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Author Topic: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding  (Read 41715 times)

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Offline JustBendIt

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #140 on: November 26, 2014, 04:36:00 am »
loving it  :biggrin:

they say familiarity breeds contempt

but

absence makes the heart grow fonder ...

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Offline Rolling Stone

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #141 on: November 26, 2014, 05:12:33 am »
Eish
before you read the RR you think that you were the only one to have a hard time out there and then it dawns on you that except for the front  couple of guys, everyone was in a little survival battle of their own
 
nice RR Andy, keep it coming :thumleft:
 

Offline Kamanya

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #142 on: November 26, 2014, 07:01:03 am »
Stage 2 video

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/FnWRJyk9-D4" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/FnWRJyk9-D4</a>
I wonder where that gravel road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. (Apologies to Mr Frost)

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Offline Kamanya

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #143 on: November 26, 2014, 08:32:30 am »
My video camera can do about 4 hours of recording before the batteries need to be changed. So I have a spare set in my back pack. In one of the more meatier crashes I thought it was about time to change over and felt behind me for the side pocket that I keep them in.

Sadly, my radio and the batteries had fallen out in the crash. I searched about in the sand but couldn't find them. They must have fallen out in one of the earlier crashes....

Or so I thought.

About a day later I found them. They were in the other side.

So sadly I didn't get the last bit of the stage in the river bed and steep rocky tracks.

Chop!
I wonder where that gravel road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. (Apologies to Mr Frost)

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Offline GG

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #144 on: November 26, 2014, 10:32:35 am »
Flip those falls are so familiar  :laughing4:
 

Offline whitedelight

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #145 on: November 26, 2014, 10:49:24 am »
Respect dude  :thumleft:
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Offline met eish

Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #146 on: November 26, 2014, 11:32:17 am »
Enjoyed the ride, respect for handling that 950 on those sandy tweespoor's
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Offline Kamanya

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #147 on: November 26, 2014, 11:51:31 am »
Have stuck this where it belongs further back in the report. But as most of you would have read this far already, here are some snippets from the drive up. Music and laughter...

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/pqJLT3GIiiU" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/pqJLT3GIiiU</a>

I wonder where that gravel road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. (Apologies to Mr Frost)

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Offline Bazinga

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #148 on: November 26, 2014, 12:33:25 pm »
I enjoyed that stage 2 video a lot.

I had many front wheel holidays, ha ha ha
 

Offline DirtyHarry

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #149 on: November 26, 2014, 01:40:36 pm »
Nice track building in video 2 Andrew  :biggrin:
You are one tough MTF.
 

Offline King Louis

Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #150 on: November 26, 2014, 01:52:02 pm »
Respect and thanks for sharing.... :thumleft:
 

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #151 on: November 26, 2014, 02:06:34 pm »
HA!!      Another memory revisited - those dune-tops were a bugger

They mighta been S-shaped but I rode them like a W  :o :o :o

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Offline bonova

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #152 on: November 26, 2014, 04:29:51 pm »
Loving this!
As a matter of interest - Kobus was on his 690 RALLY (the real deal, not a conversion), not a 450 ;)

Watching your riding makes me long for my 950 again - poetry - dunno if I'd have the balls to take it on Amageza tho!
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Offline BlueBull2007

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #153 on: November 30, 2014, 04:50:20 am »
I enjoyed that stage 2 video a lot.

I had many front wheel holidays, ha ha ha

Bringing up the back of the field in the sweep with Weskus and Co. I think we must have seen like 50-60 craters in those dunes from guys wiping out. You tell the really bad ones aprt because there would always be a lot more footprints and drag marks etc. Some of them were insane, but we chuckled every time we saw them, knowing that the drama must have been high: "Look at this! Ja, some poor oke bought the farm here...Hell that one must have been really moebie".

The distribution was random most of the time, with more happening on the backs of the dunes.

On one of those steep crests, some oke must have sailed through the a good 10m, having ridden over the crest HP over one of those big grass tufts. His crater mark was about 6m below the top. He must have ploughed big time going over bars, because it looked like a war zone. Must have hurt like hell.

Saw a good 5-10 tracks off to the side in the grass at times. It became a bit of a pattern, with the tracks converging most of the time near the dune crests. One guy basically did the whole route 5-15m off to the left of the track. Insane in that grass.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2014, 04:58:35 am by BlueBull2007 »
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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #154 on: November 30, 2014, 10:43:28 am »
The grass worked - I used it a lot - and I did steer towards the path again near the tops, as you saw.

