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Offline Biesie

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #40 on: June 27, 2012, 09:47:41 pm »
Lekker Charlie  :thumleft: :thumleft:

Ek vrek oor die XTZ 750  :drif: Dalk moet ek weer old school gaan met my vlge bike  :-\
 

Offline SwampDonkey

Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #41 on: June 27, 2012, 10:54:05 pm »
And so, Day 3 had arrived and I was more than ready to get the wheels rolling. I had my morning coffe to get me into gear and by 8 o'clock or so I was under way towards the border at Namaacha. I arrived with no fuss and was only held up in the Mozambique side of the border post as the officials at the counter wanted to see on the map where I was going and were keen to see my Drift HD. THey were in no way rude or being a pain in the ass as some officials can be, they were actually interested in my trip and wished me a safe journey and sent me my way with big smiles all round. A great start to the day with an easy border crossing, friendly officials and good weather.

I rode for a few kms and at the little town of radio marconi, I turned left towards Moamba. its about a 50km ride along one of the worst potholed roads I have ridden in years. At times I rode on the gravel track next to the road as it was becoming a nightmare to ride. I loath potholes!!!! After what seemd like a very long time, I popped out in Moamba and onto a dirt road that would take me all the way to Magude. I absolutely loved this stretch of road. At times it was a nice wide gravel road, opther times it was down to a small sandy track. While I was on my way to Moamba, the weather looked as if it might rain, and seeing as I had no rain gear at all I was going to get soaked. BUt as my luck would have it that day, It did rain, but I never saw a single drop of it. the dirt road from Moamba to Magude saw a fair amount of the rain though, and riding those stretches of muddy track proved to be very exciting. I am still not quite sure how I managed to stay on two wheels the entire way as my mud riding ability is truly pathetic.

the road from Radio marconi to Moamba



With the weather coming in



I had read on a ride report on the forum about a road that went from Moamba past Sabie and on to Magude. I rode over the bridge heading towards Sabie from Moamba, but it was a tarred road and I could not remember how long the tar went on for. I rode for a few kms but decided to head back over the bridge and ride the dirt road that I had seen before I turned off to Sabie. By this point I had had enough of tar roads and was itching to get onto something a bit more exciting. I had a good look at my map and on my GPS the T4A showed no road past Sabie to Magude. So I headed north to Magude on a great dirt track, which had dry gravel, soft sand and slick red mud. my little slice of heaven that morning!!



I think I took this picture after having survived a particular muddy section of the road. I slid all over the place but managed to stay standing on the pegs and both wheels right side up...errr down





Once I got to Xinavane, it was back to the tarmac and a quick ride down to ythe beach at Bilene. I had heard that the camping at Palmerias was pretty good, So i went to have a look and seeing as it was mostly empty I decided to stay. And at R45 per night, I couldnt argue with that. I pitched my tent and settled in for a chillout session on the beach with a few cold ones after an excellent days riding.



After having a look around and a quick swim in perfectly clear water, I pulled out my map again to see how far I still had to go to get to Pomene in the north where my friends were having their family get together. It was then that i noticed a little icon/symbol thingy for a shipwreck between Xai Xai and Vilancoulos. I immediately stated loking to see if I could get there by bike and went to fetch my garmin to see if it had any more info than my paper map had on the area. As it turned out they were very similar and only showed two tracks leading down to the beach where the wreck was supposed to be. It didnt take me long to decide to make this little detour and go shipwreck hunting out in the middle of nowhere...

my route for day three of the trip was certainly one of the best.



A few random pics from Bilene











« Last Edit: June 27, 2012, 11:03:22 pm by charliegreger »
Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

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Offline SwampDonkey

Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #42 on: June 28, 2012, 12:12:11 am »
My ride from Hlane up to Bilene had been a fantastic ride and I loved every second of it. it was no the most challenging of rides I have ever done, but it gave me a taste of what Mozambique had to offer in terms of dirt roads. I had ridden some soft stuff as well as a bit of mud, and I was really hoping to have a heap load more beore my trip was over. In my desicion to go look for the shipwreck, I was to have as much sand as I could possibly ask for.

Day 4 arrived and I was up early and had my maps out yet again and had the coffee brewing not long after. By now my paper maps were starting to show signs of abuse, as I kept pulling them out and spent ages pouring over them and wishing I had more time to go explore this place or that one there. But today I was only looking at my route options up to where the wreck could be found. I had spoken to one of the locals at the restaurant at Palmerias and he reckoned I should try find a maritime authority to get permission to ride along the beach to the wreck as driving there was restricted. I had no idea where I would have found such an office in the outback of where I was headed, but kept that thought in the back of my mind incase I ran into any hassles. though how that in itself would have helped me I dont know?

by the time I had wandered down to have breakfast and my dose of coffee, it was getting on in the morning and when I finally managed to get the wheels turning, it was after 11 oclock. But I was in good spirits as I now had a definite mission in mind and no Idea on how to accomplish it, other than to do it on my bike. I had a very uneventful ride up the coast through Xai Xai and on to Praia do Chidenguele. A speedy did at one point jump out and pull me over, but I had him beat before he could open his mouth to ask for my drivers etc....

