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Offline TheBear

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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2015, 05:28:36 pm »
I love to sit at home, the few days before leaving on a trip, and taking the overall route, I break it up into what I am roughly planning to do daily, then draw up daily maps with a lot of detail on them. These I obviously take out on each relevant day.

Like a paper GPS.   :imaposer:

I love the route planning myself.  Sometimes I get so into the route planning that I sort of forget that it is actually a holiday / adventure which should not be planned to the millimeter.   :ricky:
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Offline Gerrard

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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2015, 05:41:43 pm »
Adventure is adventure. Dorsland, the above was your adventure at that time. The youngsters today grow up with the technology... its their reality.

The adventure is worrying the gadget is not going to break. Why should that be less exciting.
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Offline Dorsland

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Re:
« Reply #22 on: July 12, 2015, 05:48:17 pm »
I often wonder what it must be like to be a youngster today Jup. Lots of pressure I guess.

I still yearn for adventure though. Work or pleasure, bike or bakkie, I take the unknown or less traveled route. I am notorious for my impulsiveness when traveling or in my leisure time. I once had a friend visiting me, chatting about this and that. We got around to talking about a school friend of ours that had moved to Durban.  I said, let's go visit him. Half an hour later we were on the road :)
« Last Edit: July 12, 2015, 07:22:11 pm by Dorsland »
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Offline TheBear

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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #23 on: July 12, 2015, 05:48:18 pm »
Adventure is adventure. Dorsland, the above was your adventure at that time. The youngsters today grow up with the technology... its their reality.

The adventure is worrying the gadget is not going to break. Why should that be less exciting.

True as well.  We cannot decide on behalf of another what is an adventure and what is not. 

Apart from that, I am now many years older and sleeping on the hard floor of a caravan park's ablution block because it is pissing with rain, is not an adventure anymore, but a pain in the back that last for a week!   :lol8:
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Offline Dorsland

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Re:
« Reply #24 on: July 12, 2015, 05:50:21 pm »
One time in Namibia, I extended my trip by 2 days as I followed loose thunderstorms between Helmeringhausen and Keetmanshoop. 

Hehehe, verlang ek nou daai dae.
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Offline Dorsland

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Re:
« Reply #25 on: July 12, 2015, 05:51:49 pm »
Ja AMZ, with my recovering knee, sometimes it's an adventure to get up in a winter's night to have a pee.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2015, 07:23:04 pm by Dorsland »
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Offline TheBear

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Re:
« Reply #26 on: July 12, 2015, 05:55:10 pm »
Ja AMZ, some days it's an adventure to get up in a winter's night to have a pee.

Janee!   :imaposer:

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Offline Tommy Transalp

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Re:
« Reply #27 on: July 12, 2015, 06:08:03 pm »
Ja AMZ, some days it's an adventure to get up in a winter's night to have a pee.

Janee!   :imaposer:


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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #28 on: July 12, 2015, 06:34:47 pm »
I miss the days travelling on a single thumper.  :(
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Offline BliknÍrs

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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #29 on: July 12, 2015, 07:06:13 pm »
I saw a guy with a camera on his head on Gaysmanshoek yesterday. Seriously.

Their "adventures" are driven by "This is going to look awesome when I post it on Wilddogs. People are going to envy me / think I'm cool/rich/hard man."

People love to brag, and if you can afford that thing that everyone else will envy, you have to have it.
And post pics of it on WD with your fancy 4 x 4 in the background.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2015, 07:07:45 pm by BliknÍrs »
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Offline 2StrokeDan

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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #30 on: July 12, 2015, 08:27:15 pm »
Everytime I see Twe-Twe, or any other "newbie" on his/her XR125/XT125, I get this feeling of longing to the time of basic enjoyment.

But in truth, for me that time is almost passed. It is like AMZ pointed out, we use to sleep anywhere, on any surface. That is passing at an alarming rate.

We get old, and I get a lot of pleasure watching the young generation have "our" adventures. I have been there, and I know what they feel, heading out on a trip for the 1st time.

I wish a life of adventure on every new rider, and I will not hold it against them if they decide to embrace technology to the full.
 

Offline WildWood

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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #31 on: July 12, 2015, 09:28:47 pm »
I like the idea of having a bond with your bike. A trust if you like, built up over years together. Today we discard our trusted friend every time a new faster model comes out.
Somebody mentioned he misses traveling on a thumper. Well why not buy one and travel on it. This weird notion that faster is better is inverse to adventure , yet I so often hear of guys selling one adventure bike to get a faster one. It's the time spent between destinations that make the adventure , or you might as well fly SAA. We experience the bush from a 5 star lodge, cut off from both the dangers and more importantly the joys. We only ride the big recognised roads because our 250kg super adventure tourers won't make it through rivers ,or sand ,or rocks ....erm anything off road.

And we wonder why we aren't having as much fun. Just because manufacturers have given you the choice of a 250kg 150hp heated seat that can carry the kitchen sink it doesn't mean you have to buy it, as much as it doesn't mean the technology is progress if it doesn't enhance your experience.

Will going for a hike in the mountains be superceded by a motorized walking device that will be twice the speed of walking and come with a non slip function ?

Man + engine +skill +balls and the unknown = adventure. 

   

   
 

Offline alanB

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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #32 on: July 12, 2015, 09:48:53 pm »
Having said what I said earlier, I wholeheartedly endorse GPS and route planning.

I've been on a lot of trips into the middle of no-where both on cars and bikes, and every time we tried the "just use a paper map and compass" or "just wing it" approach, its just lead to us getting horribly lost and up to a few days wondering around in frustrating circles with everyone getting increasingly ratty and irritable!

