Wild Dog Adventure Riding

Riding: Plan, Report and Racing => Racing Section => Topic started by: Etienne2T on May 07, 2010, 09:35:41 pm

Title: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Etienne2T on May 07, 2010, 09:35:41 pm
I wrote this after doing all the research, here's what you need to know to go racing offroads / enduros

So what do you need to go off-road racing?
Firstly you need to be a bit mad, this is hectic stuff, there are some real tough races on the calendar, and some pretty insane stuff, like the ewxc’s (EnduroX races). Now to go racing, you firstly you need to join a club of your choice that represents the type of races you want to do, examples are WPATV, CSMX or Enduro World. Joining a club costs from R150 to about R400.

Next up you need a racing license,
This you must get from MSA (Motorsport South Africa), now this is the long and boring bit, so I’m going to keep it as short as possible, basically there are 4 types of licenses, International, National, Regional, and Club. An average rider would consider either the regional, or club license. A regional license costs R650 and you get the option to take out MSA’s medical aid cover of R100 000 for R1440. And a club license costs R300 with the option to take out MSA’s medical cover of R60 000 for R280

You will have get a race number from MSA, this number you need to have on the number board at the front of the bike, and on the side panel either side of the bike. Depending on your type of license the colour of the number, and background, will vary.

Now we are ready to go racing! Next up you need to choose a race you'd like to do, it is divided mainly into two types of races, off-roads, which are more fast open terrain, and enduro’s which are a bit slower and more technical.

To enter a race you need to get the registration form, fill it out and fax, email, snail mail it to the correct persons, along with your entry fee for the race.
Some of the things you must have with you at the race, these are MSA requirements.
At least one litre of water, a first aid kit, all the proper riding gear, a environmental refuel mat for using in the pits, a fire extinguisher for those hot days, a toolkit for when things break.

That’s about all you need to go to get into a race, remember...it's about fun...

{Edited: Title - Thanks Etienne}
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: RobC on May 08, 2010, 10:01:19 am
Don't forget your license at home! :deal:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Tuareg on May 08, 2010, 10:11:49 am
Cool thread....
Enduro is something that has been enticing me for some time.....
Now just to follow the instructions & buy a bike      :mwink:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: JustBendIt on May 09, 2010, 06:32:19 am
You forgot one super important and critical item - A SENSE OF HUMOUR

This is my first year of enduro / offroad racing. I knew it would be physically tough but I reckoned I was up for the challenge - I though "how bad can it really be ? I've been riding bikes for 15 odd years, raced a Golf in GTi Challenge for 3 years and am reasonably fit and strong - I'm a quick learner so it won't be long before I am on the podium"

HA HA HA

I have done 4 proper races so far - in Race 1 (Caledon offroad) I broke my wrist and thought I was going to die fom heat exhaustion. I did 1 lap at Caledon in the time the winner did 8 laps. Race 2 (Bredasdorp) enduro was better - I rode for 3 1/2 hours, was lapped 3 times by winner, cracked some bones in left foot and only fell off 5 times (every hour). Race 3 (Wellington offroad) was flat out and fast - saw 117 km/hr on my speedo - felt like 300 km/hr down back straight at Killarney - was only lapped twice. Race 4 (Montague Enduro) was a killer - 5 hours to do 1 lap of 54 km - fell off every 5 min - my arms were 10 cm longer at the end - felt like being ratchet strapped to a jackhammer riding over those rocks - was lapped twice by Jade Gutzeit and co and he finished 2 hours ahead of me.

BUT

I have never had more fun on a bike than the last 4 months - ever! I have ridden my KDX in and out of shit that I didn't ever think I could ride a bike. I have learnt to ride more in the last 3 months than in the last 15 years. I have also lost 7 kg and am the fittest I have been in many many years - I look like a streetdog - all cock and ribs !

I have not spent a fortune (total cost so far inc bike gear license etc is R28 000) but have had an awesome time and look forward to many more

I highly recommend it to all of you - if you like riding bikes in the dirt and don't mind working up a sweat the get off your ass and get out there













Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: LoopSoosStroop on June 02, 2010, 08:53:55 am
Hi Guys, thanks for the info!

Question:

What if I get a regional licence, say in Gauteng, can I do offroads in the Western Cape or will I need a national licence?
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: RobC on June 02, 2010, 09:06:37 am
Hi Guys, thanks for the info!

Question:

What if I get a regional licence, say in Gauteng, can I do offroads in the Western Cape or will I need a national licence?
Contact Cindy at MSA, she can fill you in as I am not quite sure on the use of a regional licence outside a region.
For most Nationals one needs the relevant National license.
ormcycles@motorsportsa.co.za
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Snafu on June 02, 2010, 09:15:53 am
As i can remember, it is the event classification that determine the status.

meaning, you can actually compete with your regional license in WC, as long as it is a regional event.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: RobC on June 02, 2010, 09:17:45 am
As i can remember, it is the event classification that determine the status.

meaning, you can actually compete with your regional license in WC, as long as it is a regional event.
I think that is the case, but Cindy will be able to confirm. I am too lazy to send her a mail. ::)
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Dutchie on September 01, 2010, 12:44:29 pm
As i can remember, it is the event classification that determine the status.

meaning, you can actually compete with your regional license in WC, as long as it is a regional event.
I think that is the case, but Cindy will be able to confirm. I am too lazy to send her a mail. ::)

Yup. The type of license, eg regional does not restrict you from competing in other regions, but rather class. More detail:

The lowest class license is "Club". This does not mean that you can now only compete in events of your club, but rather that you can only enter the "Club Class" in events, in any region, and compete in that class. You can not enter the Regional or National Class with a club license.

Thereafter is the "Regional" license which is one class up. Yet again, it has nothing to do with which region you can compete in but rather that you can enter in the "Regional competition" class in any area/province/region. You can enter Club Class or regional Class with a Regional license, but not National class. You need to bear in mind that you may not compete in more than one class, in one region or competition format.

National class license should then be obvious. You need this license to compete in the National Competition.

Some more info on Enduro's:

For the Gautengers, these are the most popular formats to be considered and includes KZN races because 1) they are within reasonable travel distance but mostly 2) the riding terrain there is spectacular and organisation of events is top drawer.

Gauteng Harescramble Comp: Low level tech, faster pace, typical laps ~35km

Enduro World X-Country: A hybrid between full blown Enduro (WFO's) and the USA GNCC series. Above average degree of tech difficulty, but definitely rideable for the average weekend warrior. Fitness is a definite factor to consider, but you will still be able to complete a lap or 2 if you are not fit... you will know about it though. Laps are pretty short (12-20km) and you try and complete as many laps as you can within a set time limit. This format is quite spectator friendly and is growing rapidly... imho, by far the most popular Enduro format in Gauteng atm.

SCMSC harescramble series: More technical than the Gauteng harescramble series, but less technical than a WFO. Laps typically ~35km. Fitness is a factor, but an unfit weekend warrior should have no reason not to make a lap... you'll know that you did a lap though when you have that beer at the pits. Fantastic series this for the not so serious guy or someone looking to start with Enduro's.

KZN WFO Series: Full blown Enduro, above ave to high degree of tech difficulty, but mostly fitness is a massive factor. Laps are typically ~35km and it is technically 'in your face' almost all of the time. If you are unfit for one of these you may find yourself out there for the day on a single lap... that's if you get to make a lap at all. Club class goal is to complete 2 laps in the quickest time possible and regional class 3 laps. The top riders typically complete laps from 1h30 - 1h45 at ave speeds ~25kph. Mid pack riders ~2h00 - 2h30 per lap and as for the arse-end like me... well, these hurt big time and getting back to the pits before dark is the goal.

Off-road series: Very low to low degree of tech difficulty, long to very long laps, very fast pace. Did one, way too fast (wide open in plenty sections), come off here and you are in a world of pain.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: RobC on September 01, 2010, 12:56:16 pm
I am a spectator now... enjoying it much more. :thumleft:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Pumbaa on January 09, 2011, 10:21:38 pm
You forgot one super important and critical item - A SENSE OF HUMOUR

This is my first year of enduro / offroad racing. I knew it would be physically tough but I reckoned I was up for the challenge - I though "how bad can it really be ? I've been riding bikes for 15 odd years, raced a Golf in GTi Challenge for 3 years and am reasonably fit and strong - I'm a quick learner so it won't be long before I am on the podium"

HA HA HA

I have done 4 proper races so far - in Race 1 (Caledon offroad) I broke my wrist and thought I was going to die fom heat exhaustion. I did 1 lap at Caledon in the time the winner did 8 laps. Race 2 (Bredasdorp) enduro was better - I rode for 3 1/2 hours, was lapped 3 times by winner, cracked some bones in left foot and only fell off 5 times (every hour). Race 3 (Wellington offroad) was flat out and fast - saw 117 km/hr on my speedo - felt like 300 km/hr down back straight at Killarney - was only lapped twice. Race 4 (Montague Enduro) was a killer - 5 hours to do 1 lap of 54 km - fell off every 5 min - my arms were 10 cm longer at the end - felt like being ratchet strapped to a jackhammer riding over those rocks - was lapped twice by Jade Gutzeit and co and he finished 2 hours ahead of me.

