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Offline cocky

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #900 on: October 10, 2018, 10:31:58 am »
Dankie Kokkie nou verstaan ek ook!  :thumleft:
Die jonge dame het n commercial likesens maar kort twin engine om bus te te vlieg
Just because your bachelors did not turn out like you wanted it to does not mean your marriage will not be better than you ever imagined it could be.
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Offline Sardine

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #901 on: October 11, 2018, 09:29:53 am »
Ok, get ready for a long reply...

So a few years ago, when people were decent, a pilot with a fresh commercial pilots licence could go to Botswana and get a job with only 200hrs to their name.

They would agree to 3 years - 2 years flying piston aircraft and then 1 year on the turbine Caravan. This would get them around 2500hrs, with about 500hrs of those on turbines.

This kicked open the door to charter and contract work. So they would go to the likes of Solenta, get a job, and work there for x-amount of years.

So let’s say 5 years after qualifying you would be eligible for an airline, having not paid a cent for a type rating.

Then things changed. The people in Botswana got their Caravan rating(paid for by their employer), and disappeared.

They did the same to the big contract companies. Now, these ratings cost anything for R60 000-R160 000. It’s a lot of time and money to invest in someone.

So, thanks to those selfish individuals, and a few other idiots flying for free because they can, you now have to pay for your own rating, with no guarantee of getting a job.

There is the odd company who will hire you and then say “ok, you have 4 months to get rated, off you go.” Which is better, but not great.

Ok, so ratings. What the frikkadel?

Typical one gets a Private Pilots Licence (PPL) on a single engine piston. If you have the money you could do it on a multi-engine piston, or a single engine turbine. But few people do.

The single engine piston is quite basic, safe, and perfect for someone with zero flying experience.
Also, good for those who just want to fly for fun.

For those who aim to use their aircraft to get from A to B for work, they typically get a PPL and then a multi-engine rating, or a turbine rating, buy their own plane, and fly themselves to meetings.

For those wanting to make a career out of it, you can do your Commercial Pilots Licence on a single engine piston, or a multi-engine piston (or, if you have loads of money, multi-engine turbine).

I went the single engine route as I knew I wouldn’t be employable with 200hours and a multi-engine rating, and I chose to use the money I would’ve spent on the multi, on an instructors rating.
No regrets!

And, multi-engine pistons scare me.

So up until now, I hold a single engine commercial pilots Licence, with an instrument rating. And I hold a turbine endorsement.

From next week that should become a multi-engine Pilots Licence with instrument rating, and a single engine turbine endorsement.

What are all these rating things?

Flying in South Africa isn’t like going from your VW Beetle to a Ferrari. For each type of aircraft you want to fly, you must be signed out on it by an instructor.

So if I can fly the Cessna 152, I need to do a type technical exam and, depending on the school, a flight in order to be able to fly the Cessna 172. Which is just a big 152.

I’m the States one rating covers all aircraft within a certain weight category, which makes sense as most light aircraft are similar. But there are some that will kill you more easily than others.

Then you get Type Ratings. These are for bigger aircraft. The Caravan, Kodiak, PC12, Boeing 737 etc each require a type rating. That can mean anything from 5-30 days ground school, and a mix of simulator training and flying the actual aircraft. And lots of money.

And then there are Class Ratings: single engine piston, turbine, multi-engine etc.

The big thing with the multi-engine flying is that multi-engine pistons don’t glide. And they don’t fly so well on one engine. The saying is “the other engine just gets you to the scene of the crash faster.”

You have to be awake because when the donkey fails, especially after take off, you have literally seconds to react.

But ja, to answer why I have had to pay for this. My employer doesn’t have multi-engine aircraft so there is no need for them to have me get the class rating.

Most companies require at least a multi-engine rating to be considered for employment.
I tick all the other boxes- turbine time, total time, ATPL exams passed. So I figured now is the time to bite the bullet and get it done. Fuel ain’t getting any cheaper! (Almost R22/l of Avgas! And the Seneca burns 87l per hour. Which isn’t actually too bad. R2000/hr, and it sits at about 140kts in the cruise. But then you have to add on insurance, maintenance, and the owner’s cut and boom, it costs R4700/hr!)
 
