from Ruacana to the mouth of Kunene river. I may be wrong here, but even if I am 500 is so light that worst case scenario a bit of standing up (and possibly very low tyre pressures if they will opt for Tubeliss, which I would recommend) will still make it more manageable in sand than most other bikes - especially as those bike would have to be ladden with the same amount of luggage, spare fuel, water and such.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on February 28, 2018, 08:41:00 pm
I am wondering what those 7liter tank panniers will do to the sand handling. I am trying to keep the front of my bike as light as possible, 27 liters upfront is quite a lot of weight.
There'll definately be some handling compromise, that's just the nature of trips like Angola.  That said, on the older models you got 22L tanks so it shouldn't be too bad I reckon. Also you're not carrying that weight around permanently, you empty as you go.

Sent from my VTR-L29 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Splash on February 28, 2018, 11:11:55 pm
From a European perspective:
http://therollinghobo.com/500exc
 (http://therollinghobo.com/500exc)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on February 28, 2018, 11:49:00 pm
Yes of course the weight will only be there until you empty the extra fuel into the tank. I am opting to carry a 5L bladder fastened onto my Giant Loop and again, empty as soon as 100km's were done. Then the Desert Fox bladder could be rolled  up and tied on out of the way. For most riding 400km is plenty, but the bladder just gives that extra 100km. Not wanting to do 700+ km in Angola....how I envy you guys. Can't wait for Saturday then it's rock and roll for Kaokoland.
I noticed a small leak on one of my forks a few days ago, and reading about Max the Panda and his leaky seal,  I quickly built some special tools and rebuilt the forks. Youtube is a wonderful invention! Hopefully I will get to use the tools again, I have a pile of special tools that were built for a job, and now I don't even remember what they were for. Anyway it is nice to be able to do shit yourself without having to schlep the bike all over and pay out huge chunks of change and wait a long time.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 01, 2018, 12:13:20 am
When you look back at what some people have ridden and the journeys done you can understand when they say go light

...

Yes, that really helped to bring the point home viscerally. But it still took few iterations (XT660Z, TE630, 690) until I finally settled on the right size - at least for now. Who knows, maybe 2 years from now I will be signing praises on CRF250 Rally. Wait - that actually means go heavy again 8).

That said, I still have a soft spot for that fat pig. Unlike the modern dinky BMWs (and other brands in that category), there was real honesty about that bike - like it was designed by engineers and not marketing people who took over afterwards. And while I did try to figure out some outlandish plans to replace it on the way in Sinai and later in Nairobi for 640 Adventure or XT600, it did bring me all the way down here eventually and there was only one place where I had to actually turn back - and that was more becaue I run out of daylight rather than because I couldn't do it on it - now unfortunatelly graveled over original Kunene river track up in Kaokoland:

(http://www.malec.name/martin/africa/galerie/060818%20Epupa%20Falls%20-%20Namibia/060817-179-03.jpg)      (http://www.malec.name/martin/africa/galerie/060818%20Epupa%20Falls%20-%20Namibia/060817-179-07.jpg)

And just for kicks (since I will probably never finish that RR) here are some other areas where I should not have been on that pig, but somehow managed to survive (while at the same time wondering constantly how much more fun I would have had on more appropriate bike):

(http://www.malec.name/martin/africa/galerie/051108%20Sinai%20-%20Egypt/051108-115-09.jpg)

(http://www.malec.name/martin/africa/galerie/051201%20Nubian%20Desert%20-%20Sudan/051126-D70-42.jpg)

Kaokoland - red drum pass:

(http://www.malec.name/martin/africa/galerie/060822%20Kaokoland%20-%20Namibia/060821-181-29.jpg)

Damaraland:

(http://www.malec.name/martin/africa/galerie/060826%20Northern%20Namibia/060826-185-17.jpg)


Swakopmund:

(http://www.malec.name/martin/africa/galerie/060902%20Desert%20Offroad%20-%20NAM/060902-189-29.jpg)

(http://www.malec.name/martin/africa/galerie/060902%20Desert%20Offroad%20-%20NAM/060902-190-45.jpg)


Good times, but it definitely would have been much more fun on smaller lighter bike. Though for that kind of long distance trip (it was almost exactly 40k km) I would go 600 cc - at the time (2005) either 640 adventure or XT600 rather than 500 enduro. I have to say that this south african XT600 I have met in Sudan kept me awake for few nights afterwards - even though the guy seemed to battle with the sand much more than me on the big pig  8)

(http://www.malec.name/martin/africa/galerie/051201%20Nubian%20Desert%20-%20Sudan/051125-123-24.jpg)


Sorry - got carried away with offtopic again.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 01, 2018, 12:26:25 am
Xpat you are living the life most Wilddogs can only dream about, being it the encumbrances we create around us (family, work, whatever) or simply don't have the balls to go it alone like you have, I for one try to make a plan to accompany you on some of your trips, (if my Husky don't let me down), and I enjoy your no-nonsense attitude, a bit like New Yorkers, cut to the chase and say it like it is. Life is too short to accommodate fools who sugar coat everything.
Now we are properly off-topic :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 01, 2018, 05:30:22 am
Legend
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 01, 2018, 08:06:31 am
Legend

You also drive a Hilux?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 01, 2018, 08:19:07 am
Question

What food do you guys pack and what do you cook it with ?.........oh and most important where do you pack your coffee ?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: WildWood on March 01, 2018, 10:15:46 am
Armpump, most important question so far.  "oh and most important where do you pack your coffee ?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ChrisL - DUSTRIDERS on March 01, 2018, 10:47:04 am
That said, I still have a soft spot for that fat pig. Unlike the modern dinky BMWs (and other brands in that category), there was real honesty about that bike - like it was designed by engineers and not marketing people who took over afterwards.

The last properly built and engineerd BMW. :deal:
Jupiter was here with his yesterday, I still like the look and sound of them. :drif: :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Serf on March 01, 2018, 12:15:26 pm
Just paid for a 2018 six days. Only 9 hours on the clock with quite a few extras on. Looking forward to getting it, but I have no intention to put it on the road

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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 01, 2018, 03:13:12 pm
Question

What food do you guys pack and what do you cook it with ?.........oh and most important where do you pack your coffee ?

Breakfast is nuts and raisins
Lunch is biltong and salticrax
Dinner is tinned curry and rice - a company called gold dish makes a beef, mutton and chicken - available at most supermarkets-  they all taste equally as shit but is a good big meal

Warm the tins next to the fire or on small gas cooker and eat out of the tin

For coffee I take those nestle cappuccino sachets - also shit but ok and better than nothing

But if we find a restaurant or Pub somewhere we stop and go mad
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on March 01, 2018, 04:45:07 pm
We do futurelife and some bread or biscuits for breakfast. Lunch is peanuts and raisins, peanut butter, some biscuits, dried fruit or whatever. Dinner is the proper meal and we eat well: braai within 2 days of shop. Then it’s on to dried stuff, tins, bread baked round fire. Cook on fire and a multifuel stove to supplement.

Nescafe cappuccino sachets are undrinkable elsewhere but the business on bike trips.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on March 01, 2018, 04:47:10 pm
We do futurelife and some bread or biscuits for breakfast. Lunch is peanuts and raisins, peanut butter, some biscuits, dried fruit or whatever. Dinner is the proper meal and we eat well: braai within 2 days of shop. Then it’s on to dried stuff, tins, bread baked round fire. Cook on fire and a multifuel stove to supplement.

Nescafe cappuccino sachets are undrinkable elsewhere but the business on bike trips.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ChrisL - DUSTRIDERS on March 01, 2018, 04:58:57 pm
 a company called gold dish makes a beef, mutton and chicken -

Wonder how many of those have I eaten on trips?
Always only take the chicken. I sometimes eat it at home too. :deal:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Amsterdam on March 01, 2018, 06:04:31 pm

Plus, from what I have seen in RRs, there isn't brutal sand there for first 300 or so km from Ruacana to the mouth of Kunene river. I may be wrong here, but even if I am 500 is so light that worst case scenario a bit of standing up (and possibly very low tyre pressures if they will opt for Tubeliss, which I would recommend) will still make it more manageable in sand than most other bikes - especially as those bike would have to be ladden with the same amount of luggage, spare fuel, water and such.

Correct.  Actually, there is no difficult sand all the way to Tombwa.  Once you are at the beach it is just straight line beach riding.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on March 01, 2018, 06:36:59 pm
Sardines and quarts from rural spaza shops, they all have them
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 01, 2018, 07:02:57 pm
Sardines and quarts from rural spaza shops, they all have them

Exactly. In Kaokoland and Damaraland (and most places in Southern Africa with possible exception of cutlines in Botswana) you pass through little villages or hamlets that have basic spaza shop every day. So you don't really need to carry too much if you can survive on the standard fare these shops provide, like Sardines, beans, rice, beer, soft drinks and in most places even bully beef. And usually one just eats in the morning and evening - during the day one may squeeze in quick snack like Lunchbar or bag of peanuts, but that is it.

As an ultimate luxury I do sometimes carry can of condensed sweetened milk for emergency to get that energy/mood boost in the critical moment if needed, but I may leave it behind it this time as Justin and Berie may laugh at me...  :peepwall:

I do not drink cofee, so that is not a concern for me. Places like Kaokoland have a way to get your blood pumping without a need for these artificial boosters.I do carry few bags of tea, but usually survive just on water and  beer/soft drinks from spaza shops.

Edit: I do carry Salticrax as a replacement of bread, as they are smaller and denser and one cannot get them (or bread sometimes) in the spaza shops). I also carry bags of biltong and dried food for a quick bite or replacement meal in pinch, should one get somewhere too late or be too knackered to want to fool around with cooking/warming stuff up.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on March 01, 2018, 08:21:39 pm
Small stove is a no for me, never really saw the use of one going lightweight as you can eat a lot of things out of the packaging / tin or heat up over a fire at night. I'm going riding not on a culinary course. I know it's also safe to ride a piece of meat or wors with, it will last a day wrapped in news paper. I wont buy meat from small town shops easily unless I'm really desperate. Too many donkeys in the sticks. Oh yeah and quarts makes you a better rider too  :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 03, 2018, 02:36:57 am
I am carrying quite a few of those energy gels, and a few Racefood bars, and then trail mix in ziplocks, oh yes some biscuits and vacuum packed biltong. I also have a few Royco snack soup which is a nice cup of nutrition.
Carrying a small stove and pot for the first time ever, lets see how it goes. My GL bag is kak heavy with all that water, I have opted for a Desert fox 5L bladder for extra fuel. All my food is in a small bag behind the GL. Probably carrying way too much, will see Sunday night at Uis how much I am actually taking with!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: George77 on March 03, 2018, 11:04:11 am
Ek het nou nie die hele fred gelees nie, lees is nie een van my sterk punte nie. Ek kyk ook al lankal na opsies van n veldfiets vir toer. Ktm 500 of WR 450. Watse spoed kan hierdie fietse handhaaf en vir hoe ver? Ek like net die moto-x look. Hoe moeilik is dit om so fiets op die pad te kry ens ens.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on March 03, 2018, 12:51:26 pm
Ek het nou nie die hele fred gelees nie, lees is nie een van my sterk punte nie. Ek kyk ook al lankal na opsies van n veldfiets vir toer. Ktm 500 of WR 450. Watse spoed kan hierdie fietse handhaaf en vir hoe ver? Ek like net die moto-x look. Hoe moeilik is dit om so fiets op die pad te kry ens ens.
Die exc 500 kom uit met 'n roadworthy kit, so geen probleem daar. Spoed hang af van sprocket sizes. Stock (13 / 50) is hy redelik kort ge-gear, maar selfs dan doen ek baie gemaklik so 110.  Sal wel die sprockets op myne verander om sy bene bietjie langer te maak.

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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on March 03, 2018, 03:50:15 pm
Sardines and quarts from rural spaza shops, they all have them

Exactly. In Kaokoland and Damaraland (and most places in Southern Africa with possible exception of cutlines in Botswana) you pass through little villages or hamlets that have basic spaza shop every day. So you don't really need to carry too much if you can survive on the standard fare these shops provide, like Sardines, beans, rice, beer, soft drinks and in most places even bully beef. And usually one just eats in the morning and evening - during the day one may squeeze in quick snack like Lunchbar or bag of peanuts, but that is it.

As an ultimate luxury I do sometimes carry can of condensed sweetened milk for emergency to get that energy/mood boost in the critical moment if needed, but I may leave it behind it this time as Justin and Berie may laugh at me...  :peepwall:

I do not drink cofee, so that is not a concern for me. Places like Kaokoland have a way to get your blood pumping without a need for these artificial boosters.I do carry few bags of tea, but usually survive just on water and  beer/soft drinks from spaza shops.

Edit: I do carry Salticrax as a replacement of bread, as they are smaller and denser and one cannot get them (or bread sometimes) in the spaza shops). I also carry bags of biltong and dried food for a quick bite or replacement meal in pinch, should one get somewhere too late or be too knackered to want to fool around with cooking/warming stuff up.

Xpat, touring in such a hot, dry environment in MX or touring pants is bound to cause the whole group to have Salticracks.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 03, 2018, 07:47:18 pm
Especially mine 🤮
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TeeJay on March 04, 2018, 10:33:55 am
Xpat, touring in such a hot, dry environment in MX or touring pants is bound to cause the whole group to have Salticracks.

 :imaposer:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 04, 2018, 08:11:48 pm
Sardines and quarts from rural spaza shops, they all have them

Exactly. In Kaokoland and Damaraland (and most places in Southern Africa with possible exception of cutlines in Botswana) you pass through little villages or hamlets that have basic spaza shop every day. So you don't really need to carry too much if you can survive on the standard fare these shops provide, like Sardines, beans, rice, beer, soft drinks and in most places even bully beef. And usually one just eats in the morning and evening - during the day one may squeeze in quick snack like Lunchbar or bag of peanuts, but that is it.

As an ultimate luxury I do sometimes carry can of condensed sweetened milk for emergency to get that energy/mood boost in the critical moment if needed, but I may leave it behind it this time as Justin and Berie may laugh at me...  :peepwall:

I do not drink cofee, so that is not a concern for me. Places like Kaokoland have a way to get your blood pumping without a need for these artificial boosters.I do carry few bags of tea, but usually survive just on water and  beer/soft drinks from spaza shops.

Edit: I do carry Salticrax as a replacement of bread, as they are smaller and denser and one cannot get them (or bread sometimes) in the spaza shops). I also carry bags of biltong and dried food for a quick bite or replacement meal in pinch, should one get somewhere too late or be too knackered to want to fool around with cooking/warming stuff up.

Xpat, touring in such a hot, dry environment in MX or touring pants is bound to cause the whole group to have Salticracks.

Well at least this time there are three of us so i can comfortably lick theirs rather than going thorough contortions of trying to lick my own on my solo trip...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: RedWolf on March 05, 2018, 07:48:46 am
Sardines and quarts from rural spaza shops, they all have them

Exactly. In Kaokoland and Damaraland (and most places in Southern Africa with possible exception of cutlines in Botswana) you pass through little villages or hamlets that have basic spaza shop every day. So you don't really need to carry too much if you can survive on the standard fare these shops provide, like Sardines, beans, rice, beer, soft drinks and in most places even bully beef. And usually one just eats in the morning and evening - during the day one may squeeze in quick snack like Lunchbar or bag of peanuts, but that is it.

As an ultimate luxury I do sometimes carry can of condensed sweetened milk for emergency to get that energy/mood boost in the critical moment if needed, but I may leave it behind it this time as Justin and Berie may laugh at me...  :peepwall:

I do not drink cofee, so that is not a concern for me. Places like Kaokoland have a way to get your blood pumping without a need for these artificial boosters.I do carry few bags of tea, but usually survive just on water and  beer/soft drinks from spaza shops.

Edit: I do carry Salticrax as a replacement of bread, as they are smaller and denser and one cannot get them (or bread sometimes) in the spaza shops). I also carry bags of biltong and dried food for a quick bite or replacement meal in pinch, should one get somewhere too late or be too knackered to want to fool around with cooking/warming stuff up.

Xpat, touring in such a hot, dry environment in MX or touring pants is bound to cause the whole group to have Salticracks.

Well at least this time there are three of us so i can comfortably lick theirs rather than going thorough contortions of trying to lick my own on my solo trip...
Suddenly I am very relieved I am not on the trip with you...  :bootyshake: :puke_r:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 05, 2018, 08:53:16 am
Don't buy owambo piele when out there chaps  :lol8:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TK on March 05, 2018, 08:54:38 am
Especially mine 🤮
[/How do you know?]
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TK on March 05, 2018, 08:57:56 am
Three guys in the middle of nowhere............talking about salty cracks......................BROKE CRACK MOUNTAIN.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: KarooKid on March 06, 2018, 06:36:44 pm
So back to this and more specifically carrying a backpack.

What size pack would one go for and what are the options? Know ATG makes one and Thule.

What else do we have as options?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 06, 2018, 06:41:00 pm
So back to this and more specifically carrying a backpack.

What size pack would one go for and what are the options? Know ATG makes one and Thule.

What else do we have as options?


Kyk ook na die nuwe Enduristan produkte
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 07, 2018, 11:06:11 am
Im relatively new to this group riding. Is this roughly what one would expect?(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/3bf63b9ccfc3dde934b4291470b71a9d.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/810c4ec850881595273d0e8df44ce6c0.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/536eba73bdf9fa5e958b64f8d10914d6.jpg)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 07, 2018, 11:18:54 am
Otherwise the trip is going just dandy. Justin’s bike broke already 4 times (tubeliss, tube, tube, tubeliss), and Bertie likes it here so much that he bought about half of Damaraland by now. He also likes to photobomb girafe portraits...

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/61e2ef1741bb818a31438cd3d1cb4c13.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/301f7a3875cceef726b19cbd0d2894b9.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/0280aab43a51a56cce3d82a69fc4d855.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/6654c03481ce4ca8ce78d1c55e5a0b73.jpg)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on March 07, 2018, 11:20:28 am
Great stuff  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 07, 2018, 11:21:43 am
So back to this and more specifically carrying a backpack.

What size pack would one go for and what are the options? Know ATG makes one and Thule.

What else do we have as options?


Not sure brand really matters. For 500 i bought 20 liter bag to get a bit more carrying capacity - used to use 14 liter before. I have Osprey hiking bag - more universal imo than dedicated biking bags


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: DCR on March 07, 2018, 11:39:17 am
Must say I'm slightly jealous sitting here in front of my computer looking at those pics. How about some more? I wanna see the terrain you guys ride that makes a 500 the necessary equipment.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 07, 2018, 11:42:28 am
Justin’s bike broke already 4 times (tubeliss, tube, tube, tubeliss)



Did tubeliss fail?  :patch:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 07, 2018, 11:56:08 am
Im relatively new to this group riding. Is this roughly what one would expect?(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/3bf63b9ccfc3dde934b4291470b71a9d.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/810c4ec850881595273d0e8df44ce6c0.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/536eba73bdf9fa5e958b64f8d10914d6.jpg)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Hahaha

Be safe
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Serf on March 07, 2018, 05:52:22 pm
Got my 500 today (https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/fe16f80f4302f0e52a63c103c9bf702f.jpg)

Sent from my SM-A510F using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 07, 2018, 05:54:25 pm
Got my 500 today (https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/fe16f80f4302f0e52a63c103c9bf702f.jpg)

Sent from my SM-A510F using Tapatalk

Wow! Congrats!!

Mine arriving in PTA tomorrow




(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/7470ff02a48c1bdba17ef95b09a045e6.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: YoungGSer on March 07, 2018, 06:19:36 pm
Got my 500 today (https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/fe16f80f4302f0e52a63c103c9bf702f.jpg)

Sent from my SM-A510F using Tapatalk
Dam she is a looker


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on March 07, 2018, 09:13:41 pm
Got my 500 today (https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/fe16f80f4302f0e52a63c103c9bf702f.jpg)

Sent from my SM-A510F using Tapatalk
My favourite colour  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: KarooKid on March 07, 2018, 09:23:45 pm
A "small" revolution happening right here....................
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 777 on March 07, 2018, 09:35:55 pm
Looking for a 500 if anyone knows of one
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: billy-joe on March 07, 2018, 11:07:22 pm
I thought it was just the husky that didn't have kick start?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on March 08, 2018, 09:13:07 am
Mine also arrives today  :) :) :) :)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on March 08, 2018, 09:20:11 am
Justin’s bike broke already 4 times (tubeliss, tube, tube, tubeliss)



Did tubeliss fail?  :patch:

Also curious. I installed tubliss this weekend and took a bit of effort to get it to seal
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: AfricaOffroad on March 08, 2018, 09:30:04 am
Got my 500 today (https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/fe16f80f4302f0e52a63c103c9bf702f.jpg)

Sent from my SM-A510F using Tapatalk

Wow! Congrats!!

Mine arriving in PTA tomorrow




(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/7470ff02a48c1bdba17ef95b09a045e6.jpg)
Awesome Noneking.
Just one thing, your signature says 2018, but those are 2017 decals on bike in pic?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 08, 2018, 11:57:53 am
Justin’s bike broke already 4 times (tubeliss, tube, tube, tubeliss)



Did tubeliss fail?  :patch:

Yes, ripped next to the valve. Replacement inner got then pinched during installation. And of course that cannot be repaired, like normal tube - we tried, lasted whole of 20km.

It is simple - if you are going deep into sticks, bring spare tubes and patches - no matter if you ride tubeliss, tubeless tyres, or anything else. That is the only repairable, reliable solution to get one out of pinch. And i ride tubeliss in my 500 -  but of course with sparr tubes, which are now in Justin’s wheel...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on March 08, 2018, 01:06:12 pm
Tubeliss too fancy for way out in the bush, how on earth are you ever going to get the high psi required with a bicycle pump or the barely adequate 500 battery if it looses pressure. Good old tubes the best bet.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 08, 2018, 03:19:35 pm
Many bike pumps can do 210 psi

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on March 08, 2018, 04:02:12 pm
Tubeliss too fancy for way out in the bush, how on earth are you ever going to get the high psi required with a bicycle pump or the barely adequate 500 battery if it looses pressure. Good old tubes the best bet.

Most mountain bike pumps can go over 100psi required.

But how about thinking of the tubliss as just another inner tube. What I am saying is carry a full size tube with you and you can replace the tubliss with a tube if you need to? 
Surely you will have less punctures with a tubliss system.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 08, 2018, 04:36:01 pm
Got my 500 today (https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/fe16f80f4302f0e52a63c103c9bf702f.jpg)

Sent from my SM-A510F using Tapatalk

Wow! Congrats!!

Mine arriving in PTA tomorrow




(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/7470ff02a48c1bdba17ef95b09a045e6.jpg)
Awesome Noneking.
Just one thing, your signature says 2018, but those are 2017 decals on bike in pic?


Registered 2018.....
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 08, 2018, 04:36:59 pm
Justin’s bike broke already 4 times (tubeliss, tube, tube, tubeliss)



Did tubeliss fail?  :patch:

Yes, ripped next to the valve. Replacement inner got then pinched during installation. And of course that cannot be repaired, like normal tube - we tried, lasted whole of 20km.

It is simple - if you are going deep into sticks, bring spare tubes and patches - no matter if you ride tubeliss, tubeless tyres, or anything else. That is the only repairable, reliable solution to get one out of pinch. And i ride tubeliss in my 500 -  but of course with sparr tubes, which are now in Justin’s wheel...


Was pressure correct to start with? Just wondering how it would rip......
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: AfricaOffroad on March 08, 2018, 05:25:02 pm
Got my 500 today (https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/fe16f80f4302f0e52a63c103c9bf702f.jpg)

Sent from my SM-A510F using Tapatalk

Wow! Congrats!!

Mine arriving in PTA tomorrow




(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/7470ff02a48c1bdba17ef95b09a045e6.jpg)
Awesome Noneking.
Just one thing, your signature says 2018, but those are 2017 decals on bike in pic?


Registered 2018.....
Ah!
And what happened to your 300 you just bought?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 08, 2018, 05:34:34 pm
Looking for a 500 if anyone knows of one

If you’ll consider a “bastard ktm” ......




(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180308/a04827d85a329b968b9e07ad29901d64.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 08, 2018, 05:36:17 pm
Got my 500 today (https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/fe16f80f4302f0e52a63c103c9bf702f.jpg)

Sent from my SM-A510F using Tapatalk

Wow! Congrats!!