BUT

I have never had more fun on a bike than the last 4 months - ever! I have ridden my KDX in and out of shit that I didn't ever think I could ride a bike. I have learnt to ride more in the last 3 months than in the last 15 years. I have also lost 7 kg and am the fittest I have been in many many years - I look like a streetdog - all cock and ribs !

I have not spent a fortune (total cost so far inc bike gear license etc is R28 000) but have had an awesome time and look forward to many more

I highly recommend it to all of you - if you like riding bikes in the dirt and don't mind working up a sweat the get off your ass and get out there


Very nice to hear your positive experience and that it's not costing a fortune yet!
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: GeelGrietII on September 15, 2011, 07:54:18 pm
Sound like something to do on a sunday.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: jpcussen on May 09, 2012, 01:07:11 pm
You forgot one super important and critical item - A SENSE OF HUMOUR

This is my first year of enduro / offroad racing. I knew it would be physically tough but I reckoned I was up for the challenge - I though "how bad can it really be ? I've been riding bikes for 15 odd years, raced a Golf in GTi Challenge for 3 years and am reasonably fit and strong - I'm a quick learner so it won't be long before I am on the podium"

HA HA HA

I have done 4 proper races so far - in Race 1 (Caledon offroad) I broke my wrist and thought I was going to die fom heat exhaustion. I did 1 lap at Caledon in the time the winner did 8 laps. Race 2 (Bredasdorp) enduro was better - I rode for 3 1/2 hours, was lapped 3 times by winner, cracked some bones in left foot and only fell off 5 times (every hour). Race 3 (Wellington offroad) was flat out and fast - saw 117 km/hr on my speedo - felt like 300 km/hr down back straight at Killarney - was only lapped twice. Race 4 (Montague Enduro) was a killer - 5 hours to do 1 lap of 54 km - fell off every 5 min - my arms were 10 cm longer at the end - felt like being ratchet strapped to a jackhammer riding over those rocks - was lapped twice by Jade Gutzeit and co and he finished 2 hours ahead of me.

BUT

I have never had more fun on a bike than the last 4 months - ever! I have ridden my KDX in and out of shit that I didn't ever think I could ride a bike. I have learnt to ride more in the last 3 months than in the last 15 years. I have also lost 7 kg and am the fittest I have been in many many years - I look like a streetdog - all cock and ribs !

I have not spent a fortune (total cost so far inc bike gear license etc is R28 000) but have had an awesome time and look forward to many more

I highly recommend it to all of you - if you like riding bikes in the dirt and don't mind working up a sweat the get off your ass and get out there >:D





BOOM - see you out there - my first one is Bonnievale 19th May - Bring it on... but now I am also a bit concerned after reading your post, but hey we will see!
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Fuzzy Muzzy on May 09, 2012, 09:20:21 pm
Will look into it for sure as soon as I am fitter, maybe next year if I am mad enough
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Freerad on May 09, 2012, 11:38:21 pm
You forgot one super important and critical item - A SENSE OF HUMOUR

This is my first year of enduro / offroad racing. I knew it would be physically tough but I reckoned I was up for the challenge - I though "how bad can it really be ? I've been riding bikes for 15 odd years, raced a Golf in GTi Challenge for 3 years and am reasonably fit and strong - I'm a quick learner so it won't be long before I am on the podium"

HA HA HA

I have done 4 proper races so far - in Race 1 (Caledon offroad) I broke my wrist and thought I was going to die fom heat exhaustion. I did 1 lap at Caledon in the time the winner did 8 laps. Race 2 (Bredasdorp) enduro was better - I rode for 3 1/2 hours, was lapped 3 times by winner, cracked some bones in left foot and only fell off 5 times (every hour). Race 3 (Wellington offroad) was flat out and fast - saw 117 km/hr on my speedo - felt like 300 km/hr down back straight at Killarney - was only lapped twice. Race 4 (Montague Enduro) was a killer - 5 hours to do 1 lap of 54 km - fell off every 5 min - my arms were 10 cm longer at the end - felt like being ratchet strapped to a jackhammer riding over those rocks - was lapped twice by Jade Gutzeit and co and he finished 2 hours ahead of me.

BUT

I have never had more fun on a bike than the last 4 months - ever! I have ridden my KDX in and out of shit that I didn't ever think I could ride a bike. I have learnt to ride more in the last 3 months than in the last 15 years. I have also lost 7 kg and am the fittest I have been in many many years - I look like a streetdog - all cock and ribs !

I have not spent a fortune (total cost so far inc bike gear license etc is R28 000) but have had an awesome time and look forward to many more

I highly recommend it to all of you - if you like riding bikes in the dirt and don't mind working up a sweat the get off your ass and get out there >:D





BOOM - see you out there - my first one is Bonnievale 19th May - Bring it on... but now I am also a bit concerned after reading your post, but hey we will see!
Enjoy James!,

You doing this on your little bike then?
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: jpcussen on May 10, 2012, 10:21:36 am
Yebo - on the 250, is that you Adrian??
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Wihan on May 28, 2012, 01:28:48 pm
Hi Guys, have been pondering on the subject (enduro's) for quite a while now..... Now I am ready to jump in, but would like to meet up with some like-minded folk for some pointers and advice.

I got my 14 year old laaitie a 125 pit bike this weekend to start riding and breaking bones....deal was, he sells his PS3 with all games and stay away from the couch....he didn't  hesitate for a moment.

Now I have to get myself a second hand bike to start off with, something cheap and easy to fix, but a reliable bike. This bike will be used to get my skill level up and practice crashing in style.

I have been looking at older KDX 200's 2002-2006(heard they are bullet-proof and good all round performers) Not too concerned about speed at the moment.

Some advice would be welcome and some rides I could join ,even better.

I live in George.

Cheers!
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Jannie46 on October 24, 2012, 12:42:21 pm
For those who want to race off-road, consider the GOC series. It is a series hosted in and around Gauteng. Challenging and tough! Visit then on www.racetorque.co.za
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Fuzzy Muzzy on November 23, 2012, 10:39:56 pm
A question for the racers, is a XR650R too big and heavy to race, i feel like it is like taking a tank to a knife fight with the 2t running around

What is a good bike to start on.. KDX?
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Bill the Bong on November 29, 2012, 08:37:26 pm
Could someone advise me on which series is do-able from the Northern Cape ito travelling distance. Gauteng is just to far with a bakkie for a week-end.  Is there something in North-west or the FS? Cape Town and Jhb are about 800 km from Upington
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: RobC on November 29, 2012, 09:31:04 pm
Could someone advise me on which series is do-able from the Northern Cape ito travelling distance. Gauteng is just to far with a bakkie for a week-end.  Is there something in North-west or the FS? Cape Town and Jhb are about 800 km from Upington
FS offroads have a FB group;
https://www.facebook.com/groups/fsracing/
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Bill the Bong on November 30, 2012, 06:41:20 am
Thanks Rob
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Spikey on January 02, 2013, 04:01:43 pm
Im 47 and started enduros last year. A group of us trained for the year to do the Roof of Africa. Great year. CRF 230 was a good cheap starter bike. First race ever was The Winterberg as a club rider. Came in 7th. At the Roof I was time barred after mech problems 2/3 through day one. This year Im trying a KTM 200 for another attempt at the 2013 roof. Thrilling sport! Costs for last year were R75K which included the CRF 230, Gear, liscences, entries, fuel, maintenance, repairs and accom. Training was about 6 hrs a week in the saddle plus running
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: WDT on June 06, 2013, 09:45:51 pm
Bil the bong

Ek ry die csa races, kimberley, douglas, hopetown ens.
Www.csa.inext.co.za of csa offroad op fb.

Pm my

Willem

Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: The Mighty SpongeBob on July 04, 2013, 05:06:13 pm
A question for the racers, is a XR650R too big and heavy to race, i feel like it is like taking a tank to a knife fight with the 2t running around

What is a good bike to start on.. KDX?

Totally depends on what you are trying to race? Kalahari 1000 in a straight line through the desert, or the Baja 1000, XR650 is king. Go to a Natal WFO and you will be dead within the first lap. SCMSC event needs a 200cc 2 stroke, The roof needs a 450 four stroke, etc etc .

It also depends a lot on you. I'm 6ft 3in and weigh 130kgs, I can hammer a heavy bike like the XR650 through Lesothto all day. But I die in think sand with anything that doesn't have enough power to get my weight on top of it. I tried a 125cc 2 stroke in Nambia once. Gave up after 1 day and rode quads for the rest of the week. But a 75kg 5ft 4in person would be in hospital trying to haul an XR650 over the rocks up Ongeluks nek.

Decide who you are, how you ride, where you want to ride, and by a bike accordingly
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Pom17 on July 08, 2013, 01:36:00 pm
Thanks Rob

Hi Bill

What did you decide on the racing?