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Offline Sardine

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #902 on: October 11, 2018, 09:49:07 am »
I saw this puppy parked outside my bf’s work yesterday and asked who owned it. It’s his colleague’s house mate’s. So I asked if I could take it for a ride. ...   :biggrin: :biggrin:

I haven’t ridden a bike in well over a year.

So I took it easy down the road. And then gave the throttle a little twist and was surprised to see the speedo shooting past 60km/h. Wheeee! What a jol! Now I want a motorbike.

Offline >>Thump°C

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #903 on: October 11, 2018, 09:56:45 am »
Awesome, then you can really FLY....
Boys will be Boys.
And girls are darn thankful for that
 
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Offline Ian in Great Brak River

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #904 on: October 11, 2018, 07:46:32 pm »
Excellent as always.

 8)
1978. It's 6am, mid winter...two up on a XL 185S ... off to my first casino ever with all of R40 and we've got a full tank of fuel, so enough to get there we reckon.... that's determination...

Old bike: '82 Eddie Lawson Replica
Other bike: '05 Honda Varadero 1000
New bike: '16 Honda Africa Twin.
 
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Offline Sardine

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #905 on: October 19, 2018, 09:00:41 pm »
It has been quite a slow month.
I got my paperwork back the other day, and everything is correct on it, so I officially hold a Multi-engine Commercial Pilots Licence :D

Now every time I sit down to update my CV, I get called to fly.
Which isn’t a bad thing. Yesterday I did my first George flight this month. And today we did Cape Town-George-Beaufort West-George.

It was quite lekker. Lots of cloud layers, and a good deal of turbulence. Wheeee!

Offline Sardine

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #906 on: October 19, 2018, 09:38:56 pm »
1.) Nature is cool. Where the mountains stop, the cloud stops.
Enroute to Beaufort West.

2-4.) Waiting on the world to change... beautiful cloud formations and a bright blue sky. The wind picked up considerably during our wait and it was a fun take off.

Offline Sardine

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #907 on: October 19, 2018, 09:41:14 pm »
1.) Between cloud layers
2.) Halo around the sun
3.) Not a routing we do often, I got a good view of the Stellenbosch Airfield and False Bay

Offline Ama ride ride

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #908 on: October 20, 2018, 01:18:15 am »
Sardine, I read your explaining about licenses and stuff etc. I am a bit slow like always....

What ratings or licenses do you need for the below planes?

Piper Mirage vs Piper Meridian?
Gewoontlik n@@i ek reguit aan op fyndraai.

 

Offline Oubones

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #909 on: October 20, 2018, 06:53:18 am »
Congrats, another step!
You are making us proud, are you planning on keeping going till you fly the space shuttle? :imaposer: :pot:
Dakar 650
KLR650
 
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Offline Carrots

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #910 on: October 20, 2018, 10:22:30 am »

Ok, get ready for a long reply...


Many thanks for the comprehensive reply and good luck hopefully you will get there soon.  :thumleft:
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Offline Sardine

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #911 on: October 20, 2018, 12:35:54 pm »
Sardine, I read your explaining about licenses and stuff etc. I am a bit slow like always....

What ratings or licenses do you need for the below planes?

Piper Mirage vs Piper Meridian?

Hi ARR,

Sjoe, I had to do some research there. All I know about the Piper M-series is they all look pretty, and they all look similar.

... and it turns out I misread your question, so here's a breakdown...

Okay, so they have the designation PA-46 (the Seneca is a PA-34, Super Cub PA-18 etc).

The PA-46 comprises of:
Malibu - piston engine
Malibu Mirage - piston engine
Malibu Meridian - turboprop Malibu
Matrix - piston engine, unpressurized Meridian

Then Piper decided to call them the M-Class.
M350 - updated Mirage
M500 - updated Meridian
M600 - updated M500

So, to answer your question:
Mirage = piston engine, 350hp
Meridian = turboprop, 500hp

And it seems all except the Matrix are pressurized.

