Wild Dog Adventure Riding

Riding: Plan, Report and Racing => Ride Reports => Topic started by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 12:23:22 am

Title: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 12:23:22 am
Jan du Toit instigates trips on motorcycles every so often, and the “common denominator” of all these expeditions is that places where adventure bikes have not been seen before, are visited along the way.  This time, Angola was the selected playground and Cuito Cuanavale, a town made famous by the final stages of the former SADF and FAPLA’s military scraps in the late 1980’s, was one of the places on the itinerary.  And just for good measure and to make the trip worth while, returning along the coast through the “Doodsakker” was also part of the idea.  All of these were only ideas, because we all know that in Africa it is common practice to not know the condition of the roads, where there is fuel, where one could sleep over, how the locals would receive you – to name only a few.  The team selection was a very complicated process which I do not understand at all, but it came together in the end, or should I say the beginning?  I am not sure if it was by chance or by strategy, those who know Jan will have an idea….
The process kicked off at the end of February when this letter from Jan arrived on my e-mail:
“Welkom op die Angolese uitdaging
Die antwoord op die meeste van jou vrae se antwoorde is dieselfde : “EK WEET NIE!” En as ek geweet het was dit nie ‘n uitdaging nie maar ‘n toer.
Ons gaan min of meer aan die oostekant van Angola op en kom min of meer aan die westekant af. Ons weet nie hoe ver ons gaan ry nie, ons weet nie waar oral brandstof gaan wees nie, ons weet nie waar kos of water beskikbaar is nie en ons weet nie waar ons saans gaan slaap nie.
Hierdie heeltemaal niksweet oefening is ongelukkig nie verniet nie en ‘n Rxxxx deposito word verlang. Dit is eintlik net om jouself te verbind sodat die reëlings wat eintlik nie gemaak kan word nie, gemaak word.
Daar is net 8 fietse wat mag saamgaan. Dit beteken jy is een van die min uitverkorenes op wie die dice geval het.
Elkeen moet selfversorgend wees en dit wat nie op jou fiets pas nie, gaan nie saam nie. Daar gaan ‘n bakkie saam (Bakkes en Kalie) maar dis net om in geval van ‘n flenters fiets die ding uit te ry.
Dit beloof om ‘n moerse avontuur te wees – moet dit nie misloop nie.
Die vertrekdatum is 16 Junie 2010 vanaf ongeveer Popavalle in die Caprivi en die terugkeerdatum is ongeveer einde Junie by Ruacana.
Meer detail (waarvan daar min is) sal later gegee word. Die datums is belangrik en die Rxxxx is belangrik – dis al.”


I was very fortunate to be able to make the necessary arrangements with my family and my brother who is also my partner and my trip was on.  The paperwork is a bit of a mission: Visas, police clearances, Yellow fever jabs, money and all that stuff had to be arranged through a process that unfolded at Africa’s rate.  My perception that detailed arrangements were going to follow the original letter died a slow death.  When June arrived and I knew little more than in February, I had to agree with Jan.  “If we knew all those things, it would be a tour.  This is an expedition….  It confused me slightly at the time, but now I know….  The backup strategy also confused me.  The “us and them” confused me.  I was out of my comfort zone, I had to pass control on to people I did not know.  OK, I said, so this is the trip – let’s see….

So, I had all my paperwork.  I had all the medication I needed.  I had all the spares and tools I thought might be needed.  I had my bike ready.  All my luggage fitted into two Kaoko soft bags.  Tent, sleeping bag, mattress, pillow, eating utensils in the one bag and clothes, etc in the other.  And an ammo crate for tools and spares.  A 10l Addis fuel can which I could strap on the back of the bike and my Camelbak for my own back completed my list. I was ready to attach all the above except the tools crate to my bike.  I was ready.

What follows is a daily count of the trip as it unfolded in my eyes, brain and heart.  It is not intended as a group report and some might have different views, which I accept.  Some contribution from them here will only enrich the report – please do.  Blame me for the misrepresentations, but this is how I lived the expedition.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: EtienneXplore on July 10, 2010, 12:33:12 am
 :happy1:

I have been waiting for this report....

 :drif: :drif:

Cannot wait for the rest!!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 12:35:06 am
Day 1 to 3
Bloemfontein to Rundu
Distance: about 2000 km
I left Bloemfontein early in the morning and arrived at Gert’s house, our meeting point in Pretoria at about 9.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0008.jpg)

Fred van Niekerk from Yamaha SA had the courage to offer a 1200 Super Tenere to Jan for the trip.  Jan agreed.  I have still not worked out who made the wrong decision, but that is not important any more….  The bike was at Gert’s house and we still had to go to Fred’s office to fetch a box with stuff he thought we might need along the way.  The box contained a set of crash bars and some oil- and air filters.  Gert left me and the Yamaha at his house whilst he went to do some business in town.  I spent some time figuring out how to take the Yamaha apart to replace the air filter and fitted the crash bars.  I did all of this using the tool kit Gert put together for the trip. Good experience…. Knowing the tool kit and the Yamaha would be useful later….

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0003.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0009.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0013.jpg)

In the mean time, Gert had some stress.  His and Francois’s visas were declined by the Angolan authorities, and they were trying to figure out why.  Their trip was in the balance.  They were unable to make adequate progress in the day, and the sun set with their visas still not issued.  Jan and Theo also arrived in the afternoon.  We went around to Off Road Cycles to sort out some tyres.  Theo fitted some new rubber to his 950 SE, and the Yamaha received a set of Metzeler Karoo’s.  By sunset, all was set.  Except for the two visas.  The plan changed, and we delayed out departure to the next morning.  Gert and Francois were staying behind and would be on the Angolan Consulate’s case first thing in the morning.  Jan, Theo and myself left at 3:00 in my bakkie with trailer.  If Gert and Francois were in luck within the next two days, they would leave in another vehicle and catch up.  It is costing us an extra bakkie to Rundu, but that’s how it works.  Day one, and the plan is already somewhat non-existent….  
We crossed the border into Botswana at 6:00, simple process.  Passports stamped, road tax paid and off we went.  A long day’s driving later we found a place to sleep at Sepopa swamp lodge.  Theo did not feel well, in fact he was quite sick.  Jan and I put together all our medical knowledge, but our treatment had little effect.  Theo was not rising to the occasion.  :-\

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0021.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0022.jpg)

The road in and out of the lodge had some water crossing....

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0029.jpg)

Next morning, early start and we crossed into Namibia, also with no serious issues.  Rundu was not too far away and we arrived in the afternoon.  Our logistics team, Kalie, a Cape wine and fruit farmer and Johan Bakkes, a university professor and famous author were already there.  So was Martin and his 950 SE, from Windhoek.
Frik and Wayne arrived a few hours later, they had some adventure along the way too.  Frik managed to convince his friend Wayne with a few lies, which he later apologized for, to join the trip so that we could use his Landcruiser bakkie.  They hit a big bird in Botswana and the windscreen was shattered.  It was quite a funny sight when they arrived with Frik in all his biking gear behind the wheel.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0035.jpg)

Martin has some connections in Rundu and a new windscreen was fitted before we went for Dinner at Kaisosi lodge.  So, it is 3 days into the journey.  We are only missing the two visa-less guys.  We have two Landcruiser pickup’s, both 4.5 EFI’s.  At least we knew we had something that will do sand without issues…..  The bikes: Jan on the Yamaha, Theo, Martin and Frik on KTM 950 SE’s with 30l tanks and me on the KTM 990 Adventure S.  Kalie and Johan were loaded with our food and fuel and Wayne carried all the luggage, some boxes of Portuguese Bibles and water.  Not too shabby for a non-existing logistics team I thought to myself…. The result of this was that we had no load on the bikes, except for the basic stuff in our Camelbaks, and we could manage a puncture or two and some small issues.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Dustdevil on July 10, 2010, 12:41:09 am
Ek's die eene ore!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 12:44:57 am
Day 4: Rundu to Camp on the Okavango on the Angola side
Distance: 273 km

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Camp4.jpg)

We set off from Rundu after breakfast and fuel.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0040.jpg)

Switching off the Yamaha's ABS.

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0043.jpg)

Johan Bakkes on his preferred mode of transport.  ;D

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0037.jpg)

  Refuled at Nkurenkuru.  The border formalities at the Katitiwe border post on the Namibian side were simple, but time consuming.  One official had to write down all our details.  Passport no, ID no, VIN no, Engine no, Make, Model.  Angola side, also simple, but equally time consuming.  We needed copies of passports, visas, letter of invitation to Angola, drivers licence, police clearance on the vehicles and vehicle registration documents.  Frik and Martin explained our mission and arranged all the paperwork whilst we were waiting outside.  Some hours later we each had a vehicle permit and a stamped passport.  We also changed money at the border.  1 US$ = 100 Kwanza. Used the time outside to brush up on my rusted Portuguese and gave away some Bibles in the process.  The bikes draw large crowds.  Once cleared to go, we headed for the Calai ferry over the Okavango river.  Crossed the river on the ferry without incident, and hit the road towards Calai.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0047.jpg)

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0057.jpg)

This road started off not too bad, and things were good.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0061.jpg)

That changed quickly and we were greeted by a sandy twin track detour, with signs in the trees telling us that there are landmines around.  We were now in Angola proper…..  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0062.jpg)

The bike riding was great.  No luggage and we were able to give our best.  We negotiated the terrain at decent speed and really enjoyed the riding immensely.  The varying conditions kept us very awake.  And there are some serious snakes….  Some of them are still dizzy from having to make fast U-turns….  And some riders showed how to change gears and brake with the same foot whilst the other leg was kicking in the sky with a terrified serpent wound around it….

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0064.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0065.jpg)

We found a good camping site next to the river, and made a camp fire for the first time.  The crocodiles’ exit was visible a few hundred metres down stream, and we had a nice picket fence along the river, courtesy of the locals.  Kalie and Johan put together a good meal which did not touch sides before it hit the right spot.  Only now I realized how much we enjoyed the bikes today!  Some energy replenishment was in order….. A little bit of wisdom was shared around the fire, and we went to sleep.  The one thing I did not expect in Angola was cold weather.  This is supposed to be tropical, isn’t it?  The mercury dropped to -6 degrees Celcius!  I slept in all my riding kit, and everything else I brought along.  So much for travelling light….

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0074.jpg)
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 12:53:50 am
Day 5: Okavango Camp to Calai vicinity
Distance: 132 km

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Camp5.jpg)

The -6 degrees mentioned was still on the thermometer Frik has on his bike.  Those who took their socks off were now iced up (the socks…) and had to be thawed over the fire to get them usable again! 

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0075.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0078.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0080.jpg)

We set off and thoroughly enjoyed the ride once again.  The Yamaha was by far the heaviest and lowest bike.  Jan rode it really well and it impressed in the sand.  The suspension is very good for a bike this size.  It is not only about the terrain, but the rate at which the terrain was negotiated certainly caused all the bikes to really work. 

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0085.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0092.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0096.jpg)

Theo was still not 100% (must be something with the medical treatment in Botswana), and he took a big crash in the sand.  His SE came to a halt upside down.  They righted it again, and it only ran for a few seconds and refused to go any further.  They loaded it after cranking the starter until it ended with a flat battery, and we re-grouped at Calai.  Calai is a little town just across the river from Rundu.  The police stopped us here and wanted to see all our documents.  In the mean time, we stripped Theo’s bike and diagnosed the fuel pump as the culprit.  Opened the pump, did some magic with the contacts and relays, jump started it and it was as good as new. 

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0102.jpg)

We now headed for the Cuito river, with the blessing of the police.  They warned that the road was very sandy.  They were right.  The sandy track is one thing, but there are trees and cut stumps very close to the road and they grab handle bars, bash plates, etc and the riding was getting really challenging.  The Yamaha and Jan misunderstood each other at one of these catchers, and the bike went down to the left.  Picked it up, and off we went again.  What we did not know, is that the fan on the side pushed into the radiator and got stuck.  The temperature went up, and Jan stopped to see why.  By now the fan motor was burnt out and we now had a challenge on our hands. 