And does anyone know which club Losper and his family belong to?
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: BiG DoM on July 09, 2013, 02:19:53 pm
Im 47 and started enduros last year. A group of us trained for the year to do the Roof of Africa. Great year. CRF 230 was a good cheap starter bike. First race ever was The Winterberg as a club rider. Came in 7th. At the Roof I was time barred after mech problems 2/3 through day one. This year Im trying a KTM 200 for another attempt at the 2013 roof. Thrilling sport! Costs for last year were R75K which included the CRF 230, Gear, liscences, entries, fuel, maintenance, repairs and accom. Training was about 6 hrs a week in the saddle plus running

Costs for 2013  ::)  New KTM200? ... + hospital after flipping it first day out  ??? + Physio? + Buying wife off  with overseas trip :biggrin:

Sorry just yanking your chain mate - I am pleased you are positive to do it again. Come ride Sat at J-Bay Funduro?
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Dwerg on July 09, 2013, 02:26:50 pm
But a 75kg 5ft 4in person would be in hospital trying to haul an XR650 over the rocks up Ongeluks nek.

Interested why you said that? I took my 800, loaded with stuffed ATG soft panniers, 50l roll bag, backpack and a bag of charcoal and some groceries up Ongeluks Nek without too much hassle
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Dwerg on July 09, 2013, 02:28:44 pm
To be fair, I did lose some of the goceries on the way up  :lol8:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: BlueBull2007 on July 09, 2013, 09:56:06 pm
But a 75kg 5ft 4in person would be in hospital trying to haul an XR650 over the rocks up Ongeluks nek.

Interested why you said that? I took my 800, loaded with stuffed ATG soft panniers, 50l roll bag, backpack and a bag of charcoal and some groceries up Ongeluks Nek without too much hassle

 :spitcoffee: Let me buy u a beer next time I'm in RSA.

I never heard of Ongeluks neck. Does anyone have any photos?
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: BiG DoM on July 09, 2013, 10:02:26 pm
One of the more adventurous routes in/out of Lesotho  :3some: ... has a border post that I cannot imagine sees much traffic but our tax keeps going ....
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: 3 Blind Monkeys on July 09, 2013, 10:51:11 pm
 Next off road event is next weekend in Robertson area if there is any dogs that want to come spectate or ride, it is a msa sanctioned event so you would need a license.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Dwerg on July 10, 2013, 06:23:56 am
But a 75kg 5ft 4in person would be in hospital trying to haul an XR650 over the rocks up Ongeluks nek.

Interested why you said that? I took my 800, loaded with stuffed ATG soft panniers, 50l roll bag, backpack and a bag of charcoal and some groceries up Ongeluks Nek without too much hassle

 :spitcoffee: Let me buy u a beer next time I'm in RSA.

I never heard of Ongeluks neck. Does anyone have any photos?

http://goo.gl/maps/8EBx5

Have a look from this post in our RR

http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=108068.msg2112036#msg2112036
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: BlueBull2007 on July 12, 2013, 04:15:18 am
Thanks Dwerg.


To know about costs of racing locally and type of bike & gear, here is another thread you may want to read:

http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=44160.0

 
2 stroke (2T) Versus 4 stroke (4T)  bikes - Which one to go for?
http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=125086.0


For 2T vs 4T for MX vs Enduro applications:

http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=46413.0








Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Offroad2 on July 12, 2013, 12:26:54 pm
This document might be of help - it is the required MSA self scrutnineering list for offroad & enduro which is explains what you need for racing.
For both Bikes & quads

SELF SCRUTINEERING FORM       
      
      
OFF ROAD MOTORCYCLE & QUAD SELF SCRUTINEERING CHECKLIST      
      
MOTORCYCLE   TICK   
NUMBERS      
SPONSORS DECALS      
BALL ENDED CLUTCH & BRAKE LEVERS      
KILL SWITCH      
SPOKES      
WHEEL BEARINGS      
TYRES & RIMS      
EXHAUST / SILENCER SECURE      
KICK START      
OPERATING BRAKES      
SELF CLOSING THROTTLE      
MUDGUARDS      
NO FUEL LEAKS      
FOLDING FOOTPEGS (not for quads)      
      
QUAD AS ABOVE BUT ALSO      
NERF BARS      
YELLOW LIGHT      
DEAD MAN KILL SWITCH      
      
      
SAFETY      
ONE LITRE DRINKING FLUID      
FIRST AID KIT      
SPACE BLANKET      
MEDICAL BOARD      
PENCIL & PAPER      
      
RIDING KIT      
HELMET      
GLOVES      
LONG SLEEVED JERSEY      
UPPER BODY ARMOUR      
MOTOCROSS TYPE PANTS      
MOTOCROSS TYPE BOOTS      
      
ENVIRONMENTAL & SAFETY   
FIRE EXTINGUISHER   2.5kg   
ENVIRONMENTAL MAT 500 x 500mm      
EXHAUST NOISE within permissible limits      
      
      
DECLARATION / UNDERTAKING OF COMPLIANCE IN ACCORDANCE WITH GCR 93 (iii)      
      
I  _______________________________________________       (Rider) hereby      
give the above detailed undertaking of compliance of my motorcycle/quad with all the       
technical specifications for Off Road Motorcycles & Quads, current at the time of entry,       
and in addition the safety & environmental requirements, including those that refer to       
protective and safety apparell for the rider      
      
DATE___________________________SIGNATURE________________________________      
      
THIS FORM MUST BE PRESENTED AT DOCUMENTATION      
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Andy660 on July 15, 2013, 07:22:21 pm
so Etiennne2T, The Alternative Route too good for now .?
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: DjfLoYd on August 15, 2013, 09:09:25 pm
As i can remember, it is the event classification that determine the status.

meaning, you can actually compete with your regional license in WC, as long as it is a regional event.
I think that is the case, but Cindy will be able to confirm. I am too lazy to send her a mail. ::)

Yup. The type of license, eg regional does not restrict you from competing in other regions, but rather class. More detail:

The lowest class license is "Club". This does not mean that you can now only compete in events of your club, but rather that you can only enter the "Club Class" in events, in any region, and compete in that class. You can not enter the Regional or National Class with a club license.

Thereafter is the "Regional" license which is one class up. Yet again, it has nothing to do with which region you can compete in but rather that you can enter in the "Regional competition" class in any area/province/region. You can enter Club Class or regional Class with a Regional license, but not National class. You need to bear in mind that you may not compete in more than one class, in one region or competition format.

National class license should then be obvious. You need this license to compete in the National Competition.

Some more info on Enduro's:

For the Gautengers, these are the most popular formats to be considered and includes KZN races because 1) they are within reasonable travel distance but mostly 2) the riding terrain there is spectacular and organisation of events is top drawer.

Gauteng Harescramble Comp: Low level tech, faster pace, typical laps ~35km

Enduro World X-Country: A hybrid between full blown Enduro (WFO's) and the USA GNCC series. Above average degree of tech difficulty, but definitely rideable for the average weekend warrior. Fitness is a definite factor to consider, but you will still be able to complete a lap or 2 if you are not fit... you will know about it though. Laps are pretty short (12-20km) and you try and complete as many laps as you can within a set time limit. This format is quite spectator friendly and is growing rapidly... imho, by far the most popular Enduro format in Gauteng atm.

SCMSC harescramble series: More technical than the Gauteng harescramble series, but less technical than a WFO. Laps typically ~35km. Fitness is a factor, but an unfit weekend warrior should have no reason not to make a lap... you'll know that you did a lap though when you have that beer at the pits. Fantastic series this for the not so serious guy or someone looking to start with Enduro's.

KZN WFO Series: Full blown Enduro, above ave to high degree of tech difficulty, but mostly fitness is a massive factor. Laps are typically ~35km and it is technically 'in your face' almost all of the time. If you are unfit for one of these you may find yourself out there for the day on a single lap... that's if you get to make a lap at all. Club class goal is to complete 2 laps in the quickest time possible and regional class 3 laps. The top riders typically complete laps from 1h30 - 1h45 at ave speeds ~25kph. Mid pack riders ~2h00 - 2h30 per lap and as for the arse-end like me... well, these hurt big time and getting back to the pits before dark is the goal.

Off-road series: Very low to low degree of tech difficulty, long to very long laps, very fast pace. Did one, way too fast (wide open in plenty sections), come off here and you are in a world of pain.

Thanks for that great breakdown, Dutchie.
Where can one find more info on each class?
Race dates, venues etc? Especially the KZN WFO and Enduro World XC and SCMSC classes. Found one or two website but
thought to get it from you just to make sure. Thanks.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: 3 Blind Monkeys on August 17, 2013, 09:56:24 pm
You can try motorsport.co.za
Title: Re: What you need to know to go racing:
Post by: Pleco on September 11, 2013, 12:40:09 pm
A question for the racers, is a XR650R too big and heavy to race, i feel like it is like taking a tank to a knife fight with the 2t running around

What is a good bike to start on.. KDX?

