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Author Topic: Sardine's DR650 - The Adventures of Sardine and James  (Read 24397 times)

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Online chopperpilot

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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #60 on: April 14, 2014, 01:50:56 pm »
Double or tripple the double sided tape then!

Agree with the drilling on the OEM headlight shroud. It's expensive.

My '07 DR came with the important screen. Fitted a few tap washers to lift it.

I'll do some pics!


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« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 01:50:36 pm by chopperpilot »
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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #61 on: April 23, 2014, 01:51:23 pm »
The screen. :thumleft:
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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #62 on: April 23, 2014, 01:52:35 pm »
Measurements/settings for the rear spring length. ;)

Including the damper setting/s, at the bottom. ;D
« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 01:53:34 pm by chopperpilot »
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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #63 on: April 23, 2014, 01:54:36 pm »
Damping adjuster screw. :)
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Offline Sardine

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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #64 on: April 23, 2014, 02:20:15 pm »
Aaaahhh, cool, thank you!  :thumleft:

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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #65 on: April 23, 2014, 02:46:26 pm »
Aaaahhh, cool, thank you!  :thumleft:
You're welcome! Shout if you need any advice to do the actual job! ;)
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Offline lecap

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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #66 on: April 24, 2014, 08:43:19 am »
Standard setting on the damper is a bit stiff for technical dirt or badly corrugated roads as well as when going fast on bad tar. It's a standard setting as it says. Good for good tar & good gravel.
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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #67 on: April 24, 2014, 10:45:35 am »
Standard setting on the damper is a bit stiff for technical dirt or badly corrugated roads as well as when going fast on bad tar. It's a standard setting as it says. Good for good tar & good gravel.
Would you then turn it out more than the recommended 8 turns?


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Offline lecap

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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #68 on: April 25, 2014, 09:28:40 am »
Yes out generally means softer on damping adjusters.

I don't like "factory settings" in general. For the average rider and poor tar and all sorts of dirt as often encountered in SA it's best to turn damping soft until the bike starts to feel unsettled and wallows through fast tar corners with whoops.
Don't adjust in click by click tiny steps as you will most likely not feel the difference.
Find a road ideally very poor tar with bad bumps you can accelerate over and a fast corner with two or more whoops
Count how many steps you have from the current setting to the  end of adjustment range.
Go half way between starting point and end of range. Both ways if you like but going harder will most likely end you with a bike which tramples through the bumps under acceleration and makes sounds as if your swing arm snaps in half.
Repeat by adjusting in smaller steps always cutting the adjustment range in half until it feels right or until you can't tell the difference any more.

Warning:
You might end up with two settings one with good traction when accelerating over bumps and one with good stability in the "whoopy" fast corner. Use brain and / or pack screw driver for the next ride :mwink:

If you have a fancy shock with plenty of knoppetjies it gets a bit more complex.
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Offline Sardine

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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #69 on: May 19, 2014, 08:11:34 am »
DR and I went exploring yesterday. Didn't quite work out as planned. We got a bit lost.  :eek7: But it was still fun.

Somewhere on the eastern slopes of the Bottelary Hills...

Offline GSBoland

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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #70 on: May 19, 2014, 01:55:18 pm »
 :thumleft:
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Offline fredda

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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #71 on: May 19, 2014, 07:41:43 pm »
Blikemmer, as ek na daai fotos van Sardine kyk, dan pak ek sommer nou my tas en trek af kaap toe!  ;D
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Offline Dux

Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #72 on: May 19, 2014, 07:48:23 pm »
That is just a tiny patch of WC , there is much much more , this particular section is just outside Stellenbosch . not unusual to go out doing 500km + day trips with minimal tar
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Offline Sardine

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Re: Sardine's DR650
« Reply #73 on: June 01, 2014, 03:47:17 pm »
So a while back I decided I would go and explore every Sunday, provided the weather was ok.

Late this morning, it seemed like the rain had stopped, and I decided to head to the Gordons Bay track to see if is still open.
So I donned my kit, took the topbox off my bike, and set off. (And not much later, I fell off. Don't worry, the bike is okay!  :ricky: )

Into the rain I went. As luck would have it, I was riding towards the rain. And so began the first of my lessons for the day.
1.) The little voice that told me to put my phone in my jacket pocket instead of my pants pocket, was very clever. And I'm glad I listened to it; it wasn't long before the water was seeping through my pants.
2.) The Airoh S4, while an awesome helmet, attracts water. No matter which way I tilted my head, the drops wouldn't flow off the visor.
3.) My awesome Lookwell Comfort boots leak.

But anyway. I cautiously made my way along the N2 towards Sir Lowry's Pass, somewhat hesitant having never ridden this bike in the rain before. In fact, I'd never ridden rain that made the roads absolutely soaked. I kept my eyes peeled for wet paint and patches of oil, petrol and diesel.

Not long and I was at the access road for the track.

4.) Mud is AWESOME! I plodded along the dirt road, riddled with water-filled potholes, splashing through the smaller ones and avoiding the larger, deeper ones.
5.) Water-filled potholes SUCK! The way the sun (which had now poked out for a while) was shining, made the water seem like mud, leading me to believe that there weren't any holes. I quickly realised my mistake, slowed down, and took it easy.

From there, it was onto a jeep track where I blasted through some muddy, water patches.

6.) Slimy mud SUCKS!
I slowed down for some reason, hit some slime and... the back wheel went left, I went right, and while screaming "You stupid idiot!" at myself, the bike fell to the right, and my right leg found itself under the exhaust, and I found myself lying in the mud.

