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Author Topic: Kakamas you say? Amageza 2013  (Read 17045 times)

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Offline CHorse

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #60 on: November 04, 2013, 07:20:09 am »
Loving this, thanks  :thumleft:
 

Offline alanB

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #61 on: November 04, 2013, 07:49:35 am »
Wow Andrew, this is as much a lesson on how to do it as it is a RR!

Your controlled aggression is quite impressive.

I for one wouldnt feel comfortable taking my hands off the bars at speed and then spend quite a long time fiddling with a bog roll!  :o :biggrin: :thumleft:

Thanks for all the effort in sharing your ride with us.

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Offline Wooly Bugger

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #62 on: November 04, 2013, 08:34:23 am »
bliksem! looking at that video caused me to have a few semi-relgious moments..........sitting behind my desk!

respect!
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Offline Frannarossi

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #63 on: November 04, 2013, 08:41:39 am »
Loving this RR,gooi nog! :thumleft:
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Offline SteveD

Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #64 on: November 04, 2013, 08:57:28 am »
I for one wouldnt feel comfortable taking my hands off the bars at speed and then spend quite a long time fiddling with a bog roll!  :o :biggrin: :thumleft:

Agreed. If I were to take my hands off the bars at that speed to mess around with bog roll, I would need to wipe more than just my visor.....
 

Offline Voetpomp

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #65 on: November 04, 2013, 01:41:44 pm »
 :laughing4: :laughing4: :laughing4:
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Offline weskus

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #66 on: November 04, 2013, 03:35:04 pm »
Lekker Andrew, ek't nog nie so 'n Engelsman soos jy gesien nie, :peepwall: :pot: well done once again, shows you, belanrikste ding om te doen is om kalm te te bly, maar dit sukkel maar..
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Offline Pleco

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #67 on: November 04, 2013, 04:12:56 pm »
Lekker Andrew, ek't nog nie so 'n Engelsman soos jy gesien nie, :peepwall: :pot: well done once again, shows you, belanrikste ding om te doen is om kalm te te bly, maar dit sukkel maar..

Ons het daai meelgesig gemis die jaar. Alex het spesiaal al die klippe in die rivier gelos net vir jou. Jy is mos so lief vir klip ry.  :ricky:

Hoop ons sien jou volgende jaar.

So paar manne wat ek sou op wed om met groot bikes klaar te maak die jaar:

Weskus
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Die ander ou wat die HP2 gery het laas jaar. Kan nie sy naam onthou nie.

Moet nou nie dat Andrew en Rudi volgende jaar alleen die groot  bikes bring nie.
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Offline SteveD

Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #68 on: November 04, 2013, 04:32:02 pm »
[So paar manne wat ek sou op wed om met groot bikes klaar te maak die jaar:

Weskus
Bob
Roost (as hy net kan ophou val  :lol8:)
Remy
Sack
Arch
Die ander ou wat die HP2 gery het laas jaar. Kan nie sy naam onthou nie.

Moet nou nie dat Andrew en Rudi volgende jaar alleen die groot  bikes bring nie.

en Mark Hardy?
 

Offline Pleco

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #69 on: November 04, 2013, 04:51:19 pm »
[So paar manne wat ek sou op wed om met groot bikes klaar te maak die jaar:

Weskus
Bob
Roost (as hy net kan ophou val  :lol8:)
Remy
Sack
Arch
Die ander ou wat die HP2 gery het laas jaar. Kan nie sy naam onthou nie.

Moet nou nie dat Andrew en Rudi volgende jaar alleen die groot  bikes bring nie.

en Mark Hardy?

Have not seen him ride, but from what I have heard he would have made it as well.

Come on guys Andrew and Rudi needs some competition next year.
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Offline Pleco

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #70 on: November 04, 2013, 04:52:35 pm »
Andrew, did you get footage of the wire across the river acrobatics?

Really looking forward to your next vids.

Keep it coming. :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:
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Offline whitedelight

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #71 on: November 04, 2013, 06:22:40 pm »
I keep coming back to this thread looking for updates. Very lekker so far Andrew and respect for the riding. The videos are great  :thumleft:
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Offline Crossed-up

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #72 on: November 04, 2013, 06:32:12 pm »
Great report Kamanya!  Much respect for the way you muscle that thing around.


I don't think Rudi is going to subject his 950 to another Amageza, or at least that's what he was avowing at the end.  ;D
 

Offline Kamanya

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #73 on: November 04, 2013, 07:03:18 pm »
Well, no use putting it off. I was very keen for this. I have no issues with riding sand or rocks, it’s mud that I really don’t like.

(photo's shamelessly stolen from Rynet)





Waiting for the countdown…



A bit of a concern was Lukas’ cryptic words about the stage back in Grabouw; he’d been trying to offer support without giving anything away. He’d said that there was no ways a KLR would have made through. I ridden with some excellent KLR riders and I doubt there are any places that they’d not be able to go that I too would struggle. What did that mean?