The offroad guys are always looking for Roving Marshals. Cost you nothing, and you chase the field around the loop to assist stragglers.

Took the KLR through the loop at Malmesbury. Took me 3 hrs to do 30kms. Helped a few guys along the way though, but still. I would opt for a 200 something or other. Nothing heavier than 100kgs. Anders gaan jy afkak!  :imaposer:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Ross Riddle on October 03, 2013, 02:34:28 pm
Hi there,
Thank you for all the posts, i have a question, hoping someone can help?
I would like to know where i need to search for up coming off road events? I always seem to see the flyers in the bike shop windows to late!
Is there somewhere you can search for rides? Wether its a fun ride or a sanctioned event?
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: BiG DoM on October 03, 2013, 07:50:44 pm
e-dirt is a pretty good place to start  :thumleft: Also Racecontrol has a calander.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Ross Riddle on October 03, 2013, 10:32:36 pm
Thanks
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: BlueBull2007 on October 04, 2013, 01:26:15 am
Thanks


Let us know how it goes here ou boet!! :thumleft:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Dutchie on January 11, 2014, 02:57:05 pm
Wow, this thread makes me nostalgic.

I haven't raced in a looong time. In fact, I have not ridden a bike in a touch over three years. Not totally out of pure kak-sleg'ness, in my defence  :biggrin: but circumstances have recently been changing for the better and I have been contemplating getting my aging ass out of this couch and get back into it.

I can see that there are reasonably often questions on here of how to approach the enduro/offroad racing scene. Once I get my 'arse in gear' I intend to offer as much advice as I can, but it is important to me that I qualify myself. I am no racer, never was, never will be and that is kind of the point. Even though I was never any good or never achieved any great success, I was able to enter and compete and have a fantastic time, just as much as someone who was really good at the sport.

I have had the priveledge though of getting tips and advice from some quality riders and the experience of trying my hand at quite a few different enduro class races.

So one message that I would genuinly like to bring accross is: If you've ever thought how cool it would be for you to try it out but thought (like almost all of do at least at some point); "nah, this is for professionals and people who are brilliantly good at this", then you are wrong. There are groups, clubs and races that cater for everyone... yes, even you in your 40's, 50's, whatever, it's not too late and you're not too noob!

As far as forums go, for plastic bikes racing I recommend www.e-dirt.co.za (http://www.e-dirt.co.za)

So ja, my plastic bike ('08 KTM 250XCW) needs a little bit of TLC (not sure exactly how much yet) after standing under a tarp in storage for over 3 years. As soon as I have her sorted out I intend to start from scratch... at 39 years old I realise full well that you don't try and hero any shortcuts anymore. I will be happy to pay-it-forward, as a great group of guys (Berserkers) once did for me, and offer advice to any who would like to get started too.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: BlueBull2007 on January 11, 2014, 05:31:14 pm
Dutchie, it sounds like you need to do the Amageza rally ;D
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Dutchie on January 12, 2014, 03:35:37 pm
Dutchie, it sounds like you need to do the Amageza rally ;D

I will have to educate myself on the topic... I don't know anything about it other than I think I skimmed over a thread recently in which Brett competed... staying over at some sports grounds, sitting in the pavilion while it was raining... something like that... and that it was a more of a rally type than an enduro?

I'll read up.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: BlueBull2007 on January 19, 2014, 12:57:06 am
Dutchie, it sounds like you need to do the Amageza rally ;D

I will have to educate myself on the topic... I don't know anything about it other than I think I skimmed over a thread recently in which Brett competed... staying over at some sports grounds, sitting in the pavilion while it was raining... something like that... and that it was a more of a rally type than an enduro?

I'll read up.

Yes, its our own home-grown Dakar. Long days of riding with long specials stages each day as well. Check out the Amageza 2014 thread near the top of the racing section of wilddogs.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Wihan on January 20, 2014, 04:16:05 pm
Dutchie
At 39yrs you're still young boet, I am 40 and race enduros with much older guys -into their mid 50's- and they still kick my arse.
Get your bike ready and start racing, at our age we don't have to be so competitive any more, can just get out there and have a jol. :ricky:
Carl Rohrbeck (age 52) rode with me and Jacques this past holiday, he made us look like complete amateurs...... :-[

So age in this sport is just a number.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Crossed-up on September 03, 2014, 07:45:15 pm
There's all sorts of stuff you have to know about going racing. So I finally decided it's time to do my homework, but www.motorsport.co.za (http://www.motorsport.co.za) is down.  Does anybody know anything about this?  I hope this is just a passing glitch.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Buff on September 03, 2014, 08:57:06 pm
Just a glitch, I received a mail today that they're in the process of upgrading. Try again later in the week  :thumleft:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: BigMikeKTM on September 11, 2014, 09:24:43 am
Just a glitch, I received a mail today that they're in the process of upgrading. Try again later in the week  :thumleft:

what racing do you want to do bud ? the EWXC's is a great enduro series as are the Lowveld Enduro's, for something less techincal, the GOC's are a great place to start as well. you can look at the moto101 forum for all your dirtbiking and racing questions. would probably be quicker to find out what you need to know.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Adolf Botes on November 05, 2014, 09:32:25 am
For National Off-road and Enduro racing you'll find all the information you need on www.dirtracing.co.za (http://www.dirtracing.co.za). Currently under the tab 2015 Racing you'll get the Launch Presentation as well as the Off-road and Enduro dates with the SSR's (Rules and REgulations) pertaining to each.

You can also follow us on twitter : @DirtRacingSA as well as Facebook : Dirt Racing and also the Group : Off-road & Enduro SA and Instagram : dirtracingsa

Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Dutchie on November 05, 2014, 02:15:27 pm
The 2015 WFO races are not up on WFO's site yet www.wforacing.co.za/ (http://www.wforacing.co.za/) Does anyone have access to this info? I'm more specifically keen to know if Champaigne Valley is on the roster and if so, what date.

Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Morokai on October 09, 2015, 12:28:20 pm
Also interested in this, thanx for all the info.

I reckon I will start with some of the FUNDURO'S. Can someone please clarify for me if you still need a club membership,racing license, number, bike ready for scrutineering etc.
I presume the answer is NO, but would like to know for certain.

Can you just pitch up the morning, enter and have fun?
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Buff on October 09, 2015, 01:35:34 pm
Yep, for the "funduro's" like the one happening this weekend in Piketberg you just pitch and ride, nothing else required besides a helmet, boots and enough fuel
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: BiG DoM on October 09, 2015, 03:48:12 pm
And to sign an indemnity form for when you faarkyourselfup  ::)
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: StuartC on October 09, 2015, 04:12:02 pm
Also interested in this, thanx for all the info.

I reckon I will start with some of the FUNDURO'S. Can someone please clarify for me if you still need a club membership,racing license, number, bike ready for scrutineering etc.
I presume the answer is NO, but would like to know for certain.

Can you just pitch up the morning, enter and have fun?
It all depends on what race and where, there are three "types" of races, MSA races, WOEMZA races, and non sanctioned races, as a beginner I would go for the non sanctioned races, depending on where you are located as to what races are in an area close to you !
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Morokai on October 09, 2015, 04:14:22 pm
Nice one. Pitch up, sign away and ride....seems like an easy way to start
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: StuartC on October 09, 2015, 04:16:55 pm
Nice one. Pitch up, sign away and ride....seems like an easy way to start
Going with the other two bodies races it ends up costing you so much that it leaves a bitter taste at the end of the day, also remember why you are doing it,, FUN,, when you get to national levels it's no longer fun
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Morokai on October 10, 2015, 08:07:42 am
Nice one. Pitch up, sign away and ride....seems like an easy way to start
Going with the other two bodies races it ends up costing you so much that it leaves a bitter taste at the end of the day, also remember why you are doing it,, FUN,, when you get to national levels it's no longer fun

Ya this makes alot of sense. For now it will just be for fun, probably just going to.stay like that aswell
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: SwampDonkey on December 08, 2016, 07:05:02 am
Will be riding my first ever enduro in Feb next year at the start to the KZN WFO series. I can't wait to ride,but at the same time am sh!tting myself at the prospect. I have only been into more technical type riding for most of the year. And have only just bought a bike to race on a few short weeks ago. Kinda feels like I am about to bite off more than I can chew. But I have always wanted to give racing a go,so it's time to do it while I am still able to. Any sage advice from you guys who are used to this kind of thing? ??

Sent from my SM-A510F using Tapatalk

Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Pom17 on December 08, 2016, 11:21:53 am
Start at the back and take your time. Dont race it, ride it at pace. And don’t get caught up in the rage of the start line. You will wear yourself out before lap one is done.

Use lap one to get an idea of what you are in for, get into rhythm and focus on flow and conserving energy rather than balls to the wall pace. Race smart and you will be surprised at how many people you start passing later on in the race. After lap one you can gauge the pace you can handle to finish the 3 hour race, or 2 hours if riding social or silver.