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0105.jpg)

We made contact with Fred, and he in turn made arrangements to have a new fan couriered to Rundu overnight.  And we had some good news from Gert and Francois, they now had visas and were on their way!  All of this took some time and we decided to set up camp right there in the road.  One Cruiser each side of the camp area secured the spot in the road, we could not move too far off the track due to the landmine threat which the Calai policemen reiterated.  After some more deliberation, we decided to load the Yamaha and turn back towards Katitwe and meet Gert and Francois in the vicinity of the ferry.  At the same time, they could pick up the fan in Rundu and bring it along.  This way, we fix all our current issues. 

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0107.jpg)

The only difference was that we would now approach Cuito Cuanavale from the Menongue side.  Theo was also quite happy that Jan could now ride his bike, which gave him some additional recovery time.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0116.jpg)

The campfire wisdom was great.  Jan and Martin received some lessons in steak braaing, and Theo and I had the opportunity to make a large pot of proper Vrystaat pap which would last us for 3 days.  Slept well!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 12:59:32 am
Day 6: Calai road camp to Menongue road camp
Distance: 207 km

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Camp6.jpg)

The plan was made and we headed back to Calai.  We were a little disappointed about having to miss the Cuito river ride.  But given the situation, it was the right call. The police were not too surprised to see us again and they wished us well for the rest of the journey.  With Jan on the SE, I had to work a little harder to keep up – we noticed a little change in his personality whilst riding Theo’s bike…. Just an observation….

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0120.jpg)

We made good progress.  Jan and I were riding side-by-side in the two tracks and another big snake came on its morning cruise.  The snake managed to get its head and most of its body on the “middelmannetjie” at speed and it was quite a relief to see him standing up in the rear view mirror….   We came around a corner some km’s later, and there was a guy lying in the road.  Some proper emergency braking saved him, and I was convinced that he was dead when I first saw him.  A few light kicks later we figured that he just had a long night, and we helped him off the track into the shade, preventing some more bike and Landcruiser tracks over his head.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0123.jpg)

We made good progress until we reached the ferry again.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0125.jpg)

The operator had bad news.  One of the two big diesel engines on the ferry would not start and therefore the ferry could not be used.  We were stuck on the wrong side of the river!  The good news was that they have called a mechanic and he is expected within 2 or 3 days.  We had a look and determined that the problem was a loose battery terminal and the big machine fired up straight away once fixed.  The operator was very happy and we crossed first at a preferential rate.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0131.jpg)

Our timing was perfect.  Gert and Francois had just crossed the border into Angola on their HP2’s and we found a good camp site a few km’s North of the ferry crossing.  The Yamaha fan arrived with them and we fitted it in the evening.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0143.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0153.jpg)

For the first time the whole group of 7 bikes and 2 Landcruisers were together and the atmosphere in camp was festive.  The fire burned high and we were looking forward to the next day’s ride.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 01:11:42 am
Day 7: Menongue Road camp to Cuito Cuanavale road camp
Distance: 415 km

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Camp7.jpg)

The gravel road towards Menongue is quite bad.  It used to be a tar road, and there are lots of detours where the Chinese are busy restoring it to it’s former tar glory.  The tyres took some hammering here.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0155.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0049.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0167.jpg)

The loose rocks make for interesting riding, but we gave our best and had good fun.  We crossed the Cubango (Okavango) river again, and found some tar.
  
(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0157.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0159.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0161.jpg)

Gert’s HP2 wanted to shed it’s exhaust pipe, and it needed some bolts.  Filled up fuel, and tested the Yamaha’s handling a bit as well.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0172.jpg)

Saw some pieces of war machinery along the road and it now started feeling like Angola.  

Found this little church and dropped a Bible.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0176.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0179.jpg)

The last section to Menongue was good tar, and I started feeling that my 990 is suffering a bit from fuel starvation during the top-end runs we did on the good tar surface.  Fuel filters were on the cards.  I hoped that it would last the trip, but I brought a set so I was not too phased.  Lower speeds were OK.  Arrived on the outskirts of Menongue and whilst waiting under a tree for everyone to catch up, a policeman arrived on a Chinese bike.  There are lots of Chinese bikes around here.  Seems like the preferred family transport.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0180.jpg)

 The policeman asked us to follow him, and he took us through the traffic to the police station.  We had to explain our mission again.  The police kindly agreed to escort us to the new fuel station, which they did with great enthusiasm and using all the equipment at their disposal.  At the fuel station we found a queue of Chinese bikes stretching way down the road.  I thought we were in for a long wait, but the police rescued us once again.  They cleared the way and pulled our vehicles to the front and ensured that we were served straight away.  We also bought some juice and supplies from the shop and headed out of town towards Cuito Cuanavale.

Took these photos at the garage, the police normally do not want to be in pictures.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0188.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0186.jpg)

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0195.jpg)

The police asked where to next, and “Lodge” was the word that seemed to stick.  We were taken to a new lodge just outside Menongue and sent Bakkes in to enquire about camping.  They wanted to sell us chalets at US$ 150 pppn, and we declined.  We only filled our water cans there. The police waved us goodbye and went home to go read their Bibles.  One of them asked us to write our names in the front of his Bible, quite special.  We headed for Cuito Cuanavale and agreed to look for a place to camp as soon as the population density declined to near zero.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0204.jpg)

The road surface soon declines and becomes a badly potholed mixture of pieces of tar and gravel.  The holes are sometimes bigger than the pieces of tar before and after them, and they are filled with a powdery sand / dust mixture that perfectly hide the sharp tar edges where they end.  This makes for a hard life for any front rim.  The confident riding dictated by the sand is on contrast with the care needed on those sharp edges and we have to give it some proper brain work together with a good body work-out.  We find a good spot and pulled in for another special camping night.  This one was a highlight for me.  There are lots of old cartridges, pieces of shrapnel and old condensed milk tins and stuff.  It does not feel like 20 years ago.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0207.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0208.jpg)

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0214.jpg)

It is hard to believe that we are between Menongue and Cuito Cuanavale.  For those who floated around here back then, you know the feeling.  I got that same feeling.  Theo did too.  Wow….
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 01:25:58 am
Day 8: Cuito Cuanavale
Distance: 332 km

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Camp8.jpg)

Today is a big day.  One of the prime objectives of this expedition is to cross the Cuito river on the bridge.  This bridge was a crucial spot during the war.  The one the former SADF forces could never destroy, despite all the attempts.  It is where all the FAPLA and Cuban forces crossed on the way towards Mavinga / Jamba.  I wanted to drive over it.  We had in the back of our minds the trip with Col Jan Breytenbach which was televised recently, and they were not allowed to see the bridge.  We negotiated the road with the care it dictated and the speed that the excitement brought. 

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0293.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0298.jpg)

We take a group photo on one of the tanks at the Longa river.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMG_1881.jpg)

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0237.jpg)

Some more friendly locals with Chinese bikes - check the taxi.

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 My fuel filter decided that it now had enough, and I decided to change it there and then.  Took the tank off my bike and by the time the Landcruiser with the crate arrived, I was ready.  We were back on the road fairly quickly with the help of the two HP2 riders and Wayne.

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Caught up with the rest where they were waiting just outside of town.  This place seems to only have police and soldiers around and we were quickly asked to report at the police station. 

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Again we had to explain our mission.  Tourists.  We spent some time at the police station.  The hunger for Bibles here was incredible.  Full on physical fights break out.  For Bibles!  We ask the chief if it would be possible to see the bridge.  He thinks about it.  Eventually he agrees to send 2 policemen with us.  One on the back of my bike and one on the Yam with Jan.  I feel like jumping up and down.  We ride over the bridge. Wow!!!!!  We spend some time, take pictures, look at the bridge construction, walk over backwards and forwards and look again. 

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Hard to believe we are here.  Eventually we are taken back to reality when someone mentions that we still have some miles for the day.  We head back to drop the policemen.  At the station, we are told that we have to follow another policeman.  We do so, and stop in front of an old house with bullet holes still visible in the front.  We are told that two of us had to come in.  Jan and I go in and Frik arrives in the room a few minutes later.  The room has no ceiling and the plaster is falling off the walls. The doors have no locks.  In front of the wall opposite the door, there is a mean looking lady sitting behind an old table with a little Angolan flag and a dirty writing pad on it.  To the left and right there are tables with official looking guys behind them.  You have to look through lots of poverty before you see the “officialness”.   And you have to look through the officialness to see the heart.  We are asked to sit down in front of the lady.  The police chief is standing next to her desk.  We are introduced and work out that she is the Governor of Cuito Cuanavale.  We are asked about our mission again.  We are asked if we were soldiers in the SADF.  Some of us have to lie.  She gives the police chief a thousand words for allowing us to see the bridge.  He tries to explain, but she is not interested.  I start to think that our stay is going to be a little longer than anticipated.  She orders one of the officials to take photos of us.  He pulls out a cell phone and takes a photo of each of us.  I take a Bible out of my backpack and put it on the desk.  We ask if she wants it.  She tells the police chief to tell us that she will take it only if it is handed over officially.  I stand up and she does the same, take the Bible, shake her hand and hand it to her.  She orders the official with the phone to take another one.  We ask for a picture too, she refuses.  We are wished well and leave the room.  What an experience.  We are refused access to the monument the Cubans built for the 20 year celebration of FAPLA’s victory over the SADF.  No pictures, no looking, just go – is the order of the police chief.  We see the monument a few hundred metres away – looks quite impressive, would have liked to look a little closer.  Maybe next time….. I ride out of Cuito Cuanavale on the clouds.
On the way back to Menongue, I stop to take some pictures of some equipment destroyed during the war.  There are not many left, but still enough to form an idea of the destruction.  Soon it will all be gone.

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The day ends in the dark in Menongue.  Martin knows a Namibian contractor and we camp in his construction yard in Menongue.  Menongue is where the MIG’s used to take off from during the war, and here we are sleeping a few km’s from the runway.  Who would have thought….. We have a shower for the first time in Angola.  It feels good.  The Landcruisers arrive somewhat later and Johan Bakkes gives us a speech that ends all the day’s positive excitement in a flash.  We agree to not disrespect and leave our support behind again and have a quiet night burning some locally made charcoal and eating Bully beef souped up with some tomato and onions prepared by me and Theo.  It was our day after all.  Thank you boys!

Just as a quick reflection on the war part.  It is interesting that both sides now claim victory and build monuments to celebrate this victory.  There are various initiatives where the governments of Cuba, Angola, Namibia and South Africa are working together at re-writing the history books 20 years after the event.  And the “old” books by Col Jan Breytenbach, Fred Bridgland, Peter Stiff and Helmut Heitmann still sell.  It is probably not unique to this war.  What it shows us, is that war cannot bring finality and conclusion to issues.  It leaves more problems behind that what it solves.  The same goes for our daily interaction with people around us…..  What is more difficult?  To teach an old dog new tricks, or to teach a new dog old tricks?
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 01:36:41 am
Day 9: Menongue to Dongo road
Distance: 250 km

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We do some early maintenance on the bikes.  The HP2’s both ate their number plates and the tail pieces rattled loose.  There is also the odd bolt loose on the SE’s.  Interesting to note that the loose bolts are mainly on the modified parts like the large tanks.  The Yamaha’s spokes need some work and most of the bikes have some front rim dents.  Nothing serious, except for the Yamaha which is developing flat tyres due to the bent rim not sealing properly around the tyre bead.  We get moving, heading for Lubango.  The first leg of our journey is now complete.  The second mission is to ride the “doodsakker” and the next days is the negotiation stage to get there.  The road between Menongue and Dongo via Cubango is probably some of the best riding I have ever done.  The terrain varies a lot and you have to be wide awake all the time.  The bike is very happy and it is a great learning experience and privilege for me to ride next to Jan and see how he handles the big Yamaha.  I have to dig deep to keep up, and I am grateful for being on the KTM.  The biggest challenge is to dodge the big trucks that come from the front when the sand is at it’s deepest and the road sides are near vertical.  But we get away with it and have a great time.  