I killed the engine as he was walking over, and by the time he arrived I had my paper map out, which I store tucked in the windshield of my bike for easy access. I said " Bon Dia senor, I am hoping you can help me as I am a little lost i think" a fair bit of map ruffling followed and I then continued with something like, " I am looking for a bit boat that has crashed on the beach, near Chidenguele, have you been there do you know where that is??"  plenty of pointing at the map and tapping my finger on different place names.

well, it worked a treat. he didnt even ask to see my lisence and in about two minutes I had all 5 of his mates standing around trying to explain where Chidenguele was, which I am sure a blind man could have found. After a few minutes of getting their directions and wishing me a safe trip, I was on my way again having a chuckle to myself in my helmet.

I arrived in Chidenguele at about 3:30pm and rode up to a place called Paraiso de Chidenguele which was right on the beach. they dont offer camping and only have chalets or rooms avaiable. I sat out on the lawn by the pool having a beer deciding on whether to get a room or go in search of a campsite. In the end I opted to pay for the room for the night and have the option to lock away my kit while I was out looking for the wreck. I wanted to have no extra weight on the bike when I got to the seriosly soft sands and whatever else lay ahead.

With my garmin and map out and room sorted for the night, I figured that seeing as there was still and hour or two before the sunset, I might go have a look around and see if I can find the track that would lead me down to the beach to where the shipwreck was.











I unloaded my bike and dumped all my kit in the room, and went to have a look for the track that would lead me down to the beach. A very comfy room with a very short bed.



I rode back to the tar road and had only about 5kms or so to ride before I had to ride back towards the coast on some little track I had yet to find. NOw each little town or settlement you ride through, the speed limit is 60kms/hr. I was riding out of Chidenguele but still in the 60 zone. At that time of day I was more concerned with my map and deep in thought about the practicalities of riding my bike in thick sand and had completely forgotten about my speed. And sure as shit, a speedy jumped out a mile out of town and I was forced to pull over. Caught speeding was bad enough, knowing that I should have been more careful and was about to pay through the nose I was seriously pissed off with myself. I was to busy insulting myself for my stupidity that I entirely forgot about the "pull out the map and ask for directions" trick that the cop caught me off guard and asked to see my lisence. With a bit of forward thinking on my part, before I left on the trip, I had made colour copies of my lisence and had them laminated. So I happily handed over my fake ID and prepared for the worst.

"good afternoon sir, you were doing 96 in a 60 zone"

"hello officer, my appologies I was too busy thinking about my map that the speed, seems you caught me fair and square"

" you must please pay 4000 mets"

" sorry mate (yes i actually called him that) i dont carry so much money with me"

"its either mets or dollars or euros, you can pay the fine here"

"you will have to escourt me to an atm if you want me to pay here, otherwise you must just issue me with a ticket"

" no no, you must pay here please"

At this point I can see a little smug smile creeping in and I know he not going to let me off. So I did what I had to...... and pulled out my map.

"you see the thing is officer, I was too busy thinking about this here map(map gets opened and a bit of paper ruffling ensues) and not really about my speed, which was my bad for sure.
 however, there is this big boat that has crashed on the beach near here and I am trying to find the little road to the beach from Madendere. Do you know where that is??"

"Madendere, yes that is only 5kms from here if you go that way."

"you mean just up the road that way?'

"yes that is correct"

"And do you know anything about this big boat, you know a shipwreck? you see here on the map there is this little road here which goes here and here, and... oh yes, now I see, there is Madendere. you were right, its not far from here"

And so it went on for about ten minutes, by which time his mates had joined in and they were saying that yes there is a ship there on the beach, but its very sandy and the track to get there is not far ahead. I was handed back my fake ID and with yet more well wishing and handshakes all round I was off to Madendere, which was not far ahead apparently......

Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

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Offline HANS BOORMAN

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #43 on: June 28, 2012, 07:52:41 am »
Blerrie spietkop!!!!!!
DIE LEWE WIL GELEWE WORD!!!!!
 

Ganjora

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #44 on: June 28, 2012, 07:57:29 am »
Paraiso de Chidenguele - how much did the accommodation set you back?
 

Offline TVB

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #45 on: June 28, 2012, 08:05:17 am »
Officer was hoping to see $$   :imaposer:
 

Offline Malibu

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #46 on: June 28, 2012, 08:10:13 am »
Super RR so far... standing by for more... ;D
They call me Judy or Judes...