Mine arriving in PTA tomorrow




(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180307/7470ff02a48c1bdba17ef95b09a045e6.jpg)
Awesome Noneking.
Just one thing, your signature says 2018, but those are 2017 decals on bike in pic?


Registered 2018.....
Ah!
And what happened to your 300 you just bought?


Was a mistake in hindsight.........
Sold within 2 hours of posting on Gumtree
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TK on March 08, 2018, 05:59:48 pm
There is a really really nice low hour 2016 ktm 500 at Dadas auto in Benoni............if anyone is interested.
20 hrs if I remember. Don't think its been off road.
R75K.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 08, 2018, 06:11:04 pm
There is a really really nice low hour 2016 ktm 500 at Dadas auto in Benoni............if anyone is interested.
20 hrs if I remember. Don't think its been off road.
R75K.


Saw that when I was looking

2015 XCW
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 11:54:55 am
Yesterday i got flat on my rear tubeliss, so now one pinched tube and few wasted patches later im on tube as well - at least in rear. And yes, my pressure was correct in the morning. Spent lonely night out in the bush sucking on a can of condensed milk, while the other two who took chicken route (wisely as it was past 4pm) feasted on steaks...(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/a74cf66c972d12f8d9de87e2a5e40aaf.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/2e9e9f5f58c921ed108f666c5b070536.jpg)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 12:03:53 pm
Im of two minds about tubeliss. On the one hand being able to ride low pressures is fantastic. On the other hand inability to fix it once punctured is quite limiting for trips like this one


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 12:04:04 pm
Im of two minds about tubeliss. On the one hand being able to ride low pressures is fantastic. On the other hand inability to fix it once punctured is quite limiting for trips like this one


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TeeJay on March 09, 2018, 12:11:03 pm
Don't you guys stick together?  :eek7:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on March 09, 2018, 12:13:46 pm
Quite correct Xpat. I was about to add a post that before anyone is tempted to drivel on about tubliss on this forum they should at least have fitted and changed one themselves. It is enough of a challenge in a well lit garage with all the tools and help that you need around you to doing one in the heat of the day in the dust and gravel somewhere in the middle of nowhere with the clock ticking. l will wimp out straight away and get the tube out of my backpack which in some ways begs the question (for a longer trip like this, a 3 hour enduro is a completely different fish) why take the tube out in the first place? 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 09, 2018, 12:15:38 pm
Don't you guys stick together?  :eek7:

He likes being on his own.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 09, 2018, 12:17:26 pm
Im of two minds about tubeliss. On the one hand being able to ride low pressures is fantastic. On the other hand inability to fix it once punctured is quite limiting for trips like this one


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Spare inner in your future pehaps

(http://cdn1.motocrosscenter.com/shop/622888-tm_large_default/inner-tube-replacement-tubliss-21.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 12:18:57 pm
Don't you guys stick together?  :eek7:

Yes we do. But yesterday we were late and i was still keen to try alternative to that brutal dirt road that replaced the original charming kunene river track. So i branched off on my own while the other two continued on dirt highway. No biggie, im used to ride in on my own - done kaokoland few times solo already.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 12:24:19 pm
Im of two minds about tubeliss. On the one hand being able to ride low pressures is fantastic. On the other hand inability to fix it once punctured is quite limiting for trips like this one


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Spare inner in your future pehaps

(http://cdn1.motocrosscenter.com/shop/622888-tm_large_default/inner-tube-replacement-tubliss-21.jpg)

spare inner is one shot solution - Justin had one and pinched it during installation. And he was done. Now he alternates on my Berties tube - depending which one he pinched latest. So far Bertie is the only one without flat - unsurprisingly as he rides mouses. I just dread the moment when those collaps...

Tube has very simple advantage - unless you rip it apart, you can fix it as many times as many patches you have.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 09, 2018, 12:31:01 pm
Michelin Dessert mousse's and back up tubes......... enjoy your trip :)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 09, 2018, 12:33:21 pm
One nice thing about inner tubeless, they take up very little space compared to a normal tube so can pack 4 of each in same space :)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 01:00:15 pm
One nice thing about inner tubeless, they take up very little space compared to a normal tube so can pack 4 of each in same space :)

Make that 2 - i have one pinched one now packed away. And how many patches you think one can take in the space of one inner?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on March 09, 2018, 01:16:47 pm
To be fair though tubliss is so that you can easily repair tyre punctures, not the tubliss itself. You guys do have an abnormally high failure rate though. It would be interesting to know exactly why. For me personally, at first fail of tubliss, fit a tube. Fix the tubliss at home.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on March 09, 2018, 01:20:20 pm
and the little internal bladder tubes are quite expensive at R250 each and if you get the tyre lever into the red sealer liner then it is basically a new tubliss kit.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 01:24:08 pm
and the little internal bladder tubes are quite expensive at R250 each and if you get the tyre lever into the red sealer liner then it is basically a new tubliss kit.

Which is exactly what i have done. So will have to contemplate buying new tubeliss rear at about 1800r.

As i said, the low pressures are magic - i was hitting middelmanetijes while taking pics of scenery just for kicks, but if it fails one better heve good old tube and patches ready
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 09, 2018, 01:52:44 pm
What tire spoons do you carry ?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on March 09, 2018, 02:36:58 pm
Quite correct Xpat. I was about to add a post that before anyone is tempted to drivel on about tubliss on this forum they should at least have fitted and changed one themselves. It is enough of a challenge in a well lit garage with all the tools and help that you need around you to doing one in the heat of the day in the dust and gravel somewhere in the middle of nowhere with the clock ticking. l will wimp out straight away and get the tube out of my backpack which in some ways begs the question (for a longer trip like this, a 3 hour enduro is a completely different fish) why take the tube out in the first place?
Hear hear my buddy tried them and he is very handy with wheels and tubes and eventually gave up in frustration on Tubeliss. Even the supplier told him you are on your own with these things  :imaposer:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on March 09, 2018, 03:33:14 pm
Yesterday i got flat on my rear tubeliss, so now one pinched tube and few wasted patches later im on tube as well -

You guys do have an abnormally high failure rate though. It would be interesting to know exactly why.

+1  Would also like to know how the small tube got punctured.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 09, 2018, 05:42:12 pm
I have high speed BIB Michelin mousses and Runner checked and lubed them when I fitted new tyres before the trip. Bought the bike with them in, so it was a bit of unknown. Heat and sustained high speeds like 160km/h is what kills them, I have been monitoring the temp at 100km/h and they get no hotter than any other wheel being tubliss or tubes. The nice thing is no stuffing about with pressures and no punctures. All plusses for me. I know Xpat is doubting them but mousse technology has moved on and if they were kak then why are Dakar racers using them?
Yes they are expensive but what is the value of not having constant flats in 40 plus temperatures?
To be honest I will never ride on anything else.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 09, 2018, 05:50:47 pm
I have high speed BIB Michelin mousses and Runner checked and lubed them when I fitted new tyres before the trip. Bought the bike with them in, so it was a bit of unknown. Heat and sustained high speeds like 160km/h is what kills them, I have been monitoring the temp at 100km/h and they get no hotter than any other wheel being tubliss or tubes. The nice thing is no stuffing about with pressures and no punctures. All plusses for me. I know Xpat is doubting them but mousse technology has moved on and if they were kak then why are Dakar racers using them?
Yes they are expensive but what is the value of not having constant flats in 40 plus temperatures?
To be honest I will never ride on anything else.


Nou die ander vraag ......
Waar kry julle WiFi?
Title: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: aka.Goliath on March 09, 2018, 05:53:07 pm
Xpat. To be clear, did you have a puncture in the tubliss itself. If so I'm very shocked, I have abused mine endlessly and I still have my original version 1's in my 690. They even have a few 'bite' marks from spoons and some metal rebar in them and they run perfectly only having to top them up every 2 weeks. I do put Tyre Shield in the inner tube and the tyre itself which I believe is why I've had no problems. I rode with these particular ones on a similar route to yours on the cut-lines past Chobe Park through Bots, that trips was a total of 4000km including Swaziland. I only had 1 puncture that took 5min to sort out on the front tyre (with a beer in hand mind you ), after I rode it flat for 250km to Nata Lodge. I can change the red inner tube in 15min with three proper spoons no problem, it's mainly about technique as I see it and lots of lube!

EDIT- but obviously always have a spare tubes with you no matter what you running.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on March 09, 2018, 06:01:04 pm
I have high speed BIB Michelin mousses and Runner checked and lubed them when I fitted new tyres before the trip. Bought the bike with them in, so it was a bit of unknown. Heat and sustained high speeds like 160km/h is what kills them, I have been monitoring the temp at 100km/h and they get no hotter than any other wheel being tubliss or tubes. The nice thing is no stuffing about with pressures and no punctures. All plusses for me. I know Xpat is doubting them but mousse technology has moved on and if they were kak then why are Dakar racers using them?
Yes they are expensive but what is the value of not having constant flats in 40 plus temperatures?
To be honest I will never ride on anything else.

Dakar racers replace them every day or second day.
Seen catastrophic failures of mousses at the Amageza.                   But these guys all ride high speed.

They are not recommended for DS bikes even at a low speed. But I presume this is mainly due to high bike weight, riding on tar and no control over speed.
Interest: Friend noted that going from tar to gravel his front tyre temp reduced but the rear tyre temp increased.

Enduro riders use them for extended periods and they last well.

Not much info on mousses for enduro bike touring and would like to hear your feedback.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TK on March 09, 2018, 06:38:38 pm
Hey guys. Ride safe, Bertie. Nice to know you're writing another chapter for your book.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on March 09, 2018, 07:03:59 pm
Neither mousses or Tubeliss are legal for road use for whoever that may be an issue
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Katoomski on March 09, 2018, 08:15:04 pm
I see some Tubliss spares in the for sale.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 10:42:05 pm
Xpat. To be clear, did you have a puncture in the tubliss itself. If so I'm very shocked, I have abused mine endlessly and I still have my original version 1's in my 690. They even have a few 'bite' marks from spoons and some metal rebar in them and they run perfectly only having to top them up every 2 weeks. I do put Tyre Shield in the inner tube and the tyre itself which I believe is why I've had no problems. I rode with these particular ones on a similar route to yours on the cut-lines past Chobe Park through Bots, that trips was a total of 4000km including Swaziland. I only had 1 puncture that took 5min to sort out on the front tyre (with a beer in hand mind you ), after I rode it flat for 250km to Nata Lodge. I can change the red inner tube in 15min with three proper spoons no problem, it's mainly about technique as I see it and lots of lube!

EDIT- but obviously always have a spare tubes with you no matter what you running.


The inner tube is pinched on the inside diameter. Not sure how that happened - i have ridden with it for a week in lesotho, and now for 4 days in nam. Didnt take the tyre off since installation. Checked the pressure day before the incident and it was 7.5 bar. I do check it every other day.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/92af80f21bb61774442eb7eaa60379ec.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 10:44:56 pm
Anyway, we just installed replacement tubeliss inner in (as my tube deflated out of blue about hour after i arrived to epupa with another flat), so we will see how it goes. Justin believes that red sleeve i thought is fubar is fine, we will find out soon enough.


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 10:52:27 pm
And back on topic - few nam sceneries being disrupted by 500s

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/2b2018bd9b0e267bb06574341fbe788b.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/17e3d0f4da3b2536148c6117e7ac0a57.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/932bec37965eddc084daaf5bda324ac5.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/8a92deeec699b4c40351e39db3dd75c2.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/5d246ce042dd8f3c0f32c384001b8150.jpg)


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Title: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 11:02:28 pm
Robbie’s pass - gang’s feelings at the beginning and then in the middle. And some scenery(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/cfbaa1a0ee8eff4eca5a5e64a02f82cc.jpg) (https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/a569974443ffee273e7ae7823f31dcdd.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/43efbde433f15148bb8eae1005590184.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/1714975cfd1b9f93b33ee318e1350a37.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/399de366f7493b91f49265ab1b2ee6c9.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/0c84d730e4de2ef0c04855cdfa256765.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 09, 2018, 11:13:29 pm
And few more

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/b7cd5c8934b8525c85316a6ffa5b2cd6.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/9ecb5ab5df1cef2ebf8fba40ca4c812a.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/6e5a8c24115b14daa25d726bfdcc7253.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/38887482154862d80fc5b3843415ec0d.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/652a286cce7136037ff121d3800d6b40.jpg)(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/28c72041401d680b0f4add46ebc770f3.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 10, 2018, 07:05:26 am
That terrain hard on tires.

Thanks for sharing
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on March 10, 2018, 09:26:04 am
I have high speed BIB Michelin mousses and Runner checked and lubed them when I fitted new tyres before the trip. Bought the bike with them in, so it was a bit of unknown. Heat and sustained high speeds like 160km/h is what kills them, I have been monitoring the temp at 100km/h and they get no hotter than any other wheel being tubliss or tubes. The nice thing is no stuffing about with pressures and no punctures. All plusses for me. I know Xpat is doubting them but mousse technology has moved on and if they were kak then why are Dakar racers using them?
Yes they are expensive but what is the value of not having constant flats in 40 plus temperatures?
To be honest I will never ride on anything else.

Dakar racers replace them every day or second day.
Seen catastrophic failures of mousses at the Amageza.                   But these guys all ride high speed.

They are not recommended for DS bikes even at a low speed. But I presume this is mainly due to high bike weight, riding on tar and no control over speed.
Interest: Friend noted that going from tar to gravel his front tyre temp reduced but the rear tyre temp increased.

Enduro riders use them for extended periods and they last well.

Not much info on mousses for enduro bike touring and would like to hear your feedback.


I use them all the time when I can get them (which is harder than you think in some countries!). The Amageza failures are almost all due to lower quality enduro mousses being employed on longer, hotter trips than they were designed for. They melt. Do not go for the cheaper mousses - they're cheaper because they're crapper.

The best thing is to get the tried and tested Michelin Desert bib mousses which are a lot harder and longer wearing than the michelin enduro mousses and also most of the other brands. (Note I do not sell these but I will endorse them).

Another important point is to make sure they are well lubed up before installation. Best results when you lube the inside of the tyre and slip in the mousse, the other way round results in the edge of the tyre scraping off lube as you wrestle the python in. If its well lubed, a Michelin desert mousse will last 2000-3000km (non-racing) so long as you keep your top speed on blacktop below 115km/hr.

Water is a problem with mousses, and unless you have sealed your rim, when you ride through water it will get in and could kill your mousse in just a couple of hundred km. Therefore once your tyre is on the rim, seal off the hole for the valve in the rim with some silicone glue. Then you will be able to ride through water without this worry.

A rim lock is a bitch to put in with mousses but helps stop the tyre from slipping on the rim which can happen on a loaded bike. May be worth considering.

If the shit hits the fan with your mousses on a trip have 6 of those big, thick cable ties that can go around you whole tyre & rim. Zip tie the tyre to the rim with all six cable ties to prevent it from coming off and you will be good to go for a day or two at slower pace on hard terrain or at normal pace if there is any sand about. This is a lot more successful if you run a hard tyre, and FWIW I have run Michelin deserts with flat tubes on the front & back with zip ties holding it all together for a couple of hundred km, no issues.
Title: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on March 10, 2018, 05:44:37 pm
Howzit guys! Didn't know you were posting to this thread but got the message from Robert. Seriously nostalgic for this trip... just fired up my 500 for the first time, coincidentally, since we got back in September (I've been down and out after tendon surgery). Love that bike - started and ran perfectly after standing for 6 months - not even a flat battery!

You trip looks awesome. The amazement goes on forever - I just love that place. I hope you're doing Desolation Valley still - that was one of my highlights.

Surprised at all the tyre shit! We didn't have a moment's tyre trouble on any of the five bikes (edit: actually, we had 1 front puncture on one of the tubed 690s) - I was on Tubliss and the rest on tubes.

Personally I wouldn't do mousses unless you can absolutely stay below 100kph. I've seen too many fail on rallies - and that includes loads of Michelin Deserts. The only way to manage them is to re-lube every day or two.

Tubliss is a mixed bag... most of the kak you hear - including from dealers - is from guys who haven't a clue what they're doing with them. Having said that, I ran one Amageza on them without issue, and the recent Kaoko trip. But on my second Amageza I exited the rally thanks to Tubliss when my rear collapsed at the end of the first stage and we couldn't repair it because of the marathon stage. I think my tyre went flat in the dirt without me realising it, and then I took a very hard hit on a stone and damaged the red liner, which caused the inner to collapse. That's my theory anyway. I had a slit in the tyre than needed 6 plugs and it lasted only 30 mins the next day - and that's with a new inner. If you're having inners fail repeatedly you've almost definitely got a fucked liner. Bummer!

Either way, I now don't run super low pressures on long distance trips with Tubliss. Seriously, on a 500 you really don't need to go below 1.5 bar - they have traction forever, so there's really not much point. Super low pressures means much higher risk of opportunistic damage through the tyre to the liner. On Amageza I was running 1bar front and 0.8bar rear - but I wouldn't go that low again unless it was enduro.

Have a blast - seriously jealous!! Looking forward to more photos.
ciao, Ian
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: WildWood on March 10, 2018, 08:26:25 pm
Over the past three years I've done 9 Kaokoland tours with a total of 1 front puncture.
Michelin extra heavy tubes and fresh Tire Sheild with new tires  (Pirelli MT21 Rallycross front and rear or Dunlop D606 rear).
I run 1.3-1.5 front and rear on the 690 on all surfaces unloaded and 1.7 carrying gear. Of course handling is compromised but we're touring and not racing.

Over the past 3 months which included a 9 day Orange River tour and also carrying heavy camera guys on mtb races I've been testing a Tubliss setup and so far no issues. I'll be two up filming the Cape Epic for 8 days and then three back to back Kaokoland tours which should be a comprehensive test for touring with Tubliss.

We have tried using mousses doing the mtb video work but proved a ball ache riding two up when you need to do tar work.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on March 10, 2018, 09:20:07 pm
Another important point is to make sure they are well lubed up before installation. Best results when you lube the inside of the tyre and slip in the mousse, the other way round results in the edge of the tyre scraping off lube as you wrestle the python in. If its well lubed, a Michelin desert mousse will last 2000-3000km (non-racing) so long as you keep your top speed on blacktop below 115km/hr.

Water is a problem with mousses, and unless you have sealed your rim, when you ride through water it will get in and could kill your mousse in just a couple of hundred km. Therefore once your tyre is on the rim, seal off the hole for the valve in the rim with some silicone glue. Then you will be able to ride through water without this worry.

A rim lock is a bitch to put in with mousses but helps stop the tyre from slipping on the rim which can happen on a loaded bike. May be worth considering.

What would the purpose of a rim lock be with mousses? Is it not mainly to prevent valves from tearing on tubes?

Mousses go softer over time as I understand from the enduro riders. I presume it is from the constant compression they get.
Some guys on the DS bikes sealed their rims to convert them to tubeless.
Wonder if it would be an advantage to do that with mousse tires.
- With the valve and sealed rim the moussed is sealed from water ingress and maybe the lube stays in longer
- You can pump up the pressure a bit for longer trips (maybe it keeps the mousse cooler on tar due to less deflection or maybe it has the opposite effect if the mousse has more room to move and rub inside the tyre)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on March 10, 2018, 10:28:36 pm
Sláinte Mhaith, if you really lube up a mousse well it can leak out along the bead and cause slippage, say when climbing a rocky hill. Hence the need for a rim lock. Not everyone does it though but I do.

Not really sure about filling up the tyre with air or sealing the bead...I am not convinced it will help that much.

Its true that they get softer with time and that's what really determines the usable life of them.
Title: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on March 11, 2018, 09:18:22 am
When a tyre grips and you apply a lot of torque at slow speed it can shift on rim and cause friction, damaging mousse. We run 1 rim lock on front and 2 on rear (180 deg) on Enduro bikes.

Additional purpose is if mousse collapses you have a chance of keeping tyre on rim.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on March 11, 2018, 10:22:03 am
"and 2 on rear (180 deg) on Enduro bikes."

and aren't they a pain in the arse to fit!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on March 11, 2018, 10:25:43 am
The inner tube is pinched on the inside diameter. Not sure how that happened - i have ridden with it for a week in lesotho, and now for 4 days in nam. Didnt take the tyre off since installation. Checked the pressure day before the incident and it was 7.5 bar. I do check it every other day.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/92af80f21bb61774442eb7eaa60379ec.jpg)


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So you checked the pressure and it was fine and next day it got a puncture without bringing any tools close to it?

Could it be a spoke pushing through?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Runner on March 11, 2018, 11:08:01 am
Im of two minds about tubeliss. On the one hand being able to ride low pressures is fantastic. On the other hand inability to fix it once punctured is quite limiting for trips like this one


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We had the conversation regarding tubeless.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on March 12, 2018, 08:47:28 am
"and 2 on rear (180 deg) on Enduro bikes."

and aren't they a pain in the arse to fit!

Not difficult, but that’s on soft Enduro mousses. Rally mousses may be a different situation.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on March 12, 2018, 08:49:17 am
I ride Tubliss but I wouldn’t do a remote trip without tube backup for both wheels. When you’re the only Tubliss bike in a group of tube riders it’s perfect - they carry the rubber. Which you probably won’t need... but if you do....
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on March 12, 2018, 08:53:13 am
I took my 500 for it's first proper ride yesterday. It's not at all what I expected. It took a while to get used to the LR tank, but within an hour or so, I was comfortable (it feels wider between the knees than a standard tak - obviously).

I've owned a 690 and a 350, and I was sort of expecting the 500 to sit in the middle. Well, it's completely different to both. The chassis feels a bit like the 350, but the 500 feels much more planted. I honestly think that in an off-road type race (not my thing), I would be better off with a 500. The power delivery reminds me of my old XR600R. Lots of traction, and plenty of smooth roll on power - no hard hits. I haven't checked the gearing on the bike yet, but I took it up to 155km/h and a typical Southern Cape dirt road, and there was still some oomph in reserve. No head shaking, just perfect stable tracking. I then played with the bike at the huge Brandfontein dunes, and bike was perfect for that. Once its gets :above" the sand, its unstoppable. There were a a few Land Rovers and a Pajero playing in the dunes, and it was a breeze climbing dunes they could not even get up a third of the way. There is a short road leading to the dunes with plenty of whoops, and the 500 ate these up. Lots of fun. I must add that I was lucky enough to purchase the bike with the suspension already having been upgraded for my weight.

I'm in love. Everybody has different needs, but to me, this bike is much better suited to my likes and personality than a 690.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 12, 2018, 09:06:26 am
"and 2 on rear (180 deg) on Enduro bikes."

and aren't they a pain in the arse to fit!

Not difficult, but that’s on soft Enduro mousses. Rally mousses may be a different situation.

Rally and hard side wall tires.............. you better have good levers and a good stand :)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TK on March 13, 2018, 05:58:03 pm
Another important point is to make sure they are well lubed up before installation. Best results when you lube the inside of the tyre and slip in the mousse, the other way round results in the edge of the tyre scraping off lube as you wrestle the python in. If its well lubed, a Michelin desert mousse will last 2000-3000km (non-racing) so long as you keep your top speed on blacktop below 115km/hr.

Water is a problem with mousses, and unless you have sealed your rim, when you ride through water it will get in and could kill your mousse in just a couple of hundred km. Therefore once your tyre is on the rim, seal off the hole for the valve in the rim with some silicone glue. Then you will be able to ride through water without this worry.

A rim lock is a bitch to put in with mousses but helps stop the tyre from slipping on the rim which can happen on a loaded bike. May be worth considering.

What would the purpose of a rim lock be with mousses? Is it not mainly to prevent valves from tearing on tubes?