No matter how fit you are I can guarantee that towards the end of the race you will be more than exhausted, probably more than anything you have ever done. So I say again, race smart and conserve energy. Not trying to scare you, this tip will really help in you first race. My first race I went into complete survival mode and it was not even halfway through the race. All because I did not know how to pace myself.



At one of our regional enduros this year it was pouring down which made the track and some climbs very technical. I came across a guy who was really not looking good. Much like me at that moment. So thought he was busy with his 4th or 5th lap, like me. Till he asked me how far till the end. Turned out him and a bunch of others were still busy with lap one and had about 60% of the track left to do. There are no escape routes and truly felt sorry for him. He had a long day in the saddle and could see it was no longer fun for him
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: SwampDonkey on December 08, 2016, 10:33:19 pm
Thanks for the advice Pom :thumleft: :thumleft: Its kind of where my mindset is at the moment. :deal:  I know I am in for a bit shock when it comes to it.

My goal this year will be to do a minimum of 1 lap per race. anything over and above that I will consider a bonus. I have only been riding proper "off road" fairly recently and I have been making a point of pushing my limits when I ride to try an up my skill levels. I know I have a very long way to go, and to finish a lap at least will probably be realistic when I take my current riding ability and fitness levels into account. And being a complete novice to the whole idea in the first place, I know I will have to nurse myself along at a rather sedate pace to get to the finish.( except for my approach to a hill climb... Gotta up my pace a little as I inverably run out of momentum before the top!!)  And to save my bike from any big offs. I want to the season through withough wrecking my bike to badly!! :lol8:

All I know is that I have wanted to give this racing malarky a go for many, many years and have never been organized enough to buy a bike and head off to the races, but I am now absolutely determined to have a proper go of it. :ricky:

First WFO is on the 11th of Feb out in Pomeroy somewhere.... I ride my 650R out that way now and then... gonna be a good start I rekon, and hotter than hell no doubt.!! :ricky:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Pom17 on December 09, 2016, 08:56:06 am
Thanks for the advice Pom :thumleft: :thumleft: Its kind of where my mindset is at the moment. :deal:  I know I am in for a bit shock when it comes to it.

My goal this year will be to do a minimum of 1 lap per race. anything over and above that I will consider a bonus. I have only been riding proper "off road" fairly recently and I have been making a point of pushing my limits when I ride to try an up my skill levels. I know I have a very long way to go, and to finish a lap at least will probably be realistic when I take my current riding ability and fitness levels into account. And being a complete novice to the whole idea in the first place, I know I will have to nurse myself along at a rather sedate pace to get to the finish.( except for my approach to a hill climb... Gotta up my pace a little as I inverably run out of momentum before the top!!)  And to save my bike from any big offs. I want to the season through withough wrecking my bike to badly!! :lol8:

All I know is that I have wanted to give this racing malarky a go for many, many years and have never been organized enough to buy a bike and head off to the races, but I am now absolutely determined to have a proper go of it. :ricky:

First WFO is on the 11th of Feb out in Pomeroy somewhere.... I ride my 650R out that way now and then... gonna be a good start I rekon, and hotter than hell no doubt.!! :ricky:

You will absolutely love it. The energy at the races gives my butterflies, even while sitting behind a computer just thinking about it. It is addictive, my wife does not care much about bikes but she loves the races even if she has to sit in the pits and dust all day. Remains an awesome experience.

Also try and ride with guys who's skill levels are above yours. That remains the quickest way to learn. You will see your riding ability improve weekend after weekend by heaps and bounds.

Good luck and hopefully we will see a race report  :thumleft:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: GS Jane on August 22, 2017, 01:29:00 pm
Hello everyone,

I've recently started racing in the GXCC series.  I have no idea where to start with training to improve fitness, endurance, etc.   I've done some MTB a while back, but never really been to a gym.  What training or exercises do you do or can you suggest?  Should I see a biokeneticist?

Thanks  :thumleft:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: BiG DoM on August 22, 2017, 11:48:10 pm
Hello everyone,

I've recently started racing in the GXCC series.  I have no idea where to start with training to improve fitness, endurance, etc.   I've done some MTB a while back, but never really been to a gym.  What training or exercises do you do or can you suggest?  Should I see a biokeneticist?

Thanks  :thumleft:

Get in touch with Mandy at Base Fit - works with many enduro riders including my son Josh. Understands and tailors programs specially.  :thumleft:
http://www.basefit.co.za
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on February 18, 2018, 05:32:36 am
So I'm following this with great interest and the rally bit appeals a great deal to me. My first will be on 24 February Vaaldam enduro on my stock KTM 500 barring an acro exhaust fitted.

Looking at the Kalahari rally, or any other one for that matter, what do you need to get the bike ready?
Long range
Nav tower
Do you fit cush drive? longer swingarm.

One can go ape shit on this but let's say what are the basics without breaking the bank and having something reliable to complete a rally other than a fit, suitably skilled rider.

http://www.rebelxsports.com/ktm-exc-450-rally/
I think is going overboard and as bitching as it looks at 100k will not see me at a rally for a long time to come.

I'm doing my suspension this coming week. I've asked around stalking names found on pictures of motorcycles but have not had much success figuring out alternatives, I guess that means there are none and that I'd have dig deep into the wallet. Money isn't so much the issue here as striking a balance between testing the waters before going into it full blown. Saw a rally tower on FB the other day for 4k but was too late. Bigger tank ebay but those rear ones are hard to find.

Tinus
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: GraZer on February 18, 2018, 06:25:43 am
All you would need to compete in a rally is a bike that has the required autonomy and nav gear. Each rally will typically have some additional mandatory gear that you will also need to get.
As you have already highlighted, the list of things you can do to your bike is almost infinite, but far from necessary.

Multiday rallies are an awesome experience and if you are considering doing one. Do it! It will be one of the best experiences of your life.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on February 18, 2018, 06:51:00 am
All you would need to compete in a rally is a bike that has the required autonomy and nav gear. Each rally will typically have some additional mandatory gear that you will also need to get.
As you have already highlighted, the list of things you can do to your bike is almost infinite, but far from necessary.

Multiday rallies are an awesome experience and if you are considering doing one. Do it! It will be one of the best experiences of your life.

So single bigger tank front, rear if you can to allow for some weight distribution, nav equipment and a good attitude.
I plan on getting mousse front and back and tyres better suited for speed, still got the stock knobbies on and they don't like speed at all.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Kobus Myburgh on February 18, 2018, 07:12:42 am
All you would need to compete in a rally is a bike that has the required autonomy and nav gear. Each rally will typically have some additional mandatory gear that you will also need to get.
As you have already highlighted, the list of things you can do to your bike is almost infinite, but far from necessary.

Multiday rallies are an awesome experience and if you are considering doing one. Do it! It will be one of the best experiences of your life.

So single bigger tank front, rear if you can to allow for some weight distribution, nav equipment and a good attitude.
I plan on getting mousse front and back and tyres better suited for speed, still got the stock knobbies on and they don't like speed at all.

Watch the Kalahari Rally website.  Garth will be communicating the requirements in due course to ensure scrutineering is made easier. 

Don't discard doing a rally light prior to going full Monty. 
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on February 18, 2018, 07:31:21 am
All you would need to compete in a rally is a bike that has the required autonomy and nav gear. Each rally will typically have some additional mandatory gear that you will also need to get.
As you have already highlighted, the list of things you can do to your bike is almost infinite, but far from necessary.

Multiday rallies are an awesome experience and if you are considering doing one. Do it! It will be one of the best experiences of your life.

So single bigger tank front, rear if you can to allow for some weight distribution, nav equipment and a good attitude.
I plan on getting mousse front and back and tyres better suited for speed, still got the stock knobbies on and they don't like speed at all.

Watch the Kalahari Rally website.  Garth will be communicating the requirements in due course to ensure scrutineering is made easier. 

Don't discard doing a rally light prior to going full Monty.

Saw this which looks like it might work. Not sure whether 15l of fuel will be enough to get to a refuel stop (assuming there will be one)
https://www.rallymotoshop.com/collections/rally-kits/products/2017-ktm-450-500-rally-kit

Rear tank looks odd and cost a lot of money, perhaps a 20l tank but then don't know whether fairing will fit.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Cracker on February 18, 2018, 12:19:22 pm
So I'm following this with great interest and the rally bit appeals a great deal to me. My first will be on 24 February Vaaldam enduro on my stock KTM 500 barring an acro exhaust fitted.

Looking at the Kalahari rally, or any other one for that matter, what do you need to get the bike ready?
Long range
Nav tower
Do you fit cush drive? longer swingarm.

One can go ape shit on this but let's say what are the basics without breaking the bank and having something reliable to complete a rally other than a fit, suitably skilled rider.

http://www.rebelxsports.com/ktm-exc-450-rally/
I think is going overboard and as bitching as it looks at 100k will not see me at a rally for a long time to come.

