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Author Topic: The Original Adventure Bike?  (Read 4651 times)

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Offline 2StrokeDan

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Re: The Original Adventure Bike?
« Reply #60 on: June 06, 2014, 08:39:51 am »
Well the DR650SE is IMHO one of the few true heirs to the legacy the first half litre class dual sport bikes (XT AND XL) left behind:

It's reliable and lasts well because it's too dumb to break. No gimmicks over and above the digital ignition timing control (which seems fairly reliable).
No gimmicks at all actually. Who needs a rev. counter?
You can fully service it with an absolute tiny minimum of tools: A 16mm spark plug socket. #21 or #17(dep. on year model) ring spanner for the sump plug, #8 for the oil filter cover, #10 ring spanner and feeler gauges for tappet covers and tappets. Phillips #2 for the air filter. #24 to adjust the chain. The air filter you wash and oil plenty of times before it gets tatty and needs replacement.

Even better: Everything that has to come off for servicing you can either throw into the dirt next to the bike (tank, frame covers and seat) or temporarily store the items in your denim's pockets (tappet covers & oil filter cover, after wiping the oil off ;D ).

Feel free to compare with contemporary claimed adventure bikes like the Transalp 700:
You have to drop the engine to get the tappet covers off :o
The air filter you throw away and you buy a new one instead of wash and oil :-\

Should we look for the original adventure bike (any vintage) by comparing how much clutter you have to carry to keep it running?

Just the tools and parts needed for a spark plug change, oil and filter, air filter and adjusting the valve clearances and the drive chain slack to keep it simple:



A truly worthy successor to the venerable old XT500.
 

Offline lecap

Re: The Original Adventure Bike?
« Reply #61 on: June 06, 2014, 08:41:59 am »
My KLR (C) needs:
Phillips 10mm and 8mm to get the tank off. Phillips also for frame side covers and air box lid. 12mm for the seat.
17mm for the sump plug
Oil filter takes 8mm again and two flat screw drivers to pry the damn lid out ::)
For the valves you need the 10 and 12 plus the feeler gauges and a box full of valve shims :-\
It's als very highly recommended to have a torque wrench to tighten the cam journal caps and the valve cover.
Spark plug socket as usual.
27mm, 12mm and 14mm for the drive chain adjustments.

Not too bad although the valve shims & torque wrench spoil the picture a bit.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2014, 08:45:05 am by lecap »
"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." (Red Adair)
 

Offline Fario

Re: The Original Adventure Bike?
« Reply #62 on: June 06, 2014, 09:58:36 am »
This is it.........

As a matter of interest, BSA had a "works" version of this bike that Jeff Smith won the 500cc MX world championship with in 1965. For 1966 the BSA factory built a titanium framed bike (also many titanium bits on the bike). This machine weighed 88kg! To date, this is apparently the most expensive works campaign ever. Worth a google. Search "Jeff Smith BSA" The BSA engineers also experimented with front and rear discs. A previous manager of mine was an apprentice in the BSA MX racing division and worked on these factory MX'ers. Apparently put out 50hp on the dyno.
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Offline Jacobsroodt

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Re: The Original Adventure Bike?
« Reply #63 on: June 06, 2014, 01:17:20 pm »
 :sip:
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Offline StuartC

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Re: The Original Adventure Bike?
« Reply #64 on: June 09, 2014, 08:12:11 pm »
You all got it wrong, there is only one original do it all adventure bike
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Offline 2StrokeDan

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Re: The Original Adventure Bike?
« Reply #65 on: June 09, 2014, 08:18:48 pm »
Stuart, but that looks like a R1? :pot:
 

Offline Sabre

Re: The Original Adventure Bike?
« Reply #66 on: June 09, 2014, 08:23:21 pm »
My KLR (C) needs:
Phillips 10mm and 8mm to get the tank off. Phillips also for frame side covers and air box lid. 12mm for the seat.
17mm for the sump plug
Oil filter takes 8mm again and two flat screw drivers to pry the damn lid out ::)
For the valves you need the 10 and 12 plus the feeler gauges and a box full of valve shims :-\
It's als very highly recommended to have a torque wrench to tighten the cam journal caps and the valve cover.
Spark plug socket as usual.
27mm, 12mm and 14mm for the drive chain adjustments.

Not too bad although the valve shims & torque wrench spoil the picture a bit.
But still, the schlep to change that spark plug !
If you read the book "In search of greener grass" by Graham Field, you will know that when he wanted to change the plug by the road-side, he had to remove all his luggage, spare tyres, then side covers, seat, fairing, tank. On a DS bike ?!
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Offline StuartC

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Re: The Original Adventure Bike?
« Reply #67 on: June 09, 2014, 09:30:39 pm »
Stuart, but that looks like a R1? :pot:

It's a throbbing twin with a furry seat that would bring tears of joy to any Aussie man's eye's !
Life is too short to ride a Honda
 

Offline lecap

Re: The Original Adventure Bike?
« Reply #68 on: June 10, 2014, 08:33:15 am »
My KLR (C) needs:
Phillips 10mm and 8mm to get the tank off. Phillips also for frame side covers and air box lid. 12mm for the seat.
17mm for the sump plug
Oil filter takes 8mm again and two flat screw drivers to pry the damn lid out ::)
For the valves you need the 10 and 12 plus the feeler gauges and a box full of valve shims :-\
It's als very highly recommended to have a torque wrench to tighten the cam journal caps and the valve cover.
Spark plug socket as usual.
27mm, 12mm and 14mm for the drive chain adjustments.

Not too bad although the valve shims & torque wrench spoil the picture a bit.
But still, the schlep to change that spark plug !
If you read the book "In search of greener grass" by Graham Field, you will know that when he wanted to change the plug by the road-side, he had to remove all his luggage, spare tyres, then side covers, seat, fairing, tank. On a DS bike ?!


And your point is ???

Why would you replace a spark plug of a four stroke engine on the side of the road. Because you were too cheap to do it the last four times you serviced the bike? ::)

Also: Feel free what you have to take off an Africa Twin to change spark plugs (Yes all four!).

Or: How to adjust valve clearances on a Transalp 700 oh my!


And: How does a factory racer BSA with a titanium frame fit into the category "Adventure bike" :-\

The Brits might have invented it.
But the Japs sold it :D
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Offline Malibu

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Re: The Original Adventure Bike?
« Reply #69 on: June 10, 2014, 08:44:09 am »
In the 1930's my great grandfather would plough his fields after the harvest, and allow "the boys" to come spend some time on the farm, sleeping in the barn and playing with their motorcycles in the fields. 
Many Londoners, young men needing a break from the city, took the opportunity to spend time in Bedfordshire at the farm.
My grandmother learnt then how to ride, and remembers burning her leg on the exhaust. 
I think that was when her need for adventure grew, culminating with her moving to Africa... chopping out a tobacco farm in the wilds, learning to fly planes and being an incredible woman with an amazing life story.
They call me Judy or Judes...

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Offline Offshore

Re: The Original Adventure Bike?
« Reply #70 on: June 10, 2014, 06:35:32 pm »
In the 1930's my great grandfather would plough his fields after the harvest, and allow "the boys" to come spend some time on the farm, sleeping in the barn and playing with their motorcycles in the fields. 
Many Londoners, young men needing a break from the city, took the opportunity to spend time in Bedfordshire at the farm.
My grandmother learnt then how to ride, and remembers burning her leg on the exhaust. 
I think that was when her need for adventure grew, culminating with her moving to Africa... chopping out a tobacco farm in the wilds, learning to fly planes and being an incredible woman with an amazing life story.
  8) :thumleft: :ricky:
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