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Author Topic: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels  (Read 8950 times)

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Offline Clint_G

Re: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels
« Reply #80 on: December 23, 2015, 03:05:54 pm »
Well that was stupid! What did you use then when you got to your friend?

You do know they come in packs of 3, right?   :ricky:

reverse gear  :imaposer:

Wahahahahahaha. True story.  :peepwall:
 

Offline MiniDan

Re: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels
« Reply #81 on: December 23, 2015, 03:18:09 pm »
Packs of 3!!!

Well that just made my day...

 

Offline Mr Zog

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Re: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels
« Reply #82 on: December 23, 2015, 03:27:19 pm »

You do know they come in packs of 3, right?   :ricky:


So you had a spare one for the ride home too  :ricky:  :imaposer:
Young enough to know I can, old enough to know I shouldn't, stupid enough to do it anyway.
 

Offline Clint_G

Re: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels
« Reply #83 on: December 23, 2015, 03:38:38 pm »
 :spitcoffee:

Exactly.  :imaposer:
 

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Re: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels
« Reply #84 on: December 23, 2015, 04:04:24 pm »



Lesson learned !! Now you will seldom find me on the bike without my little tripod chair  ;D ;D

These chairs just have the tendency of tearing the seat material in the corners where the legs go in, so I made a seat with proper leather and tough leather support where the legs go in.
some of our - ahem - HEAVIER customers take a rope, and the install it around leg A, B and C of that little tripod chair, which then converts an 80kg max chair up to say 130kg stool, and there are less, um, 'incidents' !  ;)
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Offline AJBotha

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Re: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels
« Reply #85 on: December 24, 2015, 07:31:29 am »
Great tip!
Nice topic - soaking up tips!

Thanks!
 

Offline Laban

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Offline Obi -Wan

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Re: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels
« Reply #87 on: December 26, 2015, 05:27:14 am »
Back in the day my basics instructor in the army had a saying around the 6 P's - Proper planning prevents piss poor performance. This mantra has stuck with me all my life and no doubt kept me out of one or two nasty situations.

There has been some fantastic advice given here and one learns from your peer group all the time. I have created an excel spreadsheet which lists all the stuff i need to take with - it tends to change as some things come and others go. I find that using a list means you never forget to pack anything. The next thing is to take a Saturday Afternoon, lay out everything that needs to go and pre pack the things that are going in their respective boxes,bags etc. This will be a trial and error situation until you are happy with where everything goes. One tip- keep the heavy stuff as low as possible and sleeping bags etc up high.

One of the Touratech Catalogues i saw had 1650 pages of stuff - It cannot all be used or packed onto your motorcycle! The stuff you need will come from Hiking and Mountaineering shops because it needs to be light and durable, particularly if you are camping.

Some Must haves -must do.

Make sure the bike is ready
A spare key for the bike!
Make sure you have a good battery
Good Tyres with new valves
Tools that you know fit and work on your bike
A good Compressor /co2 kit
Parts that fit your bike
Good rainsuits -multiple uses in wet and cold
A custom made first aid kit that works for you
A good headlamp
Double check your bike every day before you start - oil , tyres, fasteners etc
On day 1 that you ride, first get the feel for the extra weight, so be careful

Ride it and experience it- the only way you will ultimately know what works for you and what not .



   
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Offline alanB

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Re: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels
« Reply #88 on: December 26, 2015, 09:34:55 am »
After quite a lot of overlanding trips in a 4x4 in which I initially got sucked into the whole thing of taking 4 or 5 tons of stuff on a week long holiday, my inner engineer decided that that while showing off your excess toys etc was maybe the next "lifestyle one-upmanship competition for the modern urban man", and fun for its own sake  :P, it was just ultimately a fools game in which the only winners were the 4x4 shops, vehicle and trailer manufacturers and fuel companies.

By just altering a switch setting in your brain, you could have all the same comforts with a tenth of the bulk and weight.  Instead of the stupid cycle of:

1) getting more space by buying a bigger vehicle/trailer/roof rack,
2) then filling that space with stuff,
3) then starting the process again,

You just need to start thinking about how to EMPTY the space, and reduce the weight you carry instead.  