I'm doing my suspension this coming week. I've asked around stalking names found on pictures of motorcycles but have not had much success figuring out alternatives, I guess that means there are none and that I'd have dig deep into the wallet. Money isn't so much the issue here as striking a balance between testing the waters before going into it full blown. Saw a rally tower on FB the other day for 4k but was too late. Bigger tank ebay but those rear ones are hard to find.

Tinus

Tinus, if the race on the 24th is your first and you've only got the 500, I'd suggest you get a couple under your belt before kitting your bike for a Rally. You could also enter the GXCC races. These races especially, will gear you up for a 3-hour +, in your face, high-speed, special.

Enduros are great, but you'll kill a Rally bike trying to do those.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on February 18, 2018, 01:03:57 pm
So I'm following this with great interest and the rally bit appeals a great deal to me. My first will be on 24 February Vaaldam enduro on my stock KTM 500 barring an acro exhaust fitted.

Looking at the Kalahari rally, or any other one for that matter, what do you need to get the bike ready?
Long range
Nav tower
Do you fit cush drive? longer swingarm.

One can go ape shit on this but let's say what are the basics without breaking the bank and having something reliable to complete a rally other than a fit, suitably skilled rider.

http://www.rebelxsports.com/ktm-exc-450-rally/
I think is going overboard and as bitching as it looks at 100k will not see me at a rally for a long time to come.

I'm doing my suspension this coming week. I've asked around stalking names found on pictures of motorcycles but have not had much success figuring out alternatives, I guess that means there are none and that I'd have dig deep into the wallet. Money isn't so much the issue here as striking a balance between testing the waters before going into it full blown. Saw a rally tower on FB the other day for 4k but was too late. Bigger tank ebay but those rear ones are hard to find.

Tinus

Tinus, if the race on the 24th is your first and you've only got the 500, I'd suggest you get a couple under your belt before kitting your bike for a Rally. You could also enter the GXCC races. These races especially, will gear you up for a 3-hour +, in your face, high-speed, special.

Enduros are great, but you'll kill a Rally bike trying to do those.

Thanks
So what is suited for rally bike
Amageza
Kalahari rally
Tankwa
Bots is it 500/1000

The rest then for non-modified plastics 250-450/500 range? The last GXCC was out from a timing perspective however, when I saw they also host it as Heidelberg, and knowing what Heidelberg is like saw it as more"hard enduro" banner as opposed to enduro/offroad banner.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Dwerg on February 18, 2018, 01:35:18 pm
GXCC is offroad and not held at Heidelberg. Cracker is right do local day races first. Rally is seriously expensive. Just entry ticket was nearing 30k for amageza and you can easily spend another 30 on top of that. Amageza is no more unfortunately
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on February 18, 2018, 03:58:40 pm
GXCC is offroad and not held at Heidelberg. Cracker is right do local day races first. Rally is seriously expensive. Just entry ticket was nearing 30k for amageza and you can easily spend another 30 on top of that. Amageza is no more unfortunately

Thanks guys. Got my C's and X's mixed up, was thinking of EWXC.

Ok I'll go look for a local race (10 March Fochville) as a start and work my way up to a rally in about a year or so. In your expert opinion would you say that is what one should aspire (if in ones interest of course)  and "reasonable comfort" on a local race may be good indication to take on bigger things or what is the typical sport path followed. I get that I may like, or don't like GXCC at all, in the former case one can be happy there, on the other want to take it further or decide it ain't for me and go buy a Harley (said I never)
Title: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Kobus Myburgh on February 18, 2018, 04:12:44 pm
This is from an interview with Ned Suesse and Scott Bright.

For something like rallies accessible to us (ex Amageza) and likely the Kalahari rally, play it down quite a bit, but a lot of it is similar.

(Note that I only have experience with the Baja, the advice you're getting is from guys that did the full Amageza)

What it takes to race the Dakar Rally
The brutal challenges of the Dakar Rally begin long before the starting line.
The infamous Dakar Rally is the Holy Grail of motorcycling events. It attracts enthusiasts and professionals from all over the world to try their skills — and luck — in a race of navigation,
riding ability and endurance. With an entry fee over $20,000 and many qualifying rounds to endure, the challenges of the Dakar Rally commence long before the Starting Line.

Non-Factory racers spend months (even years) fundraising and hustling to obtain the money, gear, gadgets, and teammates to even justify an airline ticket to South America. And Rally competitors Ned Suesse and Scott Bright are no different. Considered “grassroots” riders, they’ve been independently entering themselves into races since their twenties. And now, reaching the ages when people question your abilities and motives, they’ve each developed an impressive track record.

Ned Suesse Sardegna Rally
Ned Suesse, the only American to finish the 2012 Dakar Rally.
Ned, born and raised in upstate New York, moved to Colorado for college and began riding motorcycles for the first time shortly after graduating. The Colorado back country was the perfect training ground to hone his skills as a dirt rider and his love for the trails eventually developed into a desire to race. Soon, he entered the racing world and set his sights on an incredible challenge: the Dakar Rally.

Despite the late start, Ned’s competitive racing career (though he doesn’t consider this a job) has taken him from Mexico to Tunisia, Italy and all over the Americas. By the time he finally reached the Dakar Rally at age 35, Ned was ready for the challenge and crossed the Finish Line 53rd out of the 188 participants (only 97 actually completed the rally). To top it off, he was the only American in 2012 to go all the way!

Scott Bright American Dakar Rally competitor
Scott Bright will be racing for Rally PanAm in the 2016 Dakar Rally. The only U.S. moto team competing.
This is where Scott Bright makes his entry. While supporting Ned’s participation in the 2012 Dakar, he developed a taste for the technical details of Rally Racing. Already an experienced Enduro competitor, having raced the International Six Days Enduro four times as a part of the official USA team, he switched to Rally Racing late in his racing career.

With a new found racing passion, he entered the 2014 Baja Rally — still a virgin to the sport at 44 years old — and made an outstanding impression by taking the overall win! He plans to defend his Baja Rally title this September in one last race before departing for Argentina in January where he’ll finally achieve his dream of racing in the Dakar.

We caught up with Ned and Scott while they were competing in the Sardegna Rally in Italy this past June and got a chance to ask them a few questions about what it takes to achieve the dream of competing — and finishing — the Dakar Rally. While Ned has raced Dakar once before, Scott has just been through all the preparation for his first Dakar Rally and is now only a few months away from achieving his goal. As privateers chasing the dream, they both have a unique perspective to share with the Dakar hopefuls out there, or anyone that’s ever wondered “Could I race Dakar someday?”

THE ALLURE OF DAKAR

Why are people willing to sacrifice nearly everything to race Dakar?

Scott Bright: I think the allure of Dakar hinges on the fact that it is the longest race on the planet, whether counted by days or by miles. To be able to say that you have reached the Finish Line of an event of that caliber cannot be topped.

Can you put the race length and distances traveled in perspective?

Scott Bright: Secondhand, the event is at least 5,000 miles long. Spread over two and a half weeks, that is a lot of miles everyday. Anchorage, Alaska to Miami, Florida is 4,950 miles.

What’s the most rewarding part about racing? Finishing?

Scott Bright: The most rewarding part of racing for me is the amount of time I spend testing my limits. Riding on that razor edge between being in control and losing control is exhilarating! Not many other ways can you get a feeling like that. At the end of the day, I am worn out – mostly from the adrenaline surges all day!

Sardegna FIM Rally
There’s nothing quite like the feeling of ripping through the countryside, going from village to village, during a long rally race stage.
GETTING THERE

What are the biggest obstacles to achieving “the Dream?”

Scott Bright: The biggest obstacles are the financial ones. There are such a large volume of details to pay for, and they add up. Entry fee for the rider, entry fees for the support crew, support vehicle, travel to get to and from South America, shipping of truck, bike, travel expenses during the race, bike, spare parts, motors, tires, mousses, all of these things add up quickly.

Ned Suesse: I think the biggest obstacle is mental. It will always make more sense to stop than to continue, at many points throughout the leadup and during the actual race. There are checks to write that simply cannot be reconciled to the likely outcome of not finishing. There is training to be done that goes beyond simple discomfort. And during the race, especially if you see someone get badly injured, it is impossible to defend the decision to continue logically. But that’s
the game — pushing through all kinds adversity to find out what you are capable of.

What riding skill-level is required to have a chance at finishing Dakar?

Ned Suesse: There’s a sliding scale of skill-level, desired competitive result, fitness, and chance of finishing. Some of the best riders, who are the most fit, often don’t finish because they push so hard competitively. Some fairly mediocre riders, who are very fit, work very very hard to finish at the back of the pack, and even that takes some luck. And in the middle are some people who are very skilled riders, but don’t have high (or maybe, unrealistic) competitive goals, who are able to finish through perseverance and dedication.

What are the minimum equipment requirements for a long navigation rally?

Ned Suesse: Obviously, rallies like Dakar take in some fairly extreme terrain, so the bike you choose to ride has to be technically capable of traversing those sorts of obstacles. FIM rallies (and Dakar) are limited to 450cc displacement, which most manufacturers make in some form or another. The key is choosing one, and setting it up so that it will survive the many hours and miles of punishment it will see. In addition, you must have 250kms of fuel aboard (which doesn’t sound so bad until you realize how poor fuel economy can be in the dunes), and the capability to navigate.
 

Approximately how much does it cost total to race the Dakar as a privateer?

Scott Bright: There are several different paths to the Finish Line. Some guys go with the bare minimum, and proceed with a whole lot of hope and no guarantees. I believe that the rider needs to secure some sort of peace of mind that the big things are covered, but also not going overboard on comforts that are not necessary. To achieve this minimal level of security it takes $50,000. To build in comforts and conveniences – more like $100,000 and up. Things like the size of your team effort, support vehicle, comfort when sleeping, spare parts for absolutely anything that could go wrong, and other things can really drive the price up.

Bringing the basics to Dakar
Racing Dakar as a Privateer with a minimal level of security that the basics are covered, costs at least $50,000.
Ned, what portion of your Dakar costs were covered by sponsors?

Ned Suesse: Dakar is really expensive, by any measure (dollars, hours, gallons of sweat, etc). It’s not just the two weeks of racing, it is the year leading up to it with all the days in the saddle not earning money, and so on. I found several keys that helped me. First, I lived as cheap as I could and put together the most inexpensive program for the race that I felt I could trust. Second, the motorcycle industry is full of really passionate people, and Dakar brings that passion even closer to the surface than it already is. So, for motorcycle related parts, gear, clothing, and so on, the industry really stepped forward to help.

But many of the costs of Dakar have nothing to do with motorcycles: travel, shipping, entry fee, and so on. These costs are significant, and this is where individuals stepped forward to help, incredibly generously. I reached out to everyone I knew, explained what I was doing, and asked for help. Companies like Klim, Motonation, and Layer Cake wine all stepped forward to support those who helped me, and I think the realization that I did not view Dakar as a vacation or holiday made people want to be a part of the adventure and challenge.

Scott, has fundraising proven to be more difficult than you expected so far?

Scott Bright: I knew it would be tough to raise enough to get to Dakar. One of the first lessons I learned from Ned was that you need to carry the attitude that you are going no matter what! If you would like to race Dakar and better yet have a shot at finishing, you will never make it if you approach the whole project with a passive attitude. Decide that you are going to go, take the bull by the horns and get it done! Your enthusiasm will generate 80% of the support that you will need to do it. That being said, I’m still working to reach my fundraising goal for Dakar 2016. If anyone is interested in giving their support, they can find out how by going to www.ScottBrightDakar.com.

What are some ways you can do Dakar the cheapest way possible?

Scott Bright: I have heard of some extremely cheap ways, but I wouldn’t recommend them. Anything from just showing up and demanding to race without paying an entry fee, entering but not having a flight to get from Europe to South America, to raiding trash cans along the way for spare parts to keep running, and well… I don’t want to go there!

If you have the money, what’s the easiest way to race the Dakar?

Scott Bright: There are a handful of companies out there that will supply everything for you and take care of all the details — all you have to do is show up. Rally Management Services out of Northern California is one of those companies, and they do a great job!

How much preparation is required if starting as a “recreational level” rider?

Scott Bright: I think one has to be conscious of the little things that will take a rider out of the event. Something as simple as developing soreness on your butt will cause you to want to quit. Taking care of that ahead of time will increase your chances of finishing. On a competitive and realistic level, you have to show up at the start line each day ready to go. If you just rolled in an hour before your start, you will not be physically able to finish. Getting good rest is imperative. If you need eight hours of sleep and you are only getting six, you will make mistakes that will take you out of the game. It really takes a long-term perspective of priorities to get to the finish of Dakar.

Seating comfort dakar rally
Something as simple as seating discomfort can take you out of a 13-day race like the Dakar Rally. Take care of it ahead of time to increase your chances of finishing.
What racing would you recommend starting with before attempting the Dakar?

Scott Bright: I think most people hesitate at the entry-level cost of getting into Rally. Honestly, it’s not that much. For $500 you can get a roadbook holder and an odometer that will work. Then for $200 you can pick up a five-gallon tank for your bike. That is really it with the exception of committing to at least a four-day event that will test your ability to finish. Rally Management Services offers several Bootcamp weekends in Nevada and California, and Dave Peckham will teach you everything you need to get to the Finish Line in one day. How serious you take it from there determines your ability to go far.

Once you have done a school, then I would recommend any of the Rallies that are held in Baja. Take a week off, load up your camper, your bike and go try it! If you cannot survive the three-day Cortez Rally, or the four-day Baja Rally, or even the five-day Mexican 1000, then you probably aren’t going to finish Dakar. Each of those events are relatively close to the US, and they all have their own characteristics providing a good indication of whether you should start down the Dakar road or not.

DIFFICULTIES OF THE RACE

Rank by importance: speed, navigating, mechanical, fitness, determination.

Scott Bright: Determination is probably the most important thing to have to get you through a Rally. It is easy to become frustrated, but necessary to keep your head on your shoulders and get to the Finish Line. Making mistakes while navigating can easily double the time you are on the course. Sharpening your navigational skills is key to finishing. It really helps to have a base knowledge of motorcycle mechanics before starting out, as well. If something goes wrong, you will need to work your way through the problem and one way or another get to the Finish Line.

I guess I am in some sort of shape! Round is a shape, right? Fitness is key and watching how you fuel your body is critical. You wouldn’t dump bad gas in your bike, why would you do that to yourself? I was at one of Dave Peckham’s Rally schools last year and a super-fast desert racer showed up to ride with us, but had no ‘nav’ experience at all. We were warned about his exceptional speed, and Dave remarked “I’m sure you will be going very fast — but probably not in the right direction!” I always remind myself to make good choices because of that quote.

Dakar Rally equipment roadbook holder odometer
Exceptional speed is nothing if you are going the wrong direction. Sharpening your navigational skills is key to finishing.
What personality trait would you say is most common among Dakar finishers?

Scott Bright: If you completed personality tests on all the Dakar finishers, you would probably find that every one of them is stubborn. Tim McGraw sings a song called “Can’t Tell Me Nothin”. I think the guy he is singing about is a Dakar Finisher.

What is the percentage of those who try that actually finish the Dakar?

Scott Bright: I believe the finish rate is somewhere around 50%. I believe the organizers want to keep the event difficult, and if they have too many people finishing, it must not be hard enough. They will ratchet up the difficulty until they get the DNF (did not finish) rate that they are looking for.

What’s the most common reason people don’t finish?

Scott Bright: I believe the most common reason for failure is overlooking the details. Make lists, check them five times, think about all the ‘what-if’s,’ prepare for the worst, and prepare to FINISH!

If you’d known how hard it would be beforehand, would you still have tried?

Scott Bright: I have a predisposition to be a bit masochistic. When I hear horror stories, it makes me want to go out and experience that. I have a deep desire to struggle and persevere. Not sure why, but that is my chemical make-up.

Ned Suesse: Yes. Its difficulty is the whole point of the exercise. If it were easier, I would not have tried.

prepare for success in the dakar rally details
Pay attention to the details, prepare for the worst, and prepare to FINISH!
How has the pursuit of racing Dakar affected your personal lives?

Ned Suesse: I think that when we face challenges that terrify us, it will always change us for the better by proving to ourselves that most risks are in our minds more than they are in reality. For me, Dakar was a turning point in my life, when I realized that I was more capable than I had ever given myself credit for. I think there is no easy path to self-belief; the only way is by trying things that are hard.

Scott Bright: Racing has consumed most of my free time over the past 25 years. Who knows what I would be good at doing if I didn’t race? The competition has challenged me to be a better person: more diverse and focused, less emotional about little stuff, and dedicated to seeing things through. I keep things in balance realizing that I would never sacrifice my marriage and my family in exchange for a thrill. Knowing that my wife married me because of who I was when I was racing, and she understands that if I were to change and be a different (non-racing) person, I would probably not be the person she was attracted to 21 years ago!

Who has helped you the most to achieve your goal of racing the Dakar?

Scott Bright: It always helps to be able to lean on someone who has done it before. I have lots of friends who have competed in Dakar, but I have gained most of my knowledge and expectations from Ned. I try to talk with him as often as possible to make sure I am on the right track. Dave Peckham has been a huge support with achieving my goal of racing Dakar. Without either of them, I would not be doing this!

What kind of support team do you need, and how important are they?

Scott Bright: It’s always fun to have people that believe in what you are doing, but that doesn’t always pay the bills. People that will sit down and write a check, or take days off work, or customize products, or ‘all of the above’ are who I consider my support team. There would be no option of Dakar if it were not for people like that.

What are some good resources to help Dakar hopefuls get started on the path?

