Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register

Author Topic: Breaking in new bikes  (Read 4425 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline 1190

Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #20 on: June 01, 2016, 01:45:54 pm »
There used to be a brilliant series called Twist the Throttle that gave you the complete history of all the different motorcycle manufacturers, and showed footage of the production lines of each manufacturer. I recorded it but my kids decided to delete it for me   :(

A few interesting points (if I remember correctly)

All the Jap bikes were tested on dynos at the end of the line and revved through the gears until a green light came on (probably to check the peak HP, not sure) and the production proceses were very labour intensive obviously because of the cheap labour in the land of the rising sun :biggrin:

The BMW plant which began in 1921 had alot more robotics on the line and the bikes were run for about 20 min after production.(could be wrong but thats what i remember them saying) Check it out on you tube

 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7A4036A19F2945B9

P.S. at the time of the show Honda made the most unit at +-4 million units per year :thumleft:
« Last Edit: June 01, 2016, 01:49:14 pm by 1190 »
Smith & Wesson the original point and click interface
 

Offline Bundu

  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 8,935
  • Thanked: 401 times
Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #21 on: June 01, 2016, 02:19:33 pm »
I just trust the manufacturer and do what they say - with all the electronics these days, I would hate a warranty claim to fail because they might prove I abused the motor during run in
 

Offline Vark

Re:
« Reply #22 on: June 01, 2016, 08:19:44 pm »
My take is that when you 'run in' a vehicle the focus is not just on the engine.  There are more things needed to make it move and these things (and the connections between then) need to 'bed' themselves.
The gearbox, drive train, etc all have initial wear which should probably be done in controlled manner.
But I'm not a manufacturer that cares about the reputation of my product so I might be missing the point.  :)
 

Offline TheBear

  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 10,309
  • Thanked: 595 times
Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #23 on: June 01, 2016, 08:38:04 pm »
I am not a rich man.  My GS cost me R186000.00 when I bought it.  I cannot risk a R186000 bike by running it in as described on the internet.  Going at prescribed speeds for 1000 or so km is not that big an issue for me and I also saw on the internet that the Americans never landed on the moon, no plane ever hit the World Trade Centre and the Jewish Genocide didn't happen.   I cannot risk R186000.00 on something I saw on the internet.
#33 #BRADICAL!
 

Offline Bundu

  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 8,935
  • Thanked: 401 times
Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #24 on: June 01, 2016, 09:04:29 pm »
I am not a rich man.  My GS cost me R186000.00 when I bought it.  I cannot risk a R186000 bike by running it in as described on the internet.  Going at prescribed speeds for 1000 or so km is not that big an issue for me and I also saw on the internet that the Americans never landed on the moon, no plane ever hit the World Trade Centre and the Jewish Genocide didn't happen.   I cannot risk R186000.00 on something I saw on the internet.

I had to stay below 6500RPM for the 1st 1000km - IIRC 6500RPM equates to around 160km/h - not really all that much of a punishment
 

Offline Manic

  • Little Fat Guy
  • Vendors
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: KTM 790 Adventure R
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 17,997
  • Thanked: 341 times
Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2016, 09:34:53 pm »
Ja nee ouens, ek loop my goed ook mooi in. Even my bikes.

Niks oor 3000rpm nie, en niks vinniger as 100kph vd eerste 1500km nie  :peepwall:
 

Offline Bundu

  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 8,935
  • Thanked: 401 times
Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #26 on: June 01, 2016, 09:45:06 pm »
Ja nee ouens, ek loop my goed ook mooi in. Even my bikes.

Niks oor 3000rpm nie, en niks vinniger as 100kph vd eerste 1500km nie  :peepwall:

ek weet jy lieg alweer...... maar jy gaan mos dalk binnekort van jou bikes hier verkoop ;) ;D
 

Offline Tom van Brits

Re:
« Reply #27 on: June 01, 2016, 10:07:36 pm »
I was fortunate to have bought a couple of new bikes. I never worried about manufacturers recomended run in and used the bike in normal fasion. Never ever had a problem other than bad service from some dealers but that  is common. All my bikes were reliable and back in the day (when i had no money while being a fireman) I never even serviced my Suz gs1100 and only topped up oil. She never missed a beat and was sold on 111000km

Sent from my SM-T231 using Tapatalk
 

Offline TheBear

  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 10,309
  • Thanked: 595 times
Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #28 on: June 02, 2016, 05:56:09 am »
I am not a rich man.  My GS cost me R186000.00 when I bought it.  I cannot risk a R186000 bike by running it in as described on the internet.  Going at prescribed speeds for 1000 or so km is not that big an issue for me and I also saw on the internet that the Americans never landed on the moon, no plane ever hit the World Trade Centre and the Jewish Genocide didn't happen.   I cannot risk R186000.00 on something I saw on the internet.