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Offline dirtyXT

Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #47 on: June 28, 2012, 08:12:03 am »
haha nicely done!!! looking forward to the rest.
Bike history:
Ital jet 50 - sold, DT 50 - scrapped - AR80 - sold DT185 - confiscated  KDX250 - sold ZZR400 - sold KX500 - XT660R Swapped for R1 YZF R1 - sold - XT660Z - sold

 

Offline SwampDonkey

Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #48 on: June 28, 2012, 08:34:21 am »
Paraiso de Chidenguele - how much did the accommodation set you back?

only 1000mets which is about R302. It was an extravegance I know, but why the hell not, I was on holiday after all. In the high season it goes up to 3000mets per night for the room :eek7:
Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

XR650R
 

Offline J-dog

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #49 on: June 28, 2012, 08:39:08 am »
 :coffee2:
 

Ganjora

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #50 on: June 28, 2012, 08:40:58 am »
Paraiso de Chidenguele - how much did the accommodation set you back?

only 1000mets which is about R302. It was an extravegance I know, but why the hell not, I was on holiday after all. In the high season it goes up to 3000mets per night for the room :eek7:

thanks for that.
am following your RR closely.
 

Offline Circlip

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #51 on: June 28, 2012, 08:47:18 am »
The universal language of tjo tjo, pay here and i'll never report it. GREAT RR so far. Please continue.
I'm not as young as I once was, but I can be as young once as I ever was. G.Hazell
Bad planning on your part doesn't constitute an emergency on my part.
 

Offline Misty

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #52 on: June 28, 2012, 08:48:19 am »
Nice RR! Beline looks like heaven indeed! :)
... “There might be a few bumps ahead in the road, but luckily you are well trained in off road riding!” ... PS: for sure, I'm a lot tougher than I look!! ;)
 

Offline GSLaaitie

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #53 on: June 28, 2012, 11:07:21 am »
Well done met daai speedies! Lyk asof jy dit baie geniet het, ek verlang sommer terug!
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Offline Jakkals

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #54 on: June 28, 2012, 01:37:51 pm »
Ag nee donner, dit is 'n baie nice RR en ek geniet dit maar dit laat my vreeslik baie verlang na Moz.

Die nadeel van die RR is dat ek sien daar kom alweer 'n duik in my budget want die RR gaan maak dat my bike binnekort gepak en oppad Moz toe gaan wees.

Ek het al 'n hele paar bike trips deur Moz gedoen en so ook met 'n cage en het nog nooit te veel moeilikheid gehad met die traffic outjies nie, hulle vat kaanse maar as hulle sien jy is nie snaaks nie of maak soos jy gemaak het dan is dit asof hulle jou aanvaar. Ek het ook nog nooit nodig gehad om omkoop geld te gee nie maar het al uit my eie vir hulle koue koeldrank uit my yskas aan gebied toe ek gestop was en hulle like dit nogal. By die grens poste het ek nog nooit moeilikheid gehad nie maar jy moet weet wat om te doen en wat om nie te doen nie.

Baie intresant, ons lees en hoor altyd hier in SA van hoe die speedcops in Moz om koop geld ens soek maar gaan praat bietjie met die mense in Moz en hoor wat het hulle te sę van ons N4 speedcops. :deal:

Weereens hierdie is 'n baie nice RR en ek leef myself in op die hele trip.  :thumleft:


« Last Edit: June 28, 2012, 01:39:12 pm by Jakkals »
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Offline EATMYKTM.

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #55 on: June 28, 2012, 02:04:35 pm »
sub
Got to take the time to do the things you wouldn't normally do.
 

Offline onderbroek

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Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #56 on: June 28, 2012, 03:06:26 pm »
sub
hak vrystaat
 

Offline SwampDonkey

Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #57 on: June 28, 2012, 04:21:51 pm »
While I wait for the video clips to render and upload to the web, Let me continue with my little saga......


OK, So we are on day 4 and I have ridden up to Praia DE Chidenguele and have a room sorted and have now been lucky to escape the speedy on my way to Madendere.