Now granted some of those memories are fun after the fact.  But at the time, it was bloody frustrating (two incidents one in the mountains of Lesotho and the other in Northern Mozambique come to mind).

Personally I don't set out to be frustrated and irritable when I go on a trip.  I don't think anyone does.

I like a GPS, it gives me the freedom to ride/drive off into the middle of no where and know that I can easily get to where ever I want to go without having been there before, turn off onto unexpected roads and still find a path to where I want to go, set up a point that I have never been to but still meet my mates who might be coming from a different location, or who are traveling at their own pace, at a given time for tea etc.

Also I know a lot of people pride themselves in not planning for a trip and just go where the wind blows.  That's fine if you are alone, and have lots of time and or cash, but it doesn't work in a group  IMO, especially if people want to do their own thing each day and not be constrained to a convoy.

But for me, I get at least as much fun researching the trip and planning for it, so do my mates.  Planning for most our trips usually starts at least 6 months to a year before, with many braais and bottles of red wine consumed and the maps we all bring to the planning sessions becoming stained and worn long before we even set off.  Lots of debates and proposals are made about the route and huge amounts of research on the internet with photos and google earth info etc.  

To me this does a number of things.  

You actually get to experience the trip long before you leave, with all the info about the destination gathered and poured over by everyone.  You can see everyone getting excited about the different spots we are planning to go to, and why.

And what it does for all of us is make the actual trip far more exciting and intense than it would be otherwise.  When we finally get to a much debated and anticipated point you can just see how excited everyone is when they arrive.  A passer by would not understand why all these old farts are so happy to arrive at an otherwise unremarkable cross roads or what ever it is.  Nor why we want to braai there  :biggrin:

I have to say sitting under the stars around a fire sipping wine at some distant point which we have planned to be at for months before, has to be some of the best moments of my life!

And having done all the planning we often just decide to do something else when we get there, but that's just part of the whole thing.

So for me, the key is actually being lucky enough to find a bunch of people who understand life the same way I do and have the same sense of adventure as I do, and who all get along well when stuck together in the middle of no-where.

We actually experience a trip three times:
1) Once when we plan it - I actually enjoy this the most, what better excuse for a whole series of braais, with long heated debates about the meaning of life?
2) When we actually do the trip
3) When we get together afterwards to share the photo's and videos.

There is a trip currently being planned to Bots later this year, but sadly work is probably going to count me out  :(

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Offline XT JOE

Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #33 on: July 12, 2015, 10:00:33 pm »
Perfect description of adventure - Dorsland and other of what used to be. In the 1980's there was a few times of  load up a sleeping bag and maybe change of clothes on the DT175 and leave East London for Kei Mouth or Butterworth for a w/end-- but life-media and keeping up with the Jones's and for many of us the little discomfort changed that. I dreamt of many but a ride to Malawi over Namibia/Zambia and camping there for a week or two and back along the coast to ct- but either money or not enough personal drive did not allow it. Then more life happened kids/work and the eye went off the ball. The next thing youre 40 some change and the memories come back- dream on.

For now the best we can do is the occasional spin around the karoo but Nambia 2016 is on the cards
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Offline Ilan-san

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Re:
« Reply #34 on: July 12, 2015, 10:18:10 pm »
Amen. Sometimes less is more.
 

Offline Single Cylinder

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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #35 on: July 13, 2015, 05:54:44 am »
Ja boet, well said. Less is often better but we live in a consumer society and have been brainwashed into getting more stuff to keep us happy. In the end K.I.S.S. has always been the way to go.   :ricky:
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Offline 2StrokeDan

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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #36 on: July 13, 2015, 07:47:44 am »
Yes, a GPS is a wonderful tool, yet all the roads on the GPS' memory has been built and well travelled long before the GPS were around.

It therefore stands to reason, and this may come as a surprise to some, that adventurers did not sit around and wait for the GPS.

And if you are truly travelling into real remote countryside, better you take a lot of back-up, for the electronic device is a fickle thing.
 

Offline Cracker

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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #37 on: July 13, 2015, 07:51:23 am »
Everytime I see Twe-Twe, or any other "newbie" on his/her XR125/XT125, I get this feeling of longing to the time of basic enjoyment.

But in truth, for me that time is almost passed. It is like AMZ pointed out, we use to sleep anywhere, on any surface. That is passing at an alarming rate.

We get old, and I get a lot of pleasure watching the young generation have "our" adventures. I have been there, and I know what they feel, heading out on a trip for the 1st time.

I wish a life of adventure on every new rider, and I will not hold it against them if they decide to embrace technology to the full.

And therein lies the rub - for us oldies to have an exciting adventure, we have to do something we haven't done before - which only leads to more danger.

Making memories when older costs more and hurts more - at an age when others (not AMZ  :biggrin:) think we're being reckless
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Offline dirt rat

Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #38 on: July 13, 2015, 07:55:36 am »
I agree with 2-stroke Dan except that I never plan a trip in detail - more like pick a direction and go. Mostly I go solo - always carry the necessary tools and camping gear and a bottle of whisky. I have come across riders with all the ATTGAT and GPS that could not repair a puncture stranded next to the road WTF.
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Offline 2StrokeDan

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Re: Reflections on Adventure
« Reply #39 on: July 13, 2015, 07:58:15 am »
I agree with 2-stroke Dan except that I never plan a trip in detail - more like pick a direction and go. Mostly I go solo - always carry the necessary tools and camping gear and a bottle of whisky. I have come across riders with all the ATTGAT and GPS that could not repair a puncture stranded next to the road WTF.
Riding alone I have on many occasions been asked whether I am not irresponsible -If you have to ask you would not understand.

Well said.