Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register

Author Topic: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights  (Read 4054 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2013, 04:37:08 pm »
Just ran the bike with the temp sensor installed and checked that all is well  :thumleft:

I can report that the fan turns on at 87 C water temp.
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #21 on: June 02, 2013, 04:40:45 pm »
I must say the new generation Cree LED 's are amazing technology. Will you mount the flood into your existing headlight shroud?

Ja I'm going to have to cut it to get both lights to fit, but its old and buggered already from lots of different mods.

I might ask Blazes to coat it in sexy carbon if he's willing to and its not too pricey (hint, hint  :biggrin:).
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #22 on: June 03, 2013, 06:21:57 pm »
I put some more fuel in the tank and expected to see the fuel warning light go off.  But it didn't!  So the wiring diag shown earlier isn't correct when it comes to the fuel warning light.

While the tank was off I did verify that the wire leading from the tank sensor did indeed connect to pin 18 so I'm sure about that.  I'm just not sure how they have setup the signal to light the lamp, because the wiring diagram shows its also connected to another live circuit via a 68 ohm resistor

So after scratching my head a bit and trying different options this seems to work



Its quite difficult to verify because I have to keep filling and draining the tank.  Also the switch seems to need a bit of a nudge to activate.  But I've seen it switch off when it should and switch on when it should.  So hopefully that's sorted now.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2013, 06:23:38 pm by alanB »
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline sidetrack

Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #23 on: June 03, 2013, 10:10:14 pm »
The stock fuel switch is dodgy as is, mine was epoxied / pratley steel modified when I got it as I understand this is a common failure as the will leak and break off the sender wires. Have you manually activated the switch to test ? Will be easier than filling / draining etc.
Little by little, one travels far

J.R.R Tolkien
Ride reports :
http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=134175.0 Penge's pass and the Old Forest http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=9421.0 - Orange Atlantic adventure http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=7514.0 - 805 km day trip http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=20260.0 - East Cape Bash http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=70199.0 - Two KTM thumpers head north
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #24 on: June 04, 2013, 09:05:43 am »
The stock fuel switch is dodgy as is, mine was epoxied / pratley steel modified when I got it as I understand this is a common failure as the will leak and break off the sender wires. Have you manually activated the switch to test ? Will be easier than filling / draining etc.

Ja after a bit of actual thought last night I drained the fuel until it was just enough to activate, deactivate the switch by rocking the bike from one side to another.

The switch activates very slowly for some reason you need to hold it in position for quite a while before its switches on/off.

But it does seem to work now as far as I can tell.
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline Rough Rider

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 4,934
  • Thanked: 46 times
  • Hang time
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #25 on: June 04, 2013, 09:08:31 am »
The stock fuel switch is dodgy as is, mine was epoxied / pratley steel modified when I got it as I understand this is a common failure as the will leak and break off the sender wires. Have you manually activated the switch to test ? Will be easier than filling / draining etc.

Ja after a bit of actual thought last night I drained the fuel until it was just enough to activate, deactivate the switch by rocking the bike from one side to another.

The switch activates very slowly for some reason you need to hold it in position for quite a while before its switches on/off.

But it does seem to work now as far as I can tell.

Does it not have a time delay built into it, to stop false alarms when the fuel level is on the cusp.
Current rides: 2015 WR250F / 2016 690R / 2017 701SM
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2013, 10:04:31 am »
The stock fuel switch is dodgy as is, mine was epoxied / pratley steel modified when I got it as I understand this is a common failure as the will leak and break off the sender wires. Have you manually activated the switch to test ? Will be easier than filling / draining etc.

Ja after a bit of actual thought last night I drained the fuel until it was just enough to activate, deactivate the switch by rocking the bike from one side to another.

The switch activates very slowly for some reason you need to hold it in position for quite a while before its switches on/off.

But it does seem to work now as far as I can tell.

Does it not have a time delay built into it, to stop false alarms when the fuel level is on the cusp.

