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Author Topic: Technology and gadgets  (Read 760 times)

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Offline Beebop

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Re: Technology and gadgets
« Reply #20 on: December 27, 2013, 07:24:59 pm »
Regardless of the old school/ new school debate, you still have to have some technical knowhow if
you want to look into an issue yourself. That makes the lack of technology a mute point for a lot
of riders today. Yes electronics may open up a new can of beans, but the electronics today is just as
reliable as the mechanics of 20 years ago, so what are we actually comparing ? If you perform proper
maintenance , the you already a step ahead in terms of likely failure.
Lets look at the 1150GS. Apart from the HES, which can be inspected, and a spare kept, the most
common failures are FD big bearing or seal, input splines and drive shafts. All of these are mechanical.
The electronic bits are hardly ever at fault.
 

Offline Bundu

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Re: Technology and gadgets
« Reply #21 on: December 27, 2013, 07:45:05 pm »
Regardless of the old school/ new school debate, you still have to have some technical knowhow if
you want to look into an issue yourself. That makes the lack of technology a mute point for a lot
of riders today. Yes electronics may open up a new can of beans, but the electronics today is just as
reliable as the mechanics of 20 years ago, so what are we actually comparing ? If you perform proper
maintenance , the you already a step ahead in terms of likely failure.
Lets look at the 1150GS. Apart from the HES, which can be inspected, and a spare kept, the most
common failures are FD big bearing or seal, input splines and drive shafts. All of these are mechanical.
The electronic bits are hardly ever at fault.


aaaah, some sanity!  :thumleft:

I've often wondered, if there was a bike/car manufacturer that decided to stay old school, would they be in business?
 

Offline jaybiker

  • Old school=Old's cool.
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Re: Technology and gadgets
« Reply #22 on: December 27, 2013, 08:01:44 pm »
Yeah, it's true that even the most reactionary among us (that's me!) do eventually learn to adapt to some extent, although it may take a while. Nowadays even if the choice were available I wouldn't chose a bike with old style points and coil ignition over electronics, and I probably wouldn't go for a carburetted bike either.
A few years ago I would have dismissed a R1150gs as a mass of unfathomable technology, but now of course I own one, and I'm glad that of it's simple 'old fashioned' design that I can understand and deal with (mostly).
Right now, my main fear is mechanical. That the FD bearing will let me down out on the road somewhere, which has recently happened to a friend. My mileage is approximately the same as his, but there's no sign on my bike. That's why though, that I'm checking it before each and every little ride, so that I can catch it timeously, and have a relatively simple single bearing replacement.

I somehow think though that my time will run out before I yearn for a ride by wire throttle!
Succumb not to the erosion of those born of unconsecrated union.

"Two Wheels, an engine and a place to sit." What more do you need?
 

Offline poenerhoes

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Re: Technology and gadgets
« Reply #23 on: December 25, 2014, 07:29:51 pm »
Regardless of the old school/ new school debate, you still have to have some technical knowhow if
you want to look into an issue yourself. That makes the lack of technology a mute point for a lot
of riders today. Yes electronics may open up a new can of beans, but the electronics today is just as
reliable as the mechanics of 20 years ago, so what are we actually comparing ? If you perform proper
maintenance , the you already a step ahead in terms of likely failure.
Lets look at the 1150GS. Apart from the HES, which can be inspected, and a spare kept, the most
common failures are FD big bearing or seal, input splines and drive shafts. All of these are mechanical.
The electronic bits are hardly ever at fault.


+1 :thumleft:

aaaah, some sanity!  :thumleft:

I've often wondered, if there was a bike/car manufacturer that decided to stay old school, would they be in business?
Sometimes you win and sometimes you lose....