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Offline JourneyMan

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Riding in traffic - tips
« Reply #40 on: July 14, 2006, 03:29:24 pm »
Quote from: "InsiderDirtRider"
Quote from: "JourneyMan"
How is it possible too keep control after that?


Years and years of experience riding in the worst conditions imaginable  :wink:

I once hit - OK, he stepped out in front of me - a pedestrian at around 100 kph on the right side of my handlebar, and with the impact locked my front brake, broke the mirror off and bent the handlebar ever so slightly... but I didn't come off!  :D I couldn't believe it.  I think it probably helped that it was all 300 kg of momentum helping the bike stay up, but I'd LIKE to think that there was some skill involved too...

I'd say the best way is to experiment (within bounds obviously, and in a place as devoid as possible of outside influence) - see how hard you can brake (with the ABS off obviously)... and if you lock the front wheel....let go, and see what happens.  See what happens when you lock the rear wheel, does the backside slide out, and if it does, how do you correct it.

Riding in dirt has also taught me quite a bit about how to react when you lose grip in most situations.  Gassing it with a liter-class superbike when you've lost grip on the back wheel isn't exactly advisable, but it's a theory  :twisted:


To quote one of our great sporting hero's:

"The more/harder I practise, the luckier I get"

Gary Player
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Offline Leo

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Riding in traffic - tips
« Reply #41 on: July 24, 2006, 08:44:14 pm »
Another tip is to ride with the headlight on main beam.

Rather let the cars flash you for blinding them, than them "not seeing you"


To remove a mirror, make a fist and stike the mirror from the top down. Then when bringing the hand up, grab the mirror and throw it on the drivers lap if his window is open  8) These new mirrors will just fold away if you don't generate enough speed when striking them from the front or rear.

BTW I have never broken a mirror off a car. Has seen the above technique demonstrated to perfection an several accasions - that's why I know.

I'm too scared for retaliation, next time round or a war between cars & bikes  :wink:

........and my bikes got a plate  :roll:
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Offline Welsh

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Riding in traffic - tips
« Reply #42 on: July 24, 2006, 08:44:52 pm »
Quote from: "BlouVark"
Quote from: "JourneyMan"
jirre guys. I have trouble finding the horn button! Not even talking using hand/feet. Last Friday I almost hit a cage trying to hoot to the guys still left at Dros! :oops:



 :D  :D  :D  :D  :D



When I still had my Fireblade, I was already in a circle, when this "lady" decided to pull up right in front of me. I over reacted & grabbed too much front brake & lost the front, luckily I was able to keep her from going down completely. I got off, put her on the side stand & strated running towards the car while taking my helmet off. She realised that sheet was on it's way in a hurry & started reversing. I threw my helmet with everything I had at that car & cracked her windscreen. She did not stop.
I had to replace the helmet :oops: :cry:

It is sometimes very hard, but rather try to stay calm & not get angry. I never get like this in a cage, but on my bike..... :evil:  :evil:  There is a big difference between a small bumper bashing between to cages & having the same situation between cage & bike. I wish more cagers could realise this. :(

You have to have eyes like a chameleon.


I had a beaten up Audi 500SEL 2,8 V6 a couple of years ago, worth naff all, I was stressed and the Taxis were taking the left lane on old JHB Road at Allendale then cutting in front on the filter, the cops wanted to lock me up because I "accidentally" rammed one of them when he cut in on me! Should have checked cos they was watching coming the other way waiting for the Robot.

Welsh  :oops:  :x
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Offline Welsh

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Riding in traffic - tips
« Reply #43 on: July 24, 2006, 08:52:34 pm »
Quote from: "JourneyMan"
Quote from: "BlouVark"

There is a big difference between a small bumper bashing between to cages & having the same situation between cage & bike. I wish more cagers could realise this. :(

You have to have eyes like a chameleon.


I feel totally vulnarbale when going about in city traffic/tarred roads with traffic. I do not have even an incling (?) of the some feeling when I'm on dirt. That's why I'm "more profficient" (for want of a better term) on dirt than tar. I'm a nervous wreck doing city traffice. :evil:


That is what no one understands JM, you apparently (we have not really ridden together) ride like a woos on the tar and have zero fear on dirt!
The reverse of "normality" amongst the general forum.

The generals run "all fast" or "fast tar / cautious dirt" or "medium / medium" or "all cautious" the "slow tar / fast dirt" is an anomilie?

Welsh  8) Cheers my man.
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Offline Welsh

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Riding in traffic - tips
« Reply #44 on: July 24, 2006, 09:00:31 pm »
Quote from: "InsiderDirtRider"
Quote from: "JourneyMan"
How is it possible too keep control after that?



