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Offline big oil

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7560 on: July 21, 2019, 11:52:19 pm »
.
 
« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 02:35:56 pm by big oil »
 

Offline big oil

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7561 on: July 22, 2019, 12:25:36 am »
My son told me the very first nigh he arrived in the States there was a heavy rain storm and he had to wait 3 hours at the airport for the pick up. Finally when they got going they were pulled over for speeding, his word; ' Dad, they are just like in the movies and they dont take nonsense" So the poor oke that picked him up got a speeding fine. No corrupt cops and people actually follow traffic rules. It will be an adaption of sort coming from SA with our rolling stops because you simply afraid someone will rear you, or mug you if you do stop.

 Give it time  :imaposer:

I'm just being 100 with you  O0

Cops, teachers, corrections officers, politicians, all have good n evil, all hide behind the pillars of the community persona they portray.

Fortunately, these types are a small percentage here.

That's why I fight every speeding ticket I have EVER received, even when I'm guilty and I've ALWAYS been satisfied of the result  >:D

I've had, shall I say, a few speeding tickets in life  :imaposer:

 

Offline big oil

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7562 on: July 22, 2019, 01:46:02 am »
Goodonya Zog !  Sweat bartered for a shed?  Great deal.

The buildings in US are different to in ZA because of the cost of skilled labour.


Personally I think the US timber Building Codes are over-designed.
They standardise on 2x4" timber for studs and railings at 2' centres.

BigOil, if that is the case, in ZA a timber house built of 2x6@16 would substantially out-price brick and mortar home with 9"brick walls.

I understand, I was just curious where'd you'd seen 2x4 @24 centers?  It may have felt like I was calling you out on your claim, I wasn't, I live in an enormous country and I've yet to ever see 2x4 @24, unless I have may have seen it in the cheapest of the cheapest mobile homes, I don't think I've seen that width even in modular homes where I live, it may be different in other states.

We need substantial weight bearing structures up here, we almost broke the snowfall record in the Upper Peninsula last winter. 

 

 

Offline Mr Zog

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7563 on: July 22, 2019, 02:18:21 am »
Goodonya Zog !  Sweat bartered for a shed?  Great deal.

The buildings in US are different to in ZA because of the cost of skilled labour.


Personally I think the US timber Building Codes are over-designed.
They standardise on 2x4" timber for studs and railings at 2' centres.

BigOil, if that is the case, in ZA a timber house built of 2x6@16 would substantially out-price brick and mortar home with 9"brick walls.

I understand, I was just curious where'd you'd seen 2x4 @24 centers?  It may have felt like I was calling you out on your claim, I wasn't, I live in an enormous country and I've yet to ever see 2x4 @24, unless I have may have seen it in the cheapest of the cheapest mobile homes, I don't think I've seen that width even in modular homes where I live, it may be different in other states.

We need substantial weight bearing structures up here, we almost broke the snowfall record in the Upper Peninsula last winter.

My workshop in the garden has 2x4 @ 24" centers. But it's just a shed. All the residential structures I have seen have been 16" centers  :thumleft:
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Offline Mr Zog

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7564 on: July 22, 2019, 02:22:42 am »
Right. So this morning early I got busy drilling and countersinking all the holes in the wood for the shelves.

Then I sanded them all, and made a very rudimentary jig for assembling them so that they would be perfectly square (I just screwed some offcuts to my workbench surface to line things up with). Then I glued and screwed the 5 frames, and finally installed them in my bedroom closet.

The before and after pics of my closet...
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Offline Mr Zog

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7565 on: July 22, 2019, 02:36:08 am »
Another project that has been waiting...

So I have a "Shop Vac" vacuum cleaner that I "scored" years ago while doing the handyman thing. And I also built a centrifugal filter from an old paint bucket, some will remember that post from about 3 years ago...

Anyways, they have always been a PITA to move about. The bucket falls over, the shop vac falls over, the pipes get kinked, all sorts of stuff. And they take up a whole lot of space as well. I have seen stuff on YouTube on woodworking channels about making vacuum stands. I just never got around to it.

But today I removed the wooden shelf-jobbie from my closet when I put the shelves in, and that's when I got the idea to use it for my vacuum trolley... The shelf jobbie cost me nothing, I picked it up off the street, and instead of returning it to the street I decided to give it another purpose.

I took it all apart, and removed the casters too. Then I cut 4 sections of scrap 2x4 to 2-foot lengths and used them to separate the bottom from the top shelf. Then I refitted the casters, and added a bread crate to the top. Done  :biggrin:  Oh, I did use the inside shelf as a backing just to keep everything rigid.  :lol8:

Now the shop vac sits at the bottom, and sucks the air through the centrifugal filter. This means that the stuff I vacuum up gets stuck in the bucket, keeping the shop vac canister clean, and more importantly the filter clean too. So it keeps sucking hard...  :peepwall:

It takes up half the floor space it used to, and nothing falls over now, and hoses don't get kinked as easily.  :biggrin:
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Offline Mr Zog

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7566 on: July 22, 2019, 02:49:04 am »
My workshop is slowly coming together.

Still lots of projects that I do want to do. Like building a pipeline throughout the shop for compressed air, with outlets at each tool station so I can just plug a line in and blow stuff clean etc. and an outlet at the door for pumping up tires (lawnmower, trailer, wheelbarrow, etc.)

I also want to plumb in a line around the shed for the dust removal (read vacuum  :biggrin: ) system. I think a 2 inch pipe with a port at each tool station to suck up sawdust and dust to a central vacuum would be awesome  :biggrin:

Another thing that I want to do is build a solid workbench along the west wall (where the drill press stands) the full length of the wall. I want to have all my big tools (mitre saw, table saw) set into that bench in such a way that the length of the bench will be exactly at the correct level to support long planks that I want to cut. But they must also be removeable so that if I want to cut down full sheets of plywood I can take it outside and have the space to do stuff like that. An ambitious project, but I am already designing the plans in my head. I am going to need long supports one of these days when I start making the shelves for the study and the lounge...

Oh, and I still want to get some more insulation to finish off insulating the roof of the shed. I am 3/4 of the way done now, and it makes a big difference, but I do need to get the rest finished too to make it easier to work inside there in the summer.
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Offline Ganjora

Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7567 on: July 22, 2019, 05:54:30 am »
Looking very good Mr Zog.
 :thumleft:
 

Offline TeeJay

Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7568 on: July 22, 2019, 06:31:31 am »
Nice size workshop you have there  :thumleft:
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Offline Splash

Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7569 on: July 22, 2019, 06:35:36 am »
Very organised. Getting ready for some major Zogging?
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Offline Fudmucker

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7570 on: July 22, 2019, 07:16:52 am »
Nice size workshop you have there  :thumleft:

One of these days they'll tell you that you have to rezone to Light Industrial !  :deal:

You are building up a major asset base in that workshop.  :thumleft:
Have you thought about making a mould to cast come concrete pumpkins to put on the roof as protection from the hurricanes?  ;)

Thank you for correcting my impressions of timber construction.
Most things in US timber construction work to a 4' module (boards, windows etc)
and I presumed that module would have 2 studs - not 3 studs!
When I see the EXTRA timber incorporated at doors and windows I wonder about the economics.

Also everything gets nailed in place for speed of erection. (Labour cost again?) 
Yet when I see demolitions done, they seem destroy everything with a TLB, not pull it apart for recycling?
I saw a video on a guy who helps build homes for poor people, using reclaimed materials.
One of his problems was that some counties prohibit any structural use of reclaimed timber.
I thought this was OTT and unnecessarily increases building costs to those who can least afford it. :sip:
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Offline allan.cawood

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7571 on: July 22, 2019, 11:57:36 am »
Inspirational as always Mr. Zog!!!

Keep it up!! 


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Offline big oil

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7572 on: July 22, 2019, 11:58:16 am »
Nice size workshop you have there  :thumleft:

One of these days they'll tell you that you have to rezone to Light Industrial !  :deal:

You are building up a major asset base in that workshop.  :thumleft:
Have you thought about making a mould to cast come concrete pumpkins to put on the roof as protection from the hurricanes?  ;)

Thank you for correcting my impressions of timber construction.
Most things in US timber construction work to a 4' module (boards, windows etc)
and I presumed that module would have 2 studs - not 3 studs!
When I see the EXTRA timber incorporated at doors and windows I wonder about the economics.

Also everything gets nailed in place for speed of erection. (Labour cost again?) 
Yet when I see demolitions done, they seem destroy everything with a TLB, not pull it apart for recycling?
I saw a video on a guy who helps build homes for poor people, using reclaimed materials.
One of his problems was that some counties prohibit any structural use of reclaimed timber.
I thought this was OTT and unnecessarily increases building costs to those who can least afford it. :sip:

Odd, location means everything apparently.

Brick and or block and or wood construction all have pros n cons.

Easy to alter wood construction, stick built homes can be lifted and or moved.

Silt, water, and erosion can collapse a brick n mortar home, but they tend to withstand high winds better.

We could go on and on.

Could you elaborate on your statement in bold?  What do you mean when you say windows are setup to a 4 foot module?
 

Offline hedleyj

Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7573 on: July 23, 2019, 06:15:19 am »
My workshop is slowly coming together.

Still lots of projects that I do want to do. Like building a pipeline throughout the shop for compressed air, with outlets at each tool station so I can just plug a line in and blow stuff clean etc. and an outlet at the door for pumping up tires (lawnmower, trailer, wheelbarrow, etc.)

I also want to plumb in a line around the shed for the dust removal (read vacuum  :biggrin: ) system. I think a 2 inch pipe with a port at each tool station to suck up sawdust and dust to a central vacuum would be awesome  :biggrin:

Another thing that I want to do is build a solid workbench along the west wall (where the drill press stands) the full length of the wall. I want to have all my big tools (mitre saw, table saw) set into that bench in such a way that the length of the bench will be exactly at the correct level to support long planks that I want to cut. But they must also be removeable so that if I want to cut down full sheets of plywood I can take it outside and have the space to do stuff like that. An ambitious project, but I am already designing the plans in my head. I am going to need long supports one of these days when I start making the shelves for the study and the lounge...

Oh, and I still want to get some more insulation to finish off insulating the roof of the shed. I am 3/4 of the way done now, and it makes a big difference, but I do need to get the rest finished too to make it easier to work inside there in the summer.


Gary, check out “woodshop junkies” on you tube. Juan build an awesome small shop woodwork station. Whilst may not be what you are intending it may give you ideas.

Also when doing your airline, you can use pvc irrigation piping with compression fittings, it is much cheaper (by a huge factor)  and easier to install. I have used this in tyre dealers for years with great success.

On my shop vac I fitted a remote switch, with a delay on “off” time switch to it, this way i can switch on from which ever station i am at and when i switch off it continues for long enough to clear the pipes fully.

Beautiful shop you have got going there, keep it going Rome wasn’t built in a day 😎

I'm sure the sun goes around the earth twice a day.
 

Offline Tom van Brits

Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7574 on: July 23, 2019, 11:39:45 am »
My workshop is slowly coming together.

Still lots of projects that I do want to do. Like building a pipeline throughout the shop for compressed air, with outlets at each tool station so I can just plug a line in and blow stuff clean etc. and an outlet at the door for pumping up tires (lawnmower, trailer, wheelbarrow, etc.)

I also want to plumb in a line around the shed for the dust removal (read vacuum  :biggrin: ) system. I think a 2 inch pipe with a port at each tool station to suck up sawdust and dust to a central vacuum would be awesome  :biggrin:

Another thing that I want to do is build a solid workbench along the west wall (where the drill press stands) the full length of the wall. I want to have all my big tools (mitre saw, table saw) set into that bench in such a way that the length of the bench will be exactly at the correct level to support long planks that I want to cut. But they must also be removeable so that if I want to cut down full sheets of plywood I can take it outside and have the space to do stuff like that. An ambitious project, but I am already designing the plans in my head. I am going to need long supports one of these days when I start making the shelves for the study and the lounge...

Oh, and I still want to get some more insulation to finish off insulating the roof of the shed. I am 3/4 of the way done now, and it makes a big difference, but I do need to get the rest finished too to make it easier to work inside there in the summer.


Gary, check out “woodshop junkies” on you tube. Juan build an awesome small shop woodwork station. Whilst may not be what you are intending it may give you ideas.

Also when doing your airline, you can use pvc irrigation piping with compression fittings, it is much cheaper (by a huge factor)  and easier to install. I have used this in tyre dealers for years with great success.

On my shop vac I fitted a remote switch, with a delay on “off” time switch to it, this way i can switch on from which ever station i am at and when i switch off it continues for long enough to clear the pipes fully.

Beautiful shop you have got going there, keep it going Rome wasn’t built in a day 😎

Sound advice, I have learned as well  :thumleft:
 

Offline Mr Zog

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7575 on: July 24, 2019, 02:36:46 am »
My workshop is slowly coming together.

Still lots of projects that I do want to do. Like building a pipeline throughout the shop for compressed air, with outlets at each tool station so I can just plug a line in and blow stuff clean etc. and an outlet at the door for pumping up tires (lawnmower, trailer, wheelbarrow, etc.)

I also want to plumb in a line around the shed for the dust removal (read vacuum  :biggrin: ) system. I think a 2 inch pipe with a port at each tool station to suck up sawdust and dust to a central vacuum would be awesome  :biggrin:

Another thing that I want to do is build a solid workbench along the west wall (where the drill press stands) the full length of the wall. I want to have all my big tools (mitre saw, table saw) set into that bench in such a way that the length of the bench will be exactly at the correct level to support long planks that I want to cut. But they must also be removeable so that if I want to cut down full sheets of plywood I can take it outside and have the space to do stuff like that. An ambitious project, but I am already designing the plans in my head. I am going to need long supports one of these days when I start making the shelves for the study and the lounge...

Oh, and I still want to get some more insulation to finish off insulating the roof of the shed. I am 3/4 of the way done now, and it makes a big difference, but I do need to get the rest finished too to make it easier to work inside there in the summer.


Gary, check out “woodshop junkies” on you tube. Juan build an awesome small shop woodwork station. Whilst may not be what you are intending it may give you ideas.

Also when doing your airline, you can use pvc irrigation piping with compression fittings, it is much cheaper (by a huge factor)  and easier to install. I have used this in tyre dealers for years with great success.

On my shop vac I fitted a remote switch, with a delay on “off” time switch to it, this way i can switch on from which ever station i am at and when i switch off it continues for long enough to clear the pipes fully.

Beautiful shop you have got going there, keep it going Rome wasn’t built in a day 😎

Thanks Hedley  :thumleft:

1. I have been watching many of Juan's video's for a while now, seen all 6 (or so) of the vids on the workstation build. I have some ideas for mine based on his  :biggrin:

2. I have been advised not to use PVC pipe for the air lines. Schedule 40 PVC (1") is rated to around 400psi, irrigation PVC to around 200 psi I think. The problem comes in with age, the PVC deteriorates and when it decides to let go it can explode with pieces and fragments flying off at high speed. Should the pressure controller on the compressor malfunction then it could also burst with nasty effect. I will source some proper compressor line, I think Harbor Freight sells them in 50 foot lengths for around $20, and use that. Just to be safe.  :thumleft:

3. Please tell me more? I would love to have something like that, part number or similar? I'm sure that I can pick one up on Ebay for a low price...  :thumleft:
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Offline Mr Zog

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7576 on: July 24, 2019, 02:46:26 am »
I was wet all day today  :o

I started off wet from sweat, it was very hot and extremely humid. Then this afternoon I headed down to a job in Fellsmere and I drove into the storm in the pic below. The storm is a result of Tropical Depression 3 that formed just off the coast from Miami yesterday. I just knew I would be soaked at that job, and I was right. When I finally got home my toes looked like prunes in my wet shoes  :eek7:  And I still have the old sneakers that I wanted to replace, last week's paycheck had to go to pay the bills, nothing left for new shoes.  :-\

And remember the "slightly used" water heater / geyser that I got for a bargain to replace the old one that died? Well take a look at the pic below, that is the colour of the water coming out of it now. I think that the lining inside the tank was damaged when the "slightly used" one had a bunch of chlorinated water sent through it. And now it is rusting out on the inside very fast. So I have to bite the bullet and get a brand new one. Good news is that the boss will let me buy one at cost price from him, and I can pay it off over a couple of weeks.
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Offline Mr Zog

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7577 on: July 24, 2019, 02:55:18 am »
I was stopped at a traffic light up in Titusville today when I saw a sight that made think...


There was an armoured cash-in-transit van stopped at an autoteller. The dude got out of the van, alone. I mean he was alone, no partner / backup, in the vehicle. He opened up the back and took a cash cartridge out, walked over to the ATM, opened the ATM up with a key, took the old cartridge out, put the new cartridge in, locked the ATM, put the old cartridge back in the van, closed the door, got in and drove off.

No SWAT team covering him, no chain handcuffed to his wrist, NADA. Not even an assault rifle over his shoulder. Just a pistol on his hip.

I should have taken a video...  :lol8:
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Offline Mr Zog

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Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7578 on: July 24, 2019, 03:09:45 am »
Holy Crap  :eek7:


This afternoon the lights flickered on and off a couple of times with the big storm passing through. When I got home I noticed that a big tree was leaning into the power lines that run along the drainage ditch behind the back fence. This power line supplies power to the transformer on the pole behind the house that supplies power to our house.

So I called up the power company and told them about it.

I had just finished posting the last post above when the doorbell rang. The dogs went apeshit, and I went out to see who was here.

It was a guy from the power company in a big truck with a massive boom on it. He asked about the tree in the power lines. I took him down the outsideside of the fence (where I mow each week  :biggrin: ) and showed him the tree in the powerlines with his very bright flashlight.

He said that he would take care of it first thing in the morning, as getting into that space with his big truck in the dark, and not getting stuck in the drainage ditch wasn't a great idea, and the lines were fine now that the storm was gone.

How is that for service  :eek7:  It wasn't more than 90 minutes after I called the power company and told them, AND told them that it wasn't a screaming emergency, but that they should come check it out in the next few days.  :deal:

Stuff here just works  :sip:  :lol8:
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Offline Mrs. Zog

Re: Life in America - I made the move.
« Reply #7579 on: July 24, 2019, 03:22:11 am »
It's way past my bedtime but... a couple of things.

Re: the water issue. It's nasty. I've been using cold water as much as possible because that runs clear, and of course our reverse osmosis water for cooking, brushing teeth, water for the dogs, etc. But it's becoming unacceptable, so I'm glad it's being sorted. Mr. Zog's smelly clothes and my gym clothes don't come clean too well on a cold wash cycle, and of course the dishwasher uses hot, and showering in that sludge is disgusting. I'm showering cold as much as I can stand it.

The reason why I'm up past my bedtime is that I'm waiting for my night-blooming cereus to bloom. It's also called "Queen of the Night", it's a cactus. It was gifted to me when we were still at the old house, by our neighbor there who moved and couldn't take it with him. Of course I took it and transplanted it when we moved, and it seems I found a good spot for it. Despite being right in Maggie's favorite hunting place, it's doing well, even while being periodically trampled by two enthusiastic dogs.

Anyway. It blooms once a year, only for one night, and tonight's the night. Here are a couple of pics I just took. Not fully open yet, but getting there. If I can stay awake until it opens completely, I'll post another pic tomorrow.
Please consider a donation to the GoFundMe account to help cover Zog Jr.'s air ticket for June 2020 and Mr. Zog's U.S. citizenship application fees: https://www.gofundme.com/us-citizenship-application-amp-air-ticket
 
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