Mousses go softer over time as I understand from the enduro riders. I presume it is from the constant compression they get.
Some guys on the DS bikes sealed their rims to convert them to tubeless.
Wonder if it would be an advantage to do that with mousse tires.
- With the valve and sealed rim the moussed is sealed from water ingress and maybe the lube stays in longer
- You can pump up the pressure a bit for longer trips (maybe it keeps the mousse cooler on tar due to less deflection or maybe it has the opposite effect if the mousse has more room to move and rub inside the tyre)
[Ever had that warm sensation between your legs when you realize that your tire is rotating but your rim is stationary from locking up your front breaks. And you keep pulling that break lever harder and harder but you wont stop in time. A rim lock has its uses. Even if it's just to keep your jocks clean. ]


[Ever had that warm sensation between your legs when you realize that your tire is rotating but your rim is stationary from locking up your front breaks. And you keep pulling that break lever harder and harder but you wont stop in time. A rim lock has its uses. Even if it's just to keep your jocks clean. ]
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on March 13, 2018, 10:12:11 pm
[Ever had that warm sensation between your legs when you realize that your tire is rotating but your rim is stationary from locking up your front breaks. And you keep pulling that break lever harder and harder but you wont stop in time. A rim lock has its uses. Even if it's just to keep your jocks clean. ]

No never had that feeling.

With the bigger bikes you don't have a rim lock and it is just the air pressure keeping the tyre against the rim and friction preventing it from slipping.

On the enduro bike with broken rim lock I had some slippage but only a few mm and not a tyre spinning on a rim. (That was with tubes)

Would have thought a mousse would hold a tyre in place but it sounds like it does a poor job of that.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 13, 2018, 10:19:54 pm
Back on wifi - here are few pics to piss you off first thing in the morning...

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180313/e1f9765df89f56f9fa5c21935a71d4ab.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 13, 2018, 10:41:43 pm
Ok, tapatalk decided that that was enough irritation for today - i’ll try harder next time.

@damaraland: one more essential 500 modification for adv riding that came out clearly on this trip is steel sidestand. My standard one is basically fubar forcing me to use trees and such instead. Justin has nice Pro Moto Billet one on - i will try to get one as well.


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 14, 2018, 07:06:11 am
I took my 500 for it's first proper ride yesterday. It's not at all what I expected. It took a while to get used to the LR tank, but within an hour or so, I was comfortable (it feels wider between the knees than a standard tak - obviously).

I've owned a 690 and a 350, and I was sort of expecting the 500 to sit in the middle. Well, it's completely different to both. The chassis feels a bit like the 350, but the 500 feels much more planted. I honestly think that in an off-road type race (not my thing), I would be better off with a 500. The power delivery reminds me of my old XR600R. Lots of traction, and plenty of smooth roll on power - no hard hits. I haven't checked the gearing on the bike yet, but I took it up to 155km/h and a typical Southern Cape dirt road, and there was still some oomph in reserve. No head shaking, just perfect stable tracking. I then played with the bike at the huge Brandfontein dunes, and bike was perfect for that. Once its gets :above" the sand, its unstoppable. There were a a few Land Rovers and a Pajero playing in the dunes, and it was a breeze climbing dunes they could not even get up a third of the way. There is a short road leading to the dunes with plenty of whoops, and the 500 ate these up. Lots of fun. I must add that I was lucky enough to purchase the bike with the suspension already having been upgraded for my weight.

I'm in love. Everybody has different needs, but to me, this bike is much better suited to my likes and personality than a 690.



Good to hear!
Hope I’m not going to regret trading the 701 and 300 for a 501......
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 14, 2018, 07:06:31 am
Back on wifi - here are few pics to piss you off first thing in the morning...

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180313/e1f9765df89f56f9fa5c21935a71d4ab.jpg)


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Beautiful!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on March 14, 2018, 07:46:23 am
I took my 500 for it's first proper ride yesterday. It's not at all what I expected. It took a while to get used to the LR tank, but within an hour or so, I was comfortable (it feels wider between the knees than a standard tak - obviously).

I've owned a 690 and a 350, and I was sort of expecting the 500 to sit in the middle. Well, it's completely different to both. The chassis feels a bit like the 350, but the 500 feels much more planted. I honestly think that in an off-road type race (not my thing), I would be better off with a 500. The power delivery reminds me of my old XR600R. Lots of traction, and plenty of smooth roll on power - no hard hits. I haven't checked the gearing on the bike yet, but I took it up to 155km/h and a typical Southern Cape dirt road, and there was still some oomph in reserve. No head shaking, just perfect stable tracking. I then played with the bike at the huge Brandfontein dunes, and bike was perfect for that. Once its gets :above" the sand, its unstoppable. There were a a few Land Rovers and a Pajero playing in the dunes, and it was a breeze climbing dunes they could not even get up a third of the way. There is a short road leading to the dunes with plenty of whoops, and the 500 ate these up. Lots of fun. I must add that I was lucky enough to purchase the bike with the suspension already having been upgraded for my weight.

I'm in love. Everybody has different needs, but to me, this bike is much better suited to my likes and personality than a 690.

Keep in mind that you have "tested" the 500 in the type of terrain and environment that you are not that likely to do/encounter on a longer adventure. Especially loaded with travel stuff, you would

not want to put your bike's frame through any loading such as whoops.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:07:37 am
Lets see if the tapatalk force is with me today...

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180314/96c4a99700929efab9ff3c9c2646e82f.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 14, 2018, 08:10:26 am
Was wondering when a update would come
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:12:11 am
.
(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180314/e4d25efd6c55fe720d0cee15f9e1045c.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:17:23 am
.
(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180314/31cb437fdd60070cc7647d7780e0f863.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Herklaas on March 14, 2018, 08:20:09 am
The inner tube is pinched on the inside diameter. Not sure how that happened - i have ridden with it for a week in lesotho, and now for 4 days in nam. Didnt take the tyre off since installation. Checked the pressure day before the incident and it was 7.5 bar. I do check it every other day.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180309/92af80f21bb61774442eb7eaa60379ec.jpg)


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So you checked the pressure and it was fine and next day it got a puncture without bringing any tools close to it?

Could it be a spoke pushing through?

 :sip: Did you say 7.5 bar, did I read that correct, is that not a bit much?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:20:25 am
.
(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180314/ba7bf0cd99b240cfec7e21364114c8f5.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:23:00 am
.
(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180314/fb30f8316eeaedb6a1d30996ae201e14.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Herklaas on March 14, 2018, 08:25:15 am
 :sip: Ok, did not read the whole thread, that is the tube that seals the spoke nipples, right?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:25:50 am
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 14, 2018, 08:27:57 am
Amazing terrain............ one day when i'm big.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Herklaas on March 14, 2018, 08:28:37 am
 :sip: Joh, what a country, must still do it on a bike. Nice Pics.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 14, 2018, 08:30:34 am
:sip: Ok, did not read the whole thread, that is the tube that seals the spoke nipples, right?

spoke nipples are wrapped in tape and that inner tube puts pressure on red liner to create a seal

(https://www.sixstarracing.com/sites/default/files/tubliss-gen-2-kit-3.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:31:49 am
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:35:40 am
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Herklaas on March 14, 2018, 08:40:30 am
 :sip: Ok, thanks, now 7.5 bar makes sense, must be a very high quality material to take that presure.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on March 14, 2018, 09:22:02 am
Fit tubliss system
I think a good analogy with fitting a Tubliss system is that it is very much like having anal sex. If everybody knows what is meant to happen, all parties have bought into it, the conditions are right and there is lots and lots of lube then it all works out very well. If you go at it Brokeback Mountain style then it will probably end very much like the movie – badly. It still gives me a surprise when the whole wheel suddenly vanishes inside the tyre! 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 14, 2018, 10:25:45 am
Fit tubliss system
I think a god analogy with fitting a Tubliss system is that it is very much like having anal sex. If everybody knows what is meant to happen, all parties have bought into it, the conditions are right and there is lots and lots of lube then it all works out very well. If you go at it Brokeback Mountain style then it will probably end very much like the movie – badly. It still gives me a surprise when the whole wheel suddenly vanishes inside the tyre!

If that analogy doesn't put you off Tubliss.......... :peepwall:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on March 14, 2018, 11:04:23 am
:sip: Ok, thanks, now 7.5 bar makes sense, must be a very high quality material to take that presure.

I don't think the tube is any better or much better quality than a normal tube but the red liner that it fits into is the thing that keep that pressure contained.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on March 14, 2018, 11:07:01 am
:sip: Ok, thanks, now 7.5 bar makes sense, must be a very high quality material to take that presure.

I don't think the tube is any better or much better quality than a normal tube but the red liner that it fits into is the thing that keep that pressure contained.

True, check pressures that road cycles is running their thin little tubes at. :eek7:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 11:18:23 am
:sip: Ok, thanks, now 7.5 bar makes sense, must be a very high quality material to take that presure.

I don't think the tube is any better or much better quality than a normal tube but the red liner that it fits into is the thing that keep that pressure contained.

I dont think so. I dont know about material, but the inner tube is very thick walled - more like a hose, than tube. Much thicker than heavy duty tube. That is reason why they dont pack that much smaller than standard tube.

Red liner is there imo to prevent puncture and provide width to clasp tyre to the rim
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on March 14, 2018, 11:26:14 am
I dont think so. I dont know about material, but the inner tube is very thick walled - more like a hose, than tube. Much thicker than heavy duty tube. That is reason why they dont pack that much smaller than standard tube.

Red liner is there imo to prevent puncture and provide width to clasp tyre to the rim

Apart from being thicker does it contain any special fibre layer or something?  If you pump it up to pressure outside the red liner does it retain it's shape or blow up like a balloon?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 11:30:27 am
I didnt see any special layer - just rubber or whatever the material is. Didnt try to blow it up outside liner, just cut it up for kids to use for catapult
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 14, 2018, 11:31:17 am
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 :drif: :drif:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 14, 2018, 11:33:55 am
I didnt see any special layer - just rubber or whatever the material is. Didnt try to blow it up outside liner, just cut it up for kids to use for catapult

Love your work man!

ps You better get back soon we busy selling your shit  :imaposer:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: ClimbingTurtle on March 14, 2018, 12:06:27 pm
I didnt see any special layer - just rubber or whatever the material is. Didnt try to blow it up outside liner, just cut it up for kids to use for catapult

Love your work man!

ps You better get back soon we busy selling your shit  :imaposer:

 :o  :biggrin:  :eek7:  :imaposer:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on March 14, 2018, 12:15:12 pm
I dont think so. I dont know about material, but the inner tube is very thick walled - more like a hose, than tube. Much thicker than heavy duty tube. That is reason why they dont pack that much smaller than standard tube.

Red liner is there imo to prevent puncture and provide width to clasp tyre to the rim

Apart from being thicker does it contain any special fibre layer or something?  If you pump it up to pressure outside the red liner does it retain it's shape or blow up like a balloon?

Just measured a front inner Tubliss tube, 2mm wall thickness.  It will blow up like a balloon outside it's tunnel.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 14, 2018, 02:08:54 pm
air pressure meter NB

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on March 14, 2018, 05:56:37 pm
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Wonderful pix, Xpat. The envy is strong in me right now! Don't think I recognise this... unless it's the mountains that lie between Opuwo and the river? If so I was foolishly planning on going over there, before we had to scotch that part of our route.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 07:11:34 pm
@MaxThePanda: it is a view from kopie above Huarusib river about 20km north of Puros. Just after you pass through one of the most beautifull passes from khumib river. Sorry to say, but your decision to avoid upper huarusib and instead follow the most boring tiver in the area - khumib, was imo the biggest mistake of your trip. I know it was basyed on advice from Hardy and i understand his reasoning, but still disagree. Upper huarusib together with hoanib river are for me the modt magical places there and probably anywhere.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:14:04 pm
Ok, here are few more spy photos from ktm 500 adventure testing somewhere in northern namibia.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180314/a2c1046c1386ff26288b151d8c177439.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:16:31 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on March 14, 2018, 08:17:26 pm
Ok, here are few more spy photos from ktm 500 adventure testing somewhere in northern namibia.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180314/a2c1046c1386ff26288b151d8c177439.jpg)


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With full back-up fleet just outside the photo. :pot:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:19:47 pm
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(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180314/021fad54d319e999fb71ec59d5161e11.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:22:41 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:24:38 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:27:30 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:31:24 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: blauth on March 14, 2018, 08:32:58 pm
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Can you imagine you took one of those portable printers (or instant camera's) and left them with the photo. It would be the talk of the village for a week. That would be cool.

You Okes have inspired me to get me a 501...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: KarooKid on March 14, 2018, 08:43:09 pm
The urge is strong for some proper Adventure.....
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 14, 2018, 08:43:43 pm
Very cool.Thanks for sharing again
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:47:00 pm
Ok, here are few more spy photos from ktm 500 adventure testing somewhere in northern namibia.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180314/a2c1046c1386ff26288b151d8c177439.jpg)


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With full back-up fleet just outside the photo. :pot:

Absolutely, we prefer to travel like gentlemen!

Immediately after the shot was tajen Bertie and i swooped in with umbrella and cold drinks to fend off heat stroke and foul mood. Ok, the cold drinks are stretch, but i fo think that Bertie actually had umbrella on him. Just shows you how adventure ready these 500 really are!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 08:59:03 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 09:01:57 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on March 14, 2018, 09:03:40 pm
Ok, here are few more spy photos from ktm 500 adventure testing somewhere in northern namibia.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180314/a2c1046c1386ff26288b151d8c177439.jpg)


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With full back-up fleet just outside the photo. :pot:

Absolutely, we prefer to travel like gentlemen!

Immediately after the shot was tajen Bertie and i swooped in with umbrella and cold drinks to fend off heat stroke and foul mood. Ok, the cold drinks are stretch, but i fo think that Bertie actually had umbrella on him. Just shows you how adventure ready these 500 really are!

You make me want to join you. :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 09:04:07 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 09:06:33 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 14, 2018, 09:08:15 pm
Ok, here are few more spy photos from ktm 500 adventure testing somewhere in northern namibia.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180314/a2c1046c1386ff26288b151d8c177439.jpg)


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Damn but I’m good looking
With full back-up fleet just outside the photo. :pot:

Absolutely, we prefer to travel like gentlemen!

Immediately after the shot was tajen Bertie and i swooped in with umbrella and cold drinks to fend off heat stroke and foul mood. Ok, the cold drinks are stretch, but i fo think that Bertie actually had umbrella on him. Just shows you how adventure ready these 500 really are!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 09:12:53 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 14, 2018, 09:14:30 pm
I am probably a less than average rider, have not really ridden sand much, like to sit a lot and had an op on my knee just 2 weeks before our trip so my fitness was aso lacking. Then I am not even mentioning that I am 15 and 10 years older than my riding buddies. My 500 took this trip in its stride, the one riverbed we flew down had thick thick sand so if you stopped it would dig a trench before you got going again, and I was jumping the middelmannetjie just for fun....this side other side and so on. It is almost like cheating. But then why make things difficult with a less than ideal bike??
My 500 has taken a few tumbles on the trip and it is not as pristine as it was before, but I am sure all will be revealed in Xpats RR.
Towards the end I was getting really tired and was dreading a fatigue off and breaking a bone so I opted to do the dirt highway instead and the next day Justbended was also partied out due to carpal tunnel hands. Xpat of course continued on his own to ride a few more routes as he does! Kaokoland is a magic place and the best way to experience it is on a 500. Thanks Martin for an unforgettable experience.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 09:14:48 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 09:17:39 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 09:19:30 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 14, 2018, 09:21:55 pm
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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: WildWood on March 14, 2018, 09:27:26 pm
Some great pics guys.

You're driving me crazy with those images . I can't wait to get there in April.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: blauth on March 14, 2018, 09:55:38 pm
Awesome and inspiring lads.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on March 15, 2018, 04:59:26 am
Are there going to be any pics left for the RR? ;D
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 15, 2018, 06:24:11 am
I took like 600 pics and Xpat even more, so I would guess we are still going to have a few left for the RR :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 15, 2018, 07:15:45 am
Day time temps ?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 15, 2018, 07:25:09 am
I have a temp guage on my handlebars and saw 47 deg C and regularly over 40, but that is in the sun. Not sure how that relates to other temp readings. The wind was often so hot that it felt better to close my visor. And I think we were lucky as it was slightly overcast on some days. Others were real scorchers, and our kit was drenched in sweat most days. We carried a lot of water and I had 4L in camel bladders in my rugsack which I finished most days.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 15, 2018, 07:34:15 am
Actualy both Justin and I were surprised how cool it was most days - until about two days ago. On many days we had clouds and if one wetted their t-shirt, it was actually unpleasantly cold while riding. And the nights were also quite chilly. I didnt bring sleeping bag, just the thermal inner and suffered through night or two.

That said, this is within a context of nam summer. As Bertie said, on the sun and working hard on the bike one got hot. But not as much as i expected based on my prior trips
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on March 15, 2018, 08:32:14 am
Bloody epic!  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on March 15, 2018, 10:32:41 am
@MaxThePanda: it is a view from kopie above Huarusib river about 20km north of Puros. Just after you pass through one of the most beautifull passes from khumib river. Sorry to say, but your decision to avoid upper huarusib and instead follow the most boring tiver in the area - khumib, was imo the biggest mistake of your trip. I know it was basyed on advice from Hardy and i understand his reasoning, but still disagree. Upper huarusib together with hoanib river are for me the modt magical places there and probably anywhere.

Yeah, yeah. I know. But this way I have a reason to go back (one of many).
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 15, 2018, 03:41:43 pm
So even though I cut the trip short, I still did the distance on Namibian dirt highways, my mousses lasted the whole trip just like Runner said. Not one puncture just hassle free soft tyres that worked awesome in sand or wherever I chose to ride. Some places were brutal rocks, actually the whole Kaokoland is fairly brutal on tyres and the mousses did just fine the whole way. They compare to about half a bar of pressure or slightly more. Xpat and Justbendit have so many punctures, even Tubliss failing I stopped counting. The mousse naysayers had me worried halfway through but I just kept speeds at 100 and had no trouble. Nada! So there!
And they were old mousses that I got with the bike, we just serviced them. I carried pumps, tubes, spoons etc....well at least my riding buddies made good use of them!!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 15, 2018, 03:54:34 pm
:)

Yip i used them plenty in my ktm300 ......... lekker to ride anywhere and not worry about punctures

The nuetech nitro mousses are getting good reviews

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on March 15, 2018, 06:40:39 pm
So even though I cut the trip short, I still did the distance on Namibian dirt highways, my mousses lasted the whole trip just like Runner said. Not one puncture just hassle free soft tyres that worked awesome in sand or wherever I chose to ride. Some places were brutal rocks, actually the whole Kaokoland is fairly brutal on tyres and the mousses did just fine the whole way. They compare to about half a bar of pressure or slightly more. Xpat and Justbendit have so many punctures, even Tubliss failing I stopped counting. The mousse naysayers had me worried halfway through but I just kept speeds at 100 and had no trouble. Nada! So there!
And they were old mousses that I got with the bike, we just serviced them. I carried pumps, tubes, spoons etc....well at least my riding buddies made good use of them!!

Which brand mousses did you use and which type (enduro/rally/etc)?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 15, 2018, 09:01:45 pm
All I know is high speed BIB Michelin mousses, I did not buy them so anybodies guess. Would it be printed on them?
Runner was there when they took them out to lube, maybe he knows. Runner come in!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 15, 2018, 09:13:59 pm
All I know is high speed BIB Michelin mousses, I did not buy them so anybodies guess. Would it be printed on them?
Runner was there when they took them out to lube, maybe he knows. Runner come in!

I looked carefully at them on the trip

They are the warpspeed BIB variety with heavy duty earth magnets
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 15, 2018, 09:32:14 pm
That makes sense. Also tree attractant qualities. Must change them as soon as I get a chance. Never know when it may entice another tree into my path.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: chopperpilot on March 15, 2018, 11:30:31 pm
That makes sense. Also tree attractant qualities. Must change them as soon as I get a chance. Never know when it may entice another tree into my path.
Swazi habits never die!

Trust you guys had fun! Terrain looks harsh...surely an experience of a life time!

Bertie...if you are home yet...quickly load the Husky...and meet us in Tzaneen tomorrow evening....we'll be doing the 23 river crossing route...you can surely do with a wet environment now!

Bertie...bit of feedback on the 500, as a seasoned 610 TE rider?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on March 16, 2018, 12:20:46 am
All I know is high speed BIB Michelin mousses, I did not buy them so anybodies guess. Would it be printed on them?
Runner was there when they took them out to lube, maybe he knows. Runner come in!

Knowing Runner they would have been Michelin deserts with rally BIB mousses. Important to mention that these are much harder than most. Super stoked hearing that they worked for you against the tube/liss naysayers. ;D :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 16, 2018, 06:37:49 am
The 500 is a whole lot easier to ride and if revved probably faster than my 610.  Because it is lighter by some 20g it is much less tiring to ride. The Husky does have more low end torque and I stalled the 500 quite a few times untill you get used to that aspect
With the 20L tank and frugal fuel consumption the 500 is a winner. Double the range of the Husky. Love my 500..
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 16, 2018, 07:21:07 am
For ref

(http://media.michelinman.com/content/dam/motorbike/2W/5-passion-for-riding/5-3-ride-like-a-pro/off-road/bib-mousse-fullsize.jpg)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TK on March 16, 2018, 08:59:08 am
You finding trees and bushes to hide your bike in has nothing to do with your choice of mousses and tires.............how do I know?
Glad you safe.......but more importantly, trees or no trees,  you deserved that trip.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on March 16, 2018, 09:28:34 am
And hopefully this thread will also put end to the myth that an enduro 4T 450/500 class bike will explode or require valve adjustments the moment you attempt to take it on a big trip.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on March 16, 2018, 09:52:40 am
And hopefully this thread will also put end to the myth that an enduro 4T 450/500 class bike will explode or require valve adjustments the moment you attempt to take it on a big trip.

The only enduro bikes I can compare from my experience to the 500 are a CRF 450, a steel framed (2006) WR 450, a Husaberg 550 and a 690, although strictly speaking, the 690 is more a dual purpose bike. I find the 500 feels lighter than all the above bikes, except the Husaberg 550, and I find it more manageable and nimble than all the above bikes. Although the 550 was lighter, it was a beast to control. JustBendIt kept telling us how forgiving the 500 is, and it's completely true.

Awesome trip guys. I think you've lit a fire in many of of us!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 16, 2018, 01:19:26 pm
And hopefully this thread will also put end to the myth that an enduro 4T 450/500 class bike will explode or require valve adjustments the moment you attempt to take it on a big trip.

Ja probably perfect tool for that type of trip / terrain...............now just ask one of them to ride it back to Pretoria from Okongwati in 2 days  :pot:


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: blauth on March 16, 2018, 03:42:03 pm
So even though I cut the trip short, I still did the distance on Namibian dirt highways, my mousses lasted the whole trip just like Runner said. Not one puncture just hassle free soft tyres that worked awesome in sand or wherever I chose to ride. Some places were brutal rocks, actually the whole Kaokoland is fairly brutal on tyres and the mousses did just fine the whole way. They compare to about half a bar of pressure or slightly more. Xpat and Justbendit have so many punctures, even Tubliss failing I stopped counting. The mousse naysayers had me worried halfway through but I just kept speeds at 100 and had no trouble. Nada! So there!
And they were old mousses that I got with the bike, we just serviced them. I carried pumps, tubes, spoons etc....well at least my riding buddies made good use of them!!

Excellent advice, thanks. I'll keep this in mind for future.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 16, 2018, 07:41:35 pm
Alright, we are done. Well i am, the other two have been done few days ago (Justin is in ct already). So here is the last short batch, as the models run away

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180316/13f350bc056e5f07dba6d9d8af1d9dd9.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180316/381e51141c04968096d0f6b6fabe4293.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180316/5a5d9387875c9553860f149586086c11.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180316/f5c4f303f2d120d4ded0b06ebcf13bbf.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180316/562a83b9c49044cb34f53add962ad543.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 16, 2018, 07:46:25 pm
And hopefully this thread will also put end to the myth that an enduro 4T 450/500 class bike will explode or require valve adjustments the moment you attempt to take it on a big trip.

Ja probably perfect tool for that type of trip / terrain...............now just ask one of them to ride it back to Pretoria from Okongwati in 2 days  :pot:

I will, if you will ride up on your suv, ride the same route as us in the same time (i will even excuse you from Robbies pass) and lets see how much you will be looking forward to that mind numbing commute...


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 16, 2018, 07:53:18 pm
I took like 600 pics and Xpat even more, so I would guess we are still going to have a few left for the RR :biggrin:

And Justin took another 6 or so.

But yes, i might have wasted most of the best ones here so may not bother with rr.