I suspect it got more to do with two opposing forces overcoming each other.  I'm actually not sure how it actually works.

I think its designed to ensure that there are no sparks in the tank (a good thing I think  :thumleft:).  I think what happens is that when the switch closes it sets up an alternate path for the current to flow, but that happens gradually - I'm guessing I only have the vaguest understanding of electronics.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2013, 10:23:41 am by alanB »
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2013, 12:03:57 pm »
OK just managed to get my business partner to have a look at the theory and he is reasonably sure this is how the fuel warning works:



It seems the switching device in the tank isnt a conventional switch but a thermal resistor which is heated all the time by the current flowing through the 68 ohm resistor.

When is immersed in fuel it remains cool and its resistance is high so no or very low current flows through it.

But when its not in fuel it heats up and its resistance drops and thus current flows through it lighting the lamp.

Seems to match the facts and explains why the light comes on so slowly.
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #28 on: June 05, 2013, 07:50:58 pm »
Yesterday I got the cut plates back from the laser cutters  :thumleft:



My idea was to have one vertical bracket to hold the lights that bolted onto holes in the lower fork bracket.  It extends up to an another bracket that extends forwards from the handle bar mounts (ie it replaces the existing instrument mounting plate).  The two join and support each other giving each other strength and rigidity while not being too large or heavy a structure.  (Together they weigh 600g)

I spent most of last night till the early hours bending them and fitting all the components.

Here's the light bracket bent into shape (3mm aluminium very light and quite strong).



Here's the instrument bracket bent into shape.  Its 2mm stainless.  Which I needed because some of the sections around the key switch were quite thin and fiddly, I wasnt sure that aluminium would last.  Stainless is a lot harder to work with than aluminium and I battled with the key switch dog leg!  It started off with gentle well considered taps with the hammer and bends in the vice and ended with me hammering the hell out of the thing!  I could have got the laser company to do the bending but have found that getting them to understand what I want can be quite challenging when it comes to bends and this needed lots of little bends and things.  So I thought it would be easier to do myself - I was wondering of I had bitten off more than I could chew at a few points.  But I eventually got it to the right shape more or less.



This would be replacing the existing instrument mounting bracket to enable the mounting of the TrailTech Striker as well as extending forward to support the light bracket.

Here's the old and new instrument bracket side by side.



Here's the lights mounted on their bracket.



And here's it all mounted on the bike



I must admit it worked quite well!

Its very rigid overall, more than I thought it would be!  And plenty strong enough to mount a roadbook to - as and when.


« Last Edit: June 05, 2013, 08:28:30 pm by alanB »
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #29 on: June 05, 2013, 08:13:49 pm »
I'm afraid at 1:30 in the morning I couldn't resist setting the lights and testing them by riding up and down my road.  My neighbours must have been cursing!

I have to say I'm very happy with them!

I can get the flood unit to light the area immediately in front of the bike quite nicely while the light shines down quite a lot and thus I don't think it will blind oncoming drivers.  And the spot unit has quite a long reach so when you to switch brights you can see quite far.  So at least the hefty expense wasn't in vain  :thumleft:  

I didnt take any photo's because it was late and I was trying to get it all done with the least disturbance possible.   In any event, photos of lights never can be easily interpreted because cameras are designed to equalise exposures regardless of the light levels.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2013, 08:33:18 pm by alanB »
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline BiG DoM

  • A Grahamstown Greyhound!
  • Moderator
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS HP2
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 17,860
  • Thanked: 237 times
  • License Plates: GSpot EC and HUSKY EC
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #30 on: June 06, 2013, 01:05:12 am »
Awesome Alan  :thumleft: Excellent mod taking shape. I would probably have been tempted to relocate the ignition switch a bit although I know there is not much play in the wiring ... just find it's positioning very irritating and would love a keyless solution.
"Love is the feeling you get when you like something as much as your motorcycle" - Hunter S. Thompson

Scoots: BMW HP2  Husky 701R  Husky  TE610E  BMW G450X  KTM 250XCW  Yamaha YZ250X BMW R100S YAMAHA BWS 

 :ricky:
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #31 on: June 08, 2013, 08:29:37 pm »
I cut the standard plastic headlight shroud to suite the new lights, and bolted it onto the new aluminium bracket using a whole bunch of rubber tap washers as spacers.  Worked better than I hoped  :thumleft:



Here's a front view with the flood headlight on.  It doesn't blind you when you stand in front of the bike  :thumleft:



Here's both lights on - quite dazzling if you look into the beam!



I just took it for another spin around the neighbourhood in the dark, nobody complained about the light dazzling them - a good sign.  The light pattern is very nice, very clear and even white light.  Not fantastically bright but more than enough light to see properly.  On brights you can see quite far.  All good IMO  :thumleft:

« Last Edit: June 09, 2013, 08:15:38 am by alanB »
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #32 on: June 08, 2013, 08:40:21 pm »
Here's the cockpit



I've got mixed feelings at the moment about the TrailTech Striker.  It has some very nice functionality and is very simple to set up.

But I'm experiencing two problems at the moment.

1) The remote switch after working initially, now only works intermittently!   >:(.  This was the whole reason I decided to change instruments, so I could have this feature together with the ability to change the trip distance via the remote switch while you were riding.  It looks like its some sort of fault in the wire or the connector, because every now and then it works again.  I'm currently in correspondence with TrailTech - hopefully they will rectify the situation.  I was very careful when I installed it so I'm sure it wasn't an installation fault.  Besides it did work initially and then suddenly stopped.

2) The display on the unit doesn't have a wide angle of view.  As it is currently mounted when I'm standing you cant see anything on the screen.  I have to squat right down to see anything.  A bit irritating!

Lets hope it all gets sorted out.
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline buzzlightyear

  • I'm Buzz Lightyear. I come in peace.
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 7,962
  • Thanked: 19 times
  • To infinity and beyond
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #33 on: June 08, 2013, 08:55:52 pm »
Does the angle not get better when you remove the protective cover, I see it is still on?

Otherwise it is looking great, bar your niggles.
"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." (Edmund Burke)
 

Offline Jacobsroodt

  • vendor
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1090 Adventure R
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 3,928
  • Thanked: 72 times
  • Carpe Diem (in Afrikaans: Life's short, Ride hard)
    • West Coast Parts
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #34 on: June 08, 2013, 09:03:40 pm »
This is really Impressive Alan! I just installed a pair of Mk 3 LED spotlights on my new F800GS and they work very well!
Apologies if this looks like hijacking your thread, but is it easy to bend aluminium? You are definitely the expert!
I have a Givi top box mount that weighs 2kg - much too heavy. I read that aluminium weighs a 1/3rd of mild steel and I want to make a new base plate. It will have 90' bends like your spotlight mounting plate. Can one bend aluminium at 90' (and how) or should one rather weld? Repairing bent levers means heating them in a flame and bend while hot. Is this the same with aluminium?
BoosterPlug, LED Spots, Tool Tubes, RustStop, Kappa Screens, Top boxes, Tank Bags, ATG Gear - whatever works for me.
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #35 on: June 08, 2013, 09:14:15 pm »
Does the angle not get better when you remove the protective cover, I see it is still on?

Otherwise it is looking great, bar your niggles.

Good point!

I'm always loath to remove those things because I hate the thought of new stuff getting scratched.  I'll bite the bullet tomorrow and see if its better.
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #36 on: June 08, 2013, 09:20:50 pm »
This is really Impressive Alan! I just installed a pair of Mk 3 LED spotlights on my new F800GS and they work very well!
Apologies if this looks like hijacking your thread, but is it easy to bend aluminium? You are definitely the expert!
I have a Givi top box mount that weighs 2kg - much too heavy. I read that aluminium weighs a 1/3rd of mild steel and I want to make a new base plate. It will have 90' bends like your spotlight mounting plate. Can one bend aluminium at 90' (and how) or should one rather weld? Repairing bent levers means heating them in a flame and bend while hot. Is this the same with aluminium?

Hell I would hardly call myself an expert!

I just put it in a vice and hit it with a hammer!  If that doesn't work I use anything else I can (it gets ugly at times  :biggrin:).

You do get stretch marks on the bend and I think 3mm is about the limit before the stretch marks turn into tears.

The bent material wont be as strong as the unworked metal (and is probably prone to cracking if highly stressed and subject to cyclic loads), but its strong enough for my purposes IMO, those lights weigh 1 kg in total.
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline BiG DoM

  • A Grahamstown Greyhound!
  • Moderator
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS HP2
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 17,860
  • Thanked: 237 times
  • License Plates: GSpot EC and HUSKY EC
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #37 on: June 09, 2013, 08:04:56 am »
What alan is saying is spot on regarding the bend being the weak point on alu - I have seen this time and again with Touratech stuff ... they love alu and when it gives it cracks and breaks on the bend. And is then difficult or impossible to repair. A metal working engineering firm will have a plate bender that can easily bend straight even bends. You also get different grade alu incuding a hardened type. I am not sure of the structural importance of the plate on your rack but feel sure part of its purpose is to restrict the plastic flexing ... when this happens the topbox exits the carrier... not nice for youm...or mecriding behind  :eek7: Personally I would stick with the existing setup. Hijack off  ;D

Alan I see you seem to have angled the dash a bit more vertically which one would expext to allow better viewing but is probably putting a more acute angle on the screen. Regarding those plastic covers that come with electrical goods be wary of leaving on as they can bond to the acrylic glass due to heat and UV and when they then start perishing you shit to get them off as now brittle and bonded.
"Love is the feeling you get when you like something as much as your motorcycle" - Hunter S. Thompson

Scoots: BMW HP2  Husky 701R  Husky  TE610E  BMW G450X  KTM 250XCW  Yamaha YZ250X BMW R100S YAMAHA BWS 

 :ricky:
 

Offline alanB

  • Vendors
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 6,769
  • Thanked: 10 times
    • www.extinction.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #38 on: June 09, 2013, 11:28:02 am »
Quote
Alan I see you seem to have angled the dash a bit more vertically which one would expext to allow better viewing but is probably putting a more acute angle on the screen. Regarding those plastic covers that come with electrical goods be wary of leaving on as they can bond to the acrylic glass due to heat and UV and when they then start perishing you shit to get them off as now brittle and bonded.

In the photo it may seem that way but its supposed to be at the same angle as the original. I bent the plate to mach the original in any event - and during installation I didnt have to push and shove too much to get the holes to line up so I think it should be more or less the same.

I'll take the little plastic cover sheet off before I go ride today  :P  :biggrin:
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline DeepBass9

  • 2010 DL1000-'91 DR650 DAKAR
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Suzuki DL 1000 V-Strom
    Location: North West
  • Posts: 4,439
  • Thanked: 5 times
    • www.dreamlodge.co.za
Re: Installing a TrailTech Striker and LED lights
« Reply #39 on: June 09, 2013, 11:37:24 am »
Quote
Alan I see you seem to have angled the dash a bit more vertically which one would expext to allow better viewing but is probably putting a more acute angle on the screen. Regarding those plastic covers that come with electrical goods be wary of leaving on as they can bond to the acrylic glass due to heat and UV and when they then start perishing you shit to get them off as now brittle and bonded.

In the photo it may seem that way but its supposed to be at the same angle as the original. I bent the plate to mach the original in any event - and during installation I didnt have to push and shove too much to get the holes to line up so I think it should be more or less the same.

I'll take the little plastic cover sheet off before I go ride today  :P  :biggrin:

On my Vector I have the unit, probably about 20 degrees from vertical and it is fine to read. Maybe the flat angle is causing sun glare from above which makes it less visible?