Ok, now to answer your question, and not what I thought was your question  :lol8:

In South Africa, I would need to do a type technical, ground school, and flight check to fly either one.

In the past, for the Mirage, all I would have had to do was a type technical. But the CAA has made things difficult and now more is required.
In the USA, as I am rated on an aircraft bigger than the Meridian, with all the same systems (turboprop, retractable gear- pressurized), I -think- I could automatically jump in the Meridian and fly with no specific flight training.
 
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Offline Ama ride ride

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #912 on: October 20, 2018, 08:33:52 pm »
Sardine, I read your explaining about licenses and stuff etc. I am a bit slow like always....

What ratings or licenses do you need for the below planes?

Piper Mirage vs Piper Meridian?

Hi ARR,

Sjoe, I had to do some research there. All I know about the Piper M-series is they all look pretty, and they all look similar.

... and it turns out I misread your question, so here's a breakdown...

Okay, so they have the designation PA-46 (the Seneca is a PA-34, Super Cub PA-18 etc).

The PA-46 comprises of:
Malibu - piston engine
Malibu Mirage - piston engine
Malibu Meridian - turboprop Malibu
Matrix - piston engine, unpressurized Meridian

Then Piper decided to call them the M-Class.
M350 - updated Mirage
M500 - updated Meridian
M600 - updated M500

So, to answer your question:
Mirage = piston engine, 350hp
Meridian = turboprop, 500hp

And it seems all except the Matrix are pressurized.

Ok, now to answer your question, and not what I thought was your question  :lol8:

In South Africa, I would need to do a type technical, ground school, and flight check to fly either one.

In the past, for the Mirage, all I would have had to do was a type technical. But the CAA has made things difficult and now more is required.
In the USA, as I am rated on an aircraft bigger than the Meridian, with all the same systems (turboprop, retractable gear- pressurized), I -think- I could automatically jump in the Meridian and fly with no specific flight training.

Sorry for the loaded question. :biggrin:Its indeed piston vs turboprop.

In the late 1980's when I was still skydiving the club was discussing about getting a turboprop due to rapid cooling of the club's Cessna 206 between loads, One of the pilots remarked that's its just a technical course to do.

Gewoontlik n@@i ek reguit aan op fyndraai.

 

Offline Sardine

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #913 on: October 20, 2018, 09:03:52 pm »
Sardine, I read your explaining about licenses and stuff etc. I am a bit slow like always....

What ratings or licenses do you need for the below planes?

Piper Mirage vs Piper Meridian?

Hi ARR,

Sjoe, I had to do some research there. All I know about the Piper M-series is they all look pretty, and they all look similar.

... and it turns out I misread your question, so here's a breakdown...

Okay, so they have the designation PA-46 (the Seneca is a PA-34, Super Cub PA-18 etc).

The PA-46 comprises of:
Malibu - piston engine
Malibu Mirage - piston engine
Malibu Meridian - turboprop Malibu
Matrix - piston engine, unpressurized Meridian

Then Piper decided to call them the M-Class.
M350 - updated Mirage
M500 - updated Meridian
M600 - updated M500

So, to answer your question:
Mirage = piston engine, 350hp
Meridian = turboprop, 500hp

And it seems all except the Matrix are pressurized.

Ok, now to answer your question, and not what I thought was your question  :lol8:

In South Africa, I would need to do a type technical, ground school, and flight check to fly either one.

In the past, for the Mirage, all I would have had to do was a type technical. But the CAA has made things difficult and now more is required.
In the USA, as I am rated on an aircraft bigger than the Meridian, with all the same systems (turboprop, retractable gear- pressurized), I -think- I could automatically jump in the Meridian and fly with no specific flight training.

