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Offline Buff

Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« on: March 01, 2016, 03:24:19 pm »
Setting the scene:

Early in the new year we took delivery of a brand new Yamaha WR250F which was supposed to be my wife’s new race weapon. It took one ride on it for her to realize that it was too much bike for her right now and for me to realize that I really liked the bike. So we reached an agreement that I could race the bike until her lap times in training are faster on the WR250 than on her current TTR230… sounded fair to me  ;D
With us both being on Yamaha’s, Droomers Yamaha in CT invited us to be part of their Support Team for the race season. We pay our own way but they’ll kit us and the bikes out in their Droomers Racing livery and look after us in the pits on race day, win win situation  :thumleft:

Race day:

I started on the 7th row of the grid on my brand new boney with its shiny new sticker kit done by ByKleyn Graphics in CT and my fancy new Droomer Yamaha Racing shirt. I thought I was the main freckle.
The lights went green, I dropped the clutch, the front end went North and in my effort to get it under control I got out-dragged to the first corner by my teammate on a YZ125  :o The dust was insane, it went from full vis to no vis in an instant and I was forced to back off immediately because I could see jack sh1t  :(

We hit the riverbed section within the first kilometer of the race and before dropping into it, kippy here hit probably the only lurker in the dust which threw me straight off the embackment into the river 2m below me on my right. It was one of those moments where for a split second I thought I could save it but my momentum was all going right and my fate was sealed. I landed heavily with my right hip on a moerse rock and the WR landed on top of me. It actually dunked me, helmet and all under the water.
I kinda lay there for a second or two thinking “WTF just happened here?”  ??? Then I began talking to myself in a language unbefitting of an adult.

It took me the best part of 10mins to get myself sorted and then find a way out of the section I was trapped in, while all the bikes where passing me at just above head height blissfully unaware of this chop stuck down in the river undergrowth… fudgeit !!! Fortunately with the bike landing on me it never sucked water, that would have been a royal cock-up.
Needless to say I was somewhat rattled and sore and I couldn’t get a good look at what the damage was to my hip because of my neck brace and body armour so I decided to try ride it off. The next 1.5km’s of riverbed negotiation was a bloody nightmare, I was all over the place and managed to drop the bike again on the slippery rocks.

Once out of the river, the course opened up and it was wide open, rally type tracks & farm roads where you could run the bike 6th gear flat out. Dust was a huge issue here, making it very difficult to put passes on the back markers I was catching.
It took me the remaining 50km’s of the lap to find my rhythm again and stop feeling sorry for myself. The only challenging section here was a very steep and slippery climb that had an A and B option to it. A was straight up the climb, B was around it and slightly longer. I took the A line on every lap and even though I dropped the bike on lap 2 & 3 on the climb, I was able to get going again and ride it out thanks to the traction on the little 4T.
By the time I reached the pits I was into the swing of racing again (the laps where approx. 55km’s long).

The 2nd lap went much better and with the bikes spread out, the dust was less of an issue. I was getting into my stride and enjoying the new WR250F. Having always raced a 2T it took some time to get used to the engine breaking and traction on the 4T. I found I was on the brakes too early for corners and then not on the gas hard enough out of them. With about 10km’s to go in the lap I came across our main, Yamaha SA & Droomers sponsored team rider stranded without fuel. He was well in the lead when he ran out of juice and seeing as my own race was pretty much compromised after my fall, I decided to top his bike up from my tank to get him to the pits. Being fuel injected I didn’t want to pull pipes off so I had him sacrifice his camelback. We laid my bike on its side then I used my fuel breather hose to syphon petrol out of my tank into the camelback and decanted it into his bike.

Needless to say, it wasn’t exactly a speedy exercise with the breather hose being so small and the poor kid had ants in his pants to get racing again. With 2l of fresh fuel he took off like a rocketship to try and make up lost time on his rivals.