Scott Bright: Look through the results from the past 20 years. See who has competed, whether they finished or not. Look them up and ask a ton of questions. Read Lawrence Hacking’s book. Go to a rally school.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 18, 2018, 07:12:40 pm
Tinus - Some good posts here to get you started :thumleft:

Nothing quite like flying along through some remote section of desert all by yourself. :ricky:

Doing an offroad or two will help tonnes. I learnt very quickly I was no riding God, but my skills got better in time. Had I not done this I would not have enjoyed or finished my first rally.

Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on February 18, 2018, 08:12:32 pm
Doing an offroad or two will help tonnes. Had I not done this I would not have enjoyed or finished my first rally.

Thanks, small races it is then, least for the time being.

As for Kalahari, I'll give that a skip this year focusing on the small stuff and learning through this experience. It does look pretty epic though but realistically the bike won't be ready, I can pay reg costs but there's a lot that must go into the bike.

Sort of going into the unknown (place I'm most happy at) but guess through the sound advice received here to try the small races and build up, racing for a full day sure ain't where my performance is at now and I'll learn to "read" conditions et cetera, one thing is certain it won't be anything like riding Heidelberg but I'm sure one must need that type of technical riding ability at some point. Think it was Joey or may have been somebody else that said to ride rally you have to have a mix of skills and not only one (like climbing rocks) and good at them, think it was said in the context of Dakar. Nowhere near that, I'd like to complete a local multi day rally in the next 2 years or so. Yes I do have dreams beyond that but it is like telling people you've stopped smoking or lost xxx weight, not into that stuff, prefer doing it.

Time to network in due course.

Thanks for the help guys.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on February 18, 2018, 08:29:27 pm
Which brings me to another question. When not racing, and living in GP, where do you train.

Riding farm roads (district roads) imo can be dangerous especially if you don't know them and "racing" here will not go down well with farmers (assumption) unless arranged previously.

Not looking for tracks, if you say hit backroads from here to there I can figure it out myself but so far most if not all the guys I know either want to go to a park, don't have money or prefer gravel highways or should training consist of a few laps at De Wildt where there is sand. Heidelberg closest to me does not have that.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: IanTheTooth on February 18, 2018, 09:21:46 pm
Tinus, you will be surprised how difficult it is to get up and get dressed for the second day of a 2 day event. I'm quite sure that a one day will drain all of your adrenalin to start with. Go for a multi-day event when you feel that one day is under your belt and you still have the strength and fortitude for more. You are riding just about the best bike man has ever made in the history of the universe. Let it do it's work and you do yours. When you feel it is holding you back and not the other way round THEN start tinkering!

PS: should have said. Fitness and stamina are key. Start training now! Running, cycling, weights.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: GraZer on February 18, 2018, 09:35:52 pm
I plan on getting mousse front and back and tyres better suited for speed, still got the stock knobbies on and they don't like speed at all.

If you are going with mousses, be aware that not all mousses are equal and rally mousses are a specific kind of mousse and not the same as what is used for off roads and enduros.
Michelin Bib mousse M02 - rear and M16 - front are what is used by the majority of riders on the Dakar and will provide you with the peace of mind you would expect on a rally with long distances and high speeds.

If you are looking to find a decent kit that has been tested and used in actual rallies, give Niklaus Lutzeler a call. He is now based in Gauteng and produces kits specifically for bikes like your 500.
https://www.facebook.com/niklaus.lutzeler
https://nldesigncc.wordpress.com/

Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Cracker on February 18, 2018, 10:22:12 pm
Which brings me to another question. When not racing, and living in GP, where do you train.

Riding farm roads (district roads) imo can be dangerous especially if you don't know them and "racing" here will not go down well with farmers (assumption) unless arranged previously.

Not looking for tracks, if you say hit backroads from here to there I can figure it out myself but so far most if not all the guys I know either want to go to a park, don't have money or prefer gravel highways or should training consist of a few laps at De Wildt where there is sand. Heidelberg closest to me does not have that.

My 2c ................... don't race on district roads ............never mind the farmer's, it's just not safe. For you or anyone else. Period. ....................proper races are way faster AND way safer ......... you'll see.

Do the vaal enduro next weekend, come look me up if you like, I'll be there. It won't be a real opfok enduro (I hope), they just call them that to get riders in, sounds pro and all. It's an ad-hoc race so is more fun than GXCC bar-bashing, go for broke shit. no license needed, which is lekker.

The big thing is to just ride, anywhere, anytime. There's a few of these races around GP , just difficult getting info on them.

De Wildt is cool but if you can do laps there ............... sjoe!! ..... hats off to you ................. my advice is old news.  :biggrin: :biggrin:

And skip parks .................... no adventure in that ........ not even close to Rally ........

Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on February 19, 2018, 05:35:55 am
If you are looking to find a decent kit that has been tested and used in actual rallies, give Niklaus Lutzeler a call. He is now based in Gauteng and produces kits specifically for bikes like your 500.
https://www.facebook.com/niklaus.lutzeler
https://nldesigncc.wordpress.com/

Thank you, most helpful

The big thing is to just ride, anywhere, anytime.

Thanks, on De Wildt...get your point.

Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Cracker on February 26, 2018, 06:04:04 pm
Well, the Vaal Enduro is done and dusted.

Was a very lekker race. But, it was no enduro .................................. less tech than a GXCC. Flat-out was the order of the day, really a lot closer to Rally riding. So 120km was failry easy but still worked up a bit of a sweat. Just didn't feel like I was gonna have a heart attack for a change, which was nice ..............  :thumleft: :thumleft:

What did I learn? No matter how 'easy' you think a mud patch is, don't hit it full taps. I couldn't see a bloody thing for the last 5km and had to remove my goggles ..... my eyes are still burning today.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 27, 2018, 06:06:04 am
:imaposer: Great stuff Cracker. :thumleft:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on February 27, 2018, 08:59:02 am
Cracker I've been meaning to call you but we'll meet up some other time.

https://youtu.be/okvRTVEnEGk

I enjoyed it, would have liked a few extra laps. Placed 32nd our of 137 rides and only 70 completed 3 laps. Learned a lot about lines, riding in dust and so on. I need to sharpen sand and cornering in it, I sucked at that big time.
Had my suspension done few days before and it was too hard but a lot better than what it used to be.

Hit a few lurkers under the cut crass that flung the rear up a little but I'm hooked on this stuff. May miss next GXCC but will try to be there.

Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Cracker on February 27, 2018, 06:12:48 pm
Nice vid ......... that Kawasaki at 0.19, at the start, was me  :biggrin:

I see you had a lekker high speed off .... glad you got back up ........... going off line was a hair-raising experience in that race.

I coulda sworn those farmers are growing lurkers on purpose.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: BlueBull2007 on February 27, 2018, 07:42:36 pm
Cracker I've been meaning to call you but we'll meet up some other time.

https://youtu.be/okvRTVEnEGk

I enjoyed it, would have liked a few extra laps. Placed 32nd our of 137 rides and only 70 completed 3 laps. Learned a lot about lines, riding in dust and so on. I need to sharpen sand and cornering in it, I sucked at that big time.
Had my suspension done few days before and it was too hard but a lot better than what it used to be.

Hit a few lurkers under the cut crass that flung the rear up a little but I'm hooked on this stuff. May miss next GXCC but will try to be there.

Bloody lekker video. We want more :thumleft:
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on February 28, 2018, 05:28:05 am
We want more :thumleft:

I'll put together a few bits and try to have it done before the weekend else early next week.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Kobus Myburgh on February 28, 2018, 06:00:21 am
We want more :thumleft:

I'll put together a few bits and try to have it done before the weekend else early next week.

Awesome Tinus.  Very well done on your first race and spoiling us with a bit of footage.

Dit lyk my die gogga het gebyt! 
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: IanTheTooth on February 28, 2018, 01:25:41 pm
Anyone like to come and do the Natal WFO with me at New Hanover on Saturday 17th March? Enter here:

http://www.wforacing.co.za/regstration/
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on March 02, 2018, 08:42:47 am
Anyone like to come and do the Natal WFO with me at New Hanover on Saturday 17th March? Enter here:

http://www.wforacing.co.za/regstration/

Youngest daughter birthday. Have fun Ian.

Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: Dwerg on March 02, 2018, 08:57:11 am
Lekker pics! Daai race lyk vinnig  :o
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on March 02, 2018, 09:06:35 am
Lekker pics! Daai race lyk vinnig  :o

Dit was lekker vinnig. My gat brand om te gaan ry maar die naweek moet ek Durbs toe en week na volgende Ierland toe vir werk...eish. Maar daarna gaan ek 500 seer maak.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on March 02, 2018, 09:53:12 am
Bloody lekker video. We want more :thumleft:



Quick and dirty editing but gives a better idea of the track.
Title: Re: What you need to know to go Offroad/Enduro racing:
Post by: TinusBez on March 07, 2018, 08:11:18 pm
give Niklaus a call.

Best advice received. Thanks once more.

Now...how do you tell your wife you want to drop a load of money? No more preaching I am the converted.

:lol8: