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Messages - Fudmucker

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1
BMW Airheads / Re: Practical problem solving
« on: August 11, 2018, 03:44:50 pm »
If you know a surgeon or somebody who works in operating theatres,
try get hold of some old surgical clamps that are no longer suitable for clinical use.
They are still very useful for mechanical purposes.
They have a little clip that keeps them closed.
They also come in useful shapes.
The following users thanked this post: VaalBaas

2
BMW Airheads / Re: Practical problem solving
« on: August 10, 2018, 09:34:52 pm »
Interesting. Thank you.

I have only done this once and I didn't do the engine stud removal.  :sip:
It was fiddly, but I managed...
I had the engine out!  ;)

Getting the wires connected was the pain, though.
The following users thanked this post: eberhard

3
General Bike Related Banter / Re: Old biker?...Maybe one day!
« on: August 09, 2018, 10:38:51 am »
You don't stop riding because you get old...

you get old because you stop riding.














The following users thanked this post: RobC

4
I'm going to have a nervous breakdown or an ulcer or both before this is over...  :homework:   :help:

Hang in there, Ms Zog...
Think of the evenings on that big porch away from the mozzies and bugs...
knowing that you are paying off on your own piece of America.

(Which, if ZA's Economic Freedom Fighters are to be believed,
was stolen from the Apalachees, Seminole or Miccosukee or all three!)
The following users thanked this post: Mrs. Zog

5
Aviation Board / Re: The Convair 340 crash moloto Pretoria
« on: July 19, 2018, 01:09:19 pm »
This is were it gets interesting. We need more comments from the actual pilots.
The pilot in command passed in the crash. :'(

I believe Bwana meant from the WD's that actually are pilots...

I am not a pilot, but when I was a kid my father operated a series of private aircraft out of Wonderboom.
All airports have rules regarding the departure and arrival paths.
If you look on Google Earth, you will see that the entire area to the West, South and East of Wonderboom is built up.
There is some open space between Wonderboom and the N4 highway, but the only open space is to the North of the N4.
Perhaps licensed pilots here can confirm that, when taking off on Runway 29, (i.e. to the West)
aircraft must turn RIGHT to go around the hills to the North of Wonderboom.

Where the aircraft crashed was roughly in line with the approach to land at 29 (i..e. from the East)
Had the plane gone down ANYWHERE else from that point to the actual runway, it would have gone down in densely populated areas.
The resulting death toll, injuries and damage to property would undoubtedly have been substantially worse.

I reckon the pilot did what he could with what he had to minimise the consequences.

Edit: In case runway numbers confuse you:



Each runway has 2 numbers (180 degrees apart) indicating the magnetic heading of the approach line to the nearest 10 degrees of angle.
The following users thanked this post: RobC

6
A most fetching and infinitely manageable coiffure, Mme Zog !

We are all glad that you will be together at Christmas.
Mr Zog Snr will be with you too.
It was not to be in person, so he will be there in spirit.
Go and fish a day in his memory...

(PS: Better this way than later... like somewhere en route)
The following users thanked this post: Mrs. Zog

7
I took comfort in these words in my own loss:

"Death is nothing at all. It does not count.
I have only slipped away into the next room.
Nothing has happened. Everything remains exactly as it was.
I am I, and you are you, and the old life that we lived so fondly together is untouched, unchanged.
Whatever we were to each other, that we are still.

Call me by my old name, speak to me in the easy way which you always used.
Put no difference into your tone. Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow.
Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes we enjoyed together.
Play, smile, think of me. Pray for me.

Let my name be the household word that it always was.
Let my name be spoken without effort, without the ghost of a shadow upon it.
Life means all that it ever meant. It is the same as it ever was.
There is absolutely unbroken continuity.
What is this death but a negligible accident?
Why should I be out of your mind because I am out of your sight?
I am but waiting for you, for an interval somewhere very near, just around the corner.
All is well. Nothing is past, nothing is lost.
One brief moment and all will be as it was before, only better; infinitely happier and forever."

Henry Scott Holland


I Did Not Die

Do not stand at my grave and forever weep.
I am not there; I do not sleep.

I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
I am the gentle autumn’s rain.

When you awaken in the morning’s hush
I am the swift uplifting rush of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and forever cry.
I am not there.
I did not die.

Mary E Faye

In closing, these words:

And in the stillness of the night, when the pain it really starts
Stretch out a little with your mind and draw me to your heart
For I am always right in there, always by your side
For you have been, all my life’s days, my joy, my love, my pride.


The following users thanked this post: grizz, cheesy

8
Good Food & Braai / Re: Vegetarian/Vegan recipes (for bad hunters)
« on: June 10, 2018, 06:29:34 pm »
Vegetarian Potato + Celery soup

Ingedients:
1 Med Potato
1 Med Onion
2 sticks celery (leaves on)
1 lt vegetable stock
Fresh parsley
20ml oil
Black pepper
Salt to taste

METHOD:

Chop onions and celery sticks finely.
Fry them in the oil until caramelised.
Add stock and cook on low heat.
Grate the peeled potato into the liquid.
Add parsley and cook until the potato is cooked.
Add cracked black pepper and salt to taste.

(This soup can be eaten straight after cooking.)
The following users thanked this post: Meteor

9
The Comedy Club / Re: Photos that make you think WTF
« on: May 29, 2018, 02:03:00 pm »
How about a 150mm thick 30MPa concrete with 200x200x10mm mesh reinforcement to support...


a 10kl water tank on the ground.
The following users thanked this post: Bliknęrs

10
General Bike Related Banter / Re: Wake up call for us young 'uns.
« on: May 26, 2018, 01:12:55 pm »
The following users thanked this post: RobC

11
General Bike Related Banter / The Silent Killer in us
« on: May 22, 2018, 05:44:18 pm »
I have always been an advocate of sharing experiences with others as a way of spreading wisdom.
The subject I wish to raise now is one that many have probably not considered, but should – FATIGUE.

Recently I experienced the effects of fatigue while riding. I was most fortunate not the suffer the possible permanent effects and I lived to tell this tale. Returning from the GS Trophy, I was riding my trusted 1200GS at around the legal speed limit near Klerksdorp. Having started off from Vanderkloof Dam at sunrise, we had planned to stop at Potchefstroom to have brunch. My eyelids were getting heavy and I looked forward to the meal stop.

I choose to ride without music. Suddenly I heard a change in the sounds in my helmet.
The road rumble had gone. I realised I had experienced a micro-sleep at speed. I was no longer on the road!

I was riding on the left shoulder, rapidly approaching a large road sign on three poles. My adrenaline charged awareness told me I was not going to fit under it. I would have to ride around it. One word ran through my mind… GENTLY! My off-road rider training kicked in automatically. I stood up and applied brakes front and rear. I gently used counter steering to avoid the road sign and rode between it and the fence on its left. I saw an access road in front of me and knew that I had to ride up the embankment and I reduced speed even further. I stopped on the access road and put the side-stand out, killing the engine. I put both hands on my tank bag and lowered my head.

I HAD SURVIVED!

Some minutes later, my riding companions caught up to me. I just said: “I have to stop and rest!”
We proceeded into Klerksdorp and I rested over brunch.
We continued home without further incident.

I am writing this not to discuss or to dwell on what COULD have happened. Anyone can do so by themselves. I am appealing to all who ride to realise that fatigue catches you QUICKLY. It could have only been a few seconds of lost attention, but I now know what death looks like.

If you feel your attention even just wandering slightly, STOP IMMEDIATELY!

At the first safe place along the road, pull off and break your ride! Break the routine that is creating the fatigue. Walk around the bike. Drink some water. Eat some biltong, dry sausage, nuts or dry fruit. Avoid sugar – it causes blood sugar level spikes and troughs that affect your alertness. Close your eyes while you do to rest the optical nerves. Breathe deeply and deliberately.

DON’T WAIT FOR THE NEXT TOWN! You may not reach it alive!

The experience has changed me and how I ride. I have identified possible health causes that I will act upon.
I have resolved not to ride such long distances without breaks anymore.
I will stop every hour to rest, increasing the rest duration every time.
I will use fuel stops to really rest and to close my eyes – even take a short nap.

Learn from my mistake - you may not survive a similar experience.
The following users thanked this post: AfricaOffroad, BMWPE, RobC, Bundu, Tiger8, BigDave

12
:blob10: :blob3: :blob5: :blob6: :blob7: :blob8: :blob9: :wav: :hello2: 
HAPPY BURBDAY Miesies Zog !
 :thumleft:
The following users thanked this post: Mrs. Zog

13
Garage, Projects & Restorations / Re: R100RT rebuild
« on: May 03, 2018, 01:36:12 pm »
This is how to open up the frame and engine:



Coils and such all tucked away inside the curved cover.

Edit:

Another neat alternative:

The following users thanked this post: zebra - Flying Brick

14
New Member Introductions / Re: Introduction Ryno
« on: April 08, 2018, 04:27:03 am »
Welcome. You came to the right place. Everyone here loves BMW bikes!!!

...except those who don't, like 2SD.  ::)

Enjoy the ride, R4C3 !   :sip:
The following users thanked this post: R4C3

15
Good opening line in a book:

"I have an Oupa in Africa..."


It's been done before, sort of: "I had a farm in Africa,..."

My eternal admiration for whoever can complete the sentence without googling and name the author and book. NO CHEATING!

I say this because I'm a book slut of the worst kind, and I read, read, read. I love books. When nephew Zog was here (age 25 I think), I mentioned Ernest Hemingway. His response? "Who is Ernest Hemingway?" I died a little inside.  :-[

Of course I was paraphrasing Karen Blixen “I had a farm in Africa, at the foot of the Ngong Hills.”

(book slut = read any book?)
I have a friend who devours books and is disgusted with me.
I only read books when I am on holiday and selectively away from all electronic media.
That is because the act of reading print puts me to sleep within a chapter...  :bueller:
The following users thanked this post: Motties

16
Good opening line in a book:

"I have an Oupa in Africa..."
The following users thanked this post: Oubones

17
Aviation Board / Re: Aircraft Gooi
« on: March 27, 2018, 03:33:56 pm »
A great aircraft...

but the Able Dog (AD-1) Skyraider was arguably better:



The US only took it out of service when replaced by the A10.
In a ground support role, it could hang around the battle field for 8 hours.

The biggest problems of carrier-based Corsair, Hellcat and Skyraider aircraft occurred when a pilot wanting to land was waved off due to having a wrong approach line.
Inexperienced pilots would hit the throttle too hard and the big supercharged radial motor would rotate the aircraft about the propeller and slam into the sea or the carrier deck.
The following users thanked this post: ButchH

18
BMW Airheads / Maintenance... WTF... ANGST... Relief!
« on: March 25, 2018, 05:33:14 pm »
So, I am fairly conversant with the G/S electrical system.
The old battery in my Paralever GS is DEAD and I remove it to get a new one.
The new one is aftermarket and the poles are reversed, so I look at redirecting the cables to suit.
I come across a standard G/S fuse box attached to the frame.
Then I see there are no wires leading to it...

WTF ! ?  :o  Have I got an electrical system with ZERO fuse protection?  :eek7:

I methodically cut all the cable ties around the wiring loom looking for clues.
Apart from my own installed GPS power cable with in-line fuse, I see nothing. :patch:

I sit down on a crate and contemplate the options... 

Then I go back to the other side of the bike and look further.
I spot a wiring loom leading back on the exhaust side.
Is that a workshop computer coupling port behind the exhaust side cover? Surely not?

Reaching through the gaping hole where the battery must come,
I remove the lid and spy a row of nice neat paddle fuses...

RELIEF!

I go back to getting the battery in place and discover the aftermarket doesn't fit the cradle due to corner protrusions.
I consider the options / modifcations  :deal: and decide on the way forward.

I Vespa :ricky: back to the battery shop for a refund (thank you!) and zoom up the N1South to the dealer for an OEM battery.

Twice the price, twice the warranty and it fits... ::)

Now just to fit the bigger GS tank I had resprayed and it is ready for the Great Gathering.  ;D


 


 
The following users thanked this post: pietas

19
I have been there myself before - and friends and family are what you need for keeping an even keel in life - and on the Jonboat.
Debt can be a killer and not being allowed to work in the field where you were skilled and qualified in is a real bummer.

So keep your chin up, keep maintaining your dignity through working at what you can.
With a good woman by your side, half your battle is won.
With a bunch of good friends here on WD, the other half is well on its way.

Every week I find there are gems of people here.
We will do our bit where we can to help .
The following users thanked this post: RobC

20
Let us just take a quiet moment to remember that Mrs. Zog has one of these (http://www.mossberg.com/product/maverick-88-security-31046/) and knows how to use it...  ::)

Good choice for home defence...  :thumleft:

...and erring spouses?
The following users thanked this post: Mrs. Zog

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