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Offline dsislen

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Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« on: October 14, 2012, 08:59:25 am »
Friends,

A buddy and I are planning a proper adventure, likely Jo'burg -> Addis Ababa. We are both experienced riders but this will be our first serious African trip. We are just in the initial stages of planning, so as we get further along I will come back with a lot of detailed questions, but for the moment a few basic questions on bikes and gear. We will both be on F800GSs. I know that these are fairly basic questions, and really appreciate the help... so here goes:

1. Tires. Any recommendations/thoughts on tire choice? We don't plan to do any real hard core technical riding, but obviously we need something more versatile than the stock tires. Also, anything that can be done to reduce likelihood of blowouts/punctures

2. Tools and Spare Parts. Any thoughts on what additional tools we should bring? I've seen some tool kits specifically designed for BMWs (with a set of torx wrenches, etc.). Equally importantly, what are the minimum set of spares that we need to bring with us given what all of you know about these bikes? While we're obviously trying to pack as light as possible, am very curious to know about what you all think are the critical spares to pack.

3. Auxiliary Gas Tanks. The issue which most concerns me is the size of the gas tank on the F800GS. I've done some internet research but wondering what others have done to bring auxiliary gas along.

Again, there will be many more questions coming, but thanks again for any help on these first few!

David (in Pretoria)

 

Offline kwagga-sakkie

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2012, 12:06:59 pm »
Hi.
We just did a trip Northern Moz, Tanzania,Malawi and Zim. Did about 5500km on 690"s. Dont know the BM"s  so cant help with Tools/spares list.
I have done quite a bit of trips. One thing I know that the Mitas e-07 backtyre is amazing. After 5500km it didnt even show some wear,where the heidi had about 50-60% gone,the TKC was shot.
This is my 2nd E 07 and the problem with them is that it takes forever to buy a new one!
Cheers,enjoy the planning. Probably the best part!
I like the TKC front, or the Heidi
Progression is.. IT 200; IT 490;KDX 200;Cagiva wrx 200;KX 500;CR 500;ktm 380;300,450,520,525,530,500;300...What next
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Offline CoolBreeze

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2012, 01:08:52 pm »
Hi Guys
I'm watching this post closely. It's a dream of mine to do something like this. Please post as much detail of the planning as posible.
I recon those Mitas are good. I've heard lots about them.
Can you not maybe mount 1 of those small jerrycans somewhere fo extra fuell?

I'm waiting to see some smart ass mention that you should take a KTM or something for backup :)
The 800gs is an awsome bike!! :thumleft:

Goodluck and all the best
'One life, Live it...so...Live to Ride & Ride to Live' :)
F800GS, XT660R....and soon to add XR650L
 

Offline Camino Cerdo

Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2012, 05:19:30 pm »
There are a lot of options for extra fuel, I really like the looks of the fuel cells that can snap right to the panniers.  I think you would be good most places with the fuel range you have but an extra m/l 5 L can sure give you that peace of mind.  I took two 5L cans on a Buell with almost the same range as the 650 GS, needed one of them four times in 23,000 miles through the Americas.

Malawi may still be a problem with fuel, it was last year, check before you go in.
Bob :ricky:
Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but  rather a slide in sideways, chocolate in one hand, wine in the other, body totally worn out and screaming "Woo Hoo what a ride"
 

Offline RobbieR

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2012, 10:32:22 am »
We traveled through Africa - Cairo2Cape in May and June this year. Amasing experience. Herewith an extract of some tips.

End of the trip comments
We obviously still had to wait for another 6 days before the cruiser eventually made it back and we are pleased that all are safe and sound. As with anything like this there are many lessons to learn by all and we will try and share these here. (These are our personal views and other travels may have different views or opinions – we respect that)
1)   If you ship your vehicle, ensure that your Agent actually gives you the right advice! If you going to Egypt, allow 3 week’s time before you get there yourself. Customs take at least 2 weeks and no “local contact” can expedite this.
2)   Make sure you actually understand the concept of Africa Time 
3)   Make sure that you get the right advice in terms of what you can bring into the country and what special authorisation papers you need – for 2 way radios and medical kit.
4)   You do not need to buy any food in SA.  In Egypt you can get anything you want in the supermarkets at half the price you pay in SA.
5)   Ensure that all the bike equipment is actually loaded on the bikes when transporting in the container – whatever is loaded in the vehicle is regarded as part of the vehicle and not “personal belongings”
6)    We found that 6 bikes is too cumbersome to manage especially in heavy traffic situations and riding in a group. (There will be different views on this point and for different reasons – but I would not arrange the same type of trip with more than 4 bikes – unless you do it where you charge people money and you then operate as the tour Leader who makes all decisions)
7)   Make sure that all people going actually know each other very well before you leave – especially if you regard the group as “a group of friends, and therefore fewer rules”. If you do not know the individuals that well, ensure that there are very clear rules – even for the simpler things. This will reduce uncertainty which could cause frustration.
8)   When dealing with people that you do not know very well - Some people are not interested in the actual detail of the route, others are – cater for both types. Ensure that all know what time you leave, what time is lunch, how far is “net so entjie” etc. This is particular important as people have different needs in terms of food, water, fuel  etc.
9)   Pack light – the fact that there is a back-up vehicle does not mean you can pack more. Everything the guy on the bike needs must be on his bike.
10)   Cash is King in Africa and you can never have too much – draw the maximum you allowed and exchange easily at the borders.
11)   Ensure that all participants have actually been able to do the logistics on border crossings like purchasing of new cell Sim cards, drawing money, filling up, checking oil etc. Do not allow pressure to build for the last person who has done his paper work that he feels that he is holding up the group – direct him to the ATM, or Cell phone shop. Make sure that all understand that there is time to do these things.
12)   Make sure all bikes have a clear understanding in terms of group rules – there are various views and or interpretations around and your own view may not always be the best for the group.
13)   Double check that all parties have the correct telephone numbers of each other when you have crossed a border – do not say “ it is ok, I’ll do it later when we stop for the night”. Personally I believe that I would keep my original SA number so that everybody has a consistent contact – build this into your budget.
14)   Ensure the bikes have the ability to inflate tyres without the back-up vehicle.
15)   GPS – ensure all bikes or vehicles have one and that all have the same settings and maps! Different dated maps and settings, leads to different routes but the same destination. You quickly get lost in a foreign city
16)   Do not think that the first place you stop for the night is the best, drive to 2 – 3 before making a decision – and make sure that all in the group understand this.
17)   Eat local – food is cheap and fine. Wash veggies with a bit of Milton water  
18)   In any event, even if you think things would not be a problem at all, turn back if a vehicle has a problem. (We all know this basic rule, but due to circumstances broke it, which came back to bite us. If everything worked out the way we hoped at the time it would just have meant the we travelled 200 km further)  You may not be able to assist at all, but at least you will be able to discuss various options face to face, before making a final plan of action. In Africa everything remains largely “unknown” until it actually happens and you have 100% control over it.
19)   Decide up front how you prefer to ride in different circumstances and decide on plan. Bad roads, pot holes, good tar roads etc. It probably would be better not to allow too many opinions on this – make the rule.
20)   Even if a person is an experienced rider, it does not imply his riding style or preference is the same as the next guy. (Example: Some people do not mind riding in dust, others do. This has an impact on the distance between bikes on gravel roads) Get a clear understanding as what are the rules that all must abide by – no exceptions.
21)   Take a sympathetic Doc – not one that uses the thickest syringes available on the market 
22)   Be consciously more flexible than normal towards unfamiliar or uncomfortable situations.
No Place too Far
 

Offline RobbieR

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2012, 10:40:58 am »
We traveled through Africa - Cairo2Cape in May and June this year. Amazing experience. Herewith an extract of some tips.