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: onderbroek on March 16, 2018, 08:13:24 pm
I took like 600 pics and Xpat even more, so I would guess we are still going to have a few left for the RR :biggrin:


But yes, i might have wasted most of the best ones here so may not bother with rr.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Sorry Xpat this will not be allowed, against forum and the 500 admirers club rules
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 16, 2018, 08:50:42 pm
And hopefully this thread will also put end to the myth that an enduro 4T 450/500 class bike will explode or require valve adjustments the moment you attempt to take it on a big trip.

Ja probably perfect tool for that type of trip / terrain...............now just ask one of them to ride it back to Pretoria from Okongwati in 2 days  :pot:

I will, if you will ride up on your suv, ride the same route as us in the same time (i will even excuse you from Robbies pass) and lets see how much you will be looking forward to that mind numbing commute...


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

That's why i said for that type or riding.Coming back via bots might be more scenic but still mind numbing 2500 km
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: aka.Goliath on March 16, 2018, 09:57:52 pm
Xpat. Nice to see the MoskoMoto luggage on the 500 fully loaded. After all this talk of 'lighter is better' would you still consider the 80l? It looks like it works well on the 500.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 17, 2018, 06:59:14 am
First ride.....




(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180317/9b060f808541846e26c3758fda4ea41b.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: WildWood on March 17, 2018, 09:00:48 am
I'm still trying to understand why the EXC500 & 501 would be chosen over the 690 / 701 for a trip like Kaokoland. I feel the newer more race ready bikes are being compared to the older XR and even more recent EXC 525KTM's and Husabergs which were better suited to adventure riding.

Apart from van Zyl's Pass and the sandy bits around Brandberg the routes are easily doable on an Africa Twin / 1090R and therefore a doddle on the big thumpers.

A large percentage of my clients are Euros , who have seldom if ever ridden the type of terrain we have in Namibia and they all cope perfectly well on the 690's. Last June  I had a 50kg Austrian 50 year old women that rode the wheels off a 690 and never  stopped smiling. ( it was her first time on a 690 and bought one when she got home)

My experience with clients riding their own 501's / 500's on the route is yes they find the sandy bits a tad easier if they're less skilled riders but hate any long tar or easy gravel stretches with a passion, always angling for a space on the trailer..

A couple of hours sand practice at a spot like Atlantis dunes or the West Coast  and sand riding on a 690 is as easy as a tar road.

With 10000km service intervals and way more stability the 690/701 still to me seems like the obvious adventure touring option.

We' use them to carry the video teams on events like Absa Cape Epic where we ride two up with a camera guy filming on everything from tight single tracks on off-camber climbs to deep sand roads . I've done many 800km day rides/ been around Zone 7 and done endless loops of Atlantis & Macassar dunes on my 690's. Surely the do everything bike.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 17, 2018, 09:09:50 am
I'm still trying to understand why the EXC500 & 501 would be chosen over the 690 / 701 for a trip like Kaokoland. I feel the newer more race ready bikes are being compared to the older XR and even more recent EXC 525KTM's and Husabergs which were better suited to adventure riding.

Apart from van Zyl's Pass and the sandy bits around Brandberg the routes are easily doable on an Africa Twin / 1090R and therefore a doddle on the big thumpers.

A large percentage of my clients are Euros , who have seldom if ever ridden the type of terrain we have in Namibia and they all cope perfectly well on the 690's. Last June  I had a 50kg Austrian 50 year old women that rode the wheels off a 690 and never  stopped smiling. ( it was her first time on a 690 and bought one when she got home)

My experience with clients riding their own 501's / 500's on the route is yes they find the sandy bits a tad easier if they're less skilled riders but hate any long tar or easy gravel stretches with a passion, always angling for a space on the trailer..

A couple of hours sand practice at a spot like Atlantis dunes or the West Coast  and sand riding on a 690 is as easy as a tar road.

With 10000km service intervals and way more stability the 690/701 still to me seems like the obvious adventure touring option.

We' use them to carry the video teams on events like Absa Cape Epic where we ride two up with a camera guy filming on everything from tight single tracks on off-camber climbs to deep sand roads . I've done many 800km day rides/ been around Zone 7 and done endless loops of Atlantis & Macassar dunes on my 690's. Surely the do everything bike.

Go ride a 500 for 10 days on the routes we just did (only some of the stuff was your usual Kaokoland trip fare - the rest was quite brutal) and then tell us if you still prefer a 690

We did 2000 km - I serviced my bike before the trip and will do it again now

Yes the 690 has a 10 000 km service interval so therefore you are telling me you will do 5 trips like this on your rental bikes before you service them

I raced the 500s predecessor ...the mighty 525 ... for 5000 km in 7 days on Amageza 2015 and it never skipped a beat - all 4 of the 525s in TEAM 525 ran perfectly while many 690s did not finish due to mechanical trouble ...ask Dave Griffin (DP at RAD KTM) about his own experience on a 690

We did many 800 km plus days during that race

The 500s are superior in everything ...those that complain about riding long liasons on them need to take a spoon of cement and HTFU

And on your trips you have a backup vehicle carrying all your customer's luggage, water, etc - now put extra 30 kg of necessary stuff on to a 690 and see what a difference that makes ...every gram counts

This thread is about economically adventurising a 500 ...not debating as to what is better than it - in my opinion an adventure bike is a bike that is a bike ridden by somebody who is capable by themselves on that bike unsupported for a period of time

I know why you use 690s ...it is because you believe they are better built, stronger, more durbale and will last longer ... makes good business sense in your case

But I believe these 500s are so good and that their engines are so strong that the bottom end will do 50 000 km if maintained properly before the casings need to be split and a refresh is in order ... and I intend to prove it on my bike ... hopefully I don't end up eating my words. I will however say that the top end and piston & rings will probably need to be done twice in that mileage ...but I am well prepared to do that and pay that price considering the fun factor of my 500 vs any 690
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 17, 2018, 09:34:10 am
(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180317/1851bea59a7169a7e5a54eb8e689e16d.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on March 17, 2018, 10:41:27 am
Another important point is to make sure they are well lubed up before installation. Best results when you lube the inside of the tyre and slip in the mousse, the other way round results in the edge of the tyre scraping off lube as you wrestle the python in. If its well lubed, a Michelin desert mousse will last 2000-3000km (non-racing) so long as you keep your top speed on blacktop below 115km/hr.

Water is a problem with mousses, and unless you have sealed your rim, when you ride through water it will get in and could kill your mousse in just a couple of hundred km. Therefore once your tyre is on the rim, seal off the hole for the valve in the rim with some silicone glue. Then you will be able to ride through water without this worry.

A rim lock is a bitch to put in with mousses but helps stop the tyre from slipping on the rim which can happen on a loaded bike. May be worth considering.

What would the purpose of a rim lock be with mousses? Is it not mainly to prevent valves from tearing on tubes?

Mousses go softer over time as I understand from the enduro riders. I presume it is from the constant compression they get.
Some guys on the DS bikes sealed their rims to convert them to tubeless.
Wonder if it would be an advantage to do that with mousse tires.
- With the valve and sealed rim the moussed is sealed from water ingress and maybe the lube stays in longer
- You can pump up the pressure a bit for longer trips (maybe it keeps the mousse cooler on tar due to less deflection or maybe it has the opposite effect if the mousse has more room to move and rub inside the tyre)

Many extreme enduro guys in fact use two rim locks on the rear - yes a bit of a PIA to fit but insurance. You do not want any tyre to rim movement or for the tyre to spin due to lube or water ingress as in addition to fucking with traction it builds up friction which = heat. Heat is the mousse killer. That is why high speeds are not good for them as well. Mousses these days can last very well if understood and regularly cleaned, relubed and refitted properly.  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on March 17, 2018, 10:45:08 am
Justin, how many hours does have your 500 have on now, and you remember how many it had when you bought it?

Unrelated, but interesting anyway, a friend of mine had a 530 that did over 400 hours. The motor was spliptto have the bottom end done as a precaution on about 420 hours (if I remember correctly), and the bottom end was still all in spec. Admittedly, this particular 530 had a meticulous owner, and it never suffered from the typical oil migration problems that 530's were know for. From what I understand, the 525 and 500 engines are much better than the 530's.;

It would be interesting to hear what kind of hours you guys have on your 500's.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on March 17, 2018, 10:50:38 am
Another important point is to make sure they are well lubed up before installation. Best results when you lube the inside of the tyre and slip in the mousse, the other way round results in the edge of the tyre scraping off lube as you wrestle the python in. If its well lubed, a Michelin desert mousse will last 2000-3000km (non-racing) so long as you keep your top speed on blacktop below 115km/hr.

Water is a problem with mousses, and unless you have sealed your rim, when you ride through water it will get in and could kill your mousse in just a couple of hundred km. Therefore once your tyre is on the rim, seal off the hole for the valve in the rim with some silicone glue. Then you will be able to ride through water without this worry.

A rim lock is a bitch to put in with mousses but helps stop the tyre from slipping on the rim which can happen on a loaded bike. May be worth considering.

What would the purpose of a rim lock be with mousses? Is it not mainly to prevent valves from tearing on tubes?

Mousses go softer over time as I understand from the enduro riders. I presume it is from the constant compression they get.
Some guys on the DS bikes sealed their rims to convert them to tubeless.
Wonder if it would be an advantage to do that with mousse tires.
- With the valve and sealed rim the moussed is sealed from water ingress and maybe the lube stays in longer
- You can pump up the pressure a bit for longer trips (maybe it keeps the mousse cooler on tar due to less deflection or maybe it has the opposite effect if the mousse has more room to move and rub inside the tyre)

Many extreme enduro guys in fact use two rim locks on the rear - yes a bit of a PIA to fit but insurance. You do not want any tyre to rim movement or for the tyre to spin due to lube or water ingress as in addition to fucking with traction it builds up friction which = heat. Heat is the mousse killer. That is why high speeds are not good for them as well. Mousses these days can last very well if understood and regularly cleaned, relubed and refitted properly.  :thumleft:

I had an embarrassing and expensive experience on my Husaberg 300. On fast acceleration, my clutch started slipping, especially on wet sand. The bike already had about 250 hrs on its, and had had a hard life; a third place on the Roof (Gold), a Sea to Ski, and 3 seasons worth of racing in the Rudamans/Lowveld enduro series. Naturally, I felt it was time to replace the clutch, only to find that at my very next ride, the clutch was slipping again. Ends up both rim lock bolts had sheared on by rear wheel, and it was the tyre slipping on the rim, and not the clutch. Eish...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 17, 2018, 11:11:16 am
Justin, how many hours does have your 500 have on now, and you remember how many it had when you bought it?

Unrelated, but interesting anyway, a friend of mine had a 530 that did over 400 hours. The motor was spliptto have the bottom end done as a precaution on about 420 hours (if I remember correctly), and the bottom end was still all in spec. Admittedly, this particular 530 had a meticulous owner, and it never suffered from the typical oil migration problems that 530's were know for. From what I understand, the 525 and 500 engines are much better than the 530's.;

It would be interesting to hear what kind of hours you guys have on your 500's.

I bought my 500 from RAD for R55K on the same weekend I collected the Pajero and BT50 from you ...beginning October 2016

It was Gerry Van Der Byl's bike before it was mine (Gerry did the Dakar this year) and had 130 hours and 6 000 km on it - its now got 210 hours and 10 870 km on it

It looks a bit battle scarred now but still runs beautifully

Next week I'm giving it a good service including valve clearances (I do these every 50 hours because I ride like a granny)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on March 17, 2018, 12:10:10 pm
Without getting into a whole tyre debate - what tyres did you guys use?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 17, 2018, 12:35:00 pm
Without getting into a whole tyre debate - what tyres did you guys use?

I had a Mitas C23 80/100/21 on the front - was OK but I had 7 punctures ...tubliss failed twice both on the inner tube and then 1 pinched flat and 4 thorn holes on normal thin inner tube. The tyre held up well and still has plenty life left but for performance and grip I much prefer the Michelin Desert Race that we used on Amageza

On the rear I had a Mitas EO9 130/80/18 (non Dakar heavy duty sidewall version) - this tyre was absolutely shit and is completely fucked now - last 2 days in the heavy sand just saw me spinning everywhere. Rear was also on tubliss and there were no problems no punctures no air loss . I will not use this tyre ever again because its performance and durability is so bad ... and we were riding like old grannies ... touring and not racing

Straatkat and XPat both had a maxxis knobbly 80/100/21 up front and Mitas CO2 Stoneking 120/90/18 on the rear - their rear tyres were not even halfway worn at the end of the trip and would easily do another 3000 km ...I was so impressed with this tyre that I bought one on my way home yesterday



Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on March 17, 2018, 12:41:15 pm
I use the Mitas CO2 on my Husky 610 and have been very happy with it. I also use the Mitas E09 Dakar as my all time go to tyre on the HP2 and swear by it, as do many others. I find it strange that it did not perform for you as was a Dakar developed tyre? It is the Dakar version that has the extra ply in the sidewall and is HD - honestly you can ride it as a run-flat if need be. Did the tread not last?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 17, 2018, 12:45:14 pm
This is what it looks like now ... just under 2000 km from new
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on March 17, 2018, 12:57:42 pm
Does look shagged but think where you have taken it.  ::)  Essentially most wear is on the rounded and chipped blocks due to rocks. A CO2 starts off with considerably more tread depth and is clearly designed for rocks due to its name. It is actually an MX tyre if I recall correctly.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on March 17, 2018, 02:40:09 pm
Justin, how many hours does have your 500 have on now, and you remember how many it had when you bought it?

Unrelated, but interesting anyway, a friend of mine had a 530 that did over 400 hours. The motor was spliptto have the bottom end done as a precaution on about 420 hours (if I remember correctly), and the bottom end was still all in spec. Admittedly, this particular 530 had a meticulous owner, and it never suffered from the typical oil migration problems that 530's were know for. From what I understand, the 525 and 500 engines are much better than the 530's.;

It would be interesting to hear what kind of hours you guys have on your 500's.

In Peru the guys I rode with used ride a lot  the 500's & 525's in the dunes. They all did not like the 530's due to engine troubles.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: WildWood on March 17, 2018, 03:55:23 pm

Go ride a 500 for 10 days on the routes we just did (only some of the stuff was your usual Kaokoland trip fare - the rest was quite brutal) and then tell us if you still prefer a 690

We did 2000 km - I serviced my bike before the trip and will do it again now

Yes the 690 has a 10 000 km service interval so therefore you are telling me you will do 5 trips like this on your rental bikes before you service them

I raced the 500s predecessor ...the mighty 525 ... for 5000 km in 7 days on Amageza 2015 and it never skipped a beat - all 4 of the 525s in TEAM 525 ran perfectly while many 690s did not finish due to mechanical trouble ...ask Dave Griffin (DP at RAD KTM) about his own experience on a 690

We did many 800 km plus days during that race

The 500s are superior in everything ...those that complain about riding long liasons on them need to take a spoon of cement and HTFU

"And on your trips you have a backup vehicle carrying all your customer's luggage, water, etc - now put extra 30 kg of necessary stuff on to a 690 and see what a difference that makes ...every gram counts

This thread is about economically adventurising a 500 ...not debating as to what is better than it - in my opinion an adventure bike is a bike that is a bike ridden by somebody who is capable by themselves on that bike unsupported for a period of time

I know why you use 690s ...it is because you believe they are better built, stronger, more durbale and will last longer ... makes good business sense in your case

But I believe these 500s are so good and that their engines are so strong that the bottom end will do 50 000 km if maintained properly before the casings need to be split and a refresh is in order ... and I intend to prove it on my bike ... hopefully I don't end up eating my words. I will however say that the top end and piston & rings will probably need to be done twice in that mileage ...but I am well prepared to do that and pay that price considering the fun factor of my 500 vs any 690"

Justin, I'm not challenging your beliefs, I'm just coming from another angle.  Gideon Joubert (my partner) and myself have discussed getting some new 500's for a while now and we both landed up staying with the 690/701's. We've both ridden those routes a few times carrying all our gear and fuel without issue, despite not really planning the trip and just sort of what you doing on Friday, lets go to Kaokoland type plan. I also have two mates that have sold 690's for 500's and seem pretty happy. Must admit I still think a DR650 is the perfect bike for the trip and other than a big tank needs zero mods.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 17, 2018, 06:08:24 pm
500s are better than anything because I say so ...and because I have one

Please be reasonable and see it my way  :ricky:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 17, 2018, 06:24:06 pm
I use the Mitas CO2 on my Husky 610 and have been very happy with it. I also use the Mitas E09 Dakar as my all time go to tyre on the HP2 and swear by it, as do many others. I find it strange that it did not perform for you as was a Dakar developed tyre? It is the Dakar version that has the extra ply in the sidewall and is HD - honestly you can ride it as a run-flat if need be. Did the tread not last?

I believe Justin rode standard e09, not Dakar version as those are not being imported in the righr sizes to sa. Dakar lasts much longer with additional ply
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 17, 2018, 06:47:44 pm
I'm still trying to understand why the EXC500 & 501 would be chosen over the 690 / 701 for a trip like Kaokoland. I feel the newer more race ready bikes are being compared to the older XR and even more recent EXC 525KTM's and Husabergs which were better suited to adventure riding.

Apart from van Zyl's Pass and the sandy bits around Brandberg the routes are easily doable on an Africa Twin / 1090R and therefore a doddle on the big thumpers.

A large percentage of my clients are Euros , who have seldom if ever ridden the type of terrain we have in Namibia and they all cope perfectly well on the 690's. Last June  I had a 50kg Austrian 50 year old women that rode the wheels off a 690 and never  stopped smiling. ( it was her first time on a 690 and bought one when she got home)

My experience with clients riding their own 501's / 500's on the route is yes they find the sandy bits a tad easier if they're less skilled riders but hate any long tar or easy gravel stretches with a passion, always angling for a space on the trailer..

A couple of hours sand practice at a spot like Atlantis dunes or the West Coast  and sand riding on a 690 is as easy as a tar road.

With 10000km service intervals and way more stability the 690/701 still to me seems like the obvious adventure touring option.

We' use them to carry the video teams on events like Absa Cape Epic where we ride two up with a camera guy filming on everything from tight single tracks on off-camber climbs to deep sand roads . I've done many 800km day rides/ been around Zone 7 and done endless loops of Atlantis & Macassar dunes on my 690's. Surely the do everything bike.

I believe we have been through this, but again - because it is easier and much more fun and enjoyable. I can do our whole route on 690 (which i have) with some considerable suffering on Robbies pass. But not in a timeframe we did - would need week or so longer to accommodate many rest days. Even on 500 i was the only one who finished  the whole route, other ones giving up because of accummulated exhaustion and health ailments.

As far as i know your trips are 10 days in total out of which only 4 days are off dirt highways (inner kaokoland plus day through dunes north of Brandberg). And you do huge distances on highways.

We took 4 days just to get from uis to epupa, along doros crater, little serengeti, and robbies pass. I dare to say that by epupa - which is start of the interesting riding on you trip - we already rode at least as tiring trip as all your interesting bits. And the only considerable amount of time on highways for us was opuwo to epupa, only because we were too late and tired to do shortcut i plotted.

And it is much easier riding deep sand in hoanib while at the same time scanning bush for wildlife. So yes - doable on both ( dven on bigger bike) if time is not constraint, but 500 clearly the best choice in terms of enjoyment and ability to sqeeze most into limited time.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: WildWood on March 17, 2018, 07:09:37 pm
500s are better than anything because I say so ...and because I have one

Please be reasonable and see it my way  :ricky:

 :)

Can't argue with that.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: WildWood on March 17, 2018, 07:12:08 pm
Would the 350 husky be much different to the 501 for touring?

As I understand it they are very similar.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 17, 2018, 08:08:42 pm
How many times did you guys have to pick up fallen over bikes in a day? Or is it slow and steady to conserve energy as much as possible?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 17, 2018, 09:15:49 pm
Would the 350 husky be much different to the 501 for touring?

As I understand it they are very similar.

Yes

Same frame and suspension as 501 but smaller engine

Would need a service every 2000 km max

Will need to re ridden a little harder than a 500 but no reason that it should not  last if looked after

Super light and an excellent choice me thinks
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 17, 2018, 09:17:04 pm
How many times did you guys have to pick up fallen over bikes in a day? Or is it slow and steady to conserve energy as much as possible?

Me - thrice in the whole trip

Straatkat - a few more

Xpat - he doesn’t pick the bike up he pushes the earth down
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 17, 2018, 09:57:25 pm
Xpat. Nice to see the MoskoMoto luggage on the 500 fully loaded. After all this talk of 'lighter is better' would you still consider the 80l? It looks like it works well on the 500.

No, 40 is just fine. That said, i even liked Justin’s Coyote (i think). It is the new one with roll top instead of zipper and it worked just fine - unlike the original one with zipper that Bertie had, which is just plain stupid - on trip like this ones hands are swollen since day two and trying to close zipper on overladed luggage with dust everywhere is just plain torture.

So for small bike like this, where you cant push the top part further back anyway, the GL works just fine imo, and if i would be deciding between hassle and cost of importing MM and getting off the shelf Coyote, id probably just take gl.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on March 18, 2018, 05:37:55 am
I don't want to turn this into a bike comparison, and before I say anything I prefer the idea of touring on a 500 or even a 450. I will be testing my 350 as well - (it feels like a little buck compared to a 450 but I digress).

The advantage of the 500 as has been mentioned is that it is a lot easier to ride in technical stuff and one could make the route way more technical....with the caveat that the more you load on the bike the more it will behave like a big bike and then you start to lose all the benefit of the nimbleness. But a 690 will be cheaper to maintain, will run cooler overall and can be ridden at 180km/hr for a lot longer than a 450/500 could run at 150... Too fast maybe but its what some of us like to do. The 690 used to be the rally bike of choice in the days when the Dakar was still in Africa and early days in South America, because you could still abuse the shit out if it and its a great mix of power and is the end result of 20 years of racing engineering and development, particularly on the part of KTM. Back in 2009-2011 the 690 was the  bike to race the Dakar. Think of Albert Hintenaus.

WIldwood probably saves lot more maintenance money doing his tours on the bigger engines than he would on a fleet of smaller bikes, so I totally get that. Mean time between failure is also lower (so long as you have fuel pump or three on hand!) ;D), so more theoretically less unhappy clients less of the time. 

It seems to me the real reason we are riding small bikes longer distances is really thanks to what happened in the Dakar when they implemented the 450 rule. Recall the outcry at the time. Impossible! Its going to blow the privateers out of the rally - bikes would never do the distance - this is the end of competitive racing - KTM was threatening to withdraw altogether after all their development. etc. But the result is that the smaller bikes have enjoyed the development as a result of this decision (lead by KTM  of course) and now we have much better, lighter bikes, with better cooling. I would say I could have joined the three musketeers (had I been able to keep up!) in their little desert adventure on my 350. Why? Because these bikes are much more reliable than they used to be. Still a little bit out of their boxing weight perhaps but doable and enjoyable for the weekend warrior who wants to push things a little harder.

I'll wager that had the 450 rule never been implemented by the ASO, the bike of the future would have been the 500. This was is -in my mind- why KTM was trying all these different models, the 525, the 530 the 500,  the 450. They were thinking what next, how to get the weight down for the next generation rally bike. Those of us who love long distance riding stand to benefit, and we do indeed benefit even though development of the 500 has sort of been left to hang out to dry from a a long distance racing perspective.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 18, 2018, 05:38:16 am
Speaking of which do you use underware?
@Xpat
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: aka.Goliath on March 19, 2018, 10:02:27 am
Xpat. Nice to see the MoskoMoto luggage on the 500 fully loaded. After all this talk of 'lighter is better' would you still consider the 80l? It looks like it works well on the 500.

No, 40 is just fine. That said, i even liked Justin’s Coyote (i think). It is the new one with roll top instead of zipper and it worked just fine - unlike the original one with zipper that Bertie had, which is just plain stupid - on trip like this ones hands are swollen since day two and trying to close zipper on overladed luggage with dust everywhere is just plain torture.

So for small bike like this, where you cant push the top part further back anyway, the GL works just fine imo, and if i would be deciding between hassle and cost of importing MM and getting off the shelf Coyote, id probably just take gl.