I’d just got going again when I noticed the amber reserve light on dash light up “You.have.got.to.be.shitting.me”. The WR doesn’t have a reserve petcock because of the FI system but the amber light tells you that you have 1l off juice left in the tank so I was forced to back off the loud lever and nurse it back to pits as I had no intention of pushing it for 5km’s.

I also need to mention that just before we hit the wooded section near the end of the lap I got passed by our very own WD Dakar hero… Superman aboard his KTM RR450. Believe me, the man can ride… FAST !!! He must have loved those wide open roads on that beast. Unfortunately for him, the WR250 is obviously way easier to handle in the tight wooded section so I was able to pass him again before reaching pit lane after he put his bike down on a slippery little climb coming out of a mud bog.

There was also a nasty little stream crossing in this section that hung up a lot of riders after a large tree root got exposed on the embankment and kept on snagging back wheels. A big thanks to Beserker who was marshaling and took the initiative to cut it and assist get the bottleneck cleared at this point. 

Lap 3 went without incident and I really enjoyed the track. Even the riverbed section became a breeze by then as clear lines had been ridden out and you could ride everything with momentum. I even managed to pick up a nice little mid pack dice with a few riders that made for some exciting moments. Coming into pits I was secretly hoping to be sent out on another lap as I hadn’t even started cramping yet by sadly I got shown the flag, game over.

All in all a fairly disappointing ride I guess as it didn’t quite go according to plan but it did have its moments that I really enjoyed. I’m nursing a huge bruise on my right hip for my effort but fortunately the bike is undamaged.
Eventually placed 13th out of 23 in what is a very strong Masters field this year. It can only get better  :thumleft:

Amazingly, Calvin (the kid I helped) pulled back almost all his lost time and missed the top spot on the podium by 43secs. These kids sure can haul ass on a bike. We both started on new Metzeler 6 Day tires and I can probably do another 4 races on mine where his rear tire is totally trashed  :o 

The missus also never had the best of rides when she had to stop and assist a fellow lady rider that had a very bad off. She waited until the medic arrive and then was able to continue her ride. Although she was credited her time back after the race it meant she was only able to do 3 laps instead of maybe 5 or 6 but it's all in the name of fair sportsmanship.
She still however managed a 3rd place in the Ladies Intro Class  :thumleft:

Big thanks to our pit crew from Droomers Racing for taking care of us all day and a huge shout out to the Western Cape Offroad Club who presented a great opening event to the 2016 season  :thumleft:

Pics:
1. The new WR250F
2. Team Shirts  ;D
3. Team Bikes
4. My daughter being my own umbrella girl... we take our racing seriously  ;)
5. Cats on the start line
Present bikes: BETA 300RR, KTM 690, Yamaha WR250F

If you're dumb you gotta be tough !!!
 

Offline Warren Ellwood

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2016, 03:28:25 pm »
Nice Brett, hope you all healed up real soon.
"Before you speak, ask yourself, is it kind, is it necessary, is it true, and does it improve on the silence?"
 

Offline Cdp13

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2016, 04:11:11 pm »
Awesome report  :thumleft: en flippen mooi bike daai!

Hoe se die ouens wat die 250fx ry, is daar veel verskil tussen die wr en fx 250's?
Wees jouself. Moenie 'n twatwaffle wees nie.
 

Offline Buff

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2016, 04:25:37 pm »
Awesome report  :thumleft: en flippen mooi bike daai!

Hoe se die ouens wat die 250fx ry, is daar veel verskil tussen die wr en fx 250's?

Dankie  :thumleft:

Very little difference. You can spec the SA version of the WR to do exactly what the FX does. You just need to change the pipe, re-map the electronics using the mapping computer (in the States you can't do this on the WR, it's locked) and open up the air box a bit.
The only difference then is the weight of the front & rear lights and the suspension that's more "plush" than the FX  :thumleft:
« Last Edit: March 01, 2016, 04:26:22 pm by Buff »
Present bikes: BETA 300RR, KTM 690, Yamaha WR250F

If you're dumb you gotta be tough !!!
 