Going straight over the grass tops was a pot-luck affair, so I'd stop on most tops just before descent, going over the bars was not nice and freaked me out coz I dunno what the bike was doing behind me.   :o :o :o

What I did find different, though, is the animal holes in the red sand were only about a foot big so riding over them was easy - the white sand had the bigger, bone-breaking holes.

For those wondering what the road is for - I spoke to a farmer (a white landcruiser) on the Namibian side of the fence who owned some of the land on both sides. He reckoned the path is used by the SA border patrol and is used quite regularly. I didn't ask what vehicle they used but it must be a helluva job driving up and down those dunes.

He told me that even he has to go through an official border post, about 140kms away, to visit his other farm - and there we were, standing 6 feet apart, talking through a little wire mesh fence, both of us standing on his land.

It was quite comical at the time - I couldn't understand his attempt at English, so he had to endure my 'brilliant' Afrikaans - his wife was standing there, sniggering.

Woulda been a great photo - me in my shiny, green, MX kit - standing in SA. Greeting a sun beaten, veldskoen, leather-hatted Boer, across the little fence, in Namibia. And it was on top of that big, dry, grassless dune with the scary drop-off.

Chalk and cheese doesn't quite do it - but you know what I mean .................................. 
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Offline N[]vA

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #155 on: November 30, 2014, 11:39:09 am »

Woulda been a great photo - me in my shiny, green, MX kit - standing in SA. Greeting a sun beaten, veldskoen, leather-hatted Boer, across the little fence, in Namibia. And it was on top of that big, dry, grassless dune with the scary drop-off.

Chalk and cheese doesn't quite do it - but you know what I mean .................................. 
hahah awesome visual thanks :)
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Offline Kamanya

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #156 on: December 02, 2014, 08:21:52 am »
Time to go



The ride to Kakamas was lonely. Not just for me either



It’s a strange thing that happens when rallying. There are 70 souls all on the same track and yet, for long periods, hours at a time, it’s not unusual to see nothing but the evidence of tracks that there are others out here. It’s also interesting watching how each set of tracks tells some story. Corners are the best place to read the mind-set of the riders. Here’s a few things that come to mind;

There are the barely noticeable tracks. If you didn’t know that this is possibly a guy reading his roadbook at the time, almost timid. There are the flamboyant, wide arcs, that start high on the entry to the corner and like massive stretched out Nike signs, end close to the edge of the exit. I know the feeling. Typically, two things are happening, either it’s just for the pure fun of doing it, or it’s the only way of quickly getting around a corner. The tell tales between the two are how long the follow on wheel spin is and if it continues snaking up the road. The large pendulum swings after the corner are the fun guys.

Then the ones that always give me smile are the witness marks to a bit of brown adrenalin. (that’s what adrenalin looks like, you only need to check your underpants to know) These tracks have long strips that head straight to the outside of the corner then disappear into the bush only to re-emerge a little while later around the corner. Even when not being unduly irresponsible and riding way above the bikes or your own skill level, these things happen where a corner sneaks up and claims another farmer. Mostly the roadbook it very good at giving ample warning about the really dangerous ones, but there’s always a few that are obviously special. You can tell them by the multiple lines going for a bit of a dance with the bush.

The really impressive ones are where the superfast guys’ marks go. They are the ones that are the shortest distance between two points, have lots of wheel traction marks and don’t seem too fussed by rocks, small trees, donga’s or huge ruts. Not just big kaoona’s but exceptional suspension too.

Lastly as mentioned above, the crash marks. Small blots on the landscape that tell the story of visiting mother earth. Most often, there is a tale all of it’s own that leads up to the crash site.

Anyway, I was a little sore coming into Kakamas from one of the crashes, but happy that it was still midday’ish and that I would have a lot of time to chill and sort stuff out. First port of call was the chemist for some Cataflam (anti-inflammatory) and better pain tablets in anticipation of stiffening up. Then off to meet Justin. Only this time I had beat him to the camp site.

There were a ton of kids that were milling around asking for autographs. Asking for their shirts to be signed. I’ve never signed an autograph in my life. Peter (Bonova) pulled a sneaky and got out of being mobbed by pointing me out and saying that I was the sand god and look at the size of my bike! Instantly there were flocks of 11 year olds asking 40 million questions and having me sign their shirts. Worse, even though I am 46, in my mind I am about 26, maybe. Nothing over 35 definitely, so it’s always a bit depressing to be addressed as “Oom”. I know it’s a respect thing, but my ego certainly doesn’t feel respected.

After handing in my GPS, getting out of my kit and finding Justin the next important order of business was finding some food. Ian (Max) was roped in, it didn’t take any convincing. I was famished. I think I had the mixed grill and large glasses of water with a few coffee’s. It certainly did the trick.



Because soon after that I was hard at work…







The leanest greenest machine there



There was precious little to do with my bike. Justin, normally fastidious about prepping, “Most races are lost in the prepping!” just couldn’t work out the secrets of getting the oil levels right in an LC8 Adventure. It took me years to learn the vagaries of the beast. The air filters got a quick wash and the chain lubed. That was it. Compared to the near open heart surgery that the 450’s have to undergo every evening and the pedicure/manicure and Botox that the 690’s have to have or else they spit their dummy’s, the 950’s are maintenance misers.

Apart from having a chat with Riaan in the showers about the differences for him between the latest 450RR he’ll be riding in this years Dakar and the one he currently was on, (bottom line it’s less stable at speed but more flickable in technical – solution for some is a longer swingarm) the evening passed quickly.

The briefing was super short,



the road book was very thick,



supper was filling and sleep came soon.

Day 3, the big one apparently was next. I love that part of the world and was looking forward to it. My hands were absolutely perfect, my arse was 100’s, knees still perfect and nothing was broke on the bike. Roll on the Richtersveld.




« Last Edit: December 02, 2014, 08:24:22 am by Kamanya »
I wonder where that gravel road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. (Apologies to Mr Frost)

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Offline I&horse

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #157 on: December 02, 2014, 09:26:51 am »
Is that the original set  of hand-guards you have on there A?

If so I'm absolutely amazed by how much abuse they can handle!!
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Offline bonova

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #158 on: December 02, 2014, 05:12:33 pm »
Andrew - That vid of stage 2 is one of the most epic videos I've seen. And it convinced me to not take my 950 on amageza next year!
Sometimes there is just nothing you can do but bin it. On the little 450 you have a chance and you fight it. On my 950 I'd just give up and superman over the bars! haha
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Offline Kamanya

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #159 on: December 02, 2014, 11:53:15 pm »
Stage 3

Kakamas To Springbok

Liaison: 270km
Special: 252km




It looked to be a great day. Bit of a bite but clear sky. Breakfast was as good as supper, it was all rolling along super smooth. Just the nagging thought of 500 plus k’s and a big special. I like this part of the world so I wasn’t so worried…

Last checks, broken Sprinbokkie in the background.





Roberts new anti-stress pill – a banana taped to the tank.



Mr and Junior Baragwaneth. Jnr is flipping quick!



The quality of banter at times like these was brilliant.



I don’t know, your guess is as good as mine.



The bonus was that Robert and I were to be riding together for the liaison to the start.





There’s something about riding with another guy for miles on end, yet in my own thoughts. The difference to a social ride is the tension of being in a race and having to observe the limits and rules.







Mark would have a long day…











Yes Master, try I will!




A strong goal that I had set myself was to be hugely more disciplined this year with regards to the navigation. Last year I had more than 2 hours of penalties, mostly for speeding and waypoint infractions. It is so very easy to  collect them. To this end I thought I had been pretty good, so it was a bit of a bummer when we came upon albert later in the liaison tootling along at 60 whilst we were doing 80. It was a really short section, so we might have got away with it. Nevertheless is was quite comical the hand signs; us doing a  what the hell is wrong? And he slapping his wrist and shaking a finger. Us then scrolling backwards and forwards in the roadbook to frantically see who was wrong.

We were.

Ahhh!





The liaison took ages, a quick refuel in Poffadder with last minute checks, then off to the start.









There’s just something great about getting counted off to start. Must be a subliminal thing having watched too many Dakars.















Rudi and a few others would also have an epic day









Gideon would win the stage, he’s really, really quick,







Eddy would have a tough day at the office



Not sure if he did…



He was playing fuel miser games





The first section was hectically quick. There was a few tricks with the navigation and many guys had already made a few errors. Robert and I were doing pretty well.

Close to the Orange river there was a flash flood that had ruined the road. I got a bit stuck after having been bounced into a thorn tree. In the video you can see all the drama.

I didn’t need any more of those!

Along the Orange River for only a few K's and then unexpectedly we turned up a river bed. I had thought we might follow the Namaqwa Eco Trail but sneaky Alex had other plans. It was a great off piste stretch that led over a watershed to a bit of a scramble down some rocks and towards the Klein Pella farm for a bit of a top up with fuel.