I have the zip up Coyote and I'm not the hugest fan although it is probably the best luggage option you can get here in SA for the kind of riding we do. My next adventure bike is going to be a 500 when I decide to sell my 690 and want to make sure what ever luggage I upgrade to will suit it. I have an option of having someone bringing in the MM stuff so reduces costs a lot which is why I am considering it again. Thanks for the feedback though. I feel the 80 has more features but is a little over weight/the-top for what I need. Then again you can always just pack less (which never happens) and it will have the extra space for spare fuel/water when needed.


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on March 19, 2018, 11:03:20 am
What I do not understand is guys riding with big/bulky rucksacks - I hate it. Just a hydrapack with space for a few snacks or whatever is enough imho. Anything more should be packed/secured to keep weight low. Not only does it lead to fatigue it affects rider balance and movement, and can be dangerous in an off.  ::)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 19, 2018, 11:16:14 am
Yip but they had to carry all there shit with them.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on March 19, 2018, 11:17:04 am
Yip but they had to carry all there shit with them.

Problem #1 - then you have too much.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: aka.Goliath on March 19, 2018, 11:22:17 am
I ride with an 18L backpack. It has 3l water and some essentials for during the ride in it, mainly food. What I also do keep in it are my shoes for when off the bike and a rain coat again for when off the bike - these are very light weight but take up a lot of space so seem like there's a lot of weight but really doesn't affect my riding. My rding jacket weighs more - now there's a problem that needs some sorting out.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: bud500 on March 19, 2018, 11:24:42 am
What I do not understand is guys riding with big/bulky rucksacks - I hate it. Just a hydrapack with space for a few snacks or whatever is enough imho. Anything more should be packed/secured to keep weight low. Not only does it lead to fatigue it affects rider balance and movement, and can be dangerous in an off.  ::)

One of my biggest issues with a big bag on my back is the fact that it blocks the outflow of hot air, thereby making me overheat.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on March 19, 2018, 12:20:15 pm
I ride with an 18L backpack. It has 3l water and some essentials for during the ride in it, mainly food. What I also do keep in it are my shoes for when off the bike and a rain coat again for when off the bike - these are very light weight but take up a lot of space so seem like there's a lot of weight but really doesn't affect my riding. My rding jacket weighs more - now there's a problem that needs some sorting out.

18L is still way too big imo - the USWE hydrapacks with their brilliant  'no dancing monkey' straps are great but even then you do not want to over-bulk them. Honestly just extra unnecessary fatigue and wait till you duck a thorn tree and your pack snags you off your bike.  :laughing4: Yes some jackets are heavy but once on one does not really feel it in the way one feels a pack - my Rallye3 with built in bladder compartment, venting, and fannypack and front pockets is all I need. If riding really very hot weather and conditions I use an Airflow jacket, small 3L hydrapack and take the Rallye3 Gortex inner along just in case, great combo. Anyway different strokes for different folks  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 21, 2018, 09:04:38 pm
I was riding with 2x2L bladders in my backpack, one with water and the other rehydrate, and had some other light stuff like clothes in there too.
It is quite heavy because of the 4L water, but it does get lighter as you drink it. On a 500 you absolutely have to put some stuff in a backpack and live with it, as there simply is no other space. Still need to get the minimalist thing down pat.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on March 23, 2018, 08:46:57 am
I don't want to turn this into a bike comparison, and before I say anything I prefer the idea of touring on a 500 or even a 450. I will be testing my 350 as well - (it feels like a little buck compared to a 450 but I digress).

The advantage of the 500 as has been mentioned is that it is a lot easier to ride in technical stuff and one could make the route way more technical....with the caveat that the more you load on the bike the more it will behave like a big bike and then you start to lose all the benefit of the nimbleness. But a 690 will be cheaper to maintain, will run cooler overall and can be ridden at 180km/hr for a lot longer than a 450/500 could run at 150... Too fast maybe but its what some of us like to do. The 690 used to be the rally bike of choice in the days when the Dakar was still in Africa and early days in South America, because you could still abuse the shit out if it and its a great mix of power and is the end result of 20 years of racing engineering and development, particularly on the part of KTM. Back in 2009-2011 the 690 was the  bike to race the Dakar. Think of Albert Hintenaus.

WIldwood probably saves lot more maintenance money doing his tours on the bigger engines than he would on a fleet of smaller bikes, so I totally get that. Mean time between failure is also lower (so long as you have fuel pump or three on hand!) ;D), so more theoretically less unhappy clients less of the time. 

It seems to me the real reason we are riding small bikes longer distances is really thanks to what happened in the Dakar when they implemented the 450 rule. Recall the outcry at the time. Impossible! Its going to blow the privateers out of the rally - bikes would never do the distance - this is the end of competitive racing - KTM was threatening to withdraw altogether after all their development. etc. But the result is that the smaller bikes have enjoyed the development as a result of this decision (lead by KTM  of course) and now we have much better, lighter bikes, with better cooling. I would say I could have joined the three musketeers (had I been able to keep up!) in their little desert adventure on my 350. Why? Because these bikes are much more reliable than they used to be. Still a little bit out of their boxing weight perhaps but doable and enjoyable for the weekend warrior who wants to push things a little harder.

I'll wager that had the 450 rule never been implemented by the ASO, the bike of the future would have been the 500. This was is -in my mind- why KTM was trying all these different models, the 525, the 530 the 500,  the 450. They were thinking what next, how to get the weight down for the next generation rally bike. Those of us who love long distance riding stand to benefit, and we do indeed benefit even though development of the 500 has sort of been left to hang out to dry from a a long distance racing perspective.

Keen to hear how you are getting on with your 350. I’m also considering one


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: 2StrokeDan on March 23, 2018, 10:34:59 pm
What I do not understand is guys riding with big/bulky rucksacks - I hate it. Just a hydrapack with space for a few snacks or whatever is enough imho. Anything more should be packed/secured to keep weight low. Not only does it lead to fatigue it affects rider balance and movement, and can be dangerous in an off.  ::)

What's dangerous about landing on a big, comfy and soft rucksack? :pot:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on March 23, 2018, 11:57:29 pm
What's dangerous about landing on a big, comfy and soft rucksack?

Certainly done that a few times Dan!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on March 24, 2018, 12:34:24 am
What's dangerous about landing on a big, comfy and soft rucksack?

Certainly done that a few times Dan!

Depends whats in it - I know of one guy that got spiked by his short tyre levers and also heard of one that broke his back on the coke can that was in it ...
Straps can snag on things when you fall off and a bag can hinder sliding and tuck and roll
Backpack creates a space between helmet and ground increasing chance of possible whiplash

But yes I guess can also be seen as a possible personal airbag  :lol8:  Different strokes for different folks.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 24, 2018, 12:10:04 pm
Jawellnofine, I once read that you never carry stuff in your backpack that you would not like to penetrate your body, clothes and other soft stuff only. Really thought that was common sense. Light soft stuff. I recently bought a lovely piece of land in Kaokoland at about 60-80km/h, Maybe faster, OK, I didn't check the launch speed, and I didn't fall on my backpack....bummer! Those pesky sand middelmannetjies are fun to jump, until one launches you and one of those mobile bushes jump in front of you.
It could have ended so differently :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: blauth on March 25, 2018, 07:55:06 pm
You know those little scrappy things hanging down from the bottom of the rucksack. Well, some time back, I didn't tie them up. Just as I was wanting to stand up, one of those straps had gotten hocked in the rear fender rendering me seat bound for the jump. This particular case didn't end in tears but it could easily have.

I still wear a backpack but now my straps are always safely tied up and out of the way.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Runner on March 25, 2018, 08:23:58 pm
I got this on Friday, what is a fair price for it?
It is a 2014 model with registration papers and licence disk, it just needs the road kit back on.
I have to ad I have been chasing this bike for quite a while.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 25, 2018, 08:37:56 pm
@ Runner ... PM sent
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: chopperpilot on March 26, 2018, 06:49:56 am
I got this on Friday, what is a fair price for it?
It is a 2014 model with registration papers and licence disk, it just needs the road kit back on.
I have to ad I have been chasing this bike for quite a while.
Beter fotos asb? Vol fotos van die sykant af.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on March 26, 2018, 08:24:22 am
I got this on Friday, what is a fair price for it?
It is a 2014 model with registration papers and licence disk, it just needs the road kit back on.
I have to ad I have been chasing this bike for quite a while.
Beter fotos asb? Vol fotos van die sykant af.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

When it comes to these, and this thread, its' a sellers market ou boet. Best just phone Runner, but I betting the bike is sold already. :deal: ;D

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 26, 2018, 08:34:32 am
Between 2012 and 2016 there has been little change and they all take the 20L tank so these years are the most desirable...and those hours!! whew, what a find.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: chopperpilot on March 26, 2018, 11:30:31 am
I got this on Friday, what is a fair price for it?
It is a 2014 model with registration papers and licence disk, it just needs the road kit back on.
I have to ad I have been chasing this bike for quite a while.
Beter fotos asb? Vol fotos van die sykant af.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

When it comes to these, and this thread, its' a sellers market ou boet. Best just phone Runner, but I betting the bike is sold already. :deal: ;D
I'm tempted, but still have my 610 TE.

In a year or two, it'll be a buyers market, when something else is the light DS to have.

Noneking's 501 will be my first choice!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 26, 2018, 12:32:53 pm
I got this on Friday, what is a fair price for it?
It is a 2014 model with registration papers and licence disk, it just needs the road kit back on.
I have to ad I have been chasing this bike for quite a while.
Beter fotos asb? Vol fotos van die sykant af.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

When it comes to these, and this thread, its' a sellers market ou boet. Best just phone Runner, but I betting the bike is sold already. :deal: ;D
I'm tempted, but still have my 610 TE.

In a year or two, it'll be a buyers market, when something else is the light DS to have.

Noneking's 501 will be my first choice!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk


Pasop vir jou!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 26, 2018, 12:42:34 pm
Cansius, are you going to tell us about your 501? How much better is that link suspension and how do you like the bike? Pictures aint enough Boet! We want the lowdown!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: chopperpilot on March 26, 2018, 12:45:03 pm
I got this on Friday, what is a fair price for it?
It is a 2014 model with registration papers and licence disk, it just needs the road kit back on.
I have to ad I have been chasing this bike for quite a while.
Beter fotos asb? Vol fotos van die sykant af.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

When it comes to these, and this thread, its' a sellers market ou boet. Best just phone Runner, but I betting the bike is sold already. :deal: ;D
I'm tempted, but still have my 610 TE.

In a year or two, it'll be a buyers market, when something else is the light DS to have.

Noneking's 501 will be my first choice!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk


Pasop vir jou!
Jy pas...en was...hom so mooi op!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: chopperpilot on March 26, 2018, 12:47:23 pm
Cansius, are you going to tell us about your 501? How much better is that link suspension and how do you like the bike? Pictures aint enough Boet! We want the lowdown!
Bertie

You'll have to bring the 500 to us, for a direct comparison!

I've had the privilege to ride the 501.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 26, 2018, 01:12:50 pm
Cansius, are you going to tell us about your 501? How much better is that link suspension and how do you like the bike? Pictures aint enough Boet! We want the lowdown!


Bertie, not an expert at all....... I believe you have to be a much better rider than me to be able to tell the difference between the ktm pds and husky linkage suspensions...... I buy Husky because I don’t like the colour orange. Already thinking of ways to turn my 990 into a Husky 901

I guess it’s a natural progression or evolution when you start enjoying more challenging DS riding. Went from HP2 to 701 and could not believe the difference weight made to my riding or at least enjoyment thereof.  Got back from my first ride on the 501 in Limpopo and got on the 701 to take it to chopperpilot......it felt massive and heavy!

Overall I’m very impressed with 501. Awesome suspension and much more power that anticipated.  Low down torque allows for effortless crawling in the rough stuff and crazy acceleration when you wring it’s ear on the open stretches.

 The 300i I had for a short while was a mistake and I was lucky to get a deal on the 501 which meant that financially, there was no loss letting go of the 300i. The seat on the 501 is horrible and feels like it chews through my behind after a few hours of riding. Ordered a 4,5gal tank and hoping it will be here in time for Namibia trip.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 26, 2018, 01:14:34 pm
I got this on Friday, what is a fair price for it?
It is a 2014 model with registration papers and licence disk, it just needs the road kit back on.
I have to ad I have been chasing this bike for quite a while.
Beter fotos asb? Vol fotos van die sykant af.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

When it comes to these, and this thread, its' a sellers market ou boet. Best just phone Runner, but I betting the bike is sold already. :deal: ;D
I'm tempted, but still have my 610 TE.

In a year or two, it'll be a buyers market, when something else is the light DS to have.

Noneking's 501 will be my first choice!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk


Pasop vir jou!
Jy pas...en was...hom so mooi op!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk



Afgelope 2 naweke meer geval met die 501 as wat ek in 18 jaar met ander bikes geval het......

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: chopperpilot on March 26, 2018, 01:21:42 pm
I got this on Friday, what is a fair price for it?
It is a 2014 model with registration papers and licence disk, it just needs the road kit back on.
I have to ad I have been chasing this bike for quite a while.
Beter fotos asb? Vol fotos van die sykant af.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

When it comes to these, and this thread, its' a sellers market ou boet. Best just phone Runner, but I betting the bike is sold already. :deal: ;D
I'm tempted, but still have my 610 TE.

In a year or two, it'll be a buyers market, when something else is the light DS to have.

Noneking's 501 will be my first choice!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk


Pasop vir jou!
Jy pas...en was...hom so mooi op!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk



Afgelope 2 naweke meer geval met die 501 as wat ek in 18 jaar met ander bikes geval het......
Vertrou dit was in sagte modder!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on March 26, 2018, 02:20:28 pm
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/sfEMOtvpUOwbTO3wGfBeQFHzH5L0xn-bJvGf-57gs1Sl69P3zewdVVmrMDgZkOnod2at5x946WgTRYRzJe0lm41ZgsJFdshKp4hgcGjVbg1fAyfu1gBMDHaj-Hax59H7G6I_59gNVDT9VTcClBqzNWBKP6t1TqRszekr2s9wdmH7SESebN8YSgZmr1902jKqLaR9yGaPwAV1439tLwZ18cB_1ZaxXjH4g4j1SUdDxFJgvYwJwHyxBD2S-eAvCx0KyFHVseLt31GBwcqh_ZVh25E9t6s2W9MnkXFSouXn6Z26oaE1VAhSJcn6uqjBf7bPM5sDmTQ821dJmvQN6f2637BIyK7fwb8LVtmgPD8uoeqGLIMvuXAEl4u-ZQrflXTPPSGcAYI97NP6tLrjByVp_a2YKMuDofTrof4kVzx1hh-WkgwXwLZnQcHZU8lBG1ooSTW1QWCEcRgd4CXXWERYU0pQXdmn0OkUjhruYrFqKsSe98tpQ_d6PHQfIal5UhyJFmLXWw5U57qaXXYPhxtzT0ykHKwG8fjhxX4RGC7AnJFT8kqnAqIBzYv6Q8u92msqywfQ9kebtDRgIcLKzDEtNULgsujTMLWwmWKnrVU=w960-h1280-no)

500 Adventure land... photos always underwhelm, but I can tell you there were 3 step-ups of about 50cm at the top of this extremely loose, bloody steep, rocky climb. It was really 300, not loaded-500 terrain, but the little goat made it up. The only issue riding a 500 on trips with bigger bikes, is that nobody wants to follow you up...

God. I love this motorcycle!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 26, 2018, 02:38:36 pm
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/sfEMOtvpUOwbTO3wGfBeQFHzH5L0xn-bJvGf-57gs1Sl69P3zewdVVmrMDgZkOnod2at5x946WgTRYRzJe0lm41ZgsJFdshKp4hgcGjVbg1fAyfu1gBMDHaj-Hax59H7G6I_59gNVDT9VTcClBqzNWBKP6t1TqRszekr2s9wdmH7SESebN8YSgZmr1902jKqLaR9yGaPwAV1439tLwZ18cB_1ZaxXjH4g4j1SUdDxFJgvYwJwHyxBD2S-eAvCx0KyFHVseLt31GBwcqh_ZVh25E9t6s2W9MnkXFSouXn6Z26oaE1VAhSJcn6uqjBf7bPM5sDmTQ821dJmvQN6f2637BIyK7fwb8LVtmgPD8uoeqGLIMvuXAEl4u-ZQrflXTPPSGcAYI97NP6tLrjByVp_a2YKMuDofTrof4kVzx1hh-WkgwXwLZnQcHZU8lBG1ooSTW1QWCEcRgd4CXXWERYU0pQXdmn0OkUjhruYrFqKsSe98tpQ_d6PHQfIal5UhyJFmLXWw5U57qaXXYPhxtzT0ykHKwG8fjhxX4RGC7AnJFT8kqnAqIBzYv6Q8u92msqywfQ9kebtDRgIcLKzDEtNULgsujTMLWwmWKnrVU=w960-h1280-no)

500 Adventure land... photos always underwhelm, but I can tell you there were 3 step-ups of about 50cm at the top of this extremely loose, bloody steep, rocky climb. It was really 300, not loaded-500 terrain, but the little goat made it up. The only issue riding a 500 on trips with bigger bikes, is that nobody wants to follow you up...

God. I love this motorcycle!


Now that looks proper! 8)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 26, 2018, 03:39:39 pm
1190 will get up there

































































































with some help :)



Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: aka.Goliath on March 26, 2018, 04:00:37 pm
WOW. is all I can say.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TeeJay on March 26, 2018, 04:21:12 pm
 :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer: :peepwall:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 26, 2018, 04:40:23 pm
My pristine 500 is now a little "characterized" after the Kaoko experience. I did all of my falling in the afternoons and only after 6+ days of riding so that tells me fatigue builds up and you lose concentration, my advice: Get fit before tackling a multi day ride in hot conditions. Your bike will thank you!
Mostly just tip overs at slow speeds, but riding a 500 is waaaay easier than riding a bigger bike, and takes a whole lot less energy
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 26, 2018, 04:42:56 pm
My pristine 500 is now a little "characterized" after the Kaoko experience. I did all of my falling in the afternoons and only after 6+ days of riding so that tells me fatigue builds up and you lose concentration, my advice: Get fit before tackling a multi day ride in hot conditions. Your bike will thank you!

Your bike now has "houding" and has increased exponentially in value ... every one of those little marks tells a story and stories are expensive
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 26, 2018, 04:47:18 pm
If I didn't like it so much I would put it up for sale for eleventy hundred, five thousand and fourteen one.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 26, 2018, 05:22:05 pm
I have mentioned it here before but it may have got lost in the noise - another important modification of 500 for adventure riding is steel stand. The aluminium one on my due to few stupid fallovers in Lesotho become unstable and basically useless. It was just matter of time when it is going to break.

I wanted to replace it with a fancy Pro Moto Bilet one that Justin has on his bike, but it seems they are not available right now in SA, and the importer is not sure when they will be. So instead I went with Trail Tech one sold by Runner, who also shortened mine as I have lowered suspension (which I suspect is going to happen to Justin's bike as well after our Kaokoland trip  :peepwall:)

Here it is:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 26, 2018, 05:27:03 pm
Sorry to bring a little seed of discontent into this little happy hippie community, but an undisclosed source that has ridden both told me that there is very noticeable difference in performance between EXC and XCW, particularly in the low revs. The difference is completely due to the different map - the bad news is that EXC ECU is locked for changes as it was supposed to be the 'legal' one of the two models.

Bertie, yours is EXC. It might explain why yours was so prone to stalling in the tricky technical terrain, while mine and Justin's (both XCWs) were fine.

The only solution unfortunatelly seems to be getting XCW ECU, which is expensive. Bertie, maybe have a look at eBay if you cannot score a cheap used one in US and then bring it in.

It would be interesting to know which maps are in 501...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 26, 2018, 05:38:54 pm
Cansius, are you going to tell us about your 501? How much better is that link suspension and how do you like the bike? Pictures aint enough Boet! We want the lowdown!


Bertie, not an expert at all....... I believe you have to be a much better rider than me to be able to tell the difference between the ktm pds and husky linkage suspensions...... I buy Husky because I don’t like the colour orange. Already thinking of ways to turn my 990 into a Husky 901

I guess it’s a natural progression or evolution when you start enjoying more challenging DS riding. Went from HP2 to 701 and could not believe the difference weight made to my riding or at least enjoyment thereof.  Got back from my first ride on the 501 in Limpopo and got on the 701 to take it to chopperpilot......it felt massive and heavy!

Overall I’m very impressed with 501. Awesome suspension and much more power that anticipated.  Low down torque allows for effortless crawling in the rough stuff and crazy acceleration when you wring it’s ear on the open stretches.

 The 300i I had for a short while was a mistake and I was lucky to get a deal on the 501 which meant that financially, there was no loss letting go of the 300i. The seat on the 501 is horrible and feels like it chews through my behind after a few hours of riding. Ordered a 4,5gal tank and hoping it will be here in time for Namibia trip.

That is good to hear. But for heaven's sake - please loose those horrible mirrors! :peepwall:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 26, 2018, 05:46:22 pm
Martin can you remember how much for that Trail Tech stand?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 26, 2018, 06:05:51 pm
Martin can you remember how much for that Trail Tech stand?

Nope, haven't got invoice yet. Will see Runner tomorrow and will ask.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on March 26, 2018, 08:07:46 pm

[/quote]

The seat on the 501 is horrible and feels like it chews through my behind after a few hours of riding. O

[/quote]

Seriously get a Seat Concepts seat - you will thank me forever.  :3some: Best money you can spend on the bike.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: TeeJay on March 27, 2018, 09:13:28 am
Sorry to bring a little seed of discontent into this little happy hippie community, but an undisclosed source that has ridden both told me that there is very noticeable difference in performance between EXC and XCW, particularly in the low revs. The difference is completely due to the different map - the bad news is that EXC ECU is locked for changes as it was supposed to be the 'legal' one of the two models.

Bertie, yours is EXC. It might explain why yours was so prone to stalling in the tricky technical terrain, while mine and Justin's (both XCWs) were fine.

The only solution unfortunatelly seems to be getting XCW ECU, which is expensive. Bertie, maybe have a look at eBay if you cannot score a cheap used one in US and then bring it in.

It would be interesting to know which maps are in 501...

Finally - now we're getting somewhere. I asked this question a few times (what is the difference between the XCW and EXC) and the answer was always - they are the same - one is just the road legal version. I never believed that - so I'm pleased to read your post. Thanks  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 27, 2018, 09:41:07 am
Well I believe it was said on this very thread already - the fact that they have different map and that EXC's one cannot be changed. I knew about it long time and I'm sure I mentioned it here before, but too lazy to look for that post now.

The only reason I brought it up again is because I never rode EXC (except for about 50 meters in Kaokoland up one very rocky section) so didn't have comparison, and was surprised to hear that the difference in power is quite pronounced. And on our trip the EXC seemed to be more prone to stalling (though that is subjective as it wasn't with different riders) at low revs. So I just thought to point it out again so that people who aer looking into this bikes can make qualified decision.

I would still like to know what map is  in 501 though as they do not seem to have two versions (or do they?).
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 27, 2018, 09:49:26 am
Well I believe it was said on this very thread already - the fact that they have different map and that EXC's one cannot be changed. I knew about it long time and I'm sure I mentioned it here before, but too lazy to look for that post now.

The only reason I brought it up again is because I never rode EXC (except for about 50 meters in Kaokoland up one very rocky section) so didn't have comparison, and was surprised to hear that the difference in power is quite pronounced. And on our trip the EXC seemed to be more prone to stalling (though that is subjective as it wasn't with different riders) at low revs. So I just thought to point it out again so that people who aer looking into this bikes can make qualified decision.

I would still like to know what map is  in 501 though as they do not seem to have two versions (or do they?).


My 501 has 2x map switch on the handlebar. KTM have that also?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 27, 2018, 09:53:44 am
Well I believe it was said on this very thread already - the fact that they have different map and that EXC's one cannot be changed. I knew about it long time and I'm sure I mentioned it here before, but too lazy to look for that post now.

The only reason I brought it up again is because I never rode EXC (except for about 50 meters in Kaokoland up one very rocky section) so didn't have comparison, and was surprised to hear that the difference in power is quite pronounced. And on our trip the EXC seemed to be more prone to stalling (though that is subjective as it wasn't with different riders) at low revs. So I just thought to point it out again so that people who aer looking into this bikes can make qualified decision.