I didn’t faf about too much and left the start line in Lainsberg with 7 or 8 bikes up ahead. Immediately we turned into the river bed. River bed sand is different from dune sand as it is coarser and counter intuitively has less traction sometimes. This was interesting as there were a lot of rocks in the sand lurking waiting for the unwary smiley.

Somehow, my video camera has nothing of the first section. But, I was having a ball. My suspension was really working well, it was all coming together. I used to be a river guide and have spent months on rivers. I believe it helped when picking lines. With a big bike, I am always amazed at what it can do if I trust it. The idea that needs to be followed is simple; aim and hold on. With a fairly constant throttle and a bit of momentum, the bike does amazing things that I still marvel at. I know that I can’t go as fast as the smaller bikes as there are limits to speed and momentum, but I wasn’t being left behind by those that I was riding with.

This was what the river often became from wide open banks of sand to chocks of rocks.

Going towards…


Come from..


I was really happy with my navigation, the trips were agreeing with the landscape and turns that were being made and I was thinking, “well, I can keep this up all day!”

One shouldn’t think like that. Chickens and eggs and hatching and all….

I had put the bike down only once in a squirrelly bit and had caught 3 guys, or they caught me, when we came across the near decapitation scene of Donovan. It was in a riverbed section just after having come over a spur of land that cut out a couple of kilometres of riverbed. He was just picking himself off the floor when we came around the corner. A fence strung across the river had caught him in the jaw of the helmet. It was high enough to miss if you were walking but perfect height when on the pegs.

Donavan was convinced his head was only held on by some sinew and kept asking if he’d not been slit. At first we thought the wire had got him in the throat, but much later he realised that the helmet had taken the full force and the bruising and blood was from the helmet strap. The force had completely cracked the jaw part of the helmet. This he only found on day 3.

I am sitting on my bike a few meters past the fence. That's where Donavon's bike landed, he did a somersault and landed where his helmet is.



I was going to put a bit of loo paper in the wire when I had the brain wave, “why not just be done with it a cut the wire?” Mark Driver held it and I cut it. There were 6 strands. Donovan got really lucky, a few millimetres lower and it could have been a lot worse.



Donovan was a bit shaken but seemed fine and was ok for us to continue. (a day later shot of his neck)



There was a confusing bit in the roadbook, that seemed to say leave the river, come back to it, leave it again and then turn right next to it. Till then and for the rest of the trip, I didn’t use my CAP bearings at all. I had tried on the liaison to make sense of it, but I think my GPS doesn’t like being near vertical. I saw the turn that was mentioned but was not sure and as there were no tracks to be seen and a good 5 or 6 going to the left, I followed that. Not 30 meters on I got stuck. I had tried to ride up a bank, not terribly difficult but the approach was tricky – down a bank, through water and missing some big rocks.



It took a few minutes to pull my way out of that, Mark gave me a hand right at the end, but my internal thermometer was approaching the red line. I needed to move… and quick.

For the next 2 kilometres, it was not fun at all. Robert caught me and we had a chat about life and the economy, you know, things that are important…





It was brutal. I'd dropped my bike many times. Riding through clumps of thick grass with dongas and huge rocks with a 200kg bike needs quite a bit of lack of mechanical sympathy and a good dose of sheer bloody mindedness.

Others just up ahead, I could hear were having just as much fun. By this time, I was thinking, “fok Alex, how on earth would you have let a 1200GS enter this knowing what was coming up!?”

By now, it was survival mode. This seemed at a level that was on par with what Alex was going on about in the briefing. The sand seemed super soft, the rocks were huge, the donga’s half a bike deep and very little open area to catch ones breath. What caught us out was that the GPS waypoint was just a little more east of the direction that we were traveling in and only a few k’s away. I can see how easy it is to “wish” that roadbook is right. It is  

I spotted a track going up a river bank and just to prove I had not learned my lesson from the last time, I headed up it. It was a dead end in a clump of thorn trees. Turning a big bike around in silt and dongas with thron trees leaning in is not fun. After laying the bike over and wrestling it around whilst under the thorn trees, I managed to bring it back to the edge of the bank. I was seriously overheating now and took a break. Robert was down in the river bed and we again swore at Alex for a bit.

A few minutes later one of the guys who had been fighting further up, fought his way back and said that it was deed ended. What a relief! At last confirmation that this was not the track. It’s far worse being on the wrong track and suspecting it than being on it and knowing that. I needed to cool down so, took my helmet off, had a drink, ate two energy bars and a rehydrate and watched as the guys upstream fought their way back past me. I think about 6 guys came back past me.

My perch in the thorn trees



I waited 20 minutes then headed back. I caught up to Mark on the 450 and Fanie on his 690. We bashed our way down stream. Interestingly it was WAY easier going back. I think the reason was that it was cooler and water flow arranges things in such a way that riding upstream is harder than down. It took 1 hour and 14 minutes to ride the detour up the river bed and 16 minutes  back!?




