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Offline NAZM

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Suzuki DR650
« on: April 15, 2008, 10:07:53 am »
Hi guys. I am thinking of buying a Suzuki DR650 for commuting and general off-road riding. Any thought on this bike? I have read almost everything on the net, just wanted to know if anyone here has one and what you have to say. Thanks.
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shark_za

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2008, 10:12:10 am »
Girls bike, ref Luckystriker in the forum.
 

Offline Eisbein

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2008, 10:50:41 am »
I think it is most underrated...

Easy to maintain, no radiator to break in a fall.

To me it looks good.

I think it is slightly easier to 'rough' it with the DR650 than a KLR (A) (pure speculation - haven't ridden either of the two).

The only problem is that its got a smaller tank...

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Offline LuckyStriker

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2008, 10:54:52 am »
Girls bike, ref Luckystriker in the forum.


It's true

NAZM. You are welcome to buy mine: http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=13963.0
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Offline Tengai

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2008, 10:58:57 am »
True, BUT.....if you really want a nice ride...GET a DR 800 Big. Excellent and will give you the ride of your life and very easy to maintain. Just one problem, if you need crash barrs you need to import this from Germany.

Otherwise, the DR 650 is good for commuting only

My 2c
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Offline Eisbein

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2008, 11:00:38 am »
Otherwise, the DR 650 is good for commuting only

??? ??? ???
02/02/12 - RIP Glen - the Arrow of Elliot and the little man with the big heart that truly was larger than life.

You have touched us and left us better for having known you - even if it was only briefly.

For grabbing the moment and living the day It's been way too early that you were taken away
 

Offline IDR

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2008, 11:10:36 am »
True, BUT.....if you really want a nice ride...GET a DR 800 Big. Excellent and will give you the ride of your life and very easy to maintain. Just one problem, if you need crash barrs you need to import this from Germany.

Otherwise, the DR 650 is good for commuting only

My 2c

urrrrg.... that wasn't worth 2c IMO.
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Offline Kykdaar

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2008, 11:49:15 am »
In case you do not feel like travelling down to Slaapstad -

Check out the latest Pretoria Junkmail (I am an expert at the Junk Mail - dont' ask - it's a long story).

Marlene (ex - dont ask - forum member  >:D) is selling her DR 650. Clean bike with long range tank, touring screen, etc - 2006 model (I think), low km's for approx R36000-00. Well worth a look.

Why didnt I take it? Well apart from the monetary aspect (i.e. the lack thereof) it is a fookin Suzuki >:D
 

Offline edgy

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2008, 12:01:57 pm »
Awesome bike-just PM LeCap regarding longetivity etc,just slap on a long range tank.
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Offline NAZM

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2008, 12:13:55 pm »
Thanks guys...
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Offline Watty

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2008, 12:14:28 pm »
True, BUT.....if you really want a nice ride...GET a DR 800 Big. Excellent and will give you the ride of your life and very easy to maintain. Just one problem, if you need crash barrs you need to import this from Germany.

Otherwise, the DR 650 is good for commuting only

My 2c

urrrrg.... that wasn't worth 2c IMO.

It is ... he is talking about Zim cents.  >:D
 

Offline lecap

Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2008, 10:50:02 pm »
Tough as a nail. Very difficult to break. Very easy to maintain. Nearly all issues sorted since 2004 model year.
Very capable DS bike as long as you don't want to ride or look like a pro.
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Offline NAZM

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2008, 10:09:43 am »
Thanks Lecap. I am going to the dealer to see if they can sort out the height issue for me. I need the seat height to be 800-810mm. They're confident it can be done.
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Offline Eisbein

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2008, 10:20:06 am »
Thanks Lecap. I am going to the dealer to see if they can sort out the height issue for me. I need the seat height to be 800-810mm. They're confident it can be done.

If you buy new they can fit a link and sidestand that lowers it a little...

02/02/12 - RIP Glen - the Arrow of Elliot and the little man with the big heart that truly was larger than life.

You have touched us and left us better for having known you - even if it was only briefly.

For grabbing the moment and living the day It's been way too early that you were taken away
 

Offline NAZM

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2008, 10:32:58 am »
I intend to buy a new one. WIll update later.
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Offline lecap

Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #15 on: April 16, 2008, 10:58:43 am »
You only need a new side stand. Or cut & weld the original one.
Besides that it's moving the connecting bolt on the bottom of the rear shock into another hole, turning the rear shock's lower spring mount around and reset the preload and moving the fork spring preload spacer from atop the spring to the bottom of the inner tube (you can alternatively also drop the whole forks in the triple clamps).

Once you've got the bike:
Set steering head bearing correctly. All five DR650SE I bought came too tight.
Remove the utterly useless upper drive chain guide roller before it removes itself.
Replace the cheapish OEM drive chain with a DID X-Ring.

Even in the high setting the DR is suitable for rather short riders due to its light weight and narrow build. Try it first and see if it's necessary at all to lower.
Looking at seat height the F650GS is the only 600cc+ DS I had which comes close to the DR whilst being much heavier, less capable on dirt, easier to break and more expensive.
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Offline NAZM

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2008, 11:02:40 am »
Thanks Lecap. What is the correct setting for the steering bearing?
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Offline LuckyStriker

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2008, 11:08:14 am »
Thanks Lecap. What is the correct setting for the steering bearing?

It is possible that your dealership already knows how to correctly adjust it.
On lecap's advice, I took my DR to my dealer and asked the mechanic to check it.
He knew about the issue and readjusted it correctly.
Why they couldn't do it in the first place is beyond me
 

Offline NAZM

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Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2008, 11:13:59 am »
Mental note: Tell mech to adjust steering bearing before leaving dealership. I was considering the BMW x country as well. The weight is similar to the DR.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2008, 01:36:08 pm by NAZM »
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Offline lecap

Re: Suzuki DR650
« Reply #19 on: April 17, 2008, 07:41:03 am »
Forget about all the torque to xNm and then turn back y degrees bulls***. It won't work as both most torque wrenches are too inaccurate and it's also difficult to hit exactly 60° for example when 55° or 65° already mean your steering head bearing will be buggered after a few thousand kilometres.
I don't think the method mentioned above will ever produce a precisely set steering head. Prove me wrong.

Be careful! Some instructions given in OEM workshop manuals are just grossly wrong. (Example: KL650C supplement to KL650A and KL650B Tengai manual). Instructions given there: Torque adjustment nut to 4.9Nm or hand tight (whow! That's super precise! 4.9 Nm equals "hand tight"!), then fit triple clamp & torque upper clamping nut to 49Nm.
(The "C" as well as the KL650E does not have the KL650A's lock washer. Proceeding as described will overtighten the bearing massively, ruin the bike's handling to the point where it becomes dangerous and fcuk up the bearings in no time).

The way it's supposed to be is exactly play free and free of preload:
You fit everything together set deliberately to end up with some play.
You feel the play and by loosening, readjusting and tightening you gradually reduce the play.
It requires quite a bit of experience to get it done quickly. It's quite tricky to feel the play as it diminishes and it's crucial to have the bike supported under the frame very solidly as else you will feel the bike moving on its support instead of play in the steering head.
If you're not sure if you overtightened return to the position where you could feel minimal play and do it again.

Once done you should not be able to feel any play in the steering head pushing and pulling the bottom ends of the forks forwards and backwards. At the same time the steering must turn without any noticable resistance. If lightly tipped it must turn quite some way until  either slowed by cables or stopped by the steering end block.
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