End of the trip comments
We obviously still had to wait for another 6 days before the cruiser eventually made it back and we are pleased that all are safe and sound. As with anything like this there are many lessons to learn by all and we will try and share these here. (These are our personal views and other travels may have different views or opinions – we respect that)
1)   If you ship your vehicle, ensure that your Agent actually gives you the right advice! If you going to Egypt, allow 3 week's time before you get there yourself. Customs take at least 2 weeks and no “local contact” can expedite this.
2)   Make sure you actually understand the concept of Africa Time 
3)   Make sure that you get the right advice in terms of what you can bring into the country and what special authorisation papers you need – for 2 way radios and medical kit.
4)   You do not need to buy any food in SA.  In Egypt you can get anything you want in the supermarkets at half the price you pay in SA.
5)   Ensure that all the bike equipment is actually loaded on the bikes when transporting in the container – whatever is loaded in the vehicle is regarded as part of the vehicle and not “personal belongings”
6)    We found that 6 bikes is too cumbersome to manage especially in heavy traffic situations and riding in a group. (There will be different views on this point and for different reasons – but I would not arrange the same type of trip with more than 4 bikes – unless you do it where you charge people money and you then operate as the tour Leader who makes all decisions)
7)   Make sure that all people going actually know each other very well before you leave – especially if you regard the group as a group of friends, and therefore fewer rules”. If you do not know the individuals that well, ensure that there are very clear rules – even for the simpler things. This will reduce uncertainty which could cause frustration.
8)   When dealing with people that you do not know very well - Some people are not interested in the actual detail of the route, others are – cater for both types. Ensure that all know what time you leave, what time is lunch, how far is “net so entjie” etc. This is particular important as people have different needs in terms of food, water, fuel  etc.
9)   Pack light – the fact that there is a back-up vehicle does not mean you can pack more. Everything the guy on the bike needs must be on his bike.
10)   Cash is King in Africa and you can never have too much – draw the maximum you allowed and exchange easily at the borders.
11)   Ensure that all participants have actually been able to do the logistics on border crossings like purchasing of new cell Sim cards, drawing money, filling up, checking oil etc. Do not allow pressure to build for the last person who has done his paper work that he feels that he is holding up the group – direct him to the ATM, or Cell phone shop. Make sure that all understand that there is time to do these things.
12)   Make sure all bikes have a clear understanding in terms of group rules – there are various views and or interpretations around and your own view may not always be the best for the group.
13)   Double check that all parties have the correct telephone numbers of each other when you have crossed a border – do not say “ it is ok, I’ll do it later when we stop for the night”. Personally I believe that I would keep my original SA number so that everybody has a consistent contact – build this into your budget.
14)   Ensure the bikes have the ability to inflate tyres without the back-up vehicle.
15)   GPS – ensure all bikes or vehicles have one and that all have the same settings and maps! Different dated maps and settings, leads to different routes but the same destination. You quickly get lost in a foreign city
16)   Do not think that the first place you stop for the night is the best, drive to 2 – 3 before making a decision – and make sure that all in the group understand this.
17)   Eat local – food is cheap and fine. Wash veggies with a bit of Milton water  
18)   In any event, even if you think things would not be a problem at all, turn back if a vehicle has a problem. (We all know this basic rule, but due to circumstances broke it, which came back to bite us. If everything worked out the way we hoped at the time it would just have meant the we travelled 200 km further)  You may not be able to assist at all, but at least you will be able to discuss various options face to face, before making a final plan of action. In Africa everything remains largely “unknown” until it actually happens and you have 100% control over it.
19)   Decide up front how you prefer to ride in different circumstances and decide on plan. Bad roads, pot holes, good tar roads etc. It probably would be better not to allow too many opinions on this – make the rule.
20)   Even if a person is an experienced rider, it does not imply his riding style or preference is the same as the next guy. (Example: Some people do not mind riding in dust, others do. This has an impact on the distance between bikes on gravel roads) Get a clear understanding as what are the rules that all must abide by – no exceptions.
21)   Take a sympathetic Doc – not one that uses the thickest syringes available on the market 
22)   Be consciously more flexible than normal towards unfamiliar or uncomfortable situations.

We had a website which you are welcome to check www.cairo2cape.co.za

Enjoy!!!

Half the fun is in the planning!
No Place too Far
 

Offline RobbieR

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2012, 10:44:39 am »
Friends,

A buddy and I are planning a proper adventure, likely Jo'burg -> Addis Ababa. We are both experienced riders but this will be our first serious African trip. We are just in the initial stages of planning, so as we get further along I will come back with a lot of detailed questions, but for the moment a few basic questions on bikes and gear. We will both be on F800GSs. I know that these are fairly basic questions, and really appreciate the help... so here goes:

1. Tires. Any recommendations/thoughts on tire choice? We don't plan to do any real hard core technical riding, but obviously we need something more versatile than the stock tires. Also, anything that can be done to reduce likelihood of blowouts/punctures

2. Tools and Spare Parts. Any thoughts on what additional tools we should bring? I've seen some tool kits specifically designed for BMWs (with a set of torx wrenches, etc.). Equally importantly, what are the minimum set of spares that we need to bring with us given what all of you know about these bikes? While we're obviously trying to pack as light as possible, am very curious to know about what you all think are the critical spares to pack.

3. Auxiliary Gas Tanks. The issue which most concerns me is the size of the gas tank on the F800GS. I've done some internet research but wondering what others have done to bring auxiliary gas along.

Again, there will be many more questions coming, but thanks again for any help on these first few!

David (in Pretoria)


1) Mitas EO-7 definate choice - We got 15 000km on 1 set
2) Petrol - Fill your tanks regularly even after only doing 100km - you never know if petrol is available at the next station
No Place too Far
 

Offline Robski

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2013, 10:35:49 pm »
Hi Guys
I'm watching this post closely. It's a dream of mine to do something like this. Please post as much detail of the planning as posible.
I recon those Mitas are good. I've heard lots about them.
Can you not maybe mount 1 of those small jerrycans somewhere fo extra fuell?

I'm waiting to see some smart ass mention that you should take a KTM or something for backup :)
The 800gs is an awsome bike!! :thumleft:

Goodluck and all the best

Haha, I took a 990 ADv R from Norway to RSA, the long way down, and gave very few problems. But take which ever bike you are most comfortable with, and suits your riding style.
Kawasaki KX60 (1997). Yamaha TW200 (1998). Honda XR 200 (1988). Yamaha YZ80 (1998). Yamaha YZ125 (2000). Kawasaki KX250 (2006). 5 Vespa's  ('63 - '69) . Aermacchi / Harley Davidson Brezza 125 (1967). Honda XRV750 Africa Twin (1999). KTM 990 ADV. R (2010). All gone. Now have.. Vespa 125 Super '67.  KTM 690 (Oryx RS kit to come)
 

Offline Robski

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2013, 10:38:24 pm »
Friends,

A buddy and I are planning a proper adventure, likely Jo'burg -> Addis Ababa. We are both experienced riders but this will be our first serious African trip. We are just in the initial stages of planning, so as we get further along I will come back with a lot of detailed questions, but for the moment a few basic questions on bikes and gear. We will both be on F800GSs. I know that these are fairly basic questions, and really appreciate the help... so here goes:

1. Tires. Any recommendations/thoughts on tire choice? We don't plan to do any real hard core technical riding, but obviously we need something more versatile than the stock tires. Also, anything that can be done to reduce likelihood of blowouts/punctures

2. Tools and Spare Parts. Any thoughts on what additional tools we should bring? I've seen some tool kits specifically designed for BMWs (with a set of torx wrenches, etc.). Equally importantly, what are the minimum set of spares that we need to bring with us given what all of you know about these bikes? While we're obviously trying to pack as light as possible, am very curious to know about what you all think are the critical spares to pack.

3. Auxiliary Gas Tanks. The issue which most concerns me is the size of the gas tank on the F800GS. I've done some internet research but wondering what others have done to bring auxiliary gas along.

Again, there will be many more questions coming, but thanks again for any help on these first few!

David (in Pretoria)



I was carrying 80L of fuel most of the time. It all depends where in Africa you intend to go, but for east coast i'm sure close to 50L would be more than safe.
Kawasaki KX60 (1997). Yamaha TW200 (1998). Honda XR 200 (1988). Yamaha YZ80 (1998). Yamaha YZ125 (2000). Kawasaki KX250 (2006). 5 Vespa's  ('63 - '69) . Aermacchi / Harley Davidson Brezza 125 (1967). Honda XRV750 Africa Twin (1999). KTM 990 ADV. R (2010). All gone. Now have.. Vespa 125 Super '67.  KTM 690 (Oryx RS kit to come)
 

Offline Optimusprime

Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2013, 03:27:30 pm »
When do you anticipate to depart and what time frame are set out, flexible? Also doing planning, 1 up on 1150GS
Cape to Cairo 2017
 

Offline Fuzzy Muzzy

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2013, 06:44:53 pm »
Friends,

A buddy and I are planning a proper adventure, likely Jo'burg -> Addis Ababa. We are both experienced riders but this will be our first serious African trip. We are just in the initial stages of planning, so as we get further along I will come back with a lot of detailed questions, but for the moment a few basic questions on bikes and gear. We will both be on F800GSs. I know that these are fairly basic questions, and really appreciate the help... so here goes:

1. Tires. Any recommendations/thoughts on tire choice? We don't plan to do any real hard core technical riding, but obviously we need something more versatile than the stock tires. Also, anything that can be done to reduce likelihood of blowouts/punctures

2. Tools and Spare Parts. Any thoughts on what additional tools we should bring? I've seen some tool kits specifically designed for BMWs (with a set of torx wrenches, etc.). Equally importantly, what are the minimum set of spares that we need to bring with us given what all of you know about these bikes? While we're obviously trying to pack as light as possible, am very curious to know about what you all think are the critical spares to pack.

3. Auxiliary Gas Tanks. The issue which most concerns me is the size of the gas tank on the F800GS. I've done some internet research but wondering what others have done to bring auxiliary gas along.

Again, there will be many more questions coming, but thanks again for any help on these first few!

David (in Pretoria)



I was carrying 80L of fuel most of the time. It all depends where in Africa you intend to go, but for east coast i'm sure close to 50L would be more than safe.

You carried 80L of fuel with you  :o .. as in an extra 80kg or weight.. wow

The most I ever needed was 15L and even then it was because there was fuel shortages in Zambia, we had to ride over into Malawi to get fuel, 20l would even be overkill, the reality is with fuel is it always available, black market fuel may be suspect at times ( carry a fuel tester and some sort of way to strain the fuel, some okes use coffee filters, in my case we just used a very fine strainer ).

If you have a fuel range of 300km - 350km with a bike you will be fine travelling in most countries.

But advising to carry 80L to 50L of fuel is probably being restricted to countries like .. err.. where, I can't think of one.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2013, 06:49:16 pm by Fuzzy Muzzy »
Africa trip, Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania & Moz rr http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=61231.0
 

Offline Robski

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2013, 10:51:11 pm »
Friends,

A buddy and I are planning a proper adventure, likely Jo'burg -> Addis Ababa. We are both experienced riders but this will be our first serious African trip. We are just in the initial stages of planning, so as we get further along I will come back with a lot of detailed questions, but for the moment a few basic questions on bikes and gear. We will both be on F800GSs. I know that these are fairly basic questions, and really appreciate the help... so here goes:

1. Tires. Any recommendations/thoughts on tire choice? We don't plan to do any real hard core technical riding, but obviously we need something more versatile than the stock tires. Also, anything that can be done to reduce likelihood of blowouts/punctures

2. Tools and Spare Parts. Any thoughts on what additional tools we should bring? I've seen some tool kits specifically designed for BMWs (with a set of torx wrenches, etc.). Equally importantly, what are the minimum set of spares that we need to bring with us given what all of you know about these bikes? While we're obviously trying to pack as light as possible, am very curious to know about what you all think are the critical spares to pack.

3. Auxiliary Gas Tanks. The issue which most concerns me is the size of the gas tank on the F800GS. I've done some internet research but wondering what others have done to bring auxiliary gas along.

Again, there will be many more questions coming, but thanks again for any help on these first few!

David (in Pretoria)



I was carrying 80L of fuel most of the time. It all depends where in Africa you intend to go, but for east coast i'm sure close to 50L would be more than safe.

You carried 80L of fuel with you  :o .. as in an extra 80kg or weight.. wow

The most I ever needed was 15L and even then it was because there was fuel shortages in Zambia, we had to ride over into Malawi to get fuel, 20l would even be overkill, the reality is with fuel is it always available, black market fuel may be suspect at times ( carry a fuel tester and some sort of way to strain the fuel, some okes use coffee filters, in my case we just used a very fine strainer ).

If you have a fuel range of 300km - 350km with a bike you will be fine travelling in most countries.

But advising to carry 80L to 50L of fuel is probably being restricted to countries like .. err.. where, I can't think of one.

Haha, guess it does sound like overkill.. but believe it or not, I actually ran out of fuel still!!

Countries such as Guinea, Cote d'Ivoire, Central African Republic and DRC you will encounter fuel as the biggest force which can stop you rather than the AK47 carrying rebels.
Kawasaki KX60 (1997). Yamaha TW200 (1998). Honda XR 200 (1988). Yamaha YZ80 (1998). Yamaha YZ125 (2000). Kawasaki KX250 (2006). 5 Vespa's  ('63 - '69) . Aermacchi / Harley Davidson Brezza 125 (1967). Honda XRV750 Africa Twin (1999). KTM 990 ADV. R (2010). All gone. Now have.. Vespa 125 Super '67.  KTM 690 (Oryx RS kit to come)
 

Offline Fuzzy Muzzy

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2013, 03:15:51 pm »
ahh yeah, I suppose some of the northern terratories are a different story, I was really referring to south of Uganda.

But sheesh.. 80L is a LOT, poor suspension
Africa trip, Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania & Moz rr http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=61231.0
 

Offline cracklin

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2013, 03:21:40 pm »
Tyre of choice

Heidenau K60 Scout.

Many riders have gone through Africa on one set .
 

Offline Robski

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2013, 09:06:26 pm »
ahh yeah, I suppose some of the northern terratories are a different story, I was really referring to south of Uganda.

But sheesh.. 80L is a LOT, poor suspension

Poor me when I used to have to dig a 320kg out of quickmud. Suspension did well.
Kawasaki KX60 (1997). Yamaha TW200 (1998). Honda XR 200 (1988). Yamaha YZ80 (1998). Yamaha YZ125 (2000). Kawasaki KX250 (2006). 5 Vespa's  ('63 - '69) . Aermacchi / Harley Davidson Brezza 125 (1967). Honda XRV750 Africa Twin (1999). KTM 990 ADV. R (2010). All gone. Now have.. Vespa 125 Super '67.  KTM 690 (Oryx RS kit to come)
 

Offline Fuzzy Muzzy

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2013, 09:50:39 pm »
Tyre of choice

Heidenau K60 Scout.

Many riders have gone through Africa on one set .

now that is a matter of opinion , I will never put a Heidenau on my bike every again ( unless it is for free ) I had 2 split on my in tananzia and moz..  feedback from manufacturer after months of back and forth was it was a bad batch. Whatever.
Africa trip, Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania & Moz rr http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=61231.0
 

Offline Fuzzy Muzzy

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2013, 09:51:22 pm »
ahh yeah, I suppose some of the northern terratories are a different story, I was really referring to south of Uganda.

But sheesh.. 80L is a LOT, poor suspension

Poor me when I used to have to dig a 320kg out of quickmud. Suspension did well.

320kg.. ouch
Africa trip, Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania & Moz rr http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=61231.0
 

Offline cracklin

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2013, 09:12:06 am »
It is difficult to comment based on a"bad batch" response.

This  would certainly not have be the response from the manufacturer.

Any  tyre on a trip of this nature is subjected to extremes varying from terrain, heat, loads, incorrect tyre pressures etc etc.

Most motorcycle tyre failures are as a result of low tyre pressures and excessive weight. This is why tyre manufacturers rate tyre pressure as the number-one priority and they strongly urge riders to check it regularly

Overload and under inflation creates excessive flex in the tyre and an excessive heat build-up that not only negatively affects handling but also  ultimately results in tyre failure–for any kind of tyre.

We have personally rode from SA to Germany with Heidenau K60 Scouts with not a single problem.

Ditto from Germany to Mongolia on a single set with not a single problem.

As have most of the riders we met in Mongolia who were on Heidenaus on a broad cross section of bikes from 650's to 1200's.

Tyres fail, regardless of brand. In the main though manufacturer failures are in the minority.

Neglect of basic fundamentals such as tyre pressure are more often the cause.

Recommeded tyre pressures:  3.0 bar at the rear  and 2.5 bar in the front


 

Offline FlyRide

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2013, 08:51:23 am »
We rode SA - Sweden on Heidis - 23 000 km, not one puncture or problem, and could have ridden further, but changed to ride back again!!!
On a heavily laden 1150 adv, and 650 gs.
Current Bike - BMW 800 Adv
 

Offline lamoufle

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Re: Planning Cross Africa Trip -- Some Advice Needed for a Newbie
« Reply #19 on: January 09, 2013, 10:31:53 pm »
i will ride the same route, cape to cairo starting by three weeks in south africa, so if you have some advice or if we can meet somewhere .. :ricky:
one question how it is easy to find heidenau or mitas in south africa ? should I order them online or can i find them on shop ?