I would still like to know what map is  in 501 though as they do not seem to have two versions (or do they?).


My 501 has 2x map switch on the handlebar. KTM have that also?

Nope - at least I'm not aware of any such a thing on 500. If I'm wrong and anybody knows about one on 500, please let me know - may have been riding in baby mode all this time...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on March 27, 2018, 10:10:37 am
My 500 - the southernmost 500 on the African Continent  :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 27, 2018, 10:12:11 am
Sorry to bring a little seed of discontent into this little happy hippie community, but an undisclosed source that has ridden both told me that there is very noticeable difference in performance between EXC and XCW, particularly in the low revs. The difference is completely due to the different map - the bad news is that EXC ECU is locked for changes as it was supposed to be the 'legal' one of the two models.

Bertie, yours is EXC. It might explain why yours was so prone to stalling in the tricky technical terrain, while mine and Justin's (both XCWs) were fine.

The only solution unfortunatelly seems to be getting XCW ECU, which is expensive. Bertie, maybe have a look at eBay if you cannot score a cheap used one in US and then bring it in.

It would be interesting to know which maps are in 501...

Plenty reading available



https://www.jdjetting.com/xcart5/jdktx14-ktm-500xcw-exc-17-.html

2017 KTM EXC and HUSKY FE TPS VOLTAGE AT IDLE, and the FACTORY REFERENCE- 0.400V:

The TPS setting at idle on the 2017's is unlike past year EXC and TE models. The previous throttle body DID NOT change TPS voltage as the idle speed screw was changed. The 2017 does move the TPS voltage when the idle speed screw is moved. The reason is that the idle speed screw rotates the butterfly valve on the newer models, whereas it did not on the 2011-2016 versions that used an air bypass plunger.

The TPS voltage per the service manual is referenced as "THAD" , throttle position sensor circuit A, at 0.400V, (+/-.004). The setting must be performed with the idle speed screw backed out to where the throttle valve (butterfly) is completely closed, as near as we can determine. The manual is very vague on this setting, and does not describe backing the screw out. After setting the TPS, the idle speed screw is turned back inwards and RAISES the TPS voltage to near .54-.55V , IF the idle speed is set per the manual on the 2017 450.

Using the KTM service tool, the TPS setting needs to be less than 0.56V on the 450 at idle, or else the signal "ATP" increases from 0% to 1% as though the throttle has been opened. The question is then, does it matter if the TPS is set higher ???
-Is there a problem with higher initial TPS settings???

Testing with an air/fuel gauge, the fueling is very consistent and nearly ideal when the completely backed-off idle speed screw results in 0.400V on the TPS (per the service manual). If the setting is higher, the results when riding makes a very rich zone just above idle and a brief flat-power zone at the same time. It can also result in a hunting/oscillating air/fuel mixture at idle.

Recommendation: Use the factory setting of 0.400V with idle screw backed off until the TPS voltage is unaffected by the screw, and keep the idle speed set to the factory spec for the ECU (1800-1900rpm for the 450/500 models). The TPS setting at idle should be no more than 0.55V on the 450/500 models as an estimate. With these settings and overall fueling correction of the tuner, the air/fuel mixture is consistent and makes for a great running combination IMHO.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: hennieswanepoel on March 27, 2018, 10:35:23 am
What is the difference between the Husqvarna 501 and the KTM 500 


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 27, 2018, 11:03:08 am
What is the difference between the Husqvarna 501 and the KTM 500 


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Mostly suspension: close cartridge forks and linked rear suspension on Husky vs. open cartridge forks and PDS shock on KTM

Plastics and decals

Nor sure about the engine map.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: AfricaOffroad on March 27, 2018, 11:08:21 am
Guys be very careful what you read about the excf and XCW versions.
The USA version of the excf is very different to the model imported into SA.
Our units do not have locked down ecus nor the various restriction devices - reeds in inlet etc.
Our model makes full power, excf purely denotes it comes with the street legal wiring, lights etc

My 17 excf is fully mappable, has the mapping switch and TC.
USA models don't have that.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 27, 2018, 11:11:09 am
Guys be very careful what you read about the excf and XCW versions.
The USA version of the excf is very different to the model imported into SA.
Our units do not have locked down ecus nor the various restriction devices - reeds in inlet etc.
Our model makes full power, excf purely denotes it comes with the street legal wiring, lights etc

My 17 excf is fully mappable, has the mapping switch and TC.
USA models don't have that.

Well, if true, that would be very good news for EXC owners, as they can get their SA bikes remapped with XCW map, rather than having to buy new ECU, Power Commander or JD Tuner. Where is this information from please?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: AfricaOffroad on March 27, 2018, 11:17:48 am
There is a long thread on KTMTALK about the restricted 17+ Excf models.
Their bikes are physically different to ours, noticeably the inlet system.

Incidentally my 17 500 is the excf model, despite my signature saying XCW.
To my knowledge there is no more XCW model like the 2012-16 bikes.

I have also spoken to my local KTM technicians and they too confirm our bikes are mappable
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on March 27, 2018, 11:20:20 am
There is a long thread on KTMTALK about the restricted 17+ Excf models.
Their bikes are physically different to ours, noticeably the inlet system.

Incidentally my 17 500 is the excf model, despite my signature saying XCW.
To my knowledge there is no more XCW model like the 2012-16 bikes.

I have also spoken to my local KTM technicians and they too confirm our bikes are mappable

Thanks - great news!  :thumleft:

Do you know if this also applies to 2012 - 16 models?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: AfricaOffroad on March 27, 2018, 11:20:49 am
Well I believe it was said on this very thread already - the fact that they have different map and that EXC's one cannot be changed. I knew about it long time and I'm sure I mentioned it here before, but too lazy to look for that post now.

The only reason I brought it up again is because I never rode EXC (except for about 50 meters in Kaokoland up one very rocky section) so didn't have comparison, and was surprised to hear that the difference in power is quite pronounced. And on our trip the EXC seemed to be more prone to stalling (though that is subjective as it wasn't with different riders) at low revs. So I just thought to point it out again so that people who aer looking into this bikes can make qualified decision.

I would still like to know what map is  in 501 though as they do not seem to have two versions (or do they?).


My 501 has 2x map switch on the handlebar. KTM have that also?
On the KTM you need to buy the switch separately but it plugs straight into the harness behind the headlight
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: AfricaOffroad on March 27, 2018, 11:25:12 am
There is a long thread on KTMTALK about the restricted 17+ Excf models.
Their bikes are physically different to ours, noticeably the inlet system.

Incidentally my 17 500 is the excf model, despite my signature saying XCW.
To my knowledge there is no more XCW model like the 2012-16 bikes.

I have also spoken to my local KTM technicians and they too confirm our bikes are mappable

Thanks - great news!  :thumleft:

Do you know if this also applies to 2012 - 16 models?
To be totally accurate I cant comment on the 12-16 XCW vs  exc comparison.
I only owned the 12 XCW model. For what it's worth the 17 excf is slightly stronger, but both have more power than what most mortals can handle.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 27, 2018, 11:43:57 am
What is the difference between the Husqvarna 501 and the KTM 500 


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501 is a looker....


(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180327/9c53c5c44eb8c51f56c1b55623076bf2.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 27, 2018, 12:07:59 pm
 :P Not with those mirrors
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 27, 2018, 12:09:58 pm
Bling r/rear indicator  :lol8:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 27, 2018, 12:14:49 pm
You guys seen this system

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 27, 2018, 12:16:30 pm
:P Not with those mirrors

Give a man a break..... ;)

Bike was delivered in PTA and @Dwerg and @MonkeyNot took it to Tzaneen for me to ride on our trip weekend before last...... no change to fit any farkles. :3some:

Rear fender and Rear blinker destroyed within first 30 min on the bike..... :-\
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: MaxThePanda on March 27, 2018, 01:12:20 pm
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/umR3S2WPCEa1AWkldyZyOiLwqXhWRREyinQvWADsTVCrHylBkqwced1blLTOjTYWmk5bwOx9KDvftUg-zyynYED7ugEbW8b2JmzA5UEbnHkc_tsZ1rQ_8Gm97_uxQfqTJNN_EJj-fJSht68SL9FQMT7Fvnla8dpkXBJE_sPE9ELcQiVdEOW52kCX79AxvlVi_tYAELvge2WpCwvpxLdb3CCUvpVOqWX8eoWvRxsTEUw-31TJHMIsJJLdJUM-sx_S1OUO5BvuSs84X1fccyHb9eS43n5ejd2dUixQwPXgM_QEZ8NUDOm7-xe09IZcqovjSmU1Pi-0HOXqDr67MYD_pigArajcMW5OSRMeNJhjmzAj2DZwdcYirIX65MJC1Zk_CEKtW5dyG70Y41JlexK-8GPRqf4lhLh0-qoOPA-raetjoo2JRA5GF9EAkZBDTEm9X-JYUi4jItPQ8t5iLXUPgvW1gveAY9J1AKZ3AR5_d9QxIBQoWL2ov32JL_zxo_-34MSqe8Id1iMveN_2ZMIbGmlDPBMzkZws3nx2UWFCJ16ruZMA503R29Oi6xGMdPz8uqIVcwliEdbGv0IfMrDwNR1DxaDhIkl8gagDXm8=w603-h803-no)

500 Adventure land... photos always underwhelm, but I can tell you there were 3 step-ups of about 50cm at the top of this extremely loose, bloody steep, rocky climb. It was really 300, not loaded-500 terrain, but the little goat made it up. The only issue riding a 500 on trips with bigger bikes, is that nobody wants to follow you up...

God. I love this motorcycle!


Now that looks proper! 8)

The problem with all this 500 snobbery:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/CDnP_HWjlb2lGGNH-Iv8oYDfoxJIhKZoklH24M9TGKDWG3BzlRaAFtmTlcpDHv-yFwBRgIzc265HBBt2zRSu_x8xPM_M2Skux2662ghUp_gwTqD9dh4ZhpPkBCBlOnITaaP9pBOOBM2FF5gZlZr8mZTdtGP7t88V9K0JZ__h9AUcIx0KMiMefjsnfTAgWz5F5sFCbg_6AT9_I0PiFUAf6FWxzdXHo7z5x7siq6uhmUaK4YMwGwRK6o4fDg8sutZMJu-Ro0yaIaQG1F38ERSBDCVCWnn5_A6gxcYf_9cN0WczVaavF3K_1KafoO5H9J5LqYGPI-7LO2NNeT3y4dYSqWxBsqdIPK64rVNwKuyeH2WExG6eCXfOmeKpGIXBB--_78rIIMj1q4S7mKRhpeMgIf6Ksyb-3jxi0jwvaLLLKngbCWdXb4nV7as8B0KMYE8gRfx2f7qE-hjMJ5_Pk0zDNFDk0oq0DI0lSrv9LnoW0atPYxgxqM-vHWuZXxDI-Tbh-7iUU4ShuZqVqbI2AnGuNdEG4tm28Kpo9SD0bpjdyzWjEZTg8xxRnxPfYy0pT7M45V9FxpMWHX6udeAxGi-siojPvZRI-9ghpgo-1gs=w603-h803-no)

That's The Midget's fire breathing carthorse, Buttercup, half way up this horrible hill. He'd fallen earlier on this route and cracked a few of his teeny weeny little ribs, so I had to ride her up there, and it was surprisingly easy, I can tell you. I don't know how she would have dealt with the step ups - and I'm glad I didn't have to find out - but annoyingly she just putters on relentlessly, despite the treatment the mechanically blind little fella deals out.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Noneking on March 27, 2018, 03:08:52 pm
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/sfEMOtvpUOwbTO3wGfBeQFHzH5L0xn-bJvGf-57gs1Sl69P3zewdVVmrMDgZkOnod2at5x946WgTRYRzJe0lm41ZgsJFdshKp4hgcGjVbg1fAyfu1gBMDHaj-Hax59H7G6I_59gNVDT9VTcClBqzNWBKP6t1TqRszekr2s9wdmH7SESebN8YSgZmr1902jKqLaR9yGaPwAV1439tLwZ18cB_1ZaxXjH4g4j1SUdDxFJgvYwJwHyxBD2S-eAvCx0KyFHVseLt31GBwcqh_ZVh25E9t6s2W9MnkXFSouXn6Z26oaE1VAhSJcn6uqjBf7bPM5sDmTQ821dJmvQN6f2637BIyK7fwb8LVtmgPD8uoeqGLIMvuXAEl4u-ZQrflXTPPSGcAYI97NP6tLrjByVp_a2YKMuDofTrof4kVzx1hh-WkgwXwLZnQcHZU8lBG1ooSTW1QWCEcRgd4CXXWERYU0pQXdmn0OkUjhruYrFqKsSe98tpQ_d6PHQfIal5UhyJFmLXWw5U57qaXXYPhxtzT0ykHKwG8fjhxX4RGC7AnJFT8kqnAqIBzYv6Q8u92msqywfQ9kebtDRgIcLKzDEtNULgsujTMLWwmWKnrVU=w960-h1280-no)

500 Adventure land... photos always underwhelm, but I can tell you there were 3 step-ups of about 50cm at the top of this extremely loose, bloody steep, rocky climb. It was really 300, not loaded-500 terrain, but the little goat made it up. The only issue riding a 500 on trips with bigger bikes, is that nobody wants to follow you up...

God. I love this motorcycle!


Now that looks proper! 8)

The problem with all this 500 snobbery:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/HEXGYM0SxxRxB1BJH2weQUNGfSnmO01iiQRbmj1mgo383rfc0eR_AoDSHqA6YtD8f-3cXj3sgsA5Na3_qm_7QLqVt_QSpHGHWnZwFv2KpfUDO2Iwg4qZThBuXYDpjSCOUpoHILL3oZtoE_a8fqPQOGGk1teVwFbDwdhC5R4leC5j_SD4QyFuNlMwNfMTAppEu-DmgGX9bevTel2rEb9psplr373i98mNW2ijzCoJM9vuZTaFo6VQf7YlKBhqLXxr5qYG5xkRkwF8pskVyohBNQBIz0oXPutwNDCz0T_1Bvx4841l0khrqkVDF5p09-ar6ilpMymlQTEXfKwyeUAvzQe3_fKbz22_wmMbFDHA_gbFNRMN4BgNmlOcSlOM_idEieJOcy-Eegxh1QvPeyY97zS3nm5EeXwYz3GD9VjsENh9i_O1XYD9RPAVoZC-qGwYPvKJX_iVk7GxXwtv1hnus_AnE2jPZ3VZ-e0HygxxR4Jiobe1Rr_KfRjBUOINzW3RgpnNl4L0wDiPibNIj3wwyNY2wrQkfWULpE8jsjqKcPaKFZBK5HzpiARGMzXndYbzFKkO9lVGnyTq9qy6ihuT53pyzxexICfKiCBtjUw=w960-h1280-no)

That's The Midget's fire breathing carthorse, Buttercup, half way up this horrible hill. He'd fallen earlier on this route and cracked a few of his teeny weeny little ribs, so I had to ride her up there, and it was surprisingly easy, I can tell you. I don't know how she would have dealt with the step ups - and I'm glad I didn't have to find out - but annoyingly she just putters on relentlessly, despite the treatment the mechanically blind little fella deals out.

Kindly keep this useless story to yourself...... :laughing4: :laughing4: I would much rather read your ramblings on the ktm 500  :ricky:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on March 27, 2018, 05:49:05 pm
mapping and stumbling/stalling

I have a fuel injection twin where you can alter the richness of the mixture from the speedo console. I assume it richens the mixture over the whole range of the bike but winding it up from euro emission specs as it is supplied to a third of the way before obviously too rich symptoms almost completely removes the stall and stumble without a significant increase in fuel consumption.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on March 28, 2018, 12:27:47 am
When Xpat mentions that my EXC was stalling quite often, this must be seen against the background that I am coming from a 610 Husky and that bike has so much bottom end grunt, that it is almost normal to stall a bike like the 500 after being used to all that torque. Maybe with some more experience with the 500 it would be a different story. This was after all my first ride on the 500 and was still learning all its little ways.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: chopperpilot on March 28, 2018, 06:05:05 am
When Xpat mentions that my EXC was stalling quite often, this must be seen against the background that I am coming from a 610 Husky and that bike has so much bottom end grunt, that it is almost normal to stall a bike like the 500 after being used to all that torque. Maybe with some more experience with the 500 it would be a different story. This was after all my first ride on the 500 and was still learning all its little ways.
Bertie

Is there room to change the gearing, without sacrificing the top-end too much?

I fitted new sprockets and chain to the 610 recently.

Was 15/41. Now 16/50.

Different animal! Leaves both 690 and 990s behind in the Swazi soccer field drags!

It is stronger in the cruise, which was actually what I was after!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on March 28, 2018, 06:25:55 am
When Xpat mentions that my EXC was stalling quite often, this must be seen against the background that I am coming from a 610 Husky and that bike has so much bottom end grunt, that it is almost normal to stall a bike like the 500 after being used to all that torque. Maybe with some more experience with the 500 it would be a different story. This was after all my first ride on the 500 and was still learning all its little ways.

I have got to agree with this - happens to me all the time when I first ride my 450 after some time having been riding the 610. You just have to be on the gas more and revs up.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on March 28, 2018, 07:24:38 am
You can also turn the idle speed up a little (but not too much because according to spec the idle is already quite high at 1800 +-50 rpm)

There is an idle speed adjuster on the throttle body
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on March 28, 2018, 07:48:16 am
I found the same stalling issue going from 450 to 350, so don't believe it is a mapping thing at all. Just a different throttle style. ;D
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on March 28, 2018, 08:09:36 am
Worth a watch

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on April 04, 2018, 10:49:14 am
@BB2007 how are you getting on with the 350? I am torn between the 350 and 500
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: aka.Goliath on April 04, 2018, 05:52:42 pm
I'm also interested about the 350  and whether they could be used for slightly longer distances. I suspect however that they would best be suited to the more technical 'out there' adventure riding, much like Xpats Lesotho adventures. I've been looking for a long range tank for my 300 2smoke for exactly that kind of riding, where you are away for couple nights in some remote places with just the minimal stuff you need to survive.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: KarooKid on April 04, 2018, 06:17:24 pm
I know it must be hidden somewhere in this thread but cannot find it for the life of me.

Please post some pictures of your "lightweight" toolkit for the 500 - what tyre levers and other bits do you carry with?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 04, 2018, 06:21:15 pm
I know it must be hidden somewhere in this thread but cannot find it for the life of me.

Please post some pictures of your "lightweight" toolkit for the 500 - what tyre levers and other bits do you carry with?

Personally I would run mousses, no question. The new Nitro ones and a few rally spec are ideal imho  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on April 04, 2018, 07:59:22 pm
I know it must be hidden somewhere in this thread but cannot find it for the life of me.

Please post some pictures of your "lightweight" toolkit for the 500 - what tyre levers and other bits do you carry with?

Personally I would run mousses, no question. The new Nitro ones and a few rally spec are ideal imho  :thumleft:


+10000
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on April 04, 2018, 08:50:28 pm
As for the toolkit, don't forget that T45 torx bit. The usual spanners, 8, 10, 12, 13,17 and then spanners to take your wheel nuts loose, those double ended jobbies, I made mine welding 2 cheap Midas spanners together.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: KarooKid on April 04, 2018, 08:51:03 pm
On longer remote trips which might include some tar sections mousses might not be the answer though.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on April 04, 2018, 09:05:41 pm
Have them lubed before the trip and try keep your speed to 100. You can also stop periodically and feel how hot your tyres are getting, remember it is only heat that destroys them. If you are going to bomb along at 150 on tar...well then rethink.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 04, 2018, 09:15:07 pm
On longer remote trips which might include some tar sections mousses might not be the answer though.

Ja keep the tar and speed down - look at the liaison distances they do with mousses at the Dakar and then go racing. Admittedly they are changing mousses daily. The Nitro mousse is very tough.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 04, 2018, 09:17:28 pm
As for the toolkit, don't forget that T45 torx bit. The usual spanners, 8, 10, 12, 13,17 and then spanners to take your wheel nuts loose, those double ended jobbies, I made mine welding 2 cheap Midas spanners together.

The new KTM tools have a great combo spanner that has both wheel nut spanners and a small tyre lever in one. Some include a rear suspension hook spanner as well.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on April 04, 2018, 09:22:05 pm
I know it must be hidden somewhere in this thread but cannot find it for the life of me.

Please post some pictures of your "lightweight" toolkit for the 500 - what tyre levers and other bits do you carry with?

I have just upgraded mine after a most epic trip to Kaokoland with Straatkat and Xpat... after not having a puncture in at least 5 years i had 8 in 10 days ... i took my front wheel and tyre off 3 times in one day

Will post pics in morning
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on April 05, 2018, 07:58:40 am
@BB2007 how are you getting on with the 350? I am torn between the 350 and 500

Hi Dwerg, yeah. Your question has been on my mind the last few days.

A 350 EXC... my first impression is its super light and quite a handful as a result. You can tell its designed for racing enduro's against 2-strokes.  I am really enjoying this bike. In technical its much easier to manage than any 450 or bigger bike. Bear in mind though this is also my first EFi bike too. She lacks a little bit of grunt in the low rpm's but its not too much of an issue (I am 96kg after all!) and she lacks top end speed with the standard gearing. I think if you put longer gearing on it would fly, but you would need to slip the clutch a lot more in 1st, especially in a gnarly uphill. Definitely not a 450 but a very nice alternative to a 250 (if that makes sense).

I would imagine that for long dirt roads it is not really the bike, as the new 450's are super light as well. But you are comparing against a 500? I would say this bike is the one to go for if you are going to be riding more technical trips; I would not recommend this bike for dirt highways - I think the engine would cook. The 450 & 500 have more momentum behind them, this bike feels more like a two stroke and I was missing the weight a little bit to be frank - probably just my bad technique.

For what I am riding around here at the moment, I think it may the perfect bike: Distances up to about 300km, jungle & mountain terrain, rocky riverbeds, steep gnarly hill climbs, descents and horse trails. Much slower stuff to the rally type riding I am more used to.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: zebra - Flying Brick on April 05, 2018, 08:02:29 am


Quote from: KarooKid on Yesterday at 06:17:24 pm (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=219441.msg4033114#msg4033114)>I know it must be hidden somewhere in this thread but cannot find it for the life of me.

Please post some pictures of your "lightweight" toolkit for the 500 - what tyre levers and other bits do you carry with?

We stock/sell an ultra-light KTM-specific toolkit, see attached pictures...
and we stock/sell the Motion Pro Bead pro forged aluminium shorty tyre levers / bead breaker combo, with the right technique, shorty levers work out well...
Cheers
Chris & team
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: KarooKid on April 05, 2018, 08:17:17 am
Thanks Chris - will pop in over the weekend.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on April 05, 2018, 08:30:02 am
I know it must be hidden somewhere in this thread but cannot find it for the life of me.

Please post some pictures of your "lightweight" toolkit for the 500 - what tyre levers and other bits do you carry with?

This is my toolkit

1 - Leatherman in pouch cable tied to left fork leg for quick easy access - I use this as a first resort

2 - Green canvas roll up with 3 spoon tyre levers (these are honestly the best and strongest and most user friendly levers - the blue handled Desert Fox levers are available on order at Flying Brick for R280 for the pair and come with rubber rim protectors). I have a 3rd lever because it makes fitting thick sidewalled tyres like MITAS C02 StoneKing and E09 Dakar easy. The wheel spanner is the original KTM 17/19/27/32 combo spanner with tyre lever - very strong and R145 from KTM Cape Town

3 - Black Kriega tool roll has

8mm ring and open spanner
10 mm ring and open spanner - for pinch bolts on fork legs and adjusting chain tension on swingarm
12 and 13 mm combo open spanner
Spark plug spanner
Reversible screwdriver
KTM T handle with various bits including very important T45 torx bit for subframe bolts

4 - Small BOSCH case super mini ratchet and socket set to get into really fiddly places ...including removing fuel injector from throttle body

I have every tool needed here to take off every single fastener on the bike and fix punctures - these all fit into a tailpack on rear fender and weigh 2 kgs in total
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on April 05, 2018, 08:38:52 am
@BB2007 how are you getting on with the 350? I am torn between the 350 and 500

Hi Dwerg, yeah. Your question has been on my mind the last few days.

A 350 EXC... my first impression is its super light and quite a handful as a result. You can tell its designed for racing enduro's against 2-strokes.  I am really enjoying this bike. In technical its much easier to manage than any 450 or bigger bike. Bear in mind though this is also my first EFi bike too. She lacks a little bit of grunt in the low rpm's but its not too much of an issue (I am 96kg after all!) and she lacks top end speed with the standard gearing. I think if you put longer gearing on it would fly, but you would need to slip the clutch a lot more in 1st, especially in a gnarly uphill. Definitely not a 450 but a very nice alternative to a 250 (if that makes sense).

I would imagine that for long dirt roads it is not really the bike, as the new 450's are super light as well. But you are comparing against a 500? I would say this bike is the one to go for if you are going to be riding more technical trips; I would not recommend this bike for dirt highways - I think the engine would cook. The 450 & 500 have more momentum behind them, this bike feels more like a two stroke and I was missing the weight a little bit to be frank - probably just my bad technique.

For what I am riding around here at the moment, I think it may the perfect bike: Distances up to about 300km, jungle & mountain terrain, rocky riverbeds, steep gnarly hill climbs, descents and horse trails. Much slower stuff to the rally type riding I am more used to.

Thanks BB I think I made my mind up a long time ago actually. I am looking for a replacement for my 250 2t not my 690 so primary use will be riding at the local offroad parks and doing the odd race. It would be a bonus if it can be plated and used for the odd technical trip
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on April 05, 2018, 08:41:16 am
2 - Green canvas roll up with 3 spoon tyre levers (these are honestly the best and strongest and most user friendly levers - the blue handled Desert Fox levers are available on order at Flying Brick for R280 for the pair and come with rubber rim protectors). I have a 3rd lever because it makes fitting thick sidewalled tyres like MITAS C02 StoneKing and E09 Dakar easy. The wheel spanner is the original KTM 17/19/27/32 combo spanner with tyre lever - very strong and R145 from KTM Cape Town

. after not having a puncture in at least 5 years i had 8 in 10 days ...

8 punctures in the field gives you experience.

Why not carry the combination spanner and tyre lever units? Is it better to have dedicated tools than the combination tool?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on April 05, 2018, 08:45:07 am
2 - Green canvas roll up with 3 spoon tyre levers (these are honestly the best and strongest and most user friendly levers - the blue handled Desert Fox levers are available on order at Flying Brick for R280 for the pair and come with rubber rim protectors). I have a 3rd lever because it makes fitting thick sidewalled tyres like MITAS C02 StoneKing and E09 Dakar easy. The wheel spanner is the original KTM 17/19/27/32 combo spanner with tyre lever - very strong and R145 from KTM Cape Town

. after not having a puncture in at least 5 years i had 8 in 10 days ...

8 punctures in the field gives you experience.

Why not carry the combination spanner and tyre lever units? Is it better to have dedicated tools than the combination tool?

I only use the combo spanner to remove and refit wheel axle nuts ...I don't use its tyre lever part because I think it's too small and too sharp and greatly increases the risk of pinching or damaging a tube on refitting

The spoon levers have wide broad flat surfaces and are so easy to use without worrying about or being overly careful of pinching tubes
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on April 05, 2018, 08:47:27 am
Tell us more about this socket set.  The ratchet looks nice and compact.

Where do you get it? Cost?
What is the extender on the right?

(http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=219441.0;attach=586107;image)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 05, 2018, 08:48:43 am
I used those blue handled tyre levers on a friends bike this past weekend - they really are excellent for small levers and that spoon shape works a treat and safest on tubes. A pair of those plus the one on the end of the KTM combo wheel spanner was all I needed. Bead breaker?  ... well use a side stand if necessary.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on April 05, 2018, 08:49:20 am
I only use the combo spanner to remove and refit wheel axle nuts ...I don't use its tyre lever part because I think it's too small and too sharp and greatly increases the risk of pinching or damaging a tube on refitting

The spoon levers have wide broad flat surfaces and are so easy to use without worrying about or being overly careful of pinching tubes

I am referring to these levers. You can carry one tool less then.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41w0HrngBcL._SY463_.jpg)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: WildWood on April 05, 2018, 08:50:08 am
Beware of the KTM 17/19/27/32 tool.
If the tool or nut is slightly worn it just slips off. Been there done that and couldn't get a rear wheel off.
Best option are tire levers with dedicated spanner ends.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on April 05, 2018, 08:51:59 am
Tell us more about this socket set.  The ratchet looks nice and compact.

Where do you get it? Cost?
What is the extender on the right?

(http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=219441.0;attach=586107;image)

I bought a few a few years ago directly from Bosch for TEAM 525s assault on Amageza 2015 - I don't think they make them anymore - I have one brand new kit available for R450

The "extender" on the right fits into the ratchet spanner and holds the various bits ...obviously it extends the tool to make it easier to get to hard to reach places

I will post more pics later ... gotta run now

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 05, 2018, 08:52:52 am
Yes had that happen as well. I have also looked at these combos recently, not cheap but good idea. One with front one with rear spanner. Flying Brick keeps a version but also looked at the Motion Pro ones.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on April 05, 2018, 08:53:51 am
I only use the combo spanner to remove and refit wheel axle nuts ...I don't use its tyre lever part because I think it's too small and too sharp and greatly increases the risk of pinching or damaging a tube on refitting

The spoon levers have wide broad flat surfaces and are so easy to use without worrying about or being overly careful of pinching tubes

I am referring to these levers. You can carry one tool less then.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41w0HrngBcL._SY463_.jpg)

YES but I'm a cheapskate - those combo lever spanners are R400 each ...my KTM spanner has 4 sizes in one for R150 and a few more grams won't kill me

Most people overtighten wheel axle nuts ... they really don't need 10 000 Nm of torque ... just a bit more than hand tight works fine for me and I think this KTM combo spanner is good enough
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on April 05, 2018, 09:57:46 am
Tell us more about this socket set.  The ratchet looks nice and compact.

Where do you get it? Cost?
What is the extender on the right?

(http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=219441.0;attach=586107;image)

I bought a few a few years ago directly from Bosch for TEAM 525s assault on Amageza 2015 - I don't think they make them anymore - I have one brand new kit available for R450

The "extender" on the right fits into the ratchet spanner and holds the various bits ...obviously it extends the tool to make it easier to get to hard to reach places

I will post more pics later ... gotta run now

Here are some more up close pics ...you can see how the extender fits into the ratchet spanner to give you extra reach ...and a pic of the spanner with just a bit in it no extender ...and lastly a close up pic of the kit to show you what it has in it
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on April 05, 2018, 10:13:42 am
Thanks  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 05, 2018, 11:47:11 am
Very nice

Seen similar kit on takealot the other day
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 05, 2018, 11:55:14 am
(https://media.takealot.com/covers_tsins/43746304/43746304_1-zoom.jpg?1500894255)

Like the bit screw driver as well
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on April 06, 2018, 09:36:20 pm
There is quite a strong rumour I heard that Chopperpilot is the latest dog to buy a 500. What were you thinking? Now you are never going to ride the 610 again!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: chopperpilot on April 07, 2018, 09:28:31 pm
There is quite a strong rumour I heard that Chopperpilot is the latest dog to buy a 500. What were you thinking? Now you are never going to ride the 610 again!



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: boland on April 08, 2018, 02:54:47 pm
Regarding tools I found that the KTM toolkit is the best and most compact option. I bought a secondhand one for my 690 and subsequently have used it for my 990 and now also my Husky FE450.

If the toolkit is not specific for the model just make sure you have the correct tyre levers
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on April 11, 2018, 12:51:45 pm
Had a look at the 350 and 500 in the showroom. Man they are tall!!! Has anyone lowered them? 38" seat height vs 30" inseam is not ideal for DS usage
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on April 11, 2018, 12:56:28 pm
Had a look at the 350 and 500 in the showroom. Man they are tall!!! Has anyone lowered them? 38" seat height vs 30" inseam is not ideal for DS usage

Xpat's bike was lowered 25 mm by Hilton Hayward - I rode it on our recent trip in Kaokoland and I was instantly sold on the lowering idea

I got mine back from Superfoxi yesterday - it has now also been lowered 25 mm

Shorter springs and a spacer have been used in the forks ...and a spacer in the rear shock

You can virtually lower it as much you want or need to ...but that obviously comes at a sacrifice of reduced ground clearance and suspension travel
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 11, 2018, 01:02:46 pm
Yup, had mine lowered by Hilton and suspension set-up properly (get your sags right - they also usually make bike sit lower as most people ride with too small sag).

Highly recommended for DS use (as well as normal weekend DeWildt fun). So far I have bottomed out only once when I overcooked G-out in Kaokoland. And have zero problem with ground clearance - you have seen my Lesotho trips where this could catch one out, but it never did (except when I screwed up over rocks, but that would catch me out even on standard suspension). As an added benefit, the bike is more stable for cruising. As I said - unless you are planning to race with huge jumps, highly recommended for DS use.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 11, 2018, 02:18:33 pm
@Straatkat

Sorry it is not "economical"

(https://dirtbikemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/DSCN0157.jpeg)

Then add some lekker foam on your seat  :)


https://2tallracing.com/media/press-release-2/
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on April 11, 2018, 03:20:48 pm
I was mightily impressed how Justin managed the rocky terrain on his tall 500, hanging off to one side to be able to touch the ground, now that his bike is lowered I am not riding with him anymore! I can put both feet flat on the ground, so no I won't be lowering mine! Might just get it set up properly at Hilton when I get a chance.
Dwerg, all I have to say to you, grow some legs man!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Offshore on April 11, 2018, 03:36:42 pm
Tell us more about this socket set.  The ratchet looks nice and compact.

Where do you get it? Cost?
What is the extender on the right?

(http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=219441.0;attach=586107;image)
They are still available from Bosch Industrial outlets.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 11, 2018, 03:41:18 pm
I was mightily impressed how Justin managed the rocky terrain on his tall 500, hanging off to one side to be able to touch the ground, now that his bike is lowered I am not riding with him anymore! I can put both feet flat on the ground, so no I won't be lowering mine! Might just get it set up properly at Hilton when I get a chance.
Dwerg, all I have to say to you, grow some legs man!

lol............. that kit is to LIFT and move your position on the bike.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on April 11, 2018, 04:16:05 pm

lol............. that kit is to LIFT and move your position on the bike.


[/quote]


That bit did not escape me.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rover on April 11, 2018, 07:21:04 pm
Very interesting
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on April 11, 2018, 11:32:40 pm
I need to lower my wife's 250 EXC. I dont have Hilton to help me in Honduras. Could someone put me onto a link where I get these springs etc.

I need to lower it about 5cm and have gotten it down by about 2cm  just by pushing the front forks all the way up and adjusting the suspension.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 12, 2018, 08:27:18 am
Electric bread knife on the seat foam :3some:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 12, 2018, 08:35:32 am
I need to lower my wife's 250 EXC. I dont have Hilton to help me in Honduras. Could someone put me onto a link where I get these springs etc.

I need to lower it about 5cm and have gotten it down by about 2cm  just by pushing the front forks all the way up and adjusting the suspension.

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 12, 2018, 08:36:47 am
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 12, 2018, 08:39:20 am
oh and link

https://motolabdirtbikes.com/product-category/shop-by-make/ktm-parts-and-services/
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Dwerg on April 12, 2018, 08:53:54 am
Our KTM dealer does the lowering as well BB, maybe try there?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on April 12, 2018, 09:57:36 am
I started this thread a while back and it's been really cool to check in every now and then, really learned a lot from everyone that contributed.  Anyhow I'm almost done with kitting out my 500.  It wasn't very economical, but having said that I think that I got awesome value.  I sourced a lot of my stuff from overseas, and then Chris @ FB helped a lot with luggage etc.  For information's sake I will list the prices I paid for the stuff ordered from overseas.  Some minor stuff to do still, like replace / re-inforce the flimsy side stand.  Perhaps for pure adv riding you don't quite need all the protection bits, but I also ride enduro with bike so for that it's critical.

Had our first proper adventure ride in Damaraland two weeks back and there's just no looking back.  For me, this is how adv riding should be, light, nimble, unencumbered and the limiting factor in choosing routes is my abilities, not the bike.

Luggage

Everything except tank panniers below was sourced from Flying Brick

Altrider Saddlebag Holster System
Rolltop Bag 25L - Asst Colours
Fender Bag Universal - Dirt/Enduro
ATG 30L Backpack
Giant Loop heat shield
Wolfman Tank Panniers - U$95 - eBay
Giant Loop Luggage Clips

Protection

Hyde Bash Plate - Flying Brick
Enduro Engineering Rear Disc Guard Protector - U$94 - Amazon
Enduro Engineering Front Brake Rotor Guard - U$98.95 - Amazon
Polisport Swingarm Protector - U$26.99 - Amazon
Polisport Clutch Protector - U$32.99

Cosmetic

Hammerhead Shifter - U$31.49 - eBay
KTM Tail Cleanup - U$143.50 - eBay

The shifter is not purely cosmetic, it is also much stronger than the stock KTM one.

Fuel Tank

Acerbis 15.5L - Flying Brick (happy I went Acerbis - see on ADVrider there is a recall out for the IMS tanks)

Some Pics:

Fuel Tank + Tank Panniers

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/h_X60iyq1n2PQ4EUJ-Y9hapIH_K9C8T4D8if11JP6zW2yiSjpdjUs7jj4mv52nKH_J_ohKWwPS13rgaDu_9uGgv3BcG2SQwC2i_D7ak8tcHC6YeFam0tmZF6eU_NQqCc6uLDlI8KyXblYlD9GDyqcQxMnVJswnaAV9jJIBzFuyeBxTNZ2syiIE6g9qB-D9C5rnyBx-4R-zMSqxAHd5mSwjMCEDmtigxWWXzZnNbt1GJKbp7-xLpGwbFVzdIcPodz3ypkRki3evamRf8SAJbyGftun97K2PfbJptGbqpIW4vR2q5z93NXJ1REZo1Xrwpwlo_E3esrNyqFF6LUYePwxDicWEfUI9tj4NEk1glSKIdk10oFQFN_66oXHPWV_yjv8sVAHKUqQ57TpXYPFdjl-9QRk7RbyyQHUF0VYNHAqKBoALW3TVtkC7jC0JrSLtHOIJ0FHGAHLN15nuM7SjqEgCf-oiSnIboaOn1K2xHjLNUC5qh2RPfAp6DpqsB-LYP0d_PVhI5kDr3zrurO9ZkCuUCnap4wsQHJbxRLfjkJKGNx-7tdyDEFV8-61_Vy5dzGsPYzr8PW02iCGhpzSacbdpO49njItkxWXpIFW5Q=w1304-h978-no)

Hammerhead Shifter:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/XoV0MaBsm_c9xXVMevAuZl5Bf2PYtvIFESoO3jCpAHIdGxmqyfDiD3cfvZE0OZAOcqk7d0RWYAI9jrIS7ePkunouF6XU2E1lGAONdo_yqwqI2_eoj94Vz1xqj7TLAKpkGgzMY3mqiUw4bcLIrZOKz_y4eFj6nDclK82jgjMrdZy6EDVVO7jmo8vGJ1RoHgbZ59vVoikuhL6LmUfgd7raAfq1C7FGRWfYA5KXDutAULg1CSWNf5586KKoVjHWPYQlwr0jPSftrbunTCaMoShEYIBGoSqRJs7Not84FYD2ejnJvSIJYfYlmjN_SM9eHzIpF0wVjkPluAMZ30yEGQYuAGkHeLtEpQ1t9Nia6gicxft-Iaoa_VRwABXxZKXK7XQd1eeaaspZ8-XK0p396yjfexmlnDh8OKxU2Fy65iPuIaV7xVkOfySiHNFUDHq9cmoXggxSGXD1XhTd4QXnRGz0E6bfYO80czeyNPf_Cd8DQyMnfTTY3VkMrvWUV0AVMhtLrig9Bzx9XfVuKxvh3r_t8F_cmOkP0sOkK9IoF1EP_iGUo6C2TY7rpjKJ39efhhjvcLAbpn3pfBeBX-zxnu_wyxRoPAQ8MaMAwbpoRHw=w1304-h978-no)

Front and Rear Enduro Engineering rotor Guards:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/AmUjx-31f_LxR-8CDIzINxuSYynYBRKhEjIYrPFnBF9hpHxgLKWRKcUc5qlDGbBvFEIC_gnHT8LrFNXUttrEyT_s9zJqwfTPQKOKQh8I073-_IKjnIVl0_kcssWDVGZhSvVOOXM9q9zCR6gX0rtTLbzY0A7g1KmATeNsJmTd8xCeXXKFoR0HycauPwlgTcymYbQh-HYm_exvKbdMLxOW9IIr8SdM0uBHhOqSmhfwMKxI_0dzjMMES5wtewdqMx0Gp9s-bmosA8UsSKJEbnlsR8CoMeo3Ej5aepatpS6dmBPvto2Bi02VAEqI2pQ-JFH3oKHpuEjz0mxM1gcj_6QHNR5hHDOUXHbeT8KlH_95m0yh1bUiF1MGJozCWRM0O25JaMwd5OM9sMPaF7EMDmbrsoJZgwzO56fGC8cxKF9oWUhR5Buuf6bOhiTQWcLSwR3WAofXk2Zo__JgK2XZui91_HbxM_-Z2Y8a660bdVOpQQvoEhwUURevFTzca4YMWum5-6e12ftvoB6Z5BT__yctUipFvcyv4ugoU1CcXZr02ViHuPNZ7L9arl6VkvdAEfu0SWfwXGVuA3JaZVfDrsMd60dgGzeRXl9YnM1gA8g=w1304-h978-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/VGXKl5AVmywFAj9IZtu1lqbW0fJIInGE4BjnPGYHsPyx0FUa77d1_yhmlzwNUK1ojgrUbG2SCExYqE4s-wnib4YSKDfAa9u-SY6XpKjPXetaNME793GHNgVy5yahgcqSN3vGG3cGAzZn_BMBC6SWrVWFlTi3gg6Gz5oWqbdKwUdw7Ylc656f8MZGX1Keu-pYyHonigFh2hHWXn0IH4CiPpmZa7hfTgNADLalfJ2j6rd6xh-dbH9vqCk9GsrYHNn4g50v-VpKE5TE8oLzZvb12ctySDfKW_NLYhnDT8bjMZ6cS_hrHxQ8Y6YgRBJqrldp0ompLfT07edzmEB7jvwCFHy0hSzPVw3EfmCDgumUzqi46lvn8Z0W0qxT_M601PN0OUZ1EyDiTCFOtJYoRRycZt1q2TPXp8B0EJbhJfOIDlZyM5tgZkd0rpBLoNPCxvHjkH_2zERUePqNsqd6guWfHvHRoIY6WI8QdzsdPV64jG3-bJVePllFiAFgvonOFXPaLC8OeqtQO_wndf-Z-oo3FykvnaLIIISFi1gbYND_TCM8I5PtrHhFkJTKOSszIsuFhqTBsHeUz4IR-6y1A0gO1QkbI6JeWeo7w7s5CL0=w1304-h978-no)

Giant Loop Luggage Clips

Had to make a spacer and get slightly longer bolts to make these fit.  Works well with the Altrider luggage system

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/dSftwgHvTgh9AxNqNgyFKTOBUuZUTAz0AmAGfCM9sya_ad95H5-39B0pvADBOkWe45S8EtppwfXufb7LbdrzbV44HJUxtIhFDGFyW0UwNJFrl4bjTj0Mdrefiw8tZg806om_1Iqb-w3edY2s6IypOwKtu31DQL9hqFa0m1f7F15e6Zgm4pVW4HI4_EBuNPcsy_NMcIyGI-9UhCaThSiSH28y32Jc2bSTJ0bVo_ljeYwW4Z8FofviWjzXEkWt429CvzTfunl62gDwkYXMLKckCri_Ib9wlV-ah7JUyfhGPOKqImv-Nr70WT1MmjR4jj48woVAnKDrKkGqZ07V0FmueG3898kBSIzwXgP_JZHRnOWVZIID1A1IlguCdMgAEBMZ_3AIRf5U16iLA45AgPjdVcFl_c0k89AU3lNEDQMrx5X6S6bOEc3qZMi7-PnCvDdEgot_0aQDzFbTcqnzdTwfbldzsptTruFo6jjG6ele0hgulzcHS7G5Lwtw1-CQ1VsVfGdetoHC2LbNr4miLCUjm8T3zKCLf-xxWhwaoQlErQlqbS3YBVrPF2RvycGSi3v2LhYNk_B81Fwwm9c5MDlXQHzoeB8MpCB4RV-VDrM=w1304-h978-no)

Tail Cleanup:

Highly recommend this - replaces poor quality flickers with LED's and no more floppy plastic shit in the rear.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-tPHNz6mwKahaPoLFmRj6x8mI48IkT8ZT1UHijagr2BiX2cmpYnlophvZm0TUFHhKB5Am3GCf3dboPuX6TTsKCaA1-79V4mB3bvzRWCQVTfz7FO1TS4aK8jY_E4lIzU3jHTk8SglsL54kndtVTVDmyw0IYuuIhEoUON4dsOuLkf6a_IPTUQf77vSk1FNs-ulxTz6SQJu_U435m6ti8Vmo-NHz6IwgppWd0p0W_vJBWhRNpjjOJqKlmY_LnsK1HUtJzNuo4Jj5sWfWFrxsvEsGQOeMqBsTjumX8xcUvlCkJIV_hfaBEVzopdsy7I3e-MvbfRTK-itxHTt4sGUlzKnvBmzp5rBTz94W8KFpXYqW5zZHcjr-e7l8LNBg4yie0rowOLMC9jo9I3LU8_tyLSVPDj1gaspgPDIBUxqbsRBaw0bueZgBLS9rPYngAQfLDwSIwaS7ImSOuFzCM1W2t1DqpBt5xCRgX82XfnZOAzwKhzcjZ1pG-cJ2-57rTIOIrxpSFidlshGQFF0GAWaIhx4a6nUfXN7jAdyyciFKvvAkR-8J0j5-ay2RKwNVgvrTWkhoP64TJA7ZtiKEpkCXCf1PbDkTSRpJhl_F_7dXbg=w1304-h978-no)

Clutch Cover and Bash Plate:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/6bGwdkTOSKshs4eitSg6AgDbQnVArD2H7AiJWPgEeCPMjsulgcf1S_bdIFkZL3TiOjKORkzjuWTf0H1F68mmXeC13ap9XAHQWZwm0UKimz04IYGuzexbgO_vE23Ls_PvLu7p9bplwlgZ-ww1_wC6m4nql-4_ldkDUF-nQZNooBqyJlvm4GyE7iu28QOr2fRTxZ98V4YXtF5L5mIOj4coGKADjbKAJ0W_sNxzM5QGZpn89FEkYvYKm8kyHoSm0Ey-RuE2GVflaJI99IPNpwrEcn8CwAfDZ-D2xfm_ncE-pqi_KE3FiHn__VmRTfZoqJQcQGJidH1P4y0mkk7nLxZ3mAu-6gHCgDaB6PaY8eri6yeS74V1Aa97M3p0FTK3QCxkJ8AmxwKJtkXiZUmQ1P9hWa-mR4l16J2__H9H_5jBWC5Y_jUV_7zTk0xSzdOl4rw5RP0Gco_DPZSLq-a72EjvWaysuMVsIMFaNbWtcrDtVEElF4UGLz9UUQsloQjJ4aLVJ4qkmbbfUe5ER1IdZpath_q6Aa6bTLxQoXPFTDTjEJrN44ulNkEZuQnB10A0UYWYFsTh0RZL2CbzevPrzTRAF6yQZzm2pJ4fmmh2fvA=w1304-h978-no)









Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 12, 2018, 10:15:33 am
@Damaraland : Here our trip through your neck of the woods just in the case you missed it:  http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=222953.0 (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=222953.0)

The only issues we run into was my sidestand got wobbly from some somersaults in Lesotho and got progressively worse so I had to mostly lean the bike against something, and my bike developed a leak at the countershaft sprocket at the end of the trip - about 8000 on ODO at the time. Easy fix with new O-ring and seal.

Otherwise it was just Tubeliss that gave us headaches, but let's not open that can of worms again  :peepwall:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 12, 2018, 10:17:36 am
Very nice. Was there a reason you did not buy the Hyde swingarm and carbon engine guards? The KTM tail cleanup - what make and are the indicators integrated into the brake light?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 12, 2018, 10:22:24 am
Maybe its just a perspective, but that Enduro Engineering number plate looks horibly big and heavy. Do you really need it there - I wouldn't want huge weight pivoting so far back.

And how are the pannier bags - don't they get in the way of your knees much? I understand you need something like that for Angola (and that I suggested it myslef), but I wouldn't want to ride with that if I absolutely don't need to.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 12, 2018, 10:24:48 am
And what is that white plastic thing hanging from your subframe - did you buy rear tank? Or is that just a standard plastic that comes with latest 500?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 12, 2018, 10:28:45 am
Maybe its just a perspective, but that Enduro Engineering number plate looks horibly big and heavy. Do you really need it there - I wouldn't want huge weight pivoting so far back.


Agree I would lose the plate and run a small numberplate or the invisible fall-off version.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on April 12, 2018, 10:42:44 am
Maybe its just a perspective, but that Enduro Engineering number plate looks horibly big and heavy. Do you really need it there - I wouldn't want huge weight pivoting so far back.

And how are the pannier bags - don't they get in the way of your knees much? I understand you need something like that for Angola (and that I suggested it myslef), but I wouldn't want to ride with that if I absolutely don't need to.

Purely perspective - below is a before and after.  Pannier bags do touch the knees when in sitting position, to address that I use two small strips of velcro which keeps them forward a bit more.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/t18WYEt5aeqeW-qWaPBTJsPFpmnTm9Uqra-gi4l624CmqKFBnUpnLbjVe6aAGktOqhhccL8d2Gi6F-w_7oj0xl3Z12UQ8dq5I9YaVTUTT624Yz3d_uZ0s35iFTMOy-Bky5UsN_PBjhdbxw801k-etT-69xE7tSXicDXHmqCEnGrfElYkZhrZNmaWOBvt3f4rK9k9CKcxOAl8iSvDgM5zlxRfLXjnFWdRalNoJyJ_nrVN4RnF6rycqUFD1O3Bnk3qq9xVUm8r91fOxlpoLP_ZirKGDWyUUyFaElmibaJBzmN17Vvu-Z07NeYrLE8N_uXBO4lx_FvX_OmQs0q5S7ousj-hAZh22sq_5RkY3X9kp-hxUHULS_q51NGtTrh_3js5FtO7HS6Ae42ipi_Nk5iWRNwC2h5vyDKUIHgQExtPhrCde5HMCN7QKZOsGs_tc2icEvAWO9PrwcUy42Nlt60If-nDmrskN_PmOcJEGLfskFwlYup_Ip5r1j798U2o_2v9prMFyikQMnWTR5R2PpXi9te5RyiEIBq9LEUhAORy-LISBlon5nhqIQbNV1EZDMjRs90yCQOsMK6R0RXLl07si8TjLI2LpywSmCqJVHQ=w1904-h596-no)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on April 12, 2018, 10:45:09 am
And what is that white plastic thing hanging from your subframe - did you buy rear tank? Or is that just a standard plastic that comes with latest 500?

Think it's so that you can hook the sidestand to prevent it coming down on a hard landing.  Comes stock.

Speaking of rear tanks, got pricing on those but 15K for about 7L extra was a bit out of my budget.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on April 12, 2018, 10:48:50 am
Very nice. Was there a reason you did not buy the Hyde swingarm and carbon engine guards? The KTM tail cleanup - what make and are the indicators integrated into the brake light?

Had a bit of difficulty sourcing Hyde, in the end it was easier to just bring in the Polisports, also price was better.

As for the KTM tails cleanup, custom-built by a vendor on eBay (PW_Garfield).  Yes the indicators are integrated.  Due to them being LED's the flickers are faster - if you do LED's in the front you'll have to install a relay.  I'm lazy so I kept the stock in front and will use my two rears as spares for those.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 12, 2018, 10:54:03 am
can you not add a resistor to rear flickers
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on April 12, 2018, 11:02:22 am
can you not add a resistor to rear flickers

Yep that'll work.  The flashing is not excessively fast though, so didn't do that yet.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 12, 2018, 11:03:49 am
Maybe its just a perspective, but that Enduro Engineering number plate looks horibly big and heavy. Do you really need it there - I wouldn't want huge weight pivoting so far back.

And how are the pannier bags - don't they get in the way of your knees much? I understand you need something like that for Angola (and that I suggested it myslef), but I wouldn't want to ride with that if I absolutely don't need to.

Purely perspective - below is a before and after.  Pannier bags do touch the knees when in sitting position, to address that I use two small strips of velcro which keeps them forward a bit more.

...

OK, that looks much better  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 12, 2018, 11:15:21 am
can you not add a resistor to rear flickers

You should be able to fit an electronic LED flicker/flasher unit without issue (most Midas, Autozone etc should have) - very often plug and play. The LED resistors are really often rather big as they need a heat sink and somewhere to hide and secure them.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on April 12, 2018, 11:21:55 am
can you not add a resistor to rear flickers

You should be able to fit an electronic LED flicker/flasher unit without issue (most Midas, Autozone etc should have) - very often plug and play. The LED resistors are really often rather big as they need a heat sink and somewhere to hide and secure them.

KTM themselves also sells an LED flicker relay - went that route on my 990.  Midas will definitely be cheaper though.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 12, 2018, 11:22:13 am


Purely perspective - below is a before and after.  Pannier bags do touch the knees when in sitting position, to address that I use two small strips of velcro which keeps them forward a bit more.

[/quote]

I cannot believe KTM put such a monstrosity on - their other smaller enduro bikes have small units tucked under the mudguard?

I do like the Enduro Engineering solution as well.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on April 12, 2018, 11:27:21 am
Monstrosity is the right word.  Lost two number plates before I put on the new one.

Stock rubbish.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/tMLO-FZ5RDQhn_PIzw0SQDyXd5eB6ImYpLlLYB53GsAvxYe3c1X-8RzfkRKk9S7m1M-zAVVPDBo0b7yuYyZpsp2UZ7-tZghuEDyZ8a5LFrEPt4IcsjrpAoTabmgh6Taw7YxKeBsYIHXAdMskEj7PmFibFD333NZ4Q-azXqnOZxJoGgyvPZ-VcjdVwPmULYkb-aXYlmfvXushQZmwiOWDS5fBAwV_FxKFyqGooaSsVsXRMxH-GhyjF388eNB6iXxvhlFBERaq408Lqx2eltKrhaGlu_HzqIN_UEYlQh6ZE_AvENI8zjkoW8IAaEYNVwY9xryDHYJyjoDoYpBOY4x2SIzGvj8SSjEeNQLpSDOS-AxmGZ7WlW_pdClLZo1ONLUL5oWQHZe28nP8rVG0Sxc22ustDQQc5oBKoxZ0n7ltRSlY69zMCwFIVMv2n96m4L8Bh3DN2u16kgJSP49fvAXGd0sReYZFgpJwMBCdIQSuCyKYZlS9HtPrPJ4v2KGnAjIBELgIOPVpBwZipOxoA1f8Kv5hkeKCmp9mag6h6W_9VSxMkFYjt3b_7PxLXRcMI5mtDz01sPei4gBXVe4bPvcAt__jzG8gBCZUbWkLW3E=w1379-h919-no)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 12, 2018, 11:32:14 am
What they thinking - guess DOT etc for Euro market?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 12, 2018, 02:49:47 pm
In stock form you will actually see lights. and licence plate will be illuminated legally.


Not much fun braking at night and indicating that you plan on turning left and cage/truck behind you can't see shit from your bike and takes you out.


 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on April 12, 2018, 03:14:16 pm
In stock form you will actually see lights. and licence plate will be illuminated legally.

Not much fun braking at night and indicating that you plan on turning left and cage/truck behind you can't see shit from your bike and takes you out.


I can see the LED's well enough both riding, brake and flickers?  Not sure about legality to be honest, must it be illuminated with a bulb?

Here's a very shitty screengrab of a ride we did in the rain

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/6pSjiu5WXyeAHqehGYosjnkd2VT4PYNkTh8A3wL12P15lWTMgzB96ZQyT1FZCUYPhnch92ADuaEd3tPCTDObfgiPI54OOC97gzn6tnNSLNt1FlexcKfCvtN0y2g9QC7YcFtXj_hisH06Qf2CL6i5fvoJlSO7st2uuqjre4I1vXdYoiPwkTXpZP2WDhWpe0dTstohyV2EFJeGYAskcdSUJsCT0Xpld0cyd-hZbET6n55qjRcUtXsb3fPsfevwt1MDTalGKmS8eM6spiNzC2-7Vo1YFXHGSo7KqSp-GHD2HjisInj49ae9BKbnkqCH2fwowmOonwe9G22xvBzp2TmsUGBVUMT9-oLiob_odD82apC-dIHbha_GurTh_1cuZ4doOUhRawx_xawdKo8QLB78UyeWBZUevh12AFtvlzUKfSQ-AjzpTtkgqu1wqe-GUZKl64lpbvFQc9Jw5ECviZnehyUhp-TMIKvAV9wl7VhOpHm1BFeCrw5kwCjMJCZPRtrg21ZVNOwnTGkrSbnTRLr4M6w8C60SHhM7_EH0cVOmYbc9E1yX_6jC8EsvaRNMVkHmwH132JijN3LRf5vtzvBo-_CtWY1Ka-j172mDsB8=w885-h919-no)

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 12, 2018, 03:23:50 pm
As far as i know yes

Many small units have a bottom white running light for plate.

BUT there not many cops ,trucks in the bush so you should be ok :)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 12, 2018, 03:31:09 pm
Is this your kit ? If yes it has down light


Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on April 14, 2018, 09:15:57 am
This is why I sold my SE and moved to a 500

It can do everything and more ... the absolute giant killer

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 14, 2018, 09:38:37 am
 :ricky: :ricky: :ricky: :3some:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on April 14, 2018, 10:31:35 am
That video sounds a lot like us, 3 mates,3  500's, lots of fun!
Thanks for posting that Justin, awesome vid.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: JustBendIt on April 14, 2018, 12:00:20 pm
This looks like a very neat bike and a very good buy considering all the extras and the big tank

https://www.gumtree.co.za/view.html?adId=1002291093340910186908609&utm_source=alert&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=bolt
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Straatkat on April 14, 2018, 12:46:45 pm
This looks like a very neat bike and a very good buy considering all the extras and the big tank

https://www.gumtree.co.za/view.html?adId=1002291093340910186908609&utm_source=alert&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=bolt

Wow that is a good deal. I would have pounced on it if I didn't have one already!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Rossdog on April 14, 2018, 02:24:39 pm
Just a head's up. When I bought my second hand 500 recently, the starter motor was poked. I shopped around, and found out that SSS Racing in Jhb sells after market complete starters for KTM's (and other bikes). They have a batch of starters in stock for the older KTM's, and a batch is on the ocean for the '12-16 models, and they will sell for about R1500 each. Good deal I think.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on April 17, 2018, 12:53:19 pm
Motonomad 3 featuring the 500

Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 17, 2018, 01:17:42 pm
Should be good - I am guessing a 4th cameraman did the trailer? Is one of them camerman on the trip - trying to remember but must be + drone etc I guess.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: onderbroek on April 17, 2018, 03:17:24 pm
Should be good - I am guessing a 4th cameraman did the trailer? Is one of them cameraman on the trip - trying to remember but must be + drone etc I guess.

Adam Riemann is an absolute champ when it comes to documenting these rides, they are only 3 and he does most of the camera work, with a drone as well, but  i can ensure you there is a lot of"let me plant the camera and ride back, then all 3 of us wheelie past, then i turnaround and collect the camera again type shots. I think he chooses his companions knowing that they know the basics of videography, or coaches them beforehand.


Similiar to LyndonsPoskitt's Races2places, all shots are done by himself, and he sends it on for editing  (i think)

IT
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on April 19, 2018, 05:47:36 pm
This is definately no Motonomad, but took some footage of a quick ride we did this morning, just outside Windhoek, to begin testing our loadout for Angola.



Loadout:

15l water
25l petrol
2 KTM toolkits
Tent
Sleeping Bag
First Aid kit
Pots
Stove and gas
Mattress
Towel
Emergency blanket
Lamp
Toiletries

Very happy with how the kit performed, the riding in Angola should be easier than what we did today.  The 500's also handled the extra weight with aplomb and handling was impacted less than what we thought it would be.  Some more testing & experimenting to be done over the course of the next couple of weekends.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Richard Smit on April 19, 2018, 06:06:23 pm
The bush there looks bloody spectacular!!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on April 19, 2018, 06:12:42 pm
The bush there looks bloody spectacular!!

Pretty lucky to have this loop about 5 mins ride from my house - video is mostly in and around the river that runs up to the Elisenheim estate just north of Windhoek.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on April 20, 2018, 01:04:59 pm
Yes great riding terrain you have there  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 20, 2018, 01:09:27 pm
Looks like you had rain that side.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Damaraland on April 20, 2018, 01:20:11 pm
Looks like you had rain that side.

Yes, Windhoek and surrounds have had nice heavy downpours the last two weeks, world is green again:-)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 20, 2018, 06:51:01 pm
Back at it again in Lesotho. The rivers are deep, fast and cold.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180420/0c548d6abbab56ad0cd4d8e5aec05696.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180420/d43d832c9771a23b625e6f98dbad752d.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180420/ca08e14a30b246b674d927974aee2aaa.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180420/2f89c756115a8dda39649cd8bb4f01dc.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180420/fb9b1b6e06cef658e80991d110262252.jpg)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: blauth on April 20, 2018, 08:21:17 pm
Nice XPat.  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: frankmac on April 20, 2018, 09:01:50 pm

Back at it again in Lesotho. The rivers are deep, fast and cold.


It's that bloody Duracell bunny again. Makes me exhausted just reading his reports  :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BlueBull2007 on April 21, 2018, 06:06:49 am

Back at it again in Lesotho. The rivers are deep, fast and cold.


It's that bloody Duracell bunny again. Makes me exhausted just reading his reports  :biggrin:

Me too ;D

Keep them coming xpat.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 21, 2018, 10:20:07 am
Can't say you have no rear wheel grip with that rubber fitted :)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 21, 2018, 10:42:13 am
Can't say you have no rear wheel grip with that rubber fitted :)

Mitas C-02?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 21, 2018, 02:01:16 pm
Can't say you have no rear wheel grip with that rubber fitted :)

Actualy i can. Yes it is c02, and on my previous trips to lesotho and nam worked like a charm. Because it was dry. Now its mud and wet rocks everywhere and the tyre is pretty sketchy, even at almost zero pressure (tubeliss). They are hard compound and last really well, but they dont shine in wet.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 21, 2018, 02:04:38 pm
Can't say you have no rear wheel grip with that rubber fitted :)

Actualy i can. Yes it is c02, and on my previous trips to lesotho and nam worked like a charm. Because it was dry. Now its mud and wet rocks everywhere and the tyre is pretty sketchy, even at almost zero pressure (tubeliss). They are hard compound and last really well, but they dont shine in wet.

Tyre of choice for those conditions would be a Mitas EF07 Double Green at same pressure - yes would make an HUGE difference. Ask the Roof boys and a few girls.   :3some:  Interestingly Mitas consider the C-02 as a Motocross tyre for Soft to Medium conditions.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 21, 2018, 02:11:00 pm
Can't say you have no rear wheel grip with that rubber fitted :)

Actualy i can. Yes it is c02, and on my previous trips to lesotho and nam worked like a charm. Because it was dry. Now its mud and wet rocks everywhere and the tyre is pretty sketchy, even at almost zero pressure (tubeliss). They are hard compound and last really well, but they dont shine in wet.

Tyre of choice for those conditions would be a Mitas EF07 Double Green at same pressure - yes would make an HUGE difference. Ask the Roof boys and a few girls.   :3some:  Interestingly Mitas consider the C-02 as a Motocross tyre for Soft to Medium conditions.

To be fair, i havent ridden here other tyres in similar conditions. They may be even sketchier. That said looking at the pattern of the knobs in rows with gap between, i doubt c02 are supposed to excel in the wet
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 21, 2018, 02:46:21 pm
Can't say you have no rear wheel grip with that rubber fitted :)

Actualy i can. Yes it is c02, and on my previous trips to lesotho and nam worked like a charm. Because it was dry. Now its mud and wet rocks everywhere and the tyre is pretty sketchy, even at almost zero pressure (tubeliss). They are hard compound and last really well, but they dont shine in wet.


To be fair, i havent ridden here other tyres in similar conditions. They may be even sketchier. That said looking at the pattern of the knobs in rows with gap between, i doubt c02 are supposed to excel in the wet

What characterises the C-02 for me is that it has very tall knobs that are well spaced - yes good in loose rocks, shale and some loamy conditions. It can punch through and clear mud quite well from my experience as well. But the knobs are quite hard due to having to be because of their high profile and also will inevitably flex - not the greatest for hard Maluti rock and TRACTION. The extreme enduro tyres of choice do not have excessive tread depth but often do have rows of knobs giving an excellent footprintt combined with light construction and a soft sidewall. While I mention the the legendary EF-07 Green and Double Green (and there are other gummy choices) a tyre that maybe you should look for for these conditions is the hybrid trials ones - banned for obvious reasons for the Roof as just too much of an unfair advantage ... offerings from Mitas, Motoz etc
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Sláinte Mhaith on April 21, 2018, 04:05:47 pm
a tyre that maybe you should look for these conditions is the hybrid trials ones - banned for obvious reasons for the Roof as just too much of an unfair advantage ... Mitas, Motoz etc

From what I gathered from reviews is that traction is very good in rocks and most surfaces but not as good in sand and mud when compared to good knobbies.  They say it give good mileage.  Ideal for the 500 adventure bike.

Asked around for the Motoz Mountain Hybrid but the guys don't know it.

Would it be suitable for use with mousses?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 21, 2018, 04:15:17 pm
Found a new shortcut between mohale and semonkong. Quite surprised nobody knows about it as it is basically a dirt road with very few tricky sections and imo doable on big adv bike with little determination.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180421/dc97a39e0493348eae7bad766dc003c9.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180421/d94dc34c14af8b95aec4b5e23516b466.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180421/a3b5ad31db9f2e708cf6f990f95d30ef.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180421/c2c726c6176f3fbd85114373d8d651cd.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180421/c368bc2271e32c6884187362450bf49e.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 21, 2018, 04:25:14 pm
I feel sure Pieter Loubser must know it.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 21, 2018, 04:28:28 pm
I feel sure Pieter Loubser must know it.

He does now, as i told him about it already.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 21, 2018, 04:30:15 pm


From what I gathered from reviews is that traction is very good in rocks and most surfaces but not as good in sand and mud when compared to good knobbies.  They say it give good mileage.  Ideal for the 500 adventure bike.

Asked around for the Motoz Mountain Hybrid but the guys don't know it.

Would it be suitable for use with mousses?
[/quote]

Yes will not clean out in mud like a more open knobbly - and sand ... not really a trials thing so ja again a more aggressive tyre or some with slightly scooped knobs do better there. It is really about putting down a big flexible tractable footprint. No reason why they would not work with mousses and many guys run them - esp soft ones. There was a short while in extreme enduro when it was the wet choice before being outlawed. 
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 21, 2018, 04:30:45 pm
I feel sure Pieter Loubser must know it.

He does now, as i told him about it already.

 :biggrin:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 21, 2018, 04:33:51 pm
Maletsunyane Falls looking quite strong - they had some rain?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 21, 2018, 04:52:18 pm
Maletsunyane Falls looking quite strong - they had some rain?

I guess so - that’s why my c02 dont seem to be working as well as last time
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 21, 2018, 07:36:51 pm
That tire is better in dry.Dom is right about mitas double green but also dont expect it to last.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 21, 2018, 07:58:17 pm
That tire is better in dry.Dom is right about mitas double green but also dont expect it to last.

The Single Green lasts better and the Yellow stripe even more so. A Yellow probably a good choice for a Lesotho trip.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 22, 2018, 06:22:31 pm
More Lesotho tease

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180422/3a81905345caa0456b7eb9f41f45329e.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180422/2ff92f09ef0b0122cabac98c7e1ee237.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180422/fad648aa60c3ca11f4c9cf8a6327db55.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180422/ca1df04b58b75243e17fcc7d8272a775.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180422/0da15d1947ceeac889bf8cc0d1821f2e.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180422/c6fd3050bff79c2875ab36902d27a1f6.jpg)






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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 22, 2018, 06:44:34 pm
Awesome.

Area?
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 22, 2018, 08:28:21 pm
Awesome.

Area?

This: http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=217887.0 (http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=217887.0)


Except i made it only to escarpment because im a wuss
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 22, 2018, 08:59:02 pm
Big diff is you are loaded
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 22, 2018, 09:25:34 pm
Big diff is you are loaded

Nope, big difference is that they can ride...
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: IanTheTooth on April 22, 2018, 10:21:22 pm
My inner wimp has been nagging at me for a while about using a big powerful bike in challenging terrain. Yesterday both heads of the argument came to the fore, I went riding yesterday morning and when descending a steep down which was quite overgrown I found a crevice opening up in front of me. I popped the throttle and got over it quite neatly but then fluffed closing off the throttle  again. My riding partner had a good laugh and I had a bark buster to straighten. That was on a common or garden 250. On a roughty, snorty 500 crisp off the throttle it would have ended very differently and probably not very well. Later in the day Xpat whatsapped about the ride he has posted above. That is one place where you don't want to have a "wardrobe malfunction" with the throttle on the drop off unless you want to fly with the birds. 

Xpat, I don't know if it was accident or design but I see your pictures are taken from very similar view points to the ones I posted!
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 23, 2018, 06:31:32 am
My inner wimp has been nagging at me for a while about using a big powerful bike in challenging terrain. Yesterday both heads of the argument came to the fore, I went riding yesterday morning and when descending a steep down which was quite overgrown I found a crevice opening up in front of me. I popped the throttle and got over it quite neatly but then fluffed closing off the throttle  again. My riding partner had a good laugh and I had a bark buster to straighten. That was on a common or garden 250. On a roughty, snorty 500 crisp off the throttle it would have ended very differently and probably not very well. Later in the day Xpat whatsapped about the ride he has posted above. That is one place where you don't want to have a "wardrobe malfunction" with the throttle on the drop off unless you want to fly with the birds. 

Xpat, I don't know if it was accident or design but I see your pictures are taken from very similar view points to the ones I posted!

Entertaining observations Ian  >:D .

I hope Xp has not just Photoshopped his bike into your pics while lazing on the beach in Mauritius  :imaposer:
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 23, 2018, 06:41:01 am
Big diff is you are loaded

Nope, big difference is that they can ride...

Can't afford to take chances when you on your own.

Preservation and all.

Weather looks perfect :)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: Xpat on April 23, 2018, 07:55:44 am
Yes, it was vertigo that stopped me.

Though Ian judging from the pictures this track is better shape than the one you took - at least the part i have seen. But your is much safer - if you misstep there you fall only 100 meters. On this one about 300.

Sorry, i will stop this offtopic now

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180423/661c0da4ce60db9887fa382b27ebcff3.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180423/a9af4fa9faef2bddf29cec43739302d8.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180423/f4ab960a7d95f84c0414b86ff4f40e37.jpg)

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180423/69ba40ad49b465c6e1ba10141c63dd94.jpg)


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Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 23, 2018, 08:06:07 am
Please don't stop posting pics :)
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: frankmac on April 23, 2018, 08:11:59 am
Please don't stop posting pics :)

 :thumleft:

Proper mountain goat country that. Get vertigo just looking at the pics.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: BiG DoM on April 23, 2018, 09:13:55 am
The kind of thing the Roofians would consider open fulltaps balls to the wall stuff (yes I know not on 500 advs - just saying)  >:D
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: mtr89 on April 23, 2018, 05:25:48 pm
Flip !
Now I need to get a 500!
What a leader thread this is.
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: sidetrack on April 24, 2018, 07:49:51 am
Rode a 500 yesterday
Title: Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
Post by: armpump on April 24, 2018, 07:52:46 am