With less than a km from the farm I mistimed a turn and hit a sharp sticking out rock. At first I thought I had gotten lucky but soon the sluggish steering told me otherwise. I had a snake bite puncture.

I’m not anxious about much to do with bikes mechanically or riding, except mud and punctures. Mud is not predicable and punctures I've only ever had 3 and I’ve yet to fix one successfully believe it or not. Each time i've either had to be rescued or rode home on the puncture. One of the three I was rescued by Jaco who brought me a fresh front after I holed mine trying to get it in. I holed that one too, so rode home 60k's on a flat front. I have a bit of a block about punctures.

I pulled over and waved Robert on. He was having none of it. He seemed to think this would take but a second or two. Me, I really didn’t know what was going to happen. I needed an attitude adjustment.

Luckily for me, he did stay because like a premium amateur, not only do I suck at punctures, but I somehow had only 2 18 inch tubes for the rear instead of one and one 21 inch for the front.

I managed to bum a tube off of Willem, a massively big thing to do with 300km to go still. I promised him my wheel if I came across him later.

Robert had helped me get the tube in and we had cut the heavy duty one up to line the tire too. Sadly, meters from the repair I was stopped again. I had pinched the tube! Chalk another puncture failure up 4 for 4! This time I insisted that Robert go. He lent me his patching kit and took off. He’d sacrificed more than an hour of his race to help me out. It was a very generous thing to have done.



It was still a bit of a comedy. My bike fell off the centre stand whislt I had the front wheel out. The last competitor past helped me set it up again. Now I truly was on my own.

So, there I was, last in the race and falling further behind all. At least I had tracker, but no radio (remember I had lost it on day 2).

Then the day turned.

Happily whilst digging in my back pack for my hand pump, what should appear but the radio and batteries I thought I’d lost. Weyhey! Maybe my luck was changing!?

I held my breath on pumping the tire and gingerly rode off to the farm. The whole fiasco had taken 2 hours and 10 minutes. To prevent more pinch flats I was now at 2.6bar. I was willing to swap traction for less punctures. It felt pretty shitty but at least I was mobile again.

I gave myself a talking to; Ride smart, be REALLY good to the front, have fun, look up at the world from time to time to appreciate what a privilege I am lucky enough to be having.

A few hours later I bumped into the last but me, Eddie on his HP2. He had just come through a riverbed with a steep rocky bit and was taking a break. I cast a keen eye over him and really watched him as he spoke to see if he really was ok. He had lots of water and seemed quite fine. This part of the world is super hard and not at all easy to have an issue in. I bid him good riding a carried on.

For the next few hours I was having a ball. This part of the world is just stunning riding. Massive vistas and big desert mountains. The bike was singing and seemed to be making up for the puncture.

Except when I got another fence in my wheel



There were tracks all over the place and they couldn’t be relied upon as cues. Often there were half and half going either way on most splits in the road. On previous Amageza’s I’ve ignored the CAP headings in the roadbook. CAP headings give the heading that you should be on once you’ve made a turn. They are hugely helpful but can be tricky to master. This time though I had them working and wasn’t making many errors and the ones I did make were very quickly fixed. Also, a difference to the previous years I wasn't doing any guessing and hoping. I felt I was really getting this navigation thing.

One pretty good error though occurred close to 3pm. After asking the local sheep guys, it was clear that even they couldn’t make out which way all the people had gone. They said that many groups had come and gone in all directions. I had to backtrack for a few minutes to get right again. It's error after waypoint 104



That bit at the top is in a riverbed. It caught a lot of guys. There were no real indicators to the hard left turn, just faint tracks. The only way to have got it right was by keeping track of the distance and turning when the roadbook said you should.


Late in the afternoon, I started to catch a few groups of guys. I’d run out of water but was feeling pretty good. I had had two water bags but had to use the one on day one for petrol so only had 3 litres to start the stage with. Just when the water thing started to bite, a manned check point popped up with some water. What a blessing that was.

At one point the trail seemed to be doing circles, it was a bit irritating compared to the high speeds of the previous days.

The last major obstacle was a goat track up a mountain to look down on the finish of the stage next to the N7. What a site, what a trail!

(stolen from GG's ride report)



« Last Edit: December 19, 2014, 01:50:49 am by Kamanya »
I wonder where that gravel road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. (Apologies to Mr Frost)

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