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Offline XTZFegen

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1280 on: June 06, 2017, 09:10:20 pm »
XTZ - I was kind of faced with your dilemma here - http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=202186.1220  - fence and all in low light

malibu is spot on

Definitly taking her advise. Will.also go read your post.  :thumleft:

Offline GundaGunda

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1281 on: June 07, 2017, 06:59:43 am »

Post it!  Just don't get me all emotional again... ;)

Here goes. - Sorry that it is off-topic.

Reading it again after a year it could use a dusting off and some edits, but I think there is still a story in it.

But on-topic it got me thinking. Can you learn to be creative, whether it be photography or writing, or is it something you have, or don't have?

Alan once called photography "the art of seeing" and I think it is a good name, but sometimes I get frustrated that I don't see a shot that someone right next to me does. 

How do you sharpen your creative skills? I know I just browse other people's published pictures or stories in the hope that some of their creativity will brush off onto me, but sometimes it feels a bit like pilferage.

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Offline Malibu

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1282 on: June 07, 2017, 12:14:56 pm »
Very good read, and terrific story... enjoyed! Thanks for the share.

It's amazing how shy we all are to share our creative sides, once shared and appreciated, we feel only then that we can move forward, and I think this applies to photography aswell... I guess that's why I like this thread, an opportunity to share and get comments and sometimes a little appreciation that allows our natural fears to subside a little....

:)
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Offline GundaGunda

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1283 on: June 07, 2017, 12:39:41 pm »
Very good read, and terrific story... enjoyed! Thanks for the share.

It's amazing how shy we all are to share our creative sides, once shared and appreciated, we feel only then that we can move forward, and I think this applies to photography aswell... I guess that's why I like this thread, an opportunity to share and get comments and sometimes a little appreciation that allows our natural fears to subside a little....

:)

Thank you, and you are so right with your comment. It can be really scary to put a creative work out there for scrutiny. That to me is a major benefit of being in a photo club and a writer's circle. The folks there understand that fear and help you over it.
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Offline Malibu

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1284 on: June 12, 2017, 12:46:38 pm »
I got my grubby paws on a Macro lens, Tamron 90 and Nikon 150 over the weekend, here are a few pics of what I managed to get...

It was a ton of fun!
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Offline Malibu

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1285 on: June 12, 2017, 12:47:41 pm »
more...
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Offline GundaGunda

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1286 on: June 13, 2017, 06:49:12 am »
Oh man, I love those little bugs !!

Viva tax refund viva !

I gotta get me a macro lens.  ;D
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Offline GundaGunda

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1287 on: June 13, 2017, 07:02:32 am »
Our club had judging and an inter-club competition last week, and because I missed the club outing I could only put in four pics, and I only had three to put in anyway. .

Our set topic was "world in motion", and I managed 2 golds towards the 15 I need to get to three star - I was promoted to 2 star so the count went back to zero before Thursday as they judge me now at 2 star level. 

I put in the sunrise with the ship I posted here but it got a silver. The were no comments as the inter-club took too much time.

All the golds and merits are here:-

http://www.durbancameraclub.co.za/pages/15183/2017-06-gallery

My two were the dog with the ball on the beach and the radio control glider against the white sky.

Our outing this month is a sunrise over the Valley of 1K hills, and the set topic is "sayings and proverbs" - I have my set topic pic already and I will go for the sunrise. 

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Offline GundaGunda

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1288 on: June 13, 2017, 07:14:37 am »
. . . and there was a lesson in seeing for me.

I took a group for a drive through the valley. It was an absolute pleasure to show these folk places I found on my bike travels.

That shot of the aloe and rock was taken by one of our "senior" ladies. I have been to that spot probably a dozen times and never seen that picture, but she just walks up, tripods up, and shoots it with her bloody great full-frame Canon and moerse-groot white lens - and gets a merit !!

Can't beat experience can you ? 
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Online frankmac

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1289 on: June 13, 2017, 07:26:25 am »
Haha, I know the feeling. Can't seem to have the eye for a decent pic

My wife is on some FB birding forum and regularly moans about all the flush people with their supa dupa equipment (and funds to spend weeks in expensive reserves) who make her images look rather mundane  :biggrin:

Offline KiLRoy

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1290 on: June 17, 2017, 03:40:00 pm »
So my laaitie convinced me to trust him with the Fuji yesterday at Zwartkops Racetrack.  He used both 135 and 50mm Rokkor manual lenses.  Struggled with the focus on the race shots and much was lost behind the dreaded fence too.  The stills I thought came out ok.  Not bad for his first try.  He has an eye for angles and shots imo - now need to learn the technical side. he is 16y old

Your thoughts,
Whataboutism . When Cold War criticisms were leveled at the Soviet Union, the response would be "What about..." followed by the naming of an event in the Western world. It represents a case of tu quoque (appeal to hypocrisy), a logical fallacy that attempts to discredit the opponent's position by asserting the opponent's failure to act consistently in accordance with that position, without directly refuting or disproving the opponent's initial argument

Offline KiLRoy

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1291 on: June 17, 2017, 03:41:39 pm »
few more
Whataboutism . When Cold War criticisms were leveled at the Soviet Union, the response would be "What about..." followed by the naming of an event in the Western world. It represents a case of tu quoque (appeal to hypocrisy), a logical fallacy that attempts to discredit the opponent's position by asserting the opponent's failure to act consistently in accordance with that position, without directly refuting or disproving the opponent's initial argument

Offline Tom van Brits

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1292 on: June 22, 2017, 11:21:33 pm »
Hein I agree he has got an eye and at age 16 he has got a whole life ahead to develop the creative and technical skills.
You should let him play more often with the gear!  :thumleft:

I have just discovered how easy it is in lightroom to stitch a panoramic and a real shame that I did not keep all the RAW panoramic pics I have taken but hoping for some snow on Mount Rowett in the next month and will be worth my while to hike up the mountain for more landscape pics.