Once you start doing that it actually becomes alot more fun IMO.  Fuel costs are less, you dont have to worry as much about difficult terrain, packing is much quicker etc, and most importantly, the trip doesnt just become all about how much kit you can drag along with you, but rather about the places you go to and the experiences you have there.

A good example is a mate of mine who took a trailer on a recent trip because "he didnt want to sukkel", well he ended up "sukkelling" more than anyone because he could not easily go where everyone else went and got stuck repeatedly in soft sand.  There was no point in saying anything, because SA values are completely at odds with the minimalist approach, but I did feel sorry for him a bit, the big trip we had all planned for and saved up for was not as nice as it should have been for him.  On international forums SA overlanders are often sniggered at due to how much stuff they take.

The exact same thing is applicable to Adventure biking, but only more so IMO.  

Luckily I had already learned this lesson when I started Adventure biking.  I also prefer riding smaller, more light weight bikes.  I dont see the benefit of turning a light, nimble fun to ride bike into a lumbering pig just because I wanted to pack the kitchen sink.  I would rather go by car in that case.

Especially because for me at least, the whole point of adventure biking is to ride your bike.  That's the whole point of the trip!  So why make riding your bike a pain in the ass by loading it unnecessarily?  Which is why I'd rather go by car if I need to take lots of stuff.  But I dont particularly enjoy driving my car, its just a means to and end - its tough and reliable enough to get me to those out of the way places I couldn't get to otherwise.

While my bike is all about enjoying the journey and the riding.  So to me its crucial to keep the weight down because I personally hate heavy bikes.

Although this does depend on the style of riding you like.  If you enjoy Goldwing type touring, then you can still take a trailer full of stuff :biggrin:

But here are my lessons learned after the trips I have done on my bike http://africantechnical.co.za/adventure-tips/basic-packing-gear-selection/

As well some kit I really think works well http://africantechnical.co.za/adventure-tips/useful-links-adventure-biking/

And here is what I take on a trip (longest trip so far with this setup is five days, but I can go almost indefinitely with this setup provided there is fuel and food available along the way).  http://africantechnical.co.za/ubag-6/ubag-6-camping-contents/



  
« Last Edit: December 26, 2015, 11:42:14 am by alanB »
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Offline 2StrokeDan

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Re: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels
« Reply #89 on: December 26, 2015, 09:47:11 am »
The argument around packing lightly versys taking everything you own is like the argument for small VS. huge D/S bikes.

You take what you want, because what works for me will not always work for the next guy. It is a trail and error process which you have to go through.
 

Offline fcprinsloo7@gmail.com

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Re: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels
« Reply #90 on: December 26, 2015, 10:18:35 am »
I understand AlanB comment. We used to go camping with a DC4x4, loaded to the max! For a weekend! Then I read an article in SA4x4 about a couple and there really young kid that went to the Richtersveld for 2 weeks in a Suzuki Jimny!

They packed with their brains and not their wallets! Never needed more than they had and had a brilliant adventure!

To each his own, but I went from hard panniers to ATG overland bags and already saved 9kg! Its going to make a heck of a difference!

Like Alan said, its important to first get the feel of the bike loaded. We packed our stuff for our first long trip and went for a ride around town. Bike was so unstable we were back within 15 minutes to unpack and rethink . We did it three times to where we felt it was comfortable and safe to travel with.
 

Offline shanti

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Re: Share what works and what not - adventure biking travels
« Reply #91 on: December 26, 2015, 10:48:27 am »
I think no matter how you pack leave some space for picking up food  beer along the way if you are free camping . No point in packing everything up tight in all your available space and then having nowhere to put some supplies for your camping - I use these tank bags -http://www.aerostich.com/aerostich-tank-panniers.html - and always have space in them to fit some bread  , a six pack of beer , extra water if out for the night in the middle of nowhere . Of course its different if you are going from campsite to campsite as you can normally get beer etc there