I I'd say the best way is to experiment (within bounds obviously, and in a place as devoid as possible of outside influence) - see how hard you can brake (with the ABS off obviously)... and if you lock the front wheel....let go, and see what happens.  See what happens when you lock the rear wheel, does the backside slide out, and if it does, how do you correct it.

Riding in dirt has also taught me quite a bit about how to react when you lose grip in most situations.  Gassing it with a liter-class superbike when you've lost grip on the back wheel isn't exactly advisable, but it's a theory  :twisted:


You never realise what the DS riding has tought you until a KAK situation occurs, you will be much better prepared when you lose the rear completely on diesel, much better when someone pulls out on you and you are trying to steer it around them both wheels almost locked. I may sound melodramatic, but all this "limited traction" training (fun) creates instinctive reactions which may save you one day.

Father Welsh,s Sermon for the Day.  :D
Having fun..... there may be casualties.....

Offline JourneyMan

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Riding in traffic - tips
« Reply #45 on: July 25, 2006, 02:18:19 pm »
Quote from: "African Welsh"

That is what no one understands JM, you apparently (we have not really ridden together) ride like a woos on the tar and have zero fear on dirt!
The reverse of "normality" amongst the general forum.

The generals run "all fast" or "fast tar / cautious dirt" or "medium / medium" or "all cautious" the "slow tar / fast dirt" is an anomilie?

Welsh  8) Cheers my man.


You make it sound as if I'm a second Sharky, Leo etc. No way. Not by a long way! Don't believe everything these moegoes tell you! :lol:

Would not call it zero fear.

In traffic and tar roads generally, your concentration/focus powers (good or bad) are devided to take in a hell of a lot of factors to ensure safe travelling and even then actions of others still cause you to go down/crash etc. (Stressful concentration)


On dirt my concentration/focus are dedicated to mostly three things only:

The dirt road ahead, performance/handling of the bike under conditions of the dirt road and my skills (or lack thereoff) in handling the conditions ahead. A small portion of my concentration/focus is spend on outside factors. (Animals, pedestrians etc.)

It means that I will be more "daring", for want of a better description, on dirt roads.

Riding my bike and handling situations does not come naturally to me ...yet. Still have to think a lot and concentrate/focus on doing the right thing.  Only time, time and time on the road (dirt and traffic/tar) will make it easier I think.


Hope it makes sense.
He who angers you, controls you.

Offline Leo

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Riding in traffic - tips
« Reply #46 on: July 27, 2006, 01:59:15 pm »
When you come up to a robot with more than one lane, where the line of cars in one lane is considerably shorter than the other, be assured that some basterd will pull out into the empty lany lane.

Likewise when the robot turns green and the one lane is held up by someone turning right who never had her indicator on, and is now blocking the whole lane, someone will pull out of that lane in front of you


Save riding chaps........... :D
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Offline Esplin

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Re: Riding in traffic - tips
« Reply #47 on: August 01, 2017, 07:27:19 pm »
Traveling on a freeway I all ways start at about 130 to 140 kms/ hour. If too many cars are passing me I will speed up. Rather worry about what is in front of you than behind

Offline NovaT

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Re: Riding in traffic - tips
« Reply #48 on: August 02, 2017, 01:02:41 am »
Time warp. Travelling back to 2006 when I was in matric

I agree though, rather slightly faster than traffic than slightly slower. Much safer.

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Re: Riding in traffic - tips
« Reply #49 on: August 02, 2017, 09:21:18 am »
Traveling on a freeway I all ways start at about 130 to 140 kms/ hour. If too many cars are passing me I will speed up. Rather worry about what is in front of you than behind

Definitely.   :thumleft:
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Offline krokonoster

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Re: Riding in traffic - tips
« Reply #50 on: August 14, 2017, 02:42:12 pm »
Few things I picked up this year (Only started riding January)

* Car's that see you and want to pull over, normally jerk over to the side.   Those on their phone tend to swerve gently across the road and might lead you to believe they are pulling over for you, just to start moving back when you think you can go.
So when I see a car gently pulling over...huh uh, I wait.

* If you see a driver with his elbow on the window frame, do not expect him to notice you.  That's one sure sign he's not watching his mirrors.   

These 2 things I picked up, and "tested" my hypothesis by looking for it, and then see for myself  (like waiting behind the driver gently pulling over and when it's safe to pull up next to him / her... yep, on the f'ing phone.  (swear one dude was watching porn.. no joke!)