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Offline Bos Toe

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Mozambique
« on: June 15, 2016, 03:32:46 pm »
FYI

The Brazilian mining company Vale has stopped using the Sena railway line to transport coal from its mine at Moatize in the western Mozambican province of Tete to the port of Beira, following two attacks on its trains last week by gunmen of the rebel movement Renamo.
According to a report in Tuesday’s issue of the independent newssheet “Mediafax”, Vale-Mozambique took the decision immediately after the second attack, on Wednesday. In both attacks, the gunmen fired at the cabin of the lead locomotive. No-one was killed in the attacks, but on each occasion a member of the train crew was injured and required hospital treatment.
Val has an alternative route to the sea for its coal exports: it can use the new railway from Moatize to the northern port of Nacala-a-Velha, which runs through southern Malawi.
Landlocked Malawi is considering abandoning the use of the road to Beira, following Renamo’s destruction of four Malawian trucks last week in ambushes in Barue district, Manica province.
On Saturday, the Mozambican police announced that vehicles will travel along the most dangerous part of the road, from the small town of Vanduzi to the Luenha river, which marks the boundary between Manica and Tete provinces, in convoys under armed escort. But this move may come too late to persuade the Malawians to continue using the road.
A spokesperson for the Malawian Foreign Ministry, Rejoice Shumba, cited by the Malawian paper, the “Nyasa Times”, said the situation was worrying and the Malawian government wanted to find out from Mozambique as to what is happening in terms of the security of Malawian citizens and their property.
“Our colleagues in Mozambique earlier told us that everything would be alright, that they would protect Malawians and their property but it looks like the trend is now increasing,” she said.
Most of the Malawian trucks destroyed were carrying fuel. The lost fuel was valued at 69 million kwachas (about 97,000 US dollars). The four trucks themselves were valued at 23 million kwachas.
Three of the Malawian trucks were destroyed in a Friday ambush. Two of the drivers made their way back to Malawi, but the third is still missing. His company, Zagaf Trucks, says it is in contact with the Malawian embassy in Maputo about the fate of the driver.
If Malawian businesses stop using the road to Beira, they can either use the railway from Malawi to the northern Mozambican port of Nacala, or take the much longer road route to Beira through Zambia and Zimbabwe. So far the Zimbabwe-Beira road has not come under Renamo attack.
Source: AIM
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Offline ChrisL - DUSTRIDERS

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Re: Mozambique
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2016, 03:36:09 pm »
and so it starts again :(
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Offline orangestring

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Re: Mozambique
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2016, 09:36:07 am »
Taken from the Kingsley Holgate Foundation facebook page - Posted yesterday.

"POTHOLES AND BULLETS
We make it to the end point of the Rio Save military convoy without serious hassles. Then duck north-east onto a dirt track that crosses the Busi River via a clapped-out ferry and across a beautiful floodplain over the Pungwe to arrive in Beira in the dark - only to learn there are still more challenges ahead.
Now I don't want to make too big a thing about this and put people off coming to Moz, its a great country and there are no troubles in the south, but the truth is that for this northern area there will have to be peace talks with Renamo otherwise it's going to escalate into a real bun fight. !! Renamo are also attacking cars and trucks on the road to Tete and the Malawian Minister of Transport is urging truck drivers to take the longer route through Zim, stating that the Tete convoy is too risky. This Renamo issue is affecting an already bruised economy says our host in Beira who together with others urges us not to take the Dondo gravel road through to the Zambezi as was our plan as it seems bandits have also attacked and burnt out vehicles on that road.
A call to friends in Gorongosa National Park seals our fate: 'Taking the Dondo road is like playing roulette 'Don't do it.' comes the reply. So after a break in Beira,we 'Pothole' it all the way to the start of another bloody military convoy, this time from near Gorongosa to hopefully take us through the beautiful natural forests past Renamo's stronghold and down to Caia on the Zambezi. The game is on! We juggle for position,dodging potholes and racing past eager bus,truck and bakkie drivers all whom, it seems, want to be directly behind the lead armored vehicle. And then,about an hour into our journey, the wildfire shooting starts.
Machine gun and AK bullets spray the forest. Leaves and dust everywhere ! We come across another burnt out vehicle on the roadside. Some of the troops jump down AK's at the ready. Thick forest either side of the road I think what sitting ducks we are. This section of the road could also win the SADAC Pothole award. In the Landy Pink Floyd plays 'Wish you were here.' Life on expedition is never dull. We're first into Caia filling station for diesel. The soldiers give us a thumbs up we give them some coldrinks and water and then we're off across the Zambezi. We break west to take the narrow track to Morrrumbala.The elephant grass higher than the Land Rover. Beautiful scenery. No Renamo here were told. All quite and peacefull from here on.
We cross the Shire River on a hand - winched ferry and then head North up the Shire valley. Malawi here we come. But the late convoy start and the hassles on the convoy mean we can't make the border in time,so we pull off the road to not be too conspicuous,light a small fire,throw out a tent and bedrolls and sit back. It's the most beautiful starlit sky imaginable....
They hit us around midnight. We hear whispers in the bush. I shine my torch and then they're all over us shouting and throwing our kit around. The torch gets slapped out of my hand. AK's in our faces. Very nasty! Fortunately one of the soldiers speaks a little English. I take him by the hand and try and reason with him. Stop. Be calm. We're just tourists. One of the soldiers gets into our tent and throws the bedrolls out. The bunch is high on tension and question and start forcing us at gun point to pack the Disco. Two guys force themselves into the Landy. Drive to the border we're told.
These young soldiers are threatening and want bucks. We keep calm. At the border compound they take our car keys and passports but allow us to put up a tent. In the morning we talk they say. One arrogant youngster says 'Hey mister you not the boss. This the boss.'showing me his AK.
During the night Sheelagh and I get a message out to a well connected mate in Maputo who by morning has a strongly worded Portuguese message on our phone assuring the authorities of our credibility. It helps a bit but still we are searched from bumper to bumper. 'We thought you were Renamo' said Mr Big. 'The villagers thought you had come to kill them, they saw your lights in the bush and came to report to us, so we came to kill you... I get one of them to add a message to the large Canvas and leather bound Scroll of Peace and Goodwill that we carry on every expedition. Seems that at this rather tense time with Renamo, it's sorely needed. Will keep you posted."
 

Offline FrancoisTz

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Re: Mozambique
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2016, 09:56:10 am »
This is an extremely bad situation.
Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to rank amongst those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the grey twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.