Offline Dwerg

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2016, 04:43:29 pm »
Mooi man  :thumleft:
What were lap times like? That's more than double the lap distance at the first GXCC
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Offline Cracker

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Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2016, 04:44:02 pm »
Nice one, Buff - seems as though your races are as haphazard as mine. What starts as a race becomes your own little adventure.  :thumleft:

But then again, the races I tend to forget are the ones where everything is breezy ............................
Don't let fear hold you back ..... take it with you!
 

Offline Buff

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2016, 08:16:06 pm »
Mooi man  :thumleft:
What were lap times like? That's more than double the lap distance at the first GXCC

The top guys were running in the low 40mins, the top seniors & masters in the low 50min.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Present bikes: BETA 300RR, KTM 690, Yamaha WR250F

If you're dumb you gotta be tough !!!
 

Offline Buff

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2016, 08:17:47 pm »
Nice one, Buff - seems as though your races are as haphazard as mine. What starts as a race becomes your own little adventure.  :thumleft:

But then again, the races I tend to forget are the ones where everything is breezy ............................

That's very true and I kind of like it that way, as long as I don't break anything :)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Present bikes: BETA 300RR, KTM 690, Yamaha WR250F

If you're dumb you gotta be tough !!!
 

Offline Offroad2

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2016, 10:15:29 am »
Nice report  Brett - had similar experience went out on a new Raptor 700 never got round to setting it up after building over the suspension - it would not turn !!! never experienced something like it, could not make the first right hand turn, klapped the fence, could not make the gap in the stone wall hit that, well then the river bed was a nightmare lost about 6-8 min with getting stuck due to turning issue. However got out there and pinned it on those sweeping rally style roads. After doing little adjustments laps 2&3 were exhilarating, hooked up in a bunch with two Banshees, Canam, two YFZ450, the six of us had a blast still discussing who has the fastest quad (mine of course). Pity... just missed the flag hoping for a fourth.

Next race will be similar terrain at Dunghye Park Caledon - bring it on.

It is always great to have Kobus Potgieter join us on his RR.
No Road like Off-Road
 

Offline Offroad2

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2016, 10:28:17 am »
Another Race report from Gavin Mclaughlin

As the dust settles after our season opener in Caledon this past weekend. Just want to give a quick recap and thanks.
 We arrived bright and early on Saturday morning at the Schonfeldt Farm, where WCOC treated us to a great first race. Pits started filling up from early bells as all the riders and support crews started arriving. Nice to see how hungry the guys and girls are to ride, as the entries were very good.
 The quads set off first and Kevin Crouse was off like a bat out of hell. Showing a clean pair of heels. Looked like a first race win for sure, until he clipped a tree with his wheel and broke his hub clean off. After loosing around 30 min he still managed to cross the line on 3 wheels and got a finish. Just wish we could get this kid on the National circuit. One of the few kid's who with some practice can run at the top. Anton Van Der Berg, starting off surprizingly slow by his standards coming in around 9th at the end of lap 1. While a quick pit stop and some fierce words from his pit crew and he was soon back on pace and come home with the overall win. Great riding also by Brodie Jacobs who made a great come back and took a class win. Bullet Clive Crouse was his usual consistent self, let me tell you this old dog still has lots of kms left in him, podium for bullet. Nice to see Wernich van der Walt also come back to racing, surprizing how threatening to call his dad, so i can use his quad, got him wanting to come back.. smile emoticon In the ladies quads Julia Moths from Namibia had a great day out. carrying on from where she ended the 2015 season and that is in the front. Followed by Maryke Spies who also came out to te first race. If she sticks at it, things will get mighty close at the front.
 With all the running around i unfotunately did not get to see all the jnr riders doing there thing, but i must make special mention of Tristan Hedgecock ( Graham Hedgcock ) this is one talented little boy following in his dad's footsteps. With the support of his parents and the passion for the sport, he is going to go far.

Afternoon came around and it was the start of the bikes. Man this is where the blood really was flowing and all the hardwork and training was about to unfold. To see get that first race under your belt, so you can see where you fit in the picture and of course to see what is needed to get the results.

Well let me start off by saying that this 2016 season will be a closely contested championship and will be taken all the way down to the last race.

Calvin Wiltshire was the first to get out in front and make the most of his advantage as he opened a gap little by little over David Ellis and Dévan De Villers Marais who were fighting amongst each other trying to hold position and keep an eye on Wiltshire. lap 3 David came in first as Calvin unfortunately ran out of fuel. With Devan still hot on his heels. It remained like that all the way to the line. With David taking it by 5sec over a charging Devan who took the class win. Super proud of this kid. He is riding with lots of confidence and all his hardwork is paying off. Calvin only 40sec behind. So after 3.6 hours and 250km's the top 3 only seperated by 40 sec. All 3 guy's have shown the pace they can run at for a race duration. Team effort will be of utmost importance in assisting a win for these guy's as not much seperates them.

Clint Rieper rode his fresh 2016 WR450F to the top step of the podium and a solid 8th overall. Hume Schonfeldt made a welcome return and kept the Schonfeldt name high as he took a 4th place finish. Herman Groenewald was styling on his new FX and also took a class win. Marius Malan was out having an absolute blast and focussed in and past brother Rossouw Malan, i have to just say proppie was charging in the last lap, setting his fastest lap of the race. A MX local Alec Combrink came to see what off roads are all about and picked up a good 3rd position. Judging by the smile every time he came around, i am sure he will be back.
Nicola Strauss showed a clean set of heels and grabbed the overall in the ladies class. p.s Nix i am glad you brought the Yamaha smile emoticon

Also fantastic results by JD van Niekerk who just keeps improving. Dreyer Van Niekerk nice to chat and joke with each other at the races,,, check the pic's, little Liam is super chuffed with his Yamaha... haha. Shannon Chase Ackerman you had some gremlins in the system but you powered through. You are talented and will be come back strong at the next one.

Last special mention can only go out to one person. Who has been side lined for way to long and that can only be Brett Lewis, my buddy i was so stoked to to see you on the line. Sitting on the side is not easy when you have so much talent and passion for the sport. 4th overall and 2nd in class. To see Melissa Lewis Glynne Lewis and of course the little croc there supporting you was special.
 Be safe and keep it up fellow.

Grant Hulley from Pyranha Stunts our fellow series sponsor, great to have you onboard and those tops you had made are really sweet.
 Thanks to WCOC, track setters, officials and everyone who made the day possible. We had an absolute blast.
 Till the next one hang cable!
Steven Robertson Rene Robertson Clive Crouse Charmaine Haupt Wilhelm Schonfeldt Stefan Kleyn Romanda Marais Anelda Marais Angelique Coetzee Ockert Swart Charles Ackerman Gary Koster's Christopher Kinghorn Kelly Bekker Jason Van Der Walt Eugene De Klerk Helderberg Yamaha Cape Town
‪#‎Yamaha‬ ‪#‎FX‬ ‪#‎YZ‬ ‪#‎WR‬ ‪#‎Leadingbrand‬ ‪#‎topdealer‬ ‪#‎ADMbedrywe‬ ‪#‎atlanticmoto‬ Thanks to all our clients for there continued support, always appreciated!
No Road like Off-Road
 

Offline Rokie

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Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2016, 01:56:02 pm »
kewl . . . one day  :-\
Previously owned:
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Offline PLUTO

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2016, 10:25:59 am »
Great race reports folks … here’s my take, from the back of the pack …

An afternoon race doesn’t have the same energy as an early morning one.  At midday when we arrived, it was hot, and dry.  There was no breeze to rustle leaves.  Out there in the stubbled wheat fields, plumes of quadbike dust hung motionless in the air.   In cool early morning conditions, people move crisply, but as the sun gets higher in the sky, crisp movement is substituted by more deliberate action, and hiding under umbrellas, race brochures or gazeebos; anything to stay out of the heat and conserve energy.   

There was a long queue for documentation.  Motorsport SA, in their wisdom, and in order to save trees, from 2016 onwards, only issue e licences.  But since the local race organisers don’t have the software wherewithal for mobile phone QR’s , we all had to print our licences on paper, and submit them at documentation. 

Admin done, it was time to line up the bikes and listen to the pre-race briefing.  All too soon it was our row’s ( Row 10) turn to line up in front of the red light.  It is at this time you can make your name Pep Stores, or not – depending on how excited you get by inhaling exhaust smoke, as a 100 bikes rev away at the start.  Yes, you want to get the holeshot, shoot away fast -  and stay in front of your start group of 5 bikes, primarily to avoid dust. 

But pop that clutch too much and you will flip your bike right there at the start, and look like a real chop.

I got it more or less right and lead my group out of the start, across the road, and into the field.  The trail veered sharp right and ran parallel to a low stone wall.  At this point I was passed by two bikes in quick succession, and have to say, it was to my advantage.  I slowed as the dust enveloped me, and out of the corner of my eye, saw hard left turn through a small open gate in the stone wall.   The bikes ahead of me missed the turn, and I effectively regained my position by being forced to slow down due to their dust. 

The next part of the trail sloped gently down to the riverbed.  Again I was passed by the same to bikes to the right, and almost simultaneously, by another bike to my left.  I could not see at all, and slammed on anchors to slow down.  Again, the thick dust played to my advantage by forcing me to slow down, as right up ahead in the way, was a bike down on its side, with its rider underneath.  Had I not slowed down and swerved to the left, I definitely would have ridden over bike and rider. 

After the race I found out it was Piranha Grant the Stunt Man I’d almost ridden over.  He said he hadn’t planned that stunt for money!  Indeed, he was also blinded by the dust, took the trail too far right and rode into an eroded rut/gutter, and did the Superman move over the handlebars.  Eish … 

Then it was time to drop into the riverbed, which proved to be much less intimidating than it looked.  But woe betides anyone with a heavy throttle hand on this section … very slippery wet rocks … then out the river bed and through a series of very fast farm roads.   

Here the dust was blinding, which lead to an interesting mental debate; slow down in the dust, or speed up so you don’t get overtaken?  For me, I am allergic to hanging on the throttle at full speed; I am not there to ride my bike as fast as possible.  This attitude is my downfall in offroad racing … I am always going to end up at the back of the field. 

So for that first lap I was overtaken by many riders, and suffered in the dust.  But I don’t have a problem with dust, for this is the nature of offroad biking.  Today it is dust, tomorrow maybe mud, or heat, or rain, or whatever … 

There is always some or other challenge going to be thrown at you, and you either take it in your stride, or stay home and play tiddlywinks. 

Board games aside, there was a flipping lekker challenge right at the end of the lap.  You dropped into a little forest section, across the narrowest of dry riverbeds, and immediately up a steep bank.  All fine, except successive bike wheel spinning had exposed a thick tree root, right in the crux of the climb up the bank, ready to unhinge you.  Thankfully, I think this root was cut away, for on the next lap I sailed up with no problems. 

On my third and final lap I came across my chommie Nick, at the A and B split, who run out of fuel.  Due to the dust, his first lap was slow, and consequently didn’t use that much sous.  So he skipped a refuel.  But after the first lap, the field had spread out, visibility was way better, and consequently much safer to go faster.  However go faster =  high fuel consumption, and 2 stroke bikes are not known for their fuel economy.   

Transferring fuel from one bike to another is all practical;  just how do you get it from one tank to the other?  Nick was standing there with his camel back juice carrier; he was prepared to sacrifice this bladder for the fuel transfer.   

Once upon a time the sage, Grim Reaper, (as he is known on a bike forum) did say, ‘ verily I say unto you to carry in your camel back, two Liquifruit empty cardboard cartons.  They weight nothing, and flattened take up no space.  One you use for the transfer of fuel, and the other for the transfer of water.’

What can I say; it was all smiles as I pulled out a flattened liquifruit carton – the fuel transfer was a doddle.  Except for one thing; I don’t have a see thru fuel tank, so it was complete guesswork how much fuel to decant from my bike to his.  Being a Good Samaritan can come back to bite you – what happens if you run out of fuel as a result of being a fuel donor? 

I don’t have a clear answer to this, except to say the Great Wheel in the Universe works in strange ways …

On the face of it, I did three laps and the winner did four – so not bad hey?  Not true; there is a huge difference, maybe not so much in distance, but in speed.  The winner was lapping almost 35 minutes per lap faster than me! 

And don’t think the four lappers were all youngers with nothing to lose - oaks in Master Class (46 years old plus) were also four lapping in sub 50 minutes/lap.  It requires combination of skill, determination and fitness to safely pilot a powerful dirt bike around at that speed.  Respect! 

Next offroad race is 9 April, also in the Caledon area.  Only about 30 sleeps to go – yay! 
 

Offline Buff

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2016, 09:35:06 pm »
Nice one Murray  :thumleft: I'm with you on this speed & dust issue, it's very much a mind game when you're out there as to how much of a chance is worth taking to gain one or two places.
How these youngsters are able to race shoulder to shoulder in that dust is mind boggling.
Present bikes: BETA 300RR, KTM 690, Yamaha WR250F

If you're dumb you gotta be tough !!!
 

Offline Offroad2

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2016, 09:47:06 am »
Great race reports folks … here’s my take, from the back of the pack …

An afternoon race doesn’t have the same energy as an early morning one.  At midday when we arrived, it was hot, and dry.  There was no breeze to rustle leaves.  Out there in the stubbled wheat fields, plumes of quadbike dust hung motionless in the air.   In cool early morning conditions, people move crisply, but as the sun gets higher in the sky, crisp movement is substituted by more deliberate action, and hiding under umbrellas, race brochures or gazeebos; anything to stay out of the heat and conserve energy.   

There was a long queue for documentation.  Motorsport SA, in their wisdom, and in order to save trees, from 2016 onwards, only issue e licences.  But since the local race organisers don’t have the software wherewithal for mobile phone QR’s , we all had to print our licences on paper, and submit them at documentation. 

Admin done, it was time to line up the bikes and listen to the pre-race briefing.  All too soon it was our row’s ( Row 10) turn to line up in front of the red light.  It is at this time you can make your name Pep Stores, or not – depending on how excited you get by inhaling exhaust smoke, as a 100 bikes rev away at the start.  Yes, you want to get the holeshot, shoot away fast -  and stay in front of your start group of 5 bikes, primarily to avoid dust. 

But pop that clutch too much and you will flip your bike right there at the start, and look like a real chop.

I got it more or less right and lead my group out of the start, across the road, and into the field.  The trail veered sharp right and ran parallel to a low stone wall.  At this point I was passed by two bikes in quick succession, and have to say, it was to my advantage.  I slowed as the dust enveloped me, and out of the corner of my eye, saw hard left turn through a small open gate in the stone wall.   The bikes ahead of me missed the turn, and I effectively regained my position by being forced to slow down due to their dust. 

The next part of the trail sloped gently down to the riverbed.  Again I was passed by the same to bikes to the right, and almost simultaneously, by another bike to my left.  I could not see at all, and slammed on anchors to slow down.  Again, the thick dust played to my advantage by forcing me to slow down, as right up ahead in the way, was a bike down on its side, with its rider underneath.  Had I not slowed down and swerved to the left, I definitely would have ridden over bike and rider. 

After the race I found out it was Piranha Grant the Stunt Man I’d almost ridden over.  He said he hadn’t planned that stunt for money!  Indeed, he was also blinded by the dust, took the trail too far right and rode into an eroded rut/gutter, and did the Superman move over the handlebars.  Eish … 

Then it was time to drop into the riverbed, which proved to be much less intimidating than it looked.  But woe betides anyone with a heavy throttle hand on this section … very slippery wet rocks … then out the river bed and through a series of very fast farm roads.   

Here the dust was blinding, which lead to an interesting mental debate; slow down in the dust, or speed up so you don’t get overtaken?  For me, I am allergic to hanging on the throttle at full speed; I am not there to ride my bike as fast as possible.  This attitude is my downfall in offroad racing … I am always going to end up at the back of the field. 

So for that first lap I was overtaken by many riders, and suffered in the dust.  But I don’t have a problem with dust, for this is the nature of offroad biking.  Today it is dust, tomorrow maybe mud, or heat, or rain, or whatever … 

There is always some or other challenge going to be thrown at you, and you either take it in your stride, or stay home and play tiddlywinks. 

Board games aside, there was a flipping lekker challenge right at the end of the lap.  You dropped into a little forest section, across the narrowest of dry riverbeds, and immediately up a steep bank.  All fine, except successive bike wheel spinning had exposed a thick tree root, right in the crux of the climb up the bank, ready to unhinge you.  Thankfully, I think this root was cut away, for on the next lap I sailed up with no problems. 

On my third and final lap I came across my chommie Nick, at the A and B split, who run out of fuel.  Due to the dust, his first lap was slow, and consequently didn’t use that much sous.  So he skipped a refuel.  But after the first lap, the field had spread out, visibility was way better, and consequently much safer to go faster.  However go faster =  high fuel consumption, and 2 stroke bikes are not known for their fuel economy.   

Transferring fuel from one bike to another is all practical;  just how do you get it from one tank to the other?  Nick was standing there with his camel back juice carrier; he was prepared to sacrifice this bladder for the fuel transfer.   

Once upon a time the sage, Grim Reaper, (as he is known on a bike forum) did say, ‘ verily I say unto you to carry in your camel back, two Liquifruit empty cardboard cartons.  They weight nothing, and flattened take up no space.  One you use for the transfer of fuel, and the other for the transfer of water.’

What can I say; it was all smiles as I pulled out a flattened liquifruit carton – the fuel transfer was a doddle.  Except for one thing; I don’t have a see thru fuel tank, so it was complete guesswork how much fuel to decant from my bike to his.  Being a Good Samaritan can come back to bite you – what happens if you run out of fuel as a result of being a fuel donor? 

I don’t have a clear answer to this, except to say the Great Wheel in the Universe works in strange ways …

On the face of it, I did three laps and the winner did four – so not bad hey?  Not true; there is a huge difference, maybe not so much in distance, but in speed.  The winner was lapping almost 35 minutes per lap faster than me! 

And don’t think the four lappers were all youngers with nothing to lose - oaks in Master Class (46 years old plus) were also four lapping in sub 50 minutes/lap.  It requires combination of skill, determination and fitness to safely pilot a powerful dirt bike around at that speed.  Respect! 

Next offroad race is 9 April, also in the Caledon area.  Only about 30 sleeps to go – yay! 

Nice Report Murray
No Road like Off-Road
 

Offline PLUTO

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #14 on: March 08, 2016, 04:24:01 pm »
Howzit Clive

any  info or pics about the race on 9 April?  What can be expected on the trail?  can't wait! 
 

Offline Offroad2

Re: Race Report for the 2016 Overberg 200 Offroad (WCOC)
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2016, 04:44:39 pm »
Murray - will be similar to last year but as always some changes - going this weekend see what we can add with time allowing
will post some pics on a new thread
No Road like Off-Road