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Offline alanB

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Re: APJ PR7
« Reply #60 on: November 25, 2015, 06:40:13 pm »
SWM Superdual specs...  really nice.  :thumleft:


I'm sorry, I seem to be an oddball here, but to me that thing looks plain wrong - they try to mimic a look of 1200 panzer on a small and relatively light bike with metal pannier and unnecessary crashbars (and put 19/17 wheels on - why?). I would rather buy the SWM equivalent of TE630 (they make it - I think it is called 650 enduro or some such) and fit it out like I did my 630, like so:



or even better:





Safari tank provides all protection I need, and soft luggage is vastly superior to me as it doesn't rattle offtar, is not fixed to one position and can be moved forward to lessen stress on the subframe and for better COG, and is much more durable than metal (crash it once properly and you done).

I agree  :thumleft:

If you are trying to sell a bike in this segment by trying to make it look like a GS1200 you have serious problems IMO  :biggrin:

This segment is ALL ABOUT PERFORMANCE not looks.

Guys that buy these bikes are not going for a specific look, all they care about is how the bike performs, and therefore it must:

1) Handle well - which means light weight, good geometry and proper shocks, clearance etc
2) Have a reasonable engine performance - most important is low down torque, not top end power
3) Be able to cruise on tar at highway speeds
4) Reliable and easy to work on



« Last Edit: November 25, 2015, 07:55:45 pm by alanB »
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Offline sidetrack

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Re: APJ PR7
« Reply #61 on: November 25, 2015, 07:03:13 pm »
SWM Superdual specs...  really nice.  :thumleft:


I'm sorry, I seem to be an oddball here, but to me that thing looks plain wrong - they try to mimic a look of 1200 panzer on a small and relatively light bike with metal pannier and unnecessary crashbars (and put 19/17 wheels on - why?). I would rather buy the SWM equivalent of TE630 (they make it - I think it is called 650 enduro or some such) and fit it out like I did my 630, like so:



or even better:





Safari tank provides all protection I need, and soft luggage is vastly superior to me as it doesn't rattle offtar, is not fixed to one position and can be moved forward to lessen stress on the subframe and for better COG, and is much more durable than metal (crash it once properly and you done).

I agree  :thumleft:

If you are trying to sell a bike in this segment by trying to make it look like a GS1200 you have serious problems IMO  :biggrin:

This segment is ALL ABOUT PERFORMANCE not looks.

Guys that buy these bikes are not going for a specific look, all they care about is how the bike performs, and therefore it must:

1) Handle well - which means good geometry and proper shocks, clearance etc
2) Have a reasonable performance - most important is low down torque, not top end power
3) Be able to cruise on tar at highway speeds
4) Reliable and easy to work on




With that bike with it's smaller front wheel and extra stuff on SWM is going the X-country, Husky Terra route and that all failed horribly.
Little by little, one travels far
J.R.R Tolkien
 

Offline Xpat

Re: APJ PR7
« Reply #62 on: November 25, 2015, 07:26:25 pm »
Husky Terra had big wheels (21/18 - I believe, maybe 17), so not exactly the same. For me it was much better Dakar, with more relaxed engine than 630 and more weight for easy cruising (and lacking one gear).

Offline alanB

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Re: APJ PR7
« Reply #63 on: November 25, 2015, 08:09:37 pm »
Quote
With that bike with it's smaller front wheel and extra stuff on SWM is going the X-country, Husky Terra route and that all failed horribly.

The main reason that the Husky Terra didnt do well IMO is BMW didn't seem to know why they bought the Husky brand.  They bought one of the top off road brands available and then started to talk only about road bikes, (which is all BMW really understand IMO, they seem to have no idea when it comes to off road bikes).

So they took an exceptionally good package (the 610) and tried to "soften" it, make it more "accessible", make it more of a road bike, make it more average etc etc.

The Terra is still not a bad bike, but its average more than exceptional.  But in a sea of average bikes, its still pretty good!

The confused message from BMW is what doomed it more than anything IMO.
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

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Offline alanB

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Re: APJ PR7
« Reply #64 on: November 26, 2015, 07:12:39 am »




I see Chris was so excited that he was shaking when he took the photo!  :biggrin:

Must admit this thing looks close to perfect to me!

So nice to see that great Husky engine in a newer bike  :thumleft:

I dont want to get my hopes up, but...... :drif:
« Last Edit: November 26, 2015, 07:14:13 am by alanB »
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.
 

Offline Omninorm

Re: APJ PR7
« Reply #65 on: November 26, 2015, 10:25:07 am »
Quote
With that bike with it's smaller front wheel and extra stuff on SWM is going the X-country, Husky Terra route and that all failed horribly.