I had to stay below 6500RPM for the 1st 1000km - IIRC 6500RPM equates to around 160km/h - not really all that much of a punishment

Agreed.  If at all a price to pay, it is a small price to pay just to be sure.
#33 #BRADICAL!
 

Offline KaTooMatt

Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #29 on: June 03, 2016, 10:25:12 am »
The reality is that your engine has already had a full rev run at the end of the assembly line. This is to check that nothing fles off and that the engine will hold together.

To run it now it now is futile. Also like all moving things engine groove themselves. Ride the engine they way you intend to ride it from day one. There will be less overall wear.

For the same reason don't buy a grannie's car drive the hell out of it and expect it to last. If you buy a Grannie's car if you want it to last keep driving like a Grannie. >:D

Thing is, the engine was revved to the limits on a dyno in the factory.  What about all the other components?

Even if a "futile" exersize, what damage can running in for 1 600km do?   
If by running it in you are expecting to prolong the life of the enigne then the exercise is futile.

No damage can be done by running an engine in for 1 600 km. The trick then is to then open it up gradually over time to your normal riding style.

Rather ride the bike as you expect to ride it from day one. On my 990 I did not cross 4000 RPM in any gear for the first two days then slowly increased this. The difference to my normal rising style was earlier gear changes and that was all. My super unreliable KTM now has 75 000 odd kilometers on with the Clutch piston seal the only problem to date and they were fixed at the 75 000km service.
"These are not machines for the meek. Ride it like you stole it, cane it within an inch of its life. It will require a bunch of maintenance and generally tend to be, shall we say, harsh? It was bred for racing, after all. It will devour rear tires and its lust for fuel will astound you. It will suffer indifference and carelessness very poorly. Like heroin and Asian girls, it's not for everybody, but when you absolutely, positively, GOTS to beat every m*****f****** in the race, accept no substitu
 

Offline silvrav

Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #30 on: June 03, 2016, 10:33:57 am »
The reality is that your engine has already had a full rev run at the end of the assembly line. This is to check that nothing fles off and that the engine will hold together.

To run it now it now is futile. Also like all moving things engine groove themselves. Ride the engine they way you intend to ride it from day one. There will be less overall wear.

For the same reason don't buy a grannie's car drive the hell out of it and expect it to last. If you buy a Grannie's car if you want it to last keep driving like a Grannie. >:D

Thing is, the engine was revved to the limits on a dyno in the factory.  What about all the other components?

Even if a "futile" exersize, what damage can running in for 1 600km do?   
If by running it in you are expecting to prolong the life of the enigne then the exercise is futile.

No damage can be done by running an engine in for 1 600 km. The trick then is to then open it up gradually over time to your normal riding style.

Rather ride the bike as you expect to ride it from day one. On my 990 I did not cross 4000 RPM in any gear for the first two days then slowly increased this. The difference to my normal rising style was earlier gear changes and that was all. My super unreliable KTM now has 75 000 odd kilometers on with the Clutch piston seal the only problem to date and they were fixed at the 75 000km service.

J, you see...if you did it properly the seal would not have gone  :peepwall: :lol8:
 

Offline TheBear

  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 10,309
  • Thanked: 595 times
Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #31 on: June 03, 2016, 11:42:43 am »
The reality is that your engine has already had a full rev run at the end of the assembly line. This is to check that nothing fles off and that the engine will hold together.

To run it now it now is futile. Also like all moving things engine groove themselves. Ride the engine they way you intend to ride it from day one. There will be less overall wear.

For the same reason don't buy a grannie's car drive the hell out of it and expect it to last. If you buy a Grannie's car if you want it to last keep driving like a Grannie. >:D

Thing is, the engine was revved to the limits on a dyno in the factory.  What about all the other components?

Even if a "futile" exersize, what damage can running in for 1 600km do?   
If by running it in you are expecting to prolong the life of the enigne then the exercise is futile.

No damage can be done by running an engine in for 1 600 km. The trick then is to then open it up gradually over time to your normal riding style.

Rather ride the bike as you expect to ride it from day one. On my 990 I did not cross 4000 RPM in any gear for the first two days then slowly increased this. The difference to my normal rising style was earlier gear changes and that was all. My super unreliable KTM now has 75 000 odd kilometers on with the Clutch piston seal the only problem to date and they were fixed at the 75 000km service.

J, you see...if you did it properly the seal would not have gone  :peepwall: :lol8:

Precisely!   :laughing4:
#33 #BRADICAL!