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We cross the Cuchi river and the contrast is quite amazing.  The old bridge was destroyed in the war, a little temporary bridge is permanently in use, and the Chinese have built a brand new railway bridge as part of the rebuilding of the entire railway between Namibe and Menongue.  Huge investments are going into infrastructure here and the Chinese are all over.  

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One construction camp we passed has hundreds of trucks and thousands of containers standing around.  The Chinese are going big here.  You can even see the Chinese style in the architecture at the new stations, they clearly have no respect for the Portuguese.
Along the new railway, we are moving along a brisk pace when suddenly a big hole appears and the Yamaha has a bad landing.  Things come to a sudden stop, because the Aluminium footpeg on the right hand side also gave up.  

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Upon closer inspection, we see the bash plate attachment point at the back of the sump has been ripped out and left a big hole.  The piece is still on the bash plate.  

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We lie the bike on it’s side and clean up the mess.  Pratley putty is our friend and within an hour the Yamaha is as good as new again.  

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Following the "bloedspoor" to see what actually caused the damage

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We modify the passenger footpeg and make it work in the front.  Off we go again.  

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The rest of the day is without major incident, and we ride a lovely new tar road for the last bit until we make camp just after a village called Dongo.  We have another good night’s rest in the bush.

Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: oo7 on July 10, 2010, 01:48:15 am
What an interesting read, Stefan!  :thumleft:

This kind of trip rarely happen more than once in a lifetime!!

Looking fwd to the rest

 :happy1:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Dustdevil on July 10, 2010, 02:08:50 am
Tomorrow I'll be a zombie but this is just to good to stop reading.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Oppad on July 10, 2010, 03:34:08 am
Super interesting, thank you. Waiting for more.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: boere on July 10, 2010, 05:45:40 am
Now i understand why everybody allways says. Tooltube/ Bloudraad en tang is baie belangrik.

Great report and ja DD we will all be zombi's today.

Where's the rest Where's the rest Where's the rest

WHERE'S THE REST!!!!!!!!! :dousing:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: wino on July 10, 2010, 07:09:04 am
an excellent read thus far, looking forward to the rest!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Welsh on July 10, 2010, 07:09:53 am
Two trips, two Super Tenere,s both go down with a fan / radiator problem? 8)
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: JourneyMan on July 10, 2010, 07:14:26 am
Eish. The Yammie taking some punishment.  :biggrin: Well done on the road side repairs. :thumleft:



Great read so far! 8)
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: JVR on July 10, 2010, 07:53:49 am
Can't wait excellent!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Marnus on July 10, 2010, 08:40:19 am
Great stuff.  Some scary police officials there  :o
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 08:44:13 am
Day 10: Dongo Camp to Lubango
Distance: 288 km

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We have an easy ride on the tar to Lubango.  Casper Lodge is the destination, we know that we can camp and shower there.  

The road is being re-built and it is a smooth tar surface - very good job the Chinese are doing.  Only a few small detours where they are still working on the bridges.  We pass through Matala, where we stop on the dam wall.

The old way and new way of getting around.  This is a brand new Yamaha with a very proud owner.

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Lots of Chinese trucks, all driven by Chinese people.

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View down stream of the dam

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School kids going home.  If you want to sit on a chair under the school tree, you bring your own.

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The Lubango area has been travelled by many before us, and there is good info available.  At Casper lodge, we have time to look through the bikes in clean conditions, no need to dig for bolts and spanners in the sand….  Those who needed to changed tyres and did some ingenious panel beating on the front rims.  

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In the afternoon we visit the Tunda Vala, located some 20km out of town. One climbs up to 2600m to get a view of rolling hills and a sheer drop to near sea level, which is breathtaking. Part of this mountain is a vertical cliff of about 400 m deep that was used by the Portuguese and the later by the Angolans too as a place to execute people.  Amazing how you can still see the bones in the bottom (no way to get there from top or bottom), and these empty cartridges and bullets you find if you just scratch the sand a bit with your fingers. Those who did not want to jump were clearly forced.  And the little Catholic Church on the way to this cliff face was where people were given an opportunity to confess their sins before being taken to the ravine.  Quite an eerie feeling up there, what a scary way to die.

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Nobody here, so we left a Bible in the front.

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On the way back, we turned in at the famous biker pub and met Jose, the owner.  We had an amazing time listening to his stories about the war.  He was forced to join the military and became part of FAPLA’s special forces. He even showed us a picture of his army days.  Another big moment when two opposing special forces members were able to shake hands with a smile.  The Falcons are not playing at this stage, he is busy re-building the place and will be back in business in August if all goes well.  We gave him some copies of the Biker Bible in Portuguese, which Jan arranged through Rene Changuion from the CMA in Portugal.  He really appreciated the Bibles, just like all the other Angolans.  We also listened to some stories from this little Spanish guy who rode with his girlfriend on bicycles from Spain along the East coast of Africa to Cape Agulhas and up the West coast to where we found them here in Lubango, 2 ½ years after they started in Spain.   The same guys who gave Roger Scheffer, Jaco and Howard some water when they had suspension issues with their GS’s in Kenya on their Durban to Dublin trip.  They also rode through Baviaans on those bikes.  They loved South Africa and Namibia the most. We feel like fashion parade girls in comparison….. Another very special visit.

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Back at Casper lodge we were ripped off with an expensive dinner which paled in comparison with Bakkes’s cooking.  Some you win, some you loose….
Lubango is a noisy place to sleep.  Much better in the bush, but we survived…..

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Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 09:02:02 am
Day 11: Lubango to Flamingo Lodge
Distance: 280 km

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We have a leisurely start and ride up the mountain to the “Cristo Rei” (Jesus Christ Statue).  The statue is one of 3 in the world and is a replica of the one found in Rio de Janeiro. Wikipedia describes it as follows: Cristo-Rei (English: Christ the King) is a Catholic monument of Jesus Christ overlooking the city of Lisbon, Portugal. It was inspired by the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and inaugurated on 17 May 1959. At that time, Portugal was being ruled by the President of the Council António de Oliveira Salazar, and it was on his orders that the Cristo-Rei was built.  Jesus has taken a few shots here, which makes this one slightly unique in this trio. We found this choir up there, singing like only Africans can sing, especially for our entertainment.  We handed a few Bibles to them, their appreciation once again a unique experience.

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View of the city from the mountain

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Humpata is the next stop.  This is where most of the “Dorsland trekkers” settled in 1878 and the years that followed.  I can see why they settled here, it is a great farming area and the remains of their fields, orchards and buildings show that they were working hard and doing well here.  We visit the monument and some graves in the area.  I am fortunate to find some of my wife’s ancestors; my father in law was born in Angola as part of this outing.  What I can tell you, is to get here from Rustenburg with an ox wagon is not for girls…..   Imagine if those people had motorbikes…..  

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We were back on the tar, direction Namibe.  Leba pass is next touristy thing to do around here, and we thoroughly enjoyed it.  The Yamaha’s front wheel still did not want to hold air (tubeless tyre leaking on the bead) – even after the panel beating in Lubango, so we quickly put in an 18” tube.  Problem solved.  Some of the bikes got “tested” a little more than the others, great fun coming down here.  You drop about 1km in altitude in 10 km of road winding its way down the mountain.  The ride is calmed by trucks with big blocks of granite on the back.  There are also some of these blocks lying on the side of the road, evidence of truck brakes failing here.  Must be a hairy experience….  We stop for lunch at the market at the foot of the pass.  The Portuguese rolls and bananas work well and hit the spot.

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New Mitas E10 - very soft compound.  [EDIT:  I have since been lead to believe that the new shipment will have a harder compound.]

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And if the tyre looks like that, the crash bars look like this.....

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From here, the mango trees rapidly disappear and the landscape gradually dries.  Within an hour we are in the desert.  I can start feeling the air cooling off, a sign that we are nearing the coast.  A dry river bed near Namibe shows some life again and we arrive at the garage just outside of the town.  We fill up here and Gert discovers that the rear sub frame of the HP2 has broken on both sides.  We need a welding machine.  Bit of a tall order, but doable I think to myself.  We look on the GPS for a place that might have a machine under Points of Interest and a few possibilities come up.  We did not need to look on the GPS, just on the side of the road there is a guy busy welding the garage’s sign!  Wow!  We approach him, he is from Portugal, speaks English and is out here doing contract work for a while.  He does not have a welding helmet, his power connection is dodgy, but he welds the frame together in a flash and we are ready to go again once Gert as re-assembled his frame and extra fuel tank under the seat.  Gert offers the welder a six pack of beers and a Biker Bible.  He declines the beers and takes the Bible.  Go figure…..

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Once all filled up, we go for a coffee on the beachfront to celebrate our arrival.  

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Then off towards Flamingo lodge.  The road towards Tombua is also brand new and smooth tar.  Although the tar riding offered a good rest it was now becoming a bit boring.  I was quite happy when we saw the turn-off to Flamingo which took us back to the good stuff.  All the riders had a sudden wake-up and we could focus on the riding again for a change.  We gave our best and found the beach and the lodge just when the sun dipped into the ocean.  Great views and a bunch of happy campers arrived at Flamingo Lodge.  

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A great place to stay over.  Owned by Rico Sako, an ex South African who came to settle here in 1992 when he realized how good the fishing was.  We had a shower, a great fish dinner (some of the best I have ever had) and slept in beds in bungalows.  We were in 5 star luxury and slept like babies.

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Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 09:11:39 am
Day 12: Flamingo Lodge
Distance: 0 km

Today is a rest day.  We gave the bikes, our clothes and ourselves some TLC, changed / cleaned air filters and just some general looking over.  No serious issues found.

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Bakkes updating his notes.

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We spent the day doing as little as possible, just parking off and relaxing.  Bernard and his wife are from Stellenbosch and they look after the lodge for Rico.  They do a great job looking after us as well.  We take a Landcruiser drive to one of the impressive sand canyons.  We find a jackal here, running up the canyon towards the dead end.  He realizes his mistake and come running back right past us at full taps.  The farmers are looking for ammunition.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0699.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0705-1.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0707.jpg)

Every day, Bernard counts the number of people sleeping over and disappears with his spear gun to go and find dinner.  He soon returns with this.  And dinner is a feast once again.  The Angolan chef must keep a low profile, he will be kidnapped and taken to Johannesburg in a flash if they find him out.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0678.jpg)

Sharing the lodge with us is this crew from Mpumalanga.  That Sprinter sports Landcruiser diffs, engine and gearbox.  It is a self-built machine.  There is also a heavy self-built trailer towed behind the 100 series Landcruiser, over loaded with spares for the Sprinter.  They entertain us for the evening with stories about all the repairs to the equipment they have been doing to get here.  We wish them a pleasant journey and I am so happy that we only have 7 fairly standard bikes to get through the desert.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0681.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0682.jpg)

Another shower and comfortable bed – we are spoilt rotten.  

The rest day was not really planned, it happened because Rico advised us to stay for another night.  The sea was rough and he said that the doodsakker would be too dangerous to do. The next day would still not be safe, but better.  I thought that he was just doing some good marketing for his lodge, we had our timing spot on and the full moon proved our impeccable planning.  Being our flexible selves, we did not mind the rest day, so we stayed.  This would prove a wise thing to do later…..
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 09:27:27 am
Day 13: Flamingo Lodge to Dunes
Distance: 146 km

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Camp13.jpg)

We are happy to be back in our gear head back to the tar road towards Tombua.  Fill up fuel from the cans that the lodge staff filled in Namibe for us yesterday - turns out htere was a bit of a mix-up.  The bikes don't work on diesel and we have to do some sucking to sort this out.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0724.jpg)

The track was the same one that brought us here, and it took some a few minutes to get back into the rhythm of sand riding…..  I lost a back tube 5 km from the lodge, rim rotated in the wheel.  I should have checked the pressure before we left, it was too flat as we left early in the morning and the tyres were cold.  Too late for tears, a new tube was installed and we were off.  Inflated all the tyres a bit when we got to the tar.  We turned off again at Lake Arcos – a lake in the middle of the desert.  Hard to believe that all this water is just standing here, and has been for some years.  Look at the sand arches – quite impressive….

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0733.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0737.jpg)

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0768.jpg)

From here we rode to just outside Tombua and avoided the town by turning left just before.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0772.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0776.jpg)

This saved some time and we headed for the Vanessa Seafood wreck.  We were back in proper sand now, and we could hear that the bikes were converting fuel to horsepower to the very best of their ability.  We gave our best – there are some nice jumps in the sand, but they command confident riding….  It is amazing how the wreck has disappeared into the sand since Metaljockey and friends came past here.

It is that way....

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0795.jpg)

Pulling off - only one way, hook up second gear, drop the clutch and give your best....

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0801.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0803.jpg)

Low tide was about 9:00 in the morning, so the mission for today is to get close enough to the doodsakker to be in there by 8:00 the next morning.  We headed south and enjoyed the ride immensely.  The rollercoaster dunes are a hoot to ride and I had a big smile on my face all the way.  Although I must say that the dunes are full of little catches.  Theo and I crossed an unexpected “double” side-by-side, and Jan who was just behind us thought that now is the time to call the evacuation helicopter for a full load back to SA.  A deep breath later it was all over. To our own amazement, we were all still on the wheels and managed to keep it that way.  Well most of us….  We arrived at the start area of the Doodsakker and after a bit of scouting inland, we found a nice camp site.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0810.jpg)

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0825.jpg)

A little bit about the “Doodsakker” (Death acre).  This piece of beach, about 40km of it, has the ocean on one side and the desert on the other.  The foot of the dune is right at the high water line, and during low tide a piece of beach is exposed where you can ride.  It is only wide enough to pass during spring tide at full moon, provided the sea is calm enough.  We could plan the full moon part.  We could not plan the weather, and it was bad.  When Rico said we should relax at the lodge for an extra day, he was right.  The previous day, the sea took a Landcruiser.  It means that one wave breaks too high, and the vehicle stops at the wrong time and the wave washing back runs under the wheels planting the vehicle on it’s chassis.  At this point the best you can do is grab your passport and run.  A few waves later the vehicle is upside down and by the next day only the wheels are visible above the sand.  This convoy of 3 vehicles, all Landcruisers, lost one to the ocean, burnt the clutch on another and the last one managed to get out.  The lesson is: Listen to Rico!!!.  We did not think twice to bring him along as a guide and advisor.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Berm_Rooster on July 10, 2010, 09:40:12 am
Wow, every time I read about the doodsakker in a WD report, I become more and more intrigued. I think it will be on my bucketlist.

Flipping nice report! :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 09:45:10 am
Day 14: Dunes to Eshpinhierra
Distance: 211 km

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Camp14.jpg)

Today is the big day – the second main reason for our expedition.  Rico is not too happy.  Because of his advice there were now a few “delayed” travellers.  Our group and another 7 vehicles.  So including Rico’s car, there were 10 vehicles and 7 bikes to pass through this morning.  We were up early, ready to roll by 7:30.  Fuel tanks full.  Moved some mass off the fuel carrying Cruiser and shared some load between Rico’s car and Wayne’s bakkie.  We did not want to loose our fuel….  Tyre pressures checked and off we went.
The bikes took the lead and it feels like we are the first ever to ride there.  Not a sign of a previous track.  The beach starts off fairly wide and we are able to stop for pictures.  We find the Engel fridge off the drowned Landcruiser on the high water line.  Then we hit the real thing.  It is supposed to be low tide, but the water runs right up to the dune. We have to time it right with the bikes to keep out of the water.  No way of stopping for a picture, and a wave breaks on some of the bikes now and again.  Imagine stopping and the water washes under the bike – one wave and you are on the bash plate.  No way to get the bike moving again.  Problems….  So not one of us even entertained the thought of stopping to take a picture of that Cruiser.  Or to pick up a packet of marshmallows or a kitchen spoon.  Eyes on the front and keep going.  That’s it.  The bikes worked hard.  The sand is not the same everywhere, it is nice and hard in place, and suddenly goes soft and you have to gear back and really gas it to keep going.  Man and machine are tested….  We all get through and stop where the dunes flatten and the terrain opens up.  The vehicles take some time to catch up, they also all made it.  Some hairy moments when waves broke over bonnets, etc are described in detail.  Bakkes is somewhere between shock and depression, he wanted to get out, but Kalie would not stop.  What counts is that we are all here and things are looking up.  This experience is only a paragraph of the story, but weighs a ton in value.  We are happy for Rico and his merry men and wave them good bye.  They are staying to go back during the next low tide and assist those poor families with the lost car and burnt clutch.  

This was my GPS's opinion....

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0830.jpg)

Fueling up

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0833.jpg)

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We continue our journey towards Foz do Cunene, where the Cunene river meets the sea.  We do a mixture of beach riding and on the little road just above the beach.  The surface varies between soft sand, rocks (smaller and bigger) and solid granite.  Good fun, but still hard on machinery. We stop to re-group just short of the river mouth, and have some biscuits and cheese courtesy of Bakkes.  He must be happy that the ocean did not swallow us…..  Gert has a flat tyre which we plug and pump and we are off to Foz.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0887.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0895.jpg)

We report at the police station and they take our details.  That same policeman that Nardus was arm wrestling is still in the area.  I ask him about that visit, and he immediately wants to know where his pictures were.  He is disappointed when I tell him I had none – should have printed some…..  Who would ever have thought that they would still be here.  I give him a Bible in stead and tell him – next time.  So whoever goes there next, take some prints along!  We spend a bit of time at the old pump station too, must have been quite impressive in it’s day.  Where did the power come from?  Generators?  Bringing the diesel must have been an adventure too!

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0896.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0897.jpg)

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The mouth is back there.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0918.jpg)

We continue direction Ruacana.  It is only 14:00 and we agree that we will ride till sunset and see how far we get before we pitch camp for the night.  That spot MJ named “Middle of Fu*^ng Nowhere” is still there and we stop for a picture.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0928.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0938.jpg)

Gert’s HP2 runs into trouble.  He has been fiddling with a sticky throttle cable, he would open up and on closing it keeps running flat-out.  Can get hairy like this….  Closer inspection reveals a broken cable, it wore through in the 90 degree bend right next to the throttle.  Bugger…  This is not something we can fix properly here, and we load the bike.  Gert now keeps Wayne company.

We continue and slowly we start seeing signs of life again.  We encounter game – Gemsbok, Springbok, Ostrich.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0940.jpg)

The road changes from sand to pebbles to rocks.  I hit one at speed and cut my front tube, which I quickly change.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0947.jpg)

This Ford got stuck here....

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0953.jpg)

The scenery is great, lots of Welwitschias.  We carry on and reach the ghost town called Eshpinhierra.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0957.jpg)

Looks like it could have been a rest camp in the game park some years ago.  There are some trees and wood here, and we decide to call it a day.  We have made good progress.  The evening is a pleasant one once again and some more campfire wisdom is shared by those who don’t retire early.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: JACOVV on July 10, 2010, 09:50:10 am
Kan nie wag vir die res nie!!

 :drif: :drif: :drif: :drif:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Leo on July 10, 2010, 09:52:17 am
Very nice report SGB.

I hope Yamaha is taking note of a few things here.  :thumleft:

It seems like we just missed you  :3some:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 09:56:08 am
Day 15: Eshpinhierra to Kapanga River
Distance: 193 km

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Camp15.jpg)

Not much to do this morning, we pack up, fuel up, pump up and get going.  The riding here is again one of the best days I have ever had.  

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0969.jpg)

The terrain offers a twin track road with sand, rocks, hard pack dirt, river crossings, sudden drop-offs, ups and downs, jumps – just about everything except serious mud.  We are kept awake and absorb every minute.  The vegetation gets denser, and life returns.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0982.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0974.jpg)

We enter Ovahimba territory.  The vehicles progress quite a bit slower than the bikes.  But we have no problem with the wait, it is the only time we can sit under a tree and talk about important stuff to chew on whilst alone under a helmet for the next stretch.  The weather is nice and warm and we work up some sweat under those jackets.  Did I say it was a great day’s riding?  Again the experience weighs a lot more than the report.  Nowhere in SA have I encountered so much of this kind of riding.  20 or 30 km, yes – but 200!  We come to Iona, a village with only a police station and we negotiate easy passage for our group, no issues.  

This guy stuck with me all the way....

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0983.jpg)

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A few km’s later, Martin’s SE does not want to pull off.  Motor dies as soon as to let go the clutch.  Yes, the side stand switch is the problem.  Closer inspection reveals the switch still in tact but the little plastic bracket with the magnet on the side stand itself is missing.  It probably got hit by a rock or something.  Anyway, we look for a magnet.  Wayne has one of those little LED lights that you stick to metal with a magnet and we remove it.  Duck tape it to the side stand switch and off we go without any modifications.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1000.jpg)

We make good progress riding on square marbles and at about 5 another disaster strikes.  Theo’s bike starts making funny noises after a fast landing and we suspect the gearbox.  Another bike for the Cruiser. Unfortunately there is nothing we can do about it.  Frustrating but fact. It is a good spot to camp under the trees, there is good fire wood and we decide to stay.  Jan, Theo and I make a fire so long.  Martin joins us when he gets back, he was in front when Theo’s bike broke and carried on a few km’s.  The rest arrive and we set up camp for the last time in Angola.  We are now within easy reach from the Ruacana border, and should easily make it if there are no serious challenges tomorrow.  

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1015.jpg)
    
At our camp site we see the first vehicle since we left Rico at the doodsakker.  The Angolans stop and we communicate.  We tell them what we are about, and they welcome us to their territory.  They give us part of their melon harvest. We offer some cash, which they decline.  Amazing….  Not very Africa-like….
They depart after admiring the bikes and asking lots of questions – I want one, is the main man’s parting words.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1017.jpg)

We have a relaxed evening and restful sleep.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 10:07:27 am
Day 16: Kapanga River to Eenhana
Distance: 454 km

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Camp16.jpg)

Loaded up

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1021.jpg)

Last morning in Angola

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We are off fairly early, and head out further towards the border.  The river crossings have some water here and there and we see some more Himba people.  They are a peaceful and friendly bunch.  Someone even taught them how to ride those Chinese bikes!  I think horses are returning to the good life…..
The riding is much like the previous day and we just enjoy.  We find lots of Baobab trees in one area and stop for some pictures.  Here we are visited by a Himba family.  This one guy brings along his whole family and that stare at us and the bikes – it must be like TV to them.  We take some pics and move along.  They run for the trees when the first bike starts up. 

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1031.jpg)

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Gert's ride

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1037.jpg)

Good fun stays with us and we have a little moment here and there....

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1057.jpg)

The TKC and Mitas were together all the way

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1068.jpg)

All too soon we are at the Ruacana dam and fill up fuel on the wall.   

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We head for the border post and go through the process.  Takes some time, more so on the Namibia side when an official decides to search our back packs.  Looking for diamonds he tells me.  We are asked to enter a little room one by one, and unpack everything in our back packs.  We find some energy bars and stuff that we did not know we had.  Good thing….  At the border, Martin leaves for Otjiwarongo, and Kalie and Bakkes head South for the Cape.  All our stuff goes on Wayne’s Cruiser and we head for Rundu.  We say goodbye to Kalie, Bakkes and Martin and head out.  It feels like the trip is over, but we are still quite far from home. 
We head for the Garage at Ruacana where we find a hose and wash the sea sand and salt off the bikes.  Feels better now. 

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1080.jpg)

It is tar again to Oshakati and Ondangwa, and we make it to Eenhana where we find a spot to overnight.  They only have one room, which is OK.  Some shopping at the local store brings us dinner.  Eenhana does not have fuel, which is a bit of a problem. 
The next fuel station is 100 km down the road, and if they are also out, we are stuck.  No option.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1084.jpg)

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Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 10:13:52 am
Day 17: Eenhana to Rundu
Distance: 376 km

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Camp17.jpg)

We head off early and make for Okongo on a wide open gravel road.  Jan sets a brisk pace on the Yamaha and we have a good ride.  We are in luck at Okongo and things are looking up again! 

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(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1100.jpg)

We now have fuel to make Rundu and now that Yamaha runs like a horse smelling it’s stable.  We have a last bit of good cable stretching fun until we hit our last stretch of tar, about 95 km to Rundu.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1104.jpg)

We arrive without incident and find our vehicles under a thick layer of dust.  Reality hits – it has been 2 weeks! 

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1112.jpg)

The trailer has a flat tyre and we have it fixed at the local tyre shop.  Loading the bikes and getting all the luggage sorted does not take long and we are on our way.  We can still make the Botswana border with ease.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1116.jpg)

Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 10:16:35 am
Day 17-19: Rundu to Bloemfontein
Distance: About 2000 km
The second part of the day is spent in the bakkie with Jan, Theo and me sharing stories and reflections.  We make good progress through the border and stop to overnight at Drotsky’s cabins.  Frik and Wayne also sleep here and we have a good dinner together.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP1120.jpg)

Gert and Francois headed for Kasane, they had to meet family there.  The next day we spend driving, and that’s all we do.  We see Leo and friends along the way and some other bikers at Kang.  We get to Pretoria in the evening.  Jan and Theo head home and I sleep over at my friend Piet’s place.  On the road to Bloem early next morning and get home at about 9.  It has been a wonderful adventure, but I am also glad to be home!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Lourens ツ on July 10, 2010, 10:38:00 am
Wow! Awesome RR!   :thumleft:  What an experience!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 10:44:55 am
Final reflections:

About Angola:
Fuel price: 40 Kwanza / l.  At R 7.50 / US$ that is R 3.00.  I can live with that!

Documents needed at the border:
-   Passport with Visa
-   Letter of invitation.  It helps if you have the route you want to travel as well, easier to explain your mission.  It also helps if the whole group’s full names and passport no’s are on the letter, then a copy can be left with police or whoever and he does not need to write it all down
-   Vehicle registration papers.
-   Police clearance for vehicle
-   Drivers licence
-   Proof of vehicle insurance in Angola
-   Yellow fever card (We were never asked for it)
-   Money, they change US$ to Kwanza at the border.  No “formal” facilities, we found a guy who gave us 100 Kwanzas / US$.  I am not sure if this is good or bad, but we survived.
-   Some copies of all documents to leave with police.  Passport, Visa, Drivers Licence, Vehicle papers.  We only needed once, but good to have in case.

Other useful things to arrange:
-   Medical evacuation.  Get out of there ASAP if you need serious medical attention.

Police, etc:  We were treated well by all police and officials.  But they do waste a lot of time.  The secret is to have more time than them, never raise your voice, they do not understand words very well but are better than us at seeing the heart.
We tried to limit stops in town.  The bikes draw a lot of attention and the police WILL stop you and take you to a station and follow a time consuming process before you can go again.  We re-grouped before towns and rode through.  By the time they realize what is happening, you are gone.

My photos are very incomplete.  For example, we did not stop in the towns and at markets, etc.  The vehicles did and they captured a lot more of those moments.  The picture distriution process is still running and I look forward to see the others' photos.

About the team:

We were a bunch of very different individuals, but the group gelled really well.  Nobody ever made life difficult for the rest and things were running really smooth on that front.
Here they are: (Photos by Kalie)
Jan du Toit.  A humble man who does not like things too structured. Don’t expect a plan.  But expect to form an understanding of adventure.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Jan.jpg)

Martin Diekmann.  The highly respected, unsympathetic doctor from Windhoek.  Expect a good ride!

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Martin.jpg)

Theo Smit.  Farmer from Wakkerstroom.  The man who gave Jan a ride on a 950 SE, and we all know what happens when you ride it once.  Theo is in my team any day.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Theo.jpg)
  
Gert Becker.  Engineer who understands how things work.  Good to have around.  Does not talk much, does not take undue risk.  Brings sense to the team and is an essential part for balance.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Gert.jpg)

Francois vd Westhuizen.  Orthopaedic Surgeon.  This is his holiday.  Always smiles, never complains.  Pleasure to have.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Francois_1.jpg)

Frik Steynberg.  Another Engineer.  His first trip of this nature, and came with a teachable spirit.  Well done mate!  He needs a wife, seriously…..  Any young immature blonds out there – R 50k is yours!  Contact me, not Frik!

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Frik.jpg)

Stefan Boshoff.  I thought I was going to find closure in Angola.  But I found the urge to go back.  Thanks!

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Stefan.jpg)

Johan Bakkes.  Accounting professor, looks the part too.  Interpid traveller who is running away from something he cannot beat and chasing something he cannot catch.  With lots of rum, cigarettes and other medication to ensure a good life.  Well read and well travelled - he tells a good story.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Bakkes.jpg)

Kalie Kirsten.  Cape farmer.  Practical and calculated, brings structure and organization.  With him around there will be fuel, water and food!

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Kalie.jpg)

Wayne.  The other Landcruiser driver.  Solid, reliable and a man of his word.  You don’t have to look for Wayne, he is there, right behind us.  Always.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Wayne.jpg)

About the bikes:
We had the following bikes along:
Yamaha 1200 Super Tenere:
Very competent machine.  It is big and heavy, but the suspension is very good and it handles the terrain extremely well.  I think we exposed all it’s weak spots by taking it into terrain where few riders will ever take it, and I doubt that anybody will do it at the speeds we saw.  The issues we exposed were more due to hard “testing” than intelligent “ride to preserve” technique.  There was none of that.  
Nothing ever rattled loose.  We did not loose any bolts.  The only thing we had to check often was the spoke tension. They tended to loosen themselves.  We were unsure if they were properly tensioned to start with.
The fan issue needs attention.  It has a 20A fuse on the fan circuit, so the motor burns before the fuse.  A smaller fuse to protect the motor should be considered.  
Foot pegs – those Aluminium ones should go and be replaced with something proper.  Really, this is a problem.
Bash plate – why they attach the bash plate to the sump I cannot work out.  BMW had patent rights on that.  Someone will make a plan, but this needs to change urgently.
Having said that, I don’t think that the design brief included anything remotely close to the conditions the bike saw.
Would I buy it, yes!

BMW HP2:
Both the HP’s had very upgraded suspension.  The standard front end and rear bladder proved unsuitable for trips like this on previous expeditions.  The WP and Ohlins rear shocks these bikes had fitted worked well.  They also had re-valved and tuned front forks.  The tail pieces rattled loose.  Maybe a smaller number plate would have helped.  Gert’s sub frame broke, maybe they were loaded too heavy at the back.  Keep loads on any sub frame light!  The throttle cable was unfortunate.   Simple thing, but not that simple to fix next to the road.

KTM 950 SE:
We had 3 of them along.  The one fuel pump needed a bit of work, and then some small things we were able to fix.  Tail pieces had to be tightened up. A bolt fell out here and there, all easy to fix.   Theo’s gearbox was unfortunate, will have to wait and see what exactly happened.  Will report when we know.  Best suspension for the terrain, but maybe lacks some of the comfort features.  Hooligan tool.

KTM 990 Adv S:
The best bike for the trip.  Why?  Because it’s mine!....  The fuel filters were kind of expected, I should have replaced before the trip, and I would have if we did not have back-up.  But I decided to test it, and I had to do the job next to the road.  Otherwise, one or 2 bolts had to tightened up, nothing serious.  It tracks straight, the suspension works amazingly well and it pulls like a horse.  Cannot fault it.

Equipment:

Essential tools needed on your body, in addition to the bike's std toolkits:
- Leatherman
- Torx keys (They fit Allan cap screws too - not vice versa)
- Pratley steel puttty
- Packet with a selection of bolts and nuts (Not many)

Equipment that impressed:
- My Troy Lee helmet.  I was undecided if I should rather take my Arai TourX.  The off-road helmet worked well for the conditions.  Very comfortable to wear all day, and used ear plugs for the noise on the tar sections

- Yamaha adventure Suit.  Great quality, slides well on tar and handles the conditions.  Nice kit

- Gaerne SG10 boots. The best protection and comfort.  I never felt that my feet were taking strain, although we were standing up on the pegs for most of the day on most of the days.

- Camelbak backpack.  Essential.

This was my first trip with backup vehicles to the luxurious extent we had it.  There are various pro's and con's to this idea, but with 7 bikes and the fuel challenges, there is no way to the trip otherwise.  Riding an unloaed bike made the terrain very enjoyable and we could really enjoy the bikes.  With luggage, a lot more care is needed to keep things together.  I think the answer is flexibility.  We all fitted in and worked within the practical constraints and benefits and it was great.

Like I said right in the beginning:  this is my story in telegram style, with no fiction added to make a good story.  I am no writer, and I am in the company of famous authors here.  You will see their stories in verious publications as time goes...  I hope this has given you a little insight of what we did and where we went, and especially the amazing experiences we had along the way.  Thank you for taking the time to read.  Till next time – Hou die rubber onder!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Adventurer on July 10, 2010, 11:09:10 am
Great trip and story, SGB.
Good to see you met up with Aitor and Laura, the Spanish couple on bicycles, we met them in Fish River Canyon in March....fantastic couple doing the trip of a lifetime.
Interesting to see what broke on the Yammie, but given the terrain and how it was ridden, I doubt any 'mere mortal' would suffer similar breakages. What will be interesting to see is how Yamaha addresses these issues, but given past history on the smaller Tenere minor issues I'm sure Yamaha will take note and correct these issues ASAP. Good to see it survived such a 'testing' trip....
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Wolweseun on July 10, 2010, 11:21:47 am
Awesome trip very inspiring  :thumleft:
Thanks for sharing
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: oo7 on July 10, 2010, 01:03:47 pm
Police, etc:  We were treated well by all police and officials.  But they do waste a lot of time.  The secret is to have more time than them, never raise your voice, they do not understand words very well but are better than us at seeing the heart.
Very good advice!! And nicely put.

The issues we exposed were more due to hard “testing” than intelligent “ride to preserve” technique.  There was none of that.
Knowing you I would not have expected anything less   :biggrin:


This was my first trip with backup vehicles to the luxurious extent we had it.  There are various pro's and con's to this idea, but with 7 bikes and the fuel challenges, there is no way to the trip otherwise.  
Deep in your heart, if you had the choice (and all other things being equal) - what will you prefer: With or without backup?    ???


Thanks for sharing this amazing experience with us - I will read this again and again.


Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 01:14:52 pm
Deep in your heart, if you had the choice (and all other things being equal) - what will you prefer: With or without backup?    ???

Thanks 007 and all the others for the nice comments!

About backup....  Let me sound like a consultant: "It depends...." 

First prize for a bike trip to do it on the bikes.  No doubt.  But on this expedition, we had 7 bikes and we did not have a good idea about fuel availability.  And Kalie and Bakkes offered to come along, so we had a vehicle.  If one vehicle comes, it is better to have 2, to manage the risk of a vehicle breaking down.  So, given the nature of this journey, the vehicles were the right thing to do from a risk management perspective, and they caused the riding to be so much better.   The riding would be a lot more "sensible" and the planning a lot more detailed if it was not for the cars.  And the bakkie people were nice guys, so we tolerated them....  >:D
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: IDR on July 10, 2010, 01:35:25 pm
Great report as usual S... but sheesh - what a trip.  Really, REALLY inspiring stuff. :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Gee S on July 10, 2010, 01:36:57 pm
What a trip. Awesome!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Oetie on July 10, 2010, 02:26:25 pm
Awesome report, thanks for the effort in writing it. For you and your mates this must be a trip to remember for ever!!

Well done!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: michnus on July 10, 2010, 04:01:53 pm
Will have to read it a few more times  :eek7:  :thumleft:

a trip of a life time, thanks for sharing SGB, just stunning  :headbang: :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: DUSTRIDERS on July 10, 2010, 04:23:56 pm
Its raining outside and the fire is going in the fieplace. Best way to spend an afternoon. Reading a great RR.
Thanks SGB and friends. :thumleft:

edit: n Spar in Eenhana?!!!!!!!!! What is the world coming too?!!!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Brakenjan on July 10, 2010, 04:56:39 pm
Bliksem SGB, dit was nou 'n lekker lees!!! Dankie vir die RR - ek waardeer die moeite.   :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: >Herman< on July 10, 2010, 05:06:45 pm
Dankie S, nice write-up.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: LeonDude on July 10, 2010, 05:16:01 pm
Great RR, thanks.
It's really nice to read about that part of the world. I hope it opens up a bit more during the coming years, in terms of all the police formalities. But with all the chinese there...

Anyways thanks again, it was a great read!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Andy660 on July 10, 2010, 05:21:46 pm
Thanks for a really great RR,
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: BMWPE on July 10, 2010, 06:56:40 pm
Awesome report :thumleft:
Thanks for sharing
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Tweets on July 10, 2010, 07:38:54 pm
Great ride yu guys had. Thanks for the good RR  :thumleft: :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Swanniebraai on July 10, 2010, 07:42:06 pm
Uitstekende trip en RR! Gate uit geniet! Respek aan julle manne!  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Trailrider on July 10, 2010, 07:55:37 pm
Great RR SGB!

Thanks. I really enjoyed reading this.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: redtiger on July 10, 2010, 07:58:58 pm
Epic trip enjoyed the read thanks for posting  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: EtienneXplore on July 10, 2010, 08:00:00 pm
WOW Stephan, I read the whole thing for a second time again now, what an awesome read, and what an awesome experience you guys must have had.

Thank for sharing you photos and words, and don't worry you are not such a crappy writer, I loved your story!!

One day when I am big and can ride a bike properly I want to do a trip like this!!

 :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Kat on July 10, 2010, 08:10:12 pm
nice trip SGB   :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Trailrider on July 10, 2010, 08:17:18 pm
SGB - considering most people trailer their bikes to the border anyway, would this trip be better or worse on a 250?
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: DRAZIL on July 10, 2010, 08:59:11 pm
Thanks for shareing a great adventure trip. :thumleft: :thumleft:
Certainly took me down memory lane.
As for the chinese everywhere ,they remind me of a virus fine in small numbers but in large numbers ...trouble.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Twister on July 10, 2010, 09:01:14 pm
Very nice ride report SGB. Thumbs up to the whole expedition team truly an adventure.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Just Blip It! on July 10, 2010, 09:03:52 pm
Trip of a lifetime...........experience to be remembered..............this is what living is all about. :drif:

Awesome, well reported, great photos, thanks for sharing SGB! :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Dustdevil on July 10, 2010, 09:13:25 pm
Aaaaaah, that was nice :drif:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: gonedown on July 10, 2010, 09:16:18 pm
Great report for a great trip - very captivating read.

Amazing to read of two 'similar' trips that happend simutaneously.  Brilliant!!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: HP FREAK on July 10, 2010, 09:26:20 pm
SGB ,well done my maat ,ek het n paar vrae vir jou en Jan volgende maand.  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Cane Rat on July 10, 2010, 09:29:38 pm
Nice RR Stefan.
Die Lubango Namibe area is seker een van die mooistes in Angola en dit is sekerlik 'n plek wat ek wil verken voordat ek eendag terugkeer SA toe.

Julle ROE was goed teen 100 Kwanzas per USD. Hier in Luanda wissel dit van 91 to 95AKZ/USD.

Rico Sako het nog 'n lodge by die mond van die Kwanza Rivier (Kwanza River Lodge). Het eendag daar aangegaan op pad terug van Porto Amboim af. Koffie is gratis en hy maak seker om vir die kelners te vertel dat hulle groot bekers moet bedien, want Suid Afrikaners drink uit groot bekers uit en met melk.

Dis net jammer dat Angola homself nie meer toespits op toerisme nie. Hier is regtig mooi plekke om te sien.

Die polisie, wel ja, die manne kan partykeer bietjie krapperig raak, veral as hulle agterkom jy is 'n buitelander.

Chinese is 'n helse probleem want alhoewel hulle onstettend baie werk hier doen, is die meeste van hulle blybaar convicts. Ek hoor dat die regering nou al so bietjie keelvol raak vir die klomp want hulle kom hier aan in hulle honderde. China het nie plek vir sy misdadigers nie, so die Afrika lande is vir hulle 'n groot verligting.

Chinese bikes is die arm man se vervoer. Daar is duisende van die goed en dis nie snaaks om pa, ma en twee kinders op 'n 50cc fietsie te sien ry nie. Hulle gaan orals met hulle and hulle laai enige iets op hulle.

Dankie vir die storie en die fotos.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Losper on July 10, 2010, 09:54:18 pm
Wow Stefan,  die beste ride report wat ek nog gelees het.
So 'n trip onthou 'n mens vir die res van jou lewe.  Eendag as ek groot is......

Dankie vir die tyd wat jy gespandeer het om dit te skryf.

Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 10, 2010, 10:24:42 pm
SGB - considering most people trailer their bikes to the border anyway, would this trip be better or worse on a 250?

TR, I suppose you can do it on a 250 - but not "better" for the terrain.  If everyone was on that type of bike it would be OK, or you would have to limit the big twins to second gear.

In the technical sections it will keep up, but I still think the bigger bikes for this terrain is a magic carpet ride in comparison.  Also - "250" is a wide term  If you mean 250 2T racing machines, they would keep up in the sand, but would not last the trip and by day 14 the rider would need to be re-sleeved too....  :o
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Trailrider on July 10, 2010, 10:31:45 pm
SGB - considering most people trailer their bikes to the border anyway, would this trip be better or worse on a 250?

TR, I suppose you can do it on a 250 - but not "better" for the terrain.  If everyone was on that type of bike it would be OK, or you would have to limit the big twins to second gear.

In the technical sections it will keep up, but I still think the bigger bikes for this terrain is a magic carpet ride in comparison.  Also - "250" is a wide term  If you mean 250 2T racing machines, they would keep up in the sand, but would not last the trip and by day 14 the rider would need to be re-sleeved too....  :o

No not a racer, a XR250 Baja or something such. I just thought maybe because it's lighter. You didn't do HUGE amounts of km's per day so I wondered if one had the luxury of buying a bike specifically for such a trip if a light lighter small bike might be better in the sand and technical stuff.

Seems from the Angola RR's that most bikes take a hammering on these Angola rides.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Stormer on July 10, 2010, 11:16:00 pm
 :thumleft:  :thumleft:  :thumleft:  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: funacide on July 11, 2010, 02:00:47 am
Really nice report, thanks for sharing. Really is a trip of a lifetime.

Also loved the thoughts on the bikes at then end.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Fiellie on July 11, 2010, 08:47:50 am
Awesome !!  :thumleft: :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Outthere on July 11, 2010, 09:50:37 am
Well done to all great report thanks for sharing .
Wonder where these trips in Africa actually end.
At R3.00 per litre  [ is that correct ] maybe never.


Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: tau on July 11, 2010, 09:55:07 am
wow!!!!!

Super report.

Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: JACOVV on July 11, 2010, 11:09:26 am
What a story!!

Thanks
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: chicco on July 11, 2010, 11:17:40 am
WOW... baie nice report Stefan, so waarheen volgende?  :mwink:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Frannarossi on July 11, 2010, 12:18:48 pm
Dankie vir 'n baie nice RR :thumleft: .My flippen internet wou nie die laaste 3 dele van die report aflaai nie (die foto's) so ek sal more weer kyk,maar dankie,dit was baie nice!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: tok-tokkie on July 11, 2010, 12:33:49 pm
That was a graphic description of a serious trip.  Many thanks for the trouble you took in putting it all together for us.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: JonW on July 11, 2010, 01:22:08 pm
Well done Stefan, fantastic ride.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: michnus on July 11, 2010, 02:09:54 pm
SGB, did Jan went down at Leba pass, or do I read it wrong?
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: rubiblue on July 11, 2010, 04:33:23 pm
Lovely, awesome adventure!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: LouisXander on July 11, 2010, 08:36:32 pm
Kort jy nie n appy nie? Ek kan tyres change et al!

Dit was nou regtig lekker lees! Hoop Yamaha neem notisie van julle teespoed, ek hou regtig van daai 1200.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Lootch67 on July 11, 2010, 08:50:33 pm
Fantastiese RR SGB. Dankie dat jy die moeite gedoen het om dit met ons te deel.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: bmad on July 12, 2010, 07:24:27 am
Wow, great ride and adventure  :thumleft:

Thanks for sharing and all the useful info on bikes and the people involved.
Although i think of myself as a good adventurer, this one seems a bit too hectic for my liking. But i thoroughly enjoyed reading it.

Thanks SGB  :biggrin:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Johnnie Bok on July 12, 2010, 08:00:06 am
Wat 'n trip!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Beserker on July 12, 2010, 09:22:54 am
 :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:

On the first page, starting this read now you shites (It's Monday morning at the office)

Lots of anticipation ..
 :ricky: :ricky: :ricky:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Biesie on July 12, 2010, 09:48:23 am
Great RR !!!  :thumleft:



Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: bertrand on July 12, 2010, 10:12:26 am
Great RR. Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: LuckyStriker on July 12, 2010, 10:15:28 am
I haven't finished reading the whole report yet but so far it's great
thanks!

Looking forward to doing a trip like this myself. Maybe solo, for a record ;) ;)
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: dust rat on July 12, 2010, 11:33:41 am
Awsome S flippin awsome!!!!!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Minora on July 12, 2010, 11:45:08 am
Ek het baie lank uitgesien na die RR! Het die hele oggend gelees aan die report, ditto al die comments

Ongelooflik!!!!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Beserker on July 12, 2010, 11:46:19 am
:thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:

On the first page, starting this read now you shites (It's Monday morning at the office)

Lots of anticipation ..
 :ricky: :ricky: :ricky:


Just finished, thanks for the trouble SGB.

I will go over it tonight again, for now I indulged in reading the story and admiring the photos, I am  now "lus"  to ride.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: fat b on July 12, 2010, 11:57:55 am
Just great ! I am sitting here in my office with a shitload of things to do ... and I have done nawt ! Lekker RR , man I wish I had the balls for a trip like that ! Great stuff , thanx for sharing !  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Kamanya on July 12, 2010, 12:34:26 pm
Shew! Stunning!

Your story just whets the appetite. One day, one day! Sooner than later hopefully.

I met up with Bakkes and Kallie at Felix's camp on my Richtersveld trip. They were excited about the trip. Bakkes is an interesting chap, he is an expert ear chewer.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: TVB on July 12, 2010, 01:16:20 pm
What an RR!! Gr8 manne!!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: ThinkMike on July 12, 2010, 01:37:28 pm
SGB - fantastic experience I am sure.

Thanks for the effort to put this RR together from start to finish in such a short period. It was a great "to the point", "I wanna do this to" read for us. Will certainly keep an eye on this for updates!!! :thumleft:.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Wheelman on July 12, 2010, 01:47:39 pm
Hi SGB,

Thank you for an insightful and interesting RR. 
It takes time to do this and i value your input...
You mentioned that a member of your party was looking for "closure" and it certainly got me thinking, maybe a good excuse for me to go snoop around up there a bit as well. :thumleft:

Who did you make arrangements with, re- Medical evacuation if you had needed it.
Also nice to see the "Boer maak a plan" aspect of this trip...... No Bmw on Call up there...... Common sense has to prevail.

Thanks again.  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: roxenz on July 12, 2010, 01:59:05 pm
Brilliant report SGB!  Huge thanks for taking the trouble to put it together!  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Juls06 on July 12, 2010, 03:49:30 pm
Fantastic RR!! Thanks for sharing :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Fantie11 on July 12, 2010, 06:19:04 pm
Bly julle is almal veilig terug. Dankie vir die RR, dis ongelooflike lees- en kykstof vir ons dromers!!!
 :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: muzzy on July 12, 2010, 08:13:18 pm
well done sounds awesome
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: bmad on July 12, 2010, 08:17:33 pm
SGB, having read your report this morning and the story and people fresh in my mind, i was surprised to come across one of your fellow travelers this afternoon.

The latest copy of Getaway magazine (June 2010) has an interesting interview with Johan Bakkes on his new book called "To Hell and Gone".
I am assuming this is the same character, as a picture can tell a thousand words and the one in the mag has a good tale to tell.


 
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: TrailBlazer on July 12, 2010, 09:23:56 pm
Just one word here...

Respect!!!

What an experience
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Gerrard on July 12, 2010, 10:13:53 pm
EISH !
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: JustBiking on July 12, 2010, 10:28:17 pm
Great trip and report Stefan! :thumleft:

As KnopKop said "One day when I'm bike ....."  :biggrin:  :drif:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: bradleys on July 13, 2010, 08:27:33 am
What a great read ,thanks for sharing,I spent nearly 3 years at Rundu ,  was in 32 batt, you sure brought lots of memories back ,good and bad,Iwould love to go back to get some closure on some issues,the bridge at Menongue is just like it was ,just missing that lekker foofie slide.It must have been awesome to ride those tracks,can rememberwhen the kwevooils used to come up to us hitting a mine ,we would go without rats for a few days,shit really a good read. Would also like to do the Doodsakker,have been chatting to a few  fellow dogs to do the trip ,maybe next year. :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Fenderbender on July 13, 2010, 01:32:05 pm
5 Star trip and 5 star report !! :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: >Herman< on July 13, 2010, 01:52:36 pm
SGB,

After re-reading this report I came to the following conclusion......

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

This freakin awesome manne! RESPECT for doing it, albeit with a back-up Cruiser or 2.  :mwink:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Jacko on July 13, 2010, 02:41:49 pm
Shew! Stunning!

Your story just whets the appetite. One day, one day! Sooner than later hopefully.

I met up with Bakkes and Kallie at Felix's camp on my Richtersveld trip. They were excited about the trip. Bakkes is an interesting chap, he is an expert ear chewer.

And a kuieraar. He'll be at my place on Saturday evening.

Essentiale? Check!

 :peepwall:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: wayneh on July 13, 2010, 03:27:57 pm
Great RR. Awesome pics. Big thanks for sharing, SBG.  :drif:

...Would also like to do the Doodsakker,have been chatting to a few  fellow dogs to do the trip ,maybe next year. :thumleft:
Mmmmmm. T'is calling us, G  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Ama ride ride on July 13, 2010, 03:36:59 pm
 :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:

Breat RR SGB.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Varadero on July 13, 2010, 04:22:02 pm
I should never have read this report, an old itch is now really starting to itch  :biggrin:

Awesome trip guys  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: allover on July 13, 2010, 04:22:57 pm
Respect is all I can say....RESPECT
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: GG on July 13, 2010, 05:22:25 pm
fantastic and well written thanks
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: ernies on July 13, 2010, 09:15:28 pm
What an adventure!!!  ;D
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: BigEd on July 13, 2010, 10:34:10 pm
Shew! Stunning!

Your story just whets the appetite. One day, one day! Sooner than later hopefully.

I met up with Bakkes and Kallie at Felix's camp on my Richtersveld trip. They were excited about the trip. Bakkes is an interesting chap, he is an expert ear chewer.

And a kuieraar. He'll be at my place on Saturday evening.

Essentiale? Check!

 :peepwall:

In jou geval eerder Salusa 45 :pot:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Heimer on July 13, 2010, 10:50:09 pm
Respect is all I can say....RESPECT

+100

Dankie dat jy dit gedeel het.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: sob89 on July 13, 2010, 11:01:43 pm
Awesome trip!
Thanks for sharing
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: KTM BIGGER on July 14, 2010, 04:13:51 am
fan fucking tastic...

lekker
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: THROTTLE JOCKEY on July 14, 2010, 09:53:44 am
Awsome ride well done. :ricky:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Black and Blue on July 14, 2010, 09:24:13 pm
Day 11: Lubango to Flamingo Lodge
Distance: 280 km

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/Camp11.jpg)

We have a leisurely start and ride up the mountain to the “Cristo Rei” (Jesus Christ Statue).  The statue is one of 3 in the world and is a replica of the one found in Rio de Janeiro. Wikipedia describes it as follows: Cristo-Rei (English: Christ the King) is a Catholic monument of Jesus Christ overlooking the city of Lisbon, Portugal. It was inspired by the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and inaugurated on 17 May 1959. At that time, Portugal was being ruled by the President of the Council António de Oliveira Salazar, and it was on his orders that the Cristo-Rei was built.  Jesus has taken a few shots here, which makes this one slightly unique in this trio. We found this choir up there, singing like only Africans can sing, especially for our entertainment.  We handed a few Bibles to them, their appreciation once again a unique experience.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0467.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0478.jpg)

View of the city from the mountain

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0473.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0476.jpg)

Humpata is the next stop.  This is where most of the “Dorsland trekkers” settled in 1878 and the years that followed.  I can see why they settled here, it is a great farming area and the remains of their fields, orchards and buildings show that they were working hard and doing well here.  We visit the monument and some graves in the area.  I am fortunate to find some of my wife’s ancestors; my father in law was born in Angola as part of this outing.  What I can tell you, is to get here from Rustenburg with an ox wagon is not for girls…..   Imagine if those people had motorbikes…..  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0481.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0485.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0491.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0493.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0496.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0501.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0504.jpg)

We were back on the tar, direction Namibe.  Leba pass is next touristy thing to do around here, and we thoroughly enjoyed it.  The Yamaha’s front wheel still did not want to hold air (tubeless tyre leaking on the bead) – even after the panel beating in Lubango, so we quickly put in an 18” tube.  Problem solved.  Some of the bikes got “tested” a little more than the others, great fun coming down here.  You drop about 1km in altitude in 10 km of road winding its way down the mountain.  The ride is calmed by trucks with big blocks of granite on the back.  There are also some of these blocks lying on the side of the road, evidence of truck brakes failing here.  Must be a hairy experience….  We stop for lunch at the market at the foot of the pass.  The Portuguese rolls and bananas work well and hit the spot.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0514.jpg)

New Mitas E10 - very soft compound.  [EDIT:  I have since been lead to believe that the new shipment will have a harder compound.]

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0519.jpg)

And if the tyre looks like that, the crash bars look like this.....

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0526.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0520.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0530.jpg)

From here, the mango trees rapidly disappear and the landscape gradually dries.  Within an hour we are in the desert.  I can start feeling the air cooling off, a sign that we are nearing the coast.  A dry river bed near Namibe shows some life again and we arrive at the garage just outside of the town.  We fill up here and Gert discovers that the rear sub frame of the HP2 has broken on both sides.  We need a welding machine.  Bit of a tall order, but doable I think to myself.  We look on the GPS for a place that might have a machine under Points of Interest and a few possibilities come up.  We did not need to look on the GPS, just on the side of the road there is a guy busy welding the garage’s sign!  Wow!  We approach him, he is from Portugal, speaks English and is out here doing contract work for a while.  He does not have a welding helmet, his power connection is dodgy, but he welds the frame together in a flash and we are ready to go again once Gert as re-assembled his frame and extra fuel tank under the seat.  Gert offers the welder a six pack of beers and a Biker Bible.  He declines the beers and takes the Bible.  Go figure…..

Gert: "It was real a real humbling experience when the guy chose the Bible over the beers... makes one think about priorities!

In defense of my HP I must say that I overloaded the tail section. The bike has done 30 000km of similar terrain and the rear frame just got fatigued. I will have to redo the welding job at some stage."

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0550.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0551.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0558.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0559.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0565.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0566.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0570.jpg)

Once all filled up, we go for a coffee on the beachfront to celebrate our arrival.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0575.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0576.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0577.jpg)

Then off towards Flamingo lodge.  The road towards Tombua is also brand new and smooth tar.  Although the tar riding offered a good rest it was now becoming a bit boring.  I was quite happy when we saw the turn-off to Flamingo which took us back to the good stuff.  All the riders had a sudden wake-up and we could focus on the riding again for a change.  We gave our best and found the beach and the lodge just when the sun dipped into the ocean.  Great views and a bunch of happy campers arrived at Flamingo Lodge.  

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0588.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0608.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0624.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0627.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0629.jpg)

A great place to stay over.  Owned by Rico Sako, an ex South African who came to settle here in 1992 when he realized how good the fishing was.  We had a shower, a great fish dinner (some of the best I have ever had) and slept in beds in bungalows.  We were in 5 star luxury and slept like babies.

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0638.jpg)

(http://gi124.photobucket.com/groups/p18/PGZA9E53OQ/IMGP0640.jpg)
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: BlueBull2007 on July 15, 2010, 01:27:28 am
Excellent report Stefan, thank you very much. A serious contender for the RR of the year.

Huge respect to you guys!  :hello2: :hello2: :hello2:

BTW, where are those other photos that were rumoured to be coming out?  :deal:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Plothond on July 15, 2010, 10:24:57 pm
As usual, one of the forum stalwarts delivers a fantastic report of a great and memorable trip.
Well done all

I notice in one of the pics that you ALL had neck braces. Was this by pure accident or was it planned. ?
Did you (as a group) decide on certain "musts"?
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 15, 2010, 10:37:46 pm
I notice in one of the pics that you ALL had neck braces. Was this by pure accident or was it planned. ?
Did you (as a group) decide on certain "musts"?

Hi Plot, thanks for the kind words.  No, we did not discuss the braces up-front, it just so happened that all arrived with them.

There were a few "musts" agreed up-front - things like evacuation insurance, sharing of spares and tools and stuff to make the luggage light.  Generally the planning was not very detailed, but all in the group were experienced enough to know what to bring / not bring and it worked out.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 15, 2010, 10:42:40 pm
I just want to say thanks to all who read and commented on the story.  I am astounded by all the feedback.   :) Also all the PM's, etc - thank you!

I am just waiting for some more pics, will post some more in due course.   

If you have asked me something and you have not had a reply, please PM again.  I have been a bit snowed under with e-mails and stuff since I got back and have still not completely caught up....   :o

Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Beserker on July 15, 2010, 11:27:03 pm

I am just waiting for some more pics, will post some more in due course.   


SGB, you mention:

-   Police clearance for vehicle
-   Proof of vehicle insurance in Angola

Were it checked? 
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 16, 2010, 08:16:11 am

I am just waiting for some more pics, will post some more in due course.   


SGB, you mention:

-   Police clearance for vehicle
-   Proof of vehicle insurance in Angola

Were it checked? 

Police clearance was checked at the border when we entered.  Insurance was on the list of requirements, we were never asked to show it.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Beserker on July 16, 2010, 09:23:23 am
Police clearance was checked at the border when we entered.  Insurance was on the list of requirements, we were never asked to show it.

Thx...I sent you the map btw.

Hopefully you have settled back by now, I know for one, when I come back I always go through a phase where I think why bother? The way I explained it to my wife (the reason why I do come back) was "post natal depression"   ;D
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: J-mo on July 16, 2010, 01:08:48 pm
Great RR SGB.

I was actually surprised that the Governor of Cuito Cuanavale asked if any of you were in the SADF. I wonder what she would have done if you said yes. I thought that it should have been bygones by now. Another thing I found very interesting is that the Cubans were under the impression that the SAFD lost the war in Angola against FAPLA. I mean, the Cubans were there 1983, they should know better. Not that it matters much, maybe just their interpretation.

Are there lots of changes in Angola ±30 years on? I remember, we used to operate north of the Kunene at Xangongo, and to me Angola was then a beautiful wild place to be. We used to see elephant tracks, but never an Elephant.

As Berm_Rooster said, I would definitely put an Angola trip on my bucketlist.

Thanks again for a great report
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on July 16, 2010, 01:32:59 pm
Extracts from Fidel Castro's speech during the 30th anniversary of the Cuban military mission in Angola:

"Titanic efforts by the Cuban political and military high command, despite the serious threat of hostilities which hung over us as well, resulted in assembling the forces needed to deliver a decisive blow against the South African forces. As in 1975, our homeland rose to the occasion. A flood of troops and weaponry rapidly crossed the Atlantic, landing on Angola's south coast in order to attack in the south west, in the direction of Namibia. At the same time, 800 km to the east, special units advanced towards Cuito Cuanavale, where they joined up with retreating Angolan forces to set up a lethal trap for the powerful South African forces heading for that large airbase.

This time, Cuban troops in Angola numbered 55,000.

So while in Cuito Cuanavale the South African troops were bled, to the southwest 40,000 Cuban and 30,000 Angolan troops, supported by some 600 tanks, hundreds of pieces of artillery, 1,000 anti-aircraft weapons and the daring MIG-23 units that secured air supremacy, advanced towards the Namibian border, ready to literally sweep up the South African forces deployed along that main route.

A great deal could be said about all the engagements and incidents in that campaign.

Here with us are Comrade Polo Cinta Frías, the bold commander of the Angola southern front at that time, and many comrades who took part in the actions of those glorious, unforgettable days.

The resounding victories in Cuito Cuanavale, especially the devastating advance by the powerful Cuban contingent in southwest Angola, spelled the end of foreign aggression.

The enemy had to set aside its usual arrogance and sit down at the negotiating table. The talks culminated in the Peace Accords for Southern Africa, signed by South Africa, Angola and Cuba at the UN headquarters in December 1988. "
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: J-mo on July 16, 2010, 02:14:05 pm
Interesting, maybe we did not loose the war, we just quit while ahead. :happy11:

Thanks for clearing that up.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Rynet on July 16, 2010, 04:26:21 pm
Man what a great trip -and report !   :drif:  thanks for posting and muchas respect guys  :thumleft:

Now I also have a burning desire to do this trip  , but I need much more sand riding experience , and stamina , and mechanical knowledge , geez this trip is not for wuzzies hey !  :ricky: :ricky: Let me go and start practising  ;)
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: eikeboom on July 17, 2010, 12:40:13 am
On winning or losing battles and wars - all sides usually claim that they have actually won the war
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: MrBig on July 17, 2010, 09:27:13 am
Awesome! Loved every moment of it.  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: DE on July 17, 2010, 10:37:48 pm
SGB - What a trip.  Thanks for sending me the link to this site.  Now I have two "problem" sites, this one and the land cruiser club one. Interesting to hear about the hunger for bibles. Good reason to go back.......
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: X Banana Boy on July 21, 2010, 07:26:41 pm
What an awesome trip.  Thanks for sharing.  Just read another one what one of the others wrote.  These are very trips and makes me want to move back - well to do the trips.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: dakardrix on July 24, 2010, 04:10:53 pm
 :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: tankgirl on July 24, 2010, 05:37:21 pm
:notworthy:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Gerrard on July 24, 2010, 07:34:33 pm
On winning or losing battles and wars - all sides usually claim that they have actually won the war

... but end up losing.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Beserker on July 25, 2010, 06:02:05 pm
On winning or losing battles and wars - all sides usually claim that they have actually won the war

... but end up losing.

+1
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: AntonDP on July 26, 2010, 10:24:16 am
Very nice RR.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Would I? on July 26, 2010, 01:52:40 pm
Nice RR. Thanks
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: MOGGIE on July 31, 2010, 05:54:33 pm
Thank you for this lovely RR.
I am starting a bike support with a Unimog and Unimog trailer for trips accross Southern africa. Off the beaten track.
Everything will go into the Mog & trailer. All the rider takes on the bike is himself.
I know a liot of riders will disagree with this idea, but getting older makes it more difficult to take gear on the bike for such a long trip.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Would I? on August 01, 2010, 09:36:02 am
Thank you for this lovely RR.
I am starting a bike support with a Unimog and Unimog trailer for trips accross Southern africa. Off the beaten track.
Everything will go into the Mog & trailer. All the rider takes on the bike is himself.
I know a liot of riders will disagree with this idea, but getting older makes it more difficult to take gear on the bike for such a long trip.

Keep us posted, age and old bones are a terrible thing :biggrin: :biggrin:
Would like to know costs etc. thanks
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Spore on August 03, 2010, 02:32:24 pm
Baie dankie SGB vir uitstekende RR - die gevoelens en herinneringe wat n ou ervaar laat my terugdink aan die tye, as jong laaitie, toe ek PJ Schoeman se boeke gelees het ....! Hierdie is ook een van daardie groot adventure trips waarvan die meeste van ons net kan droom. :thumleft: :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: KwaiPappaGaai on August 07, 2010, 10:03:50 pm
Super epic! I wanna do daat!!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 (Some more pics added see #141)
Post by: SGB on August 08, 2010, 09:08:45 pm
I received some more pics from the team, very nice to have them, I will include some here - stuff that we saw but because I did not take a good picture on the day, the particular experience did not receive the recognition it deserved.  So here are some of Johan and Kallie's pics with a little bit of "explanation" here and there.

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture2.jpg)
Here Martin had to look at Kallie's tooth ache.  Martin is not a dentist, but he is the closest to one.....  Using two small TORX keys as spanners....  It worked.

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture3.jpg)
Bakkes had an England vuvuzela along.  This is the best purpose for it, and we did not have to put up with any noise.....  ;D

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture4.jpg)

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture5.jpg)
At the border post we saw this AIDS education

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture6.jpg)
Friendly officials at the same border.  Check the mags on the Chinese bike

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture7.jpg)
That cold camp site

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture8.jpg)
Close to the Calai ferry.

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture9.jpg)
Intersting local transport - check the kid in the box.

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture10.jpg)
The police escourt in Menongue

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture11.jpg)
Another tank....  This is Angola after all

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture12.jpg)
This lady got her inspiration from a tank too maybe?

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture41.jpg)
Chopper - some spares may still work??

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture13.jpg)
These rolls are good food.

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture14.jpg)

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture16.jpg)
Doing business with the locals is a "massy" affair

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture15.jpg)
We were not so good at cooking, but had a go when it was our turn.  And nobody suffered any after effects....  Go figure.

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture17.jpg)

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture18.jpg)
Fishing....

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture19.jpg)

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture20.jpg)
Main street of Cuvango

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture21.jpg)
Market

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture22.jpg)
Everyone's friend

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture23.jpg)
Chinese architecture at a new station

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture24.jpg)
Nice riding

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture25.jpg)
They do draw crowds....

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture26.jpg)
Lunch

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture27.jpg)
Did  say Flamingo Lodge has great food??  

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture28.jpg)

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture29.jpg)

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture44.jpg)
The river and Flamingo lodge on the beach

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture31.jpg)
No Entry to nowhere

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture32.jpg)
The camp sites were great, I need some leave!!

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture42.jpg)

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture40.jpg)

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture45.jpg)

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture36.jpg)
Even the Himbas ride them

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture34.jpg)
But most still ride these

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture35.jpg)
Dad and lads

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y205/tjoenie/Angola%20more/Picture47.jpg)
Life is tough...
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: Rocstompa on August 08, 2010, 10:59:41 pm
Great photos, thanks.

Makes you want to start planing a long trip.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: Nigel X on August 09, 2010, 10:18:25 am
Brilliant!!!

Love the many photo's.

Respect.

These 'bikers' were mentioned in an article on the 'Acre of Death' story in the latest Drive Out magazine.

Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: Tweets on August 10, 2010, 08:15:10 pm
Nice RR and pics  guys.   :thumleft: :thumright: One day when I'm big, and have lots of owes working for me, and I dont have to worry about them for a month,I'm gonna go look see dees places. :biggrin:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: 2 Stroke Dan on August 10, 2010, 09:24:38 pm
Tweety, just take leave and go. Berserker, Watkykjy and myself are going there in 26 days time. Hoe lekker brag ek nou.
This looks like a wonderful trip from your RR.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: navigator on August 13, 2010, 12:38:08 am
Dankie Stefan!
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: SGB on September 05, 2010, 06:53:21 pm
There is a shortened version of the story in the September Superbike mag.  Interesting to see how much has been said and written about the Yam since this little outing....  And I am having a great time on mine too.....
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: See Gravel Will Travel on September 09, 2010, 05:34:11 am
SGB and friends, ......Ja Swaer :ricky:.....Man alive this is ....it makes me proud, glad to see y'all had Bibles with!! :3some:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: Adventurer on September 09, 2010, 05:25:38 pm
There is a shortened version of the story in the September Superbike mag.  Interesting to see how much has been said and written about the Yam since this little outing....  And I am having a great time on mine too.....

Saw the write up in SBK, well done, good story.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: SGB on September 11, 2010, 05:51:10 pm
Thanks Adv, Clinton Pienaar was very keen on the story since the planning stages.  It was good to work with him and I enjoyed learning a few things from him.  Nice person.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: Potchdaddy on September 12, 2010, 11:44:11 am
In todays Raport "Tyd" magazine (12 september) is Johan Bakkes' version of the trip - pg 20. Thought some of you might be interrested in reading it?  ;)
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: SGB on September 12, 2010, 06:26:08 pm
Here is the link to the on-line version of Bakkes's story too. 

http://www.rapport.co.za/Reis/Nuus/Dis-weer-ons-en-hulle-20100911

Lekker Bakkes!  Tamaties in 'n topboks werk net eenvoudig nie.....  Maar in 'n yskas op 'n Landcruiser ry hulle fantasties.   Dankie Johan.  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: Oetie on September 12, 2010, 08:16:33 pm
Ek het die artikel in Rappport gelees, hou van die "ons" en "hulle" vergelykings :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: GO GIRL on September 12, 2010, 08:24:16 pm
This is PURE ADVENTURE where man and mettle/metal are taken through so many facets.....,
a diversity of 'battlefields' what an ADVENTURE... :thumleft:

I have so enjoyed this.... ;D :thumleft: :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010 - Some pics added, see #141
Post by: myni on September 14, 2010, 09:01:37 pm
Hoe lewer 'n mens kommentaar op so 'n storie?  Want dit is wat dit is: 'n verhaal van mense.  Die agtergrond is 'n land wat in puin gele is deur 'n verwoestende oorlog - burger en oorgrens ... alles om ander se belange te bevorder ... en soos altyd "as die olifantbulle baklei, word die gras vertrap".
Die karakters is uiteenlopend: van mense se soeke na rus, vrede en verlossing ... iets groter as hulle om hul gebroke lewens sin te gee; die korrupte amptenary wat die uiteinde van eksploitasie is; die nuwe uitbuiters; die vlugtelinge wat 'n nuwe lewe en heenkome soek - en dan die groep op 'n pelgrimstog:  is dit om ou spoke tot rus te bring; is dit om die "Onsienlike" te soek; is dit 'n behoefte om te ontsnap van die alledaagse, of is dit waar manne hulself konfronteer en ontdek ... om tot 'n besef te kom van wat "lewe" is?
Wonderlike inspirasie - maar tog so onbeskore vir die meeste van ons.
Soos wat ek dit lees, geniet en opgewonde raak ... so ook voel ek die beklemming om my hart: sal ek dit kan doen?
Dankie vir iets tot nadenke ... veel meer as net 'n avontuur deur 'n bekende, dog vreemde, landskap.
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: SGB on September 16, 2010, 10:30:31 pm
Hi Myni, dankie vir die diep kommentaar, ek moes dit 2 keer lees....  So iets gaan meer or die mense, die "ons" en "hulle" in al sy fasette, as enigeiets anders. Dit is wonderlik om mense se reaksie op sekere gebeure te sien en hulle so beter te leer ken.  Ons almal het 'n gemaksone.  Die uitdaging is om ongemaklik te raak in jou gemaksone, en uit te klim.  Jy kan nie op water loop as jy in die boot bly sit nie.....

Also thanks again to all of you for the comments and PM's and phone calls, etc.   The trip had many aspects and resulted in a lot of discussion.  The people, the war, the Yamaha and a whole lot more.  I have really enjoyed to see this and listen to all the thoughts.  Thank you!  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: acidfreak on September 17, 2010, 09:16:23 am
Enjoyed reading about your adventure!!! Thanks for sharing!! :thumleft:
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Vosperd on October 05, 2010, 09:42:16 am
great report and respect for taking on all that sand especially to you and Jan with the yammie. I have seen Angola from Ruacana, Cahama, Lubango, Namibe and Tombua. Also have a picture of the Venessa Seafood where she just is completely on top of the sand - just dont know how to post it.

All was done by car off course... so maybe one day i will have the cahunnas to try it on a katoom...

Thanks again
Title: Re: Angola Doodsakker Ekspedisie Jun 2010
Post by: Noneking on May 26, 2016, 06:43:04 am
Awesome read, pity the photos aren't showing up any more..... :-[