Great. Ok, don't panic.
Hit the kill switch. Turn off the ignition. Switch off the spots. Last thing you need now is a flat battery.

Okay, bike is lying on its side, having a nap.
I was torn between taking a photo, and extracting my leg. I eventually chose the latter.
7.) ATGATT!!! I am SO glad I've always lived by that policy. The Lookwell boots only go up to about mid-shin, leaving the rest of your shin and knees exposed. I knew this is a no-go for offroad riding, and invested in a pair of basic Fox kneeguards a few months ago. They took the brunt of the fall; I'm not even bruised from where the bike landed on my leg (yet).

After some lifting, I managed to swing my leg out and asses the situation.

Right. No fuel is leaking out the tank - good. No one was around - bad.

8.) There are two ways I escape the world. I go fly. Or I go ride my bike. Whatever I chose, it is best done solo for maximum effect.
9.) Solo riding is STUPID! Don't go offroad alone.

Now I had to lift the bike up. I knew from a fairly recent encounter where I layed it down on its side at a stop street, that I wasn't able to lift it using the "walk it back" trick. So I didn't try (initially).

10.) Keep your gear on when attempting to lift the bike!
I squatted down, left hand on the passenger handle, right hand under the tank. And 3-2-1 LIFT!
My 22 year old back screamed at me, but I ignored it and used my legs to get the bike high enough to get my knees underneath it near the seat. I almost had it. It was going to work!
And then I slipped. And face-planted on the bike. Thank goodness I was still wearing the helmet, otherwise I would've slammed my chin into the frame!

Ok, that's not going to work. Plan B. And C. And D, and E and and and and.
Nothing was working. I even tried pulling it up using a strap I had brought with. No luck.
My best bet was to pull it to some grass, so I could get some grip and try lifting it again.
In doing so, I snapped the licence disc holder off.

Luckily someone drove past, and he very kindly helped me pick the bike up.
Phew! I got my breath back, approached my steed, and asked it sweetly to start up.
Nope. Not happy. Right, a bit of choke? She fired right up! Exhaust spitting out mud.

11.) I LOVE my bike!
12.) Check that everything is fine before riding off. I gave it a once-over to make sure nothing else had broken, and checked the clutch and brake levers. The hand guard had shifted and was applying the brakes for me, so I just yanked that out the way. All good! (On my way back I realised the mirrors were pointing in odd directions, and one spotlight was pointing about 45deg off where it was originally.)

I donned my helmet and gloves and set off home. This time riding on the grass middlemannetjie. And when I did have to go through the slimy mud, I made sure to carry some speed. No issues.

13.) Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. On my way home, I encountered a guy who's chain had jumped off. I ramped the pavement and dismounted to help him. After a bit of force, we got it back on the sprocket, and he slowly made his way home (chain wasn't seating properly).

14.) Ride with water or colddrink. One dehydrates quickly in full kit, sweating while trying to lift bikes.

15.) Prepsol is AWESOME! After getting home and removing all the wet and muddy kit, and changing into dry clothes, I hosed the bike down, then gave it a liberal coat of prepsol, and hosed it down again. Sparkling!

Bike has some new scratches, but apart from that it's fine.
As for me? I've got some very dirty clothes, and bruise on my thigh from where I landed on the pocketknife I had in my pants pocket.

All in all... AMAZING Sunday! Can't wait for next week  :ricky:

Oh, after all that, the track is indeed closed  :-\

Offline westfrogger

Re: Sardine's DR650 - The Adventures of Sardine and Jamie
« Reply #74 on: June 01, 2014, 05:05:19 pm »
 :thumleft:
 

Offline fredda

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Re: Sardine's DR650 - The Adventures of Sardine and Jamie
« Reply #75 on: June 02, 2014, 06:40:05 am »
Glad you are ok Sardine!

How is the vibration on the handlebars without the bar-end weights?
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Offline Sardine

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Re: Sardine's DR650 - The Adventures of Sardine and Jamie
« Reply #76 on: June 02, 2014, 07:44:10 am »
Feeling the aches and pains today!  :o

Fredda, can't say I've noticed anything. Never ridden a DR with the weights, so I don't have anything to compare it to.

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Re: Sardine's DR650 - The Adventures of Sardine and Jamie
« Reply #77 on: June 02, 2014, 07:56:47 am »
Thats good to know. I will fit some bark busters or something similar in the future, and for ease of fitment will probably leave the bar-end weights when fitting. Was worried that the vibration will be unbearable without the bar-ends.
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Offline Woestynhond

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Re: Sardine's DR650 - The Adventures of Sardine and Jamie
« Reply #78 on: June 04, 2014, 01:26:39 am »
Some of the handguards do not fit if the bar ends are on the bike, also the control levers tend to be in the way! i machined a third off my bar end weights and fitted cycra guards. stock levers just clear the guards.
and she said " What are you doin today ? ".
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and she said " But you did that yesterday ".
and I said "I haven`t finished yet ".
 

Offline Sardine

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Re: Sardine's DR650 - The Adventures of Sardine and Jamie
« Reply #79 on: June 06, 2014, 11:21:09 am »
Turns out the DR falls well; a lot better than its rider.  :ricky:
Cracked rib and shoulder damage, the extent of which will be known after an ultrasound on Wednesday.
This from a low speed fall (<20kmh) wearing a leather jacket with armour.

The money I was going to spend on decent boots and a new jacket is now going towards medical bills.