The main reason that the Husky Terra didnt do well IMO is BMW didn't seem to know why they bought the Husky brand.  They bought one of the top off road brands available and then started to talk only about road bikes, (which is all BMW really understand IMO, they seem to have no idea when it comes to off road bikes).

So they took an exceptionally good package (the 610) and tried to "soften" it, make it more "accessible", make it more of a road bike, make it more average etc etc.

The Terra is still not a bad bike, but its average more than exceptional.  But in a sea of average bikes, its still pretty good!

The confused message from BMW is what doomed it more than anything IMO.


Some more factual reading... it was doomed long before BMW tried to save it. Rumour has it BMW only bought it to get the factory space as in EU it was cheaper than building those production lines.

http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/2010/02/article/the-rise-and-fall-of-husqvarna-motorcycles/


Quote
Penton took the role of East Coast distributor while Dye handled things on the Pacific side until 1974 when Husky took over. With sales and racing success in the States and abroad, Husqvarna’s management was content to rest on its laurels, refusing to make a 125cc machine despite Penton and Dye’s feverish requests for a small-bore.

Husqvarna began constructing a new plant for its motorcycle production, called M73, but the vision was never realized. Swedish white goods powerhouse, Electrolux, purchased Husqvarna in 1977. Acquired for its line of appliances, Electrolux took on the motorcycles simply as part of the deal. After realizing the profit available in chainsaws, it headquartered that effort at M73. Motorcycles were split off into their own division, Husqvarna Motorcycles AB, and transferred nearly 50 miles away to a separate factory in Odeshog.

Husqvarna became the target acquisition for Cagiva, a conglomerate owned at the time by the Castiglioni brothers, Gianfranco and Claudio, which made a habit of purchasing small European brands including Aermacchi, Ducati, Moto Morini and MV Agusta. A young company with grandiose visions of its role in the world motorcycle economy, Cagiva purchased Husqvarna on April 1, 1986, taking complete control three months later and eventually moving the entire operation to Varese, Italy.

Edison Dye is widely considered the grandfather of motocross  but Torsten Hallman  shown  was the man responsible for demonstrating Husqvarnas motocross prowess. His fluid  aggressive riding style was unimaginable for Americans at the time.
Edison Dye is widely considered the grandfather of motocross, but Torsten Hallman (shown) was the man responsible for demonstrating Husqvarna’s motocross prowess. His fluid, aggressive riding style was unimaginable for Americans at the time.
From the time Cagiva took over operations of Husqvarna until BMW bought the brand in 2007 were two of the darkest decades in Husky history. It was during this time that longstanding employees and loyal dealers started falling by the wayside. Unit sales dropped from the thousands into the hundreds, and a once-glorious brand was reduced to tatters.

The 1990s were a decade of polar highs and lows. Though production was slow in the beginning, by 1993 it was beginning to pick up and Husqvarna came out of nowhere to win the World Motocross 500 GPs with Jacky Martins on a 4-stroke. However, by ’96, the company experienced its first year without producing any motorcycles. A year later, Gianfranco left to pursue the other Castiglioni business interests, leaving Claudio to handle the motorcycle side on his own, and from there the company underwent a series of financial changes. The buy-buy-buy attitude that had elevated Cagiva to the fifth-largest motorcycle manufacturer in the world, quickly switched to sell-sell-sell.

Ducati and Moto Morini were off-loaded and the remaining Cagiva and Husqvarna brands were consolidated under the MV Agusta (MVA) label. In 2002, MVA filed for the Italian equivalent of Chapter 11 bankruptcy which it labored through for two years. Castiglioni’s financial woes were temporarily eradicated when Malaysian auto maker, Proton, purchased a controlling 57.75% interest for 70 million Euro (approx $54 million). But just over a year later, fearing a complete bankruptcy by MVA, Proton decided it would be better to simply dump its share, selling the entire thing back to Italian investment company, Gevi SPA, for a single Euro ($1.19).

Once the Proton deal was complete, Husky/Cagiva/MV Agusta was again piloted by Castiglioni. Claudio made one final deal, this time much closer to home. BMW Motorrad purchased Husqvarna on July 19, 2007, and has been picking up the pieces ever since.
it was sold to the owner of KTM (Not KTM)
« Last Edit: November 26, 2015, 10:26:02 am by Omninorm »
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Offline alanB

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Re: APJ PR7
« Reply #66 on: November 26, 2015, 01:00:13 pm »
Quote
With that bike with it's smaller front wheel and extra stuff on SWM is going the X-country, Husky Terra route and that all failed horribly.