Herewith the stitch:

Offline Karoo Rider

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1293 on: June 23, 2017, 05:29:29 am »
I like the stitch.  Is it HDR as well or just tweaked a bit in the shadows? Great shot!

Offline KiLRoy

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1294 on: June 23, 2017, 06:38:26 am »
You know what Tom, i was stupidly protective of the gear - im going to let him rip.  He seems to enjoy it too.
Whataboutism . When Cold War criticisms were leveled at the Soviet Union, the response would be "What about..." followed by the naming of an event in the Western world. It represents a case of tu quoque (appeal to hypocrisy), a logical fallacy that attempts to discredit the opponent's position by asserting the opponent's failure to act consistently in accordance with that position, without directly refuting or disproving the opponent's initial argument

Offline Tom van Brits

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1295 on: June 23, 2017, 12:46:41 pm »
I like the stitch.  Is it HDR as well or just tweaked a bit in the shadows? Great shot!
Karoo Rider thanks, but not hdr. I have tried hdr at some point in time and strangely do not like the way the camera would develop hdr in it self and I cannot haul a tripot along with all my hiking gear as hdr requires 2 shots of the same scene. There is always some weird looking hue in hdr espesially in the contrast areas but I do get asked by more people about weather I am shooting hdr or not. Right in the begining when I started taking pics I used a program on Windows 10 (Windows photo viewer) to get that effect and then realised that it was way too much 'over saturated'. Now after finding my feet in lightroom and shooting in RAW I have once again adapt that hdr style although it does not look (to me) over saturated but rather close to what the the real colours are (what I see) on the island.

I got a bit concerned as I do not want to take a route of photo development that people do not like and I have asked team members their opinions on the pics. All of them seems to like it although they do agree that it is 'amplified' (is that even the right English word?)

So it seems that I keep going into the 'hdr look' direction but it is the look I really enjoy. The pictures taken in RAW looks so flat, and I enjoy it so much when they finally jump to life. I shod actually post a 'before' picture.....very hard to believe the power of lightroom and that these colours were hidden in that dark grey image.

I am a lot more cautious when developing pics of the birds and seals as I do not want their colours to look false like for instanse the Rockhopper penguins. The yellow feathers in the eye brows can be saturated to look real funky and bright bit then it is not a true reflection of the species itself.

One can also put the glint in they eye of a bird rather easilly in lightroom, but it does not make sense if the birds face is in the shaddows but the eye is super bright. I am sure my photo editing skills will get better as I enjoy spending a lot of my free time playing in there.



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Offline Karoo Rider

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1296 on: June 23, 2017, 03:25:12 pm »
Thanks Tom, interesting feedback w.r.t. HDR and it makes sense.  I also like to experiment with colours and contrasts, etc but use a simple program called Fast Stone Image Editor.  Will in future also like to start using Lightroom.  I like to decide beforehand what direction I'm heading with a picture.  It is either enhancing the camera's limitations in terms of contrast, etc and making it look like I remember it (and not how it should have looked!), or give the picture very obviously a more of an artistic look where the viewer immediately becomes aware of the fact that the changes were done on purpose.

As you mention some objects are not supposed to be over enhanced, for example animals and perhaps people's faces, since one already has an idea of what it should look like.  Other objects like sunsets for example can be manipulated to a large degree before one will start to suspect any tweaking.

Your picture of the sea and the orange containers are in my opinion perfectly representative of the real impression that one would get standing there in person, but still it's exiting to look at and you can almost smell the damp grass and feel the nip of the cold air.

Offline Tom van Brits

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1297 on: June 23, 2017, 05:16:33 pm »
I did not know about the Fast stone editing program Karoo Rider, I was (still is) using Fast stone for photo resizing and find it very nice.
Herewith the before shot - RAW straight to Jpg to give you the idea - I have used 3 x graduated filters to get the sky better exposed, one was brought in from the right. So yes many people will think (know) that it is over baked but I like it. I have also just done the 'Gough's God's window' and must say the original was just plain flat'.
Nice thing about RAW is that you keep them and can always 're-develop' them. As one adapt new level of skill one can and will re-visit some pictures again.

Offline Tom van Brits

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1298 on: June 23, 2017, 06:06:34 pm »
Judy I only managed to see the micro shots now and it is truly amazing - just loving the detail. Stunning pictures!
We do not really have insects other than flies and very tiny little spiders here but it is time to learn more about the subject while I got the time.
The macro lenses are famous to produce a very beautiful buket and I find it rather pleasing to look at regardless weather it is considered not to be natural as well.

Offline Malibu

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1299 on: June 26, 2017, 08:46:43 am »
Mark has just been given macro rings, a set of three extenders he is using on the 50mm.  Really inexpensive way of doing macro, although manual focus required and a tripod helps... his results at the moment are superb.  He is mostly using the No1 ring as the broader rings need the object being photographed to be almost on the lens... effective inexpensive way to try macro!
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