Wild Dog Adventure Riding

General => About South Africa... => Topic started by: LeonDude on April 19, 2011, 08:32:16 pm

Title: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: LeonDude on April 19, 2011, 08:32:16 pm
Book Review – Geological Journeys
A traveller's guide to South Africa's rocks and landforms
By Nick Norman and Gavin Whitfield

ISBN 978 – 1 – 11007 – 062 – 2

It’s been a long time since I’ve been able to enjoy and appreciate a book like this. Written for the laymen, it explains all the terms that are used in the book.

The book takes in all the main highways in South Africa, and takes you on a hitherto unprecedented journey through South Africa. It highlights not the Fauna and Flora, but rather the geological aspects of the country.
We ride over these wonders with our motorbikes on every trip that we do, but this book will give you the insight of what you are riding over. It explains why Barberton is as spectacular as it is. It explains our country in terms of the last 3500 million years. Where needed, it takes a side journey into places like the cape fold mountains with the fantastic Meiringspoort and Swartberg pass and tells of how these mountains were created. In Golden Gate the authors explain about ancient swamps, great desserts and outpourings of lava on a truly continental scale that created the Drakensberg mountains.
From east to west and from north to south, this book will give you a great insight into the country in which you live, and through which we love riding.

Before starting on the highways, the book gives a thorough overview of the ancient processes that formed our country, and explains how certain types of rocks are formed.

Although the book takes in mainly the highways, it is not difficult to see how you can use the book to understand the geography of the country even off the beaten track where we travel. In fact, where we travel the context of the book becomes even more valuable. 
If you have ever marveled at the mountains, great plains and mineral riches of South Africa, this book is for you.
It is, indeed, a fantastic book to read.
(And a great big thanks to Cave Girl for introducing me to the book!)


Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: 2phat on April 19, 2011, 08:46:06 pm
Thank you - right up my alley - will get it! :thumleft:
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: Heimer on April 19, 2011, 09:28:53 pm
I own that book. Always with me in the bakkie on holidays.

You will certainly enjoy this post (one of the best ever on this forum):

http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=39072.0 

Now there is another (even better) book you must get, too...
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: LeonDude on April 19, 2011, 09:48:09 pm
Thanks Heimer, will try to lay my hands on it.  :thumleft:
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: GundaGunda on May 08, 2011, 06:38:55 pm
I own that book. Always with me in the bakkie on holidays.

. . . . .

Always travels with me  - goes in my top-box on longer trips.

I second Leon's comments - a must have book for WDs
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: Rooies on May 08, 2011, 06:45:23 pm
I got this book about 2 years ago based on Gunda's recommendation.  Never looked back!

Two books that always accompany me while travelling:
1.  Discovering South Africa (TV Bulpin)
2. Geological Journeys
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: Geotraveller on July 02, 2011, 06:22:11 am
FAntastic book had it since publication. Trying to steal my dad's original Bulpin copy but he is still crafty even at 86!
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: Stofdonkie on July 04, 2011, 01:43:36 pm
Books that always accompany me while travelling:
1.  Discovering South Africa (TV Bulpin)
2. Geological Journeys
3. A Glimpse of South Africa by Matie Taljaart
4. Karoo by Lawrence Green
5. The Story of Earth & Life by McCarthy and Rubidge
6. Timeless Karoo by Jonathan Deal

Have added some to your list. 3&4 my favourites.
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: Geotraveller on July 04, 2011, 07:10:10 pm
Have a look at "The glamour of Prospecting" by Fred Cornell. One hard bastard that was.
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: GundaGunda on July 08, 2011, 02:21:53 pm
. . .
1.  Discovering South Africa (TV Bulpin)
. . . .

Thanks for the heads-up.

Found it in hardcover at Bargain Books for about R150. 6th Edition

A bit of a door stopper to take on a trip, but what an amazingly detailed reference to do research before or after a trip.
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: KiLRoy on July 08, 2011, 03:01:33 pm
Thanx - ordered it from kalahari.net
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: Rooies on July 08, 2011, 07:23:30 pm
. . .
1.  Discovering South Africa (TV Bulpin)
. . . .

. . .
A bit of a door stopper to take on a trip, but what an amazingly detailed reference to do research before or after a trip.

Indeed, not the peeeerfect book for the bike, but great in the car.  I love the format of the book as it takes you on the routes between towns, highlighting landmarks, geographical attributes, local folk stories, economical history, etc.  I consider this a gem in my collection.
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: LeonDude on February 27, 2012, 01:22:52 pm
I've just finished reading "The Story of Earth and Life" as mentioned in some of the replies to this thread.
Wow, what a great book. It changed the way I look at the environment when I go on bike trips. I now look out for lots of things that I would previously have missed. (Just ask Slakkie, he had to ride home a 10KG tree fossil for me the other day!)  :biggrin:

I can seriously suggest this book for a very inspiring read.  :thumleft:
If you have kids in the house, this book is surely a must - have.
Title: Re: Book Review – Geological Journeys
Post by: roxenz on February 27, 2012, 02:24:58 pm
I read widely (just love reading), and being a geologist, I obviously read a lot of earth science books.  For me "the Story of Earth and Life" stands out from all the other books on the history of the planet.  It is so well written that it reads effortlessly, the illustrations are clear and helpful.  Any one with a bit of common sense will be able to understand the authors.  As a South African geologist, I am immensely proud of this publication and have handed out a fair number to overseas visitors, all of whom have loved it.

If you are interested in geology and paleontology, this is the one book you must have.  Then you'll see why I say "rocks make sense"!