I rode away from the speedy, feeling very lucky and also making a big mental note to keep my right wrist in check on the tar as there was no way in hell that I was going to cough up my hard earned cash to some bloke in the middle of nowhere. I stuck to the speed limit the rest of the way up to Madendere which as it turned out, to be only a few kms up the road. I arrived at a very busy little settlement that was no more than a few ramshackle buildings and hundreds of locals waving down taxis and buses and everyone else selling their wares. I pulled over and asked the nearest person where the track to a village called Dinguini was. it was there that one had to either turn right or carry on straight to the beach where my mystery shipwreck was waiting to be found. naturally the chap had no idea what i was saying and after a few laughs from us both another guy was called over who was mostly pissed but could speak some english. He confirmed that between the two buildings there was a little track that would take me towards Dinguini. i gave my thanks and hoped that I wasn't riding into the middle of nowhere as I had my mission to achieve this afternoon.

after a few kms of riding though, my fears were alleviated as the track was great and although i had a few missed turns and had to backtrack once or twice, I found my way to what was once the settlement of Dinguini. you can still see the old colonial buildings but they all stand empty and abandoned, and are all in various states of disrepair. I would have thought that they would have been utilised by the locals as either homes or shops, but no, they are boarded up or are now gutted shells. I rode on past Dinguini for a while and was loving the ride. The track was awesome, a mix of soft sand that had my heart racing, other times it was hard enough to allow me to look at the view and see the locals going about their routines.

But I had left Chidenguela late in the afternoon and dusk had arrived. At about the halfway point to the coast, I decided to head back to the lodge and tackle this mission with a fresh start and a full day of sunlight to do it in. I headed back the way that I had come simply by following my GPS track. I think I would have gotten very lost and would have ridden around in circles had I not had it with me, as my sense of direction in the day is crap, and in the dark it gets even worse. Arriving back in Dinguini, a local chap jumps into the road and flags me to pull over. I stopped and sure enough I was asked to give him a lift out to Madendere. " Sure thing mate, jump on"

And off we went heading back to civilization and some hot food as I was starving again.  we very nearly came off when I misjudged a sandy spot and ended up going over the middle mannetjie. we had a serious weave about, but managed to keep the wheels the right side down. After what seemed to be way longer than I remember coming in, we arrived in madendere in the dark, and my new friend jumped off and couldn't thank me enough for my help. I waved him goodbye and headed back to a few cold beers, great food and a warm bed.



I was the only guest that night and had the luxury of real piece and quiet for the first time since I had left home a few days before. As I sat with my pint and the sound of the ocean to keep me company, I coulnt help in thinking what tomorrow would bring. I now knew where the track was. I had found the route that would take me to the coast, although I hadnt actually ridden the whole way I knew what I could expect from the track as far as its ridability was concerned. But I must confess, I was still nervous about riding that sand, and even more so on my own. I was now in completely uncharted territory and was not entirely convinced that I could actually do it without plenty of lie downs and even more pushing and dragging and digging my bike out the sand.

Never mind the fact that if I was to have a serious off and needed to be recovered, I would be in the kak as it was in the middle of nowhere, and no one knew where i was at this point. My cell roaming was not working so I couldnt get a message home. I asked about an internet cafe, but the nearest internet cafe was near Xai Xai. No way I was going all the way back now. Besides, it was all to be a part of the adventure..... besides, whats the worst that could happen.

Now its not that I am terrified of riding soft sand, its just that I know how utterly hopeless I am at getting it right. I think I know the technique in my head, but when the time comes and I am physically riding in soft sand and my bike is weaving about beneath me, all memory of any theory that I think I might know simply vanishes like a virgin on prom night. I am left with nothing but my reactions and my wits to see me through. I can confidently say that for the most part, I am fine along the straight sections. the bike can do its thing, and I am able to keep the wheels turning, although I still find it a challenge. corners are my nemesis. I cant seem to get my right hand to keep the power on and ride the corner out. Every time I approach a corner, i say to myself out loud "keep the power on" over and over, but there comes that crucial moment when my f$%#ing right hand says "no way boet, you cant do this!", and off goes the power and my front wheel goes farming and I end up on my face.

Day 5 was to be no different and as a result I paid a price for my efforts


my route through the bush looking for the ship wreck. the T4A shows a gravel road... pppffftt, if only it were actually gravel and not sand!




i am still waiting for the video clips to upload.......
« Last Edit: July 07, 2012, 09:17:46 pm by charliegreger »
Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

XR650R
 

Offline Rodlau

Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #58 on: June 28, 2012, 09:01:00 pm »
you can still see the old colonial buildings but they all stand empty and abandoned, and are all in various states of disrepair. I would have thought that they would have been utilised by the locals as either homes or shops, but no, they are boarded up or are now gutted shells.

Apparently all buildings at the time that Frelimo took over were forfieted to the state.  If you want a building you must buy it from the state and the prices are such that it is cheaper to build new than refurbish.  Viva socialism viva.
 

Offline SwampDonkey

Re: Mozambique Shipwrecked
« Reply #59 on: June 28, 2012, 09:47:05 pm »
THe first of a few clips I took. this was on day 4, late in the afternoon at about 17:30. I decided to head back to the lodge and tackle the sand first thing in the morning.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8s_OFATlJTM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/8s_OFATlJTM</a>
Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

XR650R