The main reason that the Husky Terra didnt do well IMO is BMW didn't seem to know why they bought the Husky brand.  They bought one of the top off road brands available and then started to talk only about road bikes, (which is all BMW really understand IMO, they seem to have no idea when it comes to off road bikes).

So they took an exceptionally good package (the 610) and tried to "soften" it, make it more "accessible", make it more of a road bike, make it more average etc etc.

The Terra is still not a bad bike, but its average more than exceptional.  But in a sea of average bikes, its still pretty good!

The confused message from BMW is what doomed it more than anything IMO.


Some more factual reading... it was doomed long before BMW tried to save it. Rumour has it BMW only bought it to get the factory space as in EU it was cheaper than building those production lines.

http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/2010/02/article/the-rise-and-fall-of-husqvarna-motorcycles/


Quote
Penton took the role of East Coast distributor while Dye handled things on the Pacific side until 1974 when Husky took over. With sales and racing success in the States and abroad, Husqvarna’s management was content to rest on its laurels, refusing to make a 125cc machine despite Penton and Dye’s feverish requests for a small-bore.

Husqvarna began constructing a new plant for its motorcycle production, called M73, but the vision was never realized. Swedish white goods powerhouse, Electrolux, purchased Husqvarna in 1977. Acquired for its line of appliances, Electrolux took on the motorcycles simply as part of the deal. After realizing the profit available in chainsaws, it headquartered that effort at M73. Motorcycles were split off into their own division, Husqvarna Motorcycles AB, and transferred nearly 50 miles away to a separate factory in Odeshog.

Husqvarna became the target acquisition for Cagiva, a conglomerate owned at the time by the Castiglioni brothers, Gianfranco and Claudio, which made a habit of purchasing small European brands including Aermacchi, Ducati, Moto Morini and MV Agusta. A young company with grandiose visions of its role in the world motorcycle economy, Cagiva purchased Husqvarna on April 1, 1986, taking complete control three months later and eventually moving the entire operation to Varese, Italy.

Edison Dye is widely considered the grandfather of motocross  but Torsten Hallman  shown  was the man responsible for demonstrating Husqvarnas motocross prowess. His fluid  aggressive riding style was unimaginable for Americans at the time.
Edison Dye is widely considered the grandfather of motocross, but Torsten Hallman (shown) was the man responsible for demonstrating Husqvarna’s motocross prowess. His fluid, aggressive riding style was unimaginable for Americans at the time.
From the time Cagiva took over operations of Husqvarna until BMW bought the brand in 2007 were two of the darkest decades in Husky history. It was during this time that longstanding employees and loyal dealers started falling by the wayside. Unit sales dropped from the thousands into the hundreds, and a once-glorious brand was reduced to tatters.

The 1990s were a decade of polar highs and lows. Though production was slow in the beginning, by 1993 it was beginning to pick up and Husqvarna came out of nowhere to win the World Motocross 500 GPs with Jacky Martins on a 4-stroke. However, by ’96, the company experienced its first year without producing any motorcycles. A year later, Gianfranco left to pursue the other Castiglioni business interests, leaving Claudio to handle the motorcycle side on his own, and from there the company underwent a series of financial changes. The buy-buy-buy attitude that had elevated Cagiva to the fifth-largest motorcycle manufacturer in the world, quickly switched to sell-sell-sell.

Ducati and Moto Morini were off-loaded and the remaining Cagiva and Husqvarna brands were consolidated under the MV Agusta (MVA) label. In 2002, MVA filed for the Italian equivalent of Chapter 11 bankruptcy which it labored through for two years. Castiglioni’s financial woes were temporarily eradicated when Malaysian auto maker, Proton, purchased a controlling 57.75% interest for 70 million Euro (approx $54 million). But just over a year later, fearing a complete bankruptcy by MVA, Proton decided it would be better to simply dump its share, selling the entire thing back to Italian investment company, Gevi SPA, for a single Euro ($1.19).

Once the Proton deal was complete, Husky/Cagiva/MV Agusta was again piloted by Castiglioni. Claudio made one final deal, this time much closer to home. BMW Motorrad purchased Husqvarna on July 19, 2007, and has been picking up the pieces ever since.
it was sold to the owner of KTM (Not KTM)

Ja this has all been discussed to death in the Husky section, nothing new  :thumleft:

BTW I was referring to the Terra specifically not the brand in general.
Husqvarna '09 610TE - Great Bike!

I just finished a SciFi novel Extinction: Task Team, download the preview.