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Author Topic: Motorcycle memories.  (Read 7418 times)

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Offline TheBear

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Re: Motorcycle memories.
« Reply #60 on: August 25, 2015, 09:27:22 pm »
My dad was a slow developer.   He got married at 36 and I was born when he was almost 38.  I got my love for bikes from him as I rode with him while still in nappies.   Thank goodness,  no cellphone cameras and Facebook or Wilddogs!   

By the time I was 18 and scooting all over Vanderbijlpark,  my dad was mid 50's.  The freaking town cops did not like bikes,  mainly because they were in VW Beatles and as such we showed them little respect.   I was on Spietkop Botha's shit list,  so one afternoon he saw me jaaging down a boulevard.   He gave chase and stopped me a bit down the road.   As he stomped up to me,  my dad ripped his helmet off and barked:  "Ja?  Wat soek jy,  huh?"   

Spietkop:  "Sorry Oom!  Sorry Oom?  Ek dog Oom is iemand anders!"   Jumped in his Beetle and hit the road.  :ricky:
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Offline MiniDan

Re: Motorcycle memories.
« Reply #61 on: August 26, 2015, 11:15:14 am »
My dad was a slow developer.   He got married at 36 and I was born when he was almost 38.  I got my love for bikes from him as I rode with him while still in nappies.   Thank goodness,  no cellphone cameras and Facebook or Wilddogs!   

By the time I was 18 and scooting all over Vanderbijlpark,  my dad was mid 50's.  The freaking town cops did not like bikes,  mainly because they were in VW Beatles and as such we showed them little respect.   I was on Spietkop Botha's shit list,  so one afternoon he saw me jaaging down a boulevard.   He gave chase and stopped me a bit down the road.   As he stomped up to me,  my dad ripped his helmet off and barked:  "Ja?  Wat soek jy,  huh?"   

Spietkop:  "Sorry Oom!  Sorry Oom?  Ek dog Oom is iemand anders!"   Jumped in his Beetle and hit the road.  :ricky:

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Re: Motorcycle memories.
« Reply #62 on: August 26, 2015, 11:21:59 am »
Ook my eerste kar op 30 gekry. My huidige vrou nou was toe al ver pregnant en moes ek my geliefde GPZ1100 verkoop.
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Offline Hans Ambulans

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Re: Motorcycle memories.
« Reply #63 on: August 26, 2015, 01:13:19 pm »
Lekker 2 stroke Dan!
I must be honest with you. I am always watching this site seeing how you stir up emotions all the time and pushing peoples buttons, wondering who you really are.
Seems we have a few things in common.....I know Aurora flats VERY well, and also Lavanda and Phyllaria. As a kid we used to play all the time on that lawn between the flats. 1970's that was till early 80's. Lifetime ago.
I actually LIVED and grew up in DS Botha str Stellenbosch. Delivered newspapers in those same flats in the mornings as a kid.
And  had a girl friend living in pappegaai str ( skuins oorkant die kooperasie ) back in the day....
Great great memories indeed. Smiling away here now. Apologies to all the other people who read this now and don't know what the heck im talking about!
 

Offline 2StrokeDan

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Re: Motorcycle memories.
« Reply #64 on: August 26, 2015, 06:50:27 pm »
Lekker 2 stroke Dan!
I must be honest with you. I am always watching this site seeing how you stir up emotions all the time and pushing peoples buttons, wondering who you really are.
Seems we have a few things in common.....I know Aurora flats VERY well, and also Lavanda and Phyllaria. As a kid we used to play all the time on that lawn between the flats. 1970's that was till early 80's. Lifetime ago.
I actually LIVED and grew up in DS Botha str Stellenbosch. Delivered newspapers in those same flats in the mornings as a kid.
And  had a girl friend living in pappegaai str ( skuins oorkant die kooperasie ) back in the day....
Great great memories indeed. Smiling away here now. Apologies to all the other people who read this now and don't know what the heck im talking about!

 :thumleft:, now I want to know who you are? I saw those blocks of flats going up, and it formed a large part of our playground in the 70's!
 

Offline Warren Ellwood

Re: Motorcycle memories.
« Reply #65 on: August 27, 2015, 10:21:26 am »
I think my happiest memory, was on a day I at first thought my old man was a real bastard.

I had got home from school aboard my MT5 and was busy making lunch, consisting of white toast with mayonnaise and Aromot, when suddenly I see this white Ford Cortina bakkie from Gavin White Suzuki coming down the driveway with a spanking new Suzuki PE 175 Full Floater on the back.

In those days my little boet was racing the 80cc Border, EC and Border and SA's on a RM80. I had opted for the MT5 to be a little more independent, but after a few months of hanging around the Gonubie Farmers Hall MX track, I was thinking I had really made the wrong choice.

I went out and the driver tells me he is looking for Mr Ellwood. I told him he was at work, he said, oh well, could I sign for the bike for him.

Astounded I asked the guy if he has not made a massive mistake. Nope he says, double checked the address and the name, definitely for Mr Ellwood.

So we off load and I stand for what seemed like hours looking at this beautiful bike, trying to figure out why my old man bought himself a PE175. I had heard him talking about getting a small bike to travel to just outside of town to where his lift club met, or was he himself going to race himself, it just didn't make sense to me.

Anyway, after spending a while letting my jealous and angry emotions get the better of me, I see the paperwork lying there and decide to have a closer look. It was then that I see the delivery note is actually addressed to MR W Ellwood, and inside the envelope was a note from my old man.

"Dear Son, I hope you will let me use this for my lift club".

I cannot explain to this day how happy I felt at that moment, and also guilty.

I never had the privilege of riding with my old man, he is still around, but since I have got back into biking, probably a little old to be riding. But I will forever cherish the day I got a brand new PE175 so I could also start racing.

And on that bike, I got lapped by the best (sometimes more than once in a single race), including Larry Wosick, Rex Staten, Jim Tarentino and our very own Russell Campbell and Derrick Murdoch.


« Last Edit: August 27, 2015, 11:18:33 am by Warren Ellwood »
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Offline jaybiker

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Re: Motorcycle memories.
« Reply #66 on: August 27, 2015, 11:00:58 am »
As a kid, before BMX was invented, we raced our bicycles around a muddy field pretending to be the moto - cross stars of the day. Then one day one of the older lads turned up on a real motorbike, a 350cc trials AJS. To us, this was a terrifying fire breathing works racer, but we all clamoured to have a go, and thus I had my first ride on a motorcycle. 100 yards or so in first gear, waddle the bike around in a U turn, then back to the group and stall the engine to stop it.
It was only after 10 or more years of strictly tar riding that I actually took to the dirt. I was considering a second bike to save my 'best' bike from the ravages of the filthy slush and salt on the UK roads. This coincided with the emerging appearance of small 'trail bikes' on the market. Up until that time, there were only 'street scramblers' which were simply cosmetic adaptations of road bikes with upswept exhaust pipes and wide handlebars with a crossbrace, but now there appeared some more purposeful machines like TS Suzukis and DT Yamahas. A couple of my friends had taken to this new 'trail riding' lark, and so, much against what was then my irrational bias against 'Jap Crap', I bought a new DT 175 as a dual purpose commuter and weekend trail bike. We belonged to an organisation called the Trail Riders Fellowship, which was mainly focussed on preserving the limited trails which were legally available for riding, against our rival organisations, the horse riding crowd, and the Ramblers, who were intent on forcing motorcyclists on to the tar roads, or better still completely out of existence if they had their way!
For the most part the terrain we rode consisted of barely discernible pathways, overgrown with impenetrable brambles, and deep gooey mud. It was absolutely essential to fit a high mounted front mudguard, otherwise the mud would quickly build up and stop the machine dead.
Lightweight two strokes were the only machinery considered viable in such conditions, and when Honda brought out the XL 250, it was dismissed as much too heavy and cumbersome. That's why these days I bemoan the fact that I can't ride my 260kg Pig as well as I could ride my little DT175 forty years ago!
But that little Yammy was a revelation to me, and completely changed my attitude towards Japanese bikes. I treated it like my worst enemy's bike, thrashed it unmercifully, abused the clutch, and never cleaned it apart from scraping off the worst of the mud, and it proved to be an absolute "kannie dood."
Spark plugs didn't last very long and would occasionally stop me on the road, but only for a minute because I always carried a spare plug and spanner in my pocket.
(NOTE - NEVER CARRY TOOLS IN YOUR POCKETS!)
Any time the bike stopped I would change the plug without dismounting, wrap the hot plug in a thick rag to protect my pocket, and my person from burns(!) and off we'd go. The only real breakdown I had was one night when I'd been working late, it could have been around 10 pm. and the bike just died in the dark on the country road 10 miles from work, and 10 miles from home. The usual checks showed nothing apparent, so it had to be something more serious and I eventually found the reed valve had broken. There were four little spring steel fingers in a neoprene block between the carburettor and the cylinder, and with one broken off there was no primary compression. All seemed lost until it occurred to me that the reeds were similar to feeler guage blades, and of course, no sensible biker rides without a set of feelers. The bodge worked, and soon I was on my merry way. Next day, on finding out the price of a new reed valve assembly, I had no choice but to postpone the purchase for a while until I won the lotto or something, hoping that my bodge would last meantime. Well believe it or not I forgot all about it and the bike continued to run perfectly, for ages until I eventually sold it in that condition. I never did find out what happened to the broken piece that was swallowed up by the engine, but it did no harm. I did though get a new set of feeler guages to carry in case it ever happened again!
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Offline Hans Ambulans

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Re: Motorcycle memories.
« Reply #67 on: August 27, 2015, 01:43:19 pm »
Lekker 2 stroke Dan!
I must be honest with you. I am always watching this site seeing how you stir up emotions all the time and pushing peoples buttons, wondering who you really are.
Seems we have a few things in common.....I know Aurora flats VERY well, and also Lavanda and Phyllaria. As a kid we used to play all the time on that lawn between the flats. 1970's that was till early 80's. Lifetime ago.
I actually LIVED and grew up in DS Botha str Stellenbosch. Delivered newspapers in those same flats in the mornings as a kid.
And  had a girl friend living in pappegaai str ( skuins oorkant die kooperasie ) back in the day....
Great great memories indeed. Smiling away here now. Apologies to all the other people who read this now and don't know what the heck im talking about!

 :thumleft:, now I want to know who you are? I saw those blocks of flats going up, and it formed a large part of our playground in the 70's!

Dan...ek het vir jou n email gestuur....
 

Offline 2StrokeDan

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Re: Motorcycle memories.
« Reply #68 on: August 27, 2015, 08:51:58 pm »
Sometime during my high school years, I was visiting with friends on a farm in Agter-Paarl, and they had two Hondas in the shed, both stripped. They bought these two
"farmbikes", one a MT250, the other a CR250, both Elsinore model names.
Something went bust on the CR's gearbox, and the farmer saw fit to strip both bikes, meaning to transplant the MT gearbox into the CR.
Great was his horror when he opened the MT engine, to find something so far removed from what he knew a car gearbox to be like. Both bikes were left as is, and this is how I
got to buy them.
Rushed home with my incredible find, and immediately started putting this puzzle together.

Boy o boy, what a learning experience. Motor assembled, finds 1st and 3rd gear. Strip down, puzzle puzzle, assemble, find 2nd, 3rd and 5th gear, or the gearox locks in two gears at once.
Finally got the CR/MT going, cannot remember which parts went where though.

I still remember that episode with fondness, and a tinge of sorrow, for the fact that such classics simply fell by the wayside.
 

Offline Sprocketbek

Re: Motorcycle memories.
« Reply #69 on: August 27, 2015, 10:41:18 pm »
Sometime during my high school years, I was visiting with friends on a farm in Agter-Paarl, and they had two Hondas in the shed, both stripped. They bought these two
"farmbikes", one a MT250, the other a CR250, both Elsinore model names.
Something went bust on the CR's gearbox, and the farmer saw fit to strip both bikes, meaning to transplant the MT gearbox into the CR.

Haha....somebody who's father had a bookstore/stationary shop in Stb brought me an MT 250 to fix.
The frame was broken at the bottom of the cradle and the gearbox forks were fubar. I welded them with an arc welder and filed them to shape.
Changed gearbox oil twice and the glitter was mostly gone  ;D
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