Right opposite where I had messed up on the bank was the track we’d been looking for.

I was now in high spirits and keen to ride again after that abortion back there. Just after we got out, there was quite a hectic up hill. 2 guys were stuck on the hill and were manfully trying to push themselves out. They looked like they were going to get out but it was going to be sweaty. My big bike needs momentum and I didn’t want to stop to help as I would undoubtedly get stuck, probably for good. I took one look at this and rode right up the side of the mountain off the track and over boulders and somehow made it up. Sadly my camera doesn’t have this. I think it would have been epic.

The next 32k’s was only technical jeep track and a few riverbed crossings. It started slow and rocky and then faster. It was great fun. Being awake was very necessary, the route had still a lot of opportunity to get it wrong. There was one drop off into a reverbed that was not marked and caused a few nervous moments. I know I wasn’t’ the only one judging by the panic marks just before it and the craters in it. I caught Jan and Charl and had a blast. My MTB training I think was showing up, I was pretty fresh when I got to the end.

Rynet, part of the welcoming committee looked hugely relieved. As if she doubted I would ever make it!

Officially, I had taken 3hrs:19minis for the stage, had incurred only 8:12minutes in penalties. I had only one speeding penalty of 2 minutes (they must have been very lenient) and 6:12 minutes for being late into the stage. Without getting lost, I would have been only half an hour slower than the quickest guys. But in this game, if’s and maybe’s very definitely don’t count.

I really enjoyed it, it was a good test. Nothing broke on the bike and I didn’t get hurt.

Coming out of it. Big bikes, make big dust



Rob had left me in the river bed whilst I had had my 20 minutes, he was surprised that I had made up time as he knew I was pretty far back when he last saw me.



I have to say that I love my suspension. It enabled me to charge and not have to worry too much. Without it I would have been a lot less safer and way more uncomfortable. It is simply amazing what it can do.

Me checking out Donovans war scars at the end of the stage.





I had some  oil to lend Rudi after he was given a bit of a scare from a detached oil pipe.



 
Right-ho, enough bench racing, next stop Sutherland, beers’ a-callin


« Last Edit: November 05, 2013, 02:27:37 pm by Kamanya »
I wonder where that gravel road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. (Apologies to Mr Frost)

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Offline Pleco

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #74 on: November 04, 2013, 07:20:44 pm »
And so, do you think a KLR would have made it through there? I dont think there would have been enough zip to tackle some of the softer sections.

The river was also a half a meter deeper when I saw it last.

Maybe I should have said my old klr with me on it would not make that. :biggrin:
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Offline Rynet

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #75 on: November 04, 2013, 07:31:28 pm »
Hectic Kamanya . Thanks for sharing the details . I must admit I was scared . Seeing the riders come back in one piece was a huge relief. Also you had the flu and on day 0 you were not looking good at all. Well done for soldiering on despite the flu , you rock.  :biggrin:

Those videos are amazing . Yes I also don't know how you ride with no hands like that .  :imaposer:

Awesome RR .  :thumleft: Glad my photos can be used .  ;)
 

Offline tour

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #76 on: November 04, 2013, 08:10:49 pm »
jinne Andrew

your writing skill is as xciting as your riding. awesome write up. have been reading your report waiting for my crash early on but can hardly see it  :-[ after kamanya helped me up he grabbed my helmet and tuned me to wake up. I was like wat the fu**???? then as I was cruising on going why was he so rude? It dawned on me... he is a psychologist and his sorting my head out.  :imaposer: wow that head doctor shit really works. it is surprising what your head can do to you. thanx again Andrew. now all nerves were gone and amageza was on. luckily that was the last fall of the amageza too.
as crossed up said we need more big bikes for next year. if it weren't for 2 flat tyres gerrit/scrat and hendrik/nu11 would of finished it too. so kom nou weskus ennie anne manne. kom speel saam.
john next year it ll be the fat girl again. 950 SE.  :3some:
ok kamanya give us some more please...
 

Offline Kamanya

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #77 on: November 04, 2013, 08:12:27 pm »
Yes I also don't know how you ride with no hands like that .  :imaposer:


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I wonder where that gravel road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. (Apologies to Mr Frost)

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Offline jimjim

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #78 on: November 04, 2013, 08:48:54 pm »
Bliksem kamanya! What do you eat for breakfast? I want some of that!

Thnx 4 a great report on a great race.
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Offline alanB

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Re: Kakamas you say?
« Reply #79 on: November 04, 2013, 09:06:22 pm »
Quote
At first we thought the wire had got him in the throat, but much later he realised that the helmet had taken the full force and the bruising and blood was from the helmet strap.

 :o  :o  :o

Fark!  Talk about a miracle - if it cracked his helmet, and left those bloody bruises and cuts from the helmet strap - imagine what it would have happened if it really caught him in the throat!

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