In the late 1980's when I was still skydiving the club was discussing about getting a turboprop due to rapid cooling of the club's Cessna 206 between loads, One of the pilots remarked that's its just a technical course to do.
I should’ve read the question properly the first time  :-P
Back the. SA had open ratings or licenses, so you could hop from one plane to another within a certain weight category. So I imagine the transition to turboprops was quite straightforward back then.

A turboprop engine is less finicky and easier to understand than a turbocharged piston!
Sorry for the loaded question. :biggrin:Its indeed piston vs turboprop.

I personally feel the over-regulation of GA (General Aviation) has lead to an increase in accidents and incidents. But that’s just me.

Offline RobbieJZW

Re: My African Dream
« Reply #914 on: October 21, 2018, 05:25:08 am »
Love your pics and stories, thank you for sharing!!
 
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Offline Sardine

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #915 on: October 21, 2018, 06:47:13 am »
I have flown the last 3 days, it has been great. :)
My lower back is sore from the tractor seat, which we use to pull the plane in and out of the hangar.
On Wednesday both machines needed a compressor wash, so it was musical planes moving them around and then we flew.

Yesterday we went to Plett. It was a beautiful day with only a 20kt wind at our cruise altitudes of 22000 and 23000ft (normally it’s 50-80kts).

The lower winds have been fun with gusts of up to 35kts. The PC-12 handlesnit quite well on take off and landing, but pulling it into the hangar with the wind hitting the tail at 90 degrees was more of a challenge than the entire flight!  :imaposer:

Despite the lack of flying this month (only 6 missions so far), I have only been to George twice which has been a boost- it gets pretty mundane and the Wimpy there sucks.

Offline Sardine

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #916 on: October 21, 2018, 06:53:31 am »
1.) Passing George at 23 000ft. The airport is sort of middle-right of the photo
2.) Loading in Plett. It’s a nice airfield, not controlled and the people are friendly
3.) Another angle. The ambulance crew were so surprised to see a lady pilot and took heaps of photos

Offline Tom van Brits

Re: My African Dream
« Reply #917 on: October 22, 2018, 08:05:03 am »
Still enjoying this thread big time Sardine!  :thumleft:

My experience of skydiving through a cloud at Wonderboom airport is great. Always enjoyed it and though it was one of the best most thrilling experiences.
I have never felt comfortable flying as a passenger in the DRC through clouds because of all the mountain peaks and rather old planes with not the latest and greatest avionics onboard.
What surprised me is that I did read earlier in the thread someone opened a canopy 'in a cloud' and then also only on the 2nd AFF jump  :eek7:
That was never allowed and if the cloud base was less than 4500feet (student opening altetude) they were not allowed to proceed.
Good to read about all the experiences, but one should always focus on safety in aviation as one do not often get a second change.
One of the professions where it is not good to learn from your mistakes but avoid mistakes at all cost  :lol8:
 

Offline EssBee

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #918 on: October 22, 2018, 10:59:36 am »
@ Tom...re - deploying canopy in cloud. Interesting what you mention there....to be honest I have NEVER given it a 2nd thought. Ja, at that stage you pulled at 5k feet and that is IT! The cloud was not very thick ( top to bottom ) and I was able to orientate myself pretty quickly.

Sorry for the partial hijack, Heather. Awesome thread this! Just love it, and well done on your 'upgrade'.
 

Offline Sardine

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Re: My African Dream
« Reply #919 on: October 22, 2018, 03:12:00 pm »
Working in Botswana taught me the art of the bush wee.
Guys have it so easy.

But it’s quite challenging finding a bush shielded from view of the guests in the vehicle. And then there’s always a chance a lion is hiding in the same bush. So whilst balancing there, you’ve got to “meerkat” and make sure nothing is sneaking up on you.

But when you gotta go, you gotta go. So I learnt the tricks quickly. Good thing too because I needed them on Kilimanjaro.

But it’s one thing dropping  “trou“ in the bush, and quite another when you have a flight suit on and the wind gusting 30km/h. It requires rather careful planning so as to stay out of the “splash zone”.

Ah, the luxurious life of a pilot.  :imaposer: