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Offline Tom van Brits

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1400 on: October 10, 2017, 05:41:56 pm »
Pragtige fotos Karoo Rider!
 

Offline Karoo Rider

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1401 on: October 10, 2017, 07:38:57 pm »
Dankie TvB - waardeer.  Oor 'n klompie jare van nou lag mens seker vir die goed maar so leer mens maar.

Het vanmiddag 'n stelletjie close-up/makro filters gekry en net vinnig voor donker gespeel.  Baie moeiliker as wat ek gedink het want die velddiepte is verskriklik kort en hy moet net die regte afstand gehou word.  Het darem een goeie shot van 'n Clyvia se onderdele gekry, sal maar nog oefen om gogga's en ander bonsai goed af te neem.
 

Offline Malibu

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1402 on: October 11, 2017, 07:46:31 am »
Very nice!
They call me Judy or Judes...
 

Offline Malibu

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1403 on: October 11, 2017, 07:49:55 am »
Started playing with back lighting and flash... and lacing pics together... this is still in process, need to eliminate the 'horizon' and a few other things, but it is fun...
They call me Judy or Judes...
 

Offline frankmac

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1404 on: October 11, 2017, 08:28:49 am »
Stunning!
 

Offline Tom van Brits

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1405 on: October 12, 2017, 01:06:44 am »
Wow Judy your photography is inspiring - you are moving through various disciplines.!
 

Offline Malibu

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1406 on: October 12, 2017, 08:01:22 am »
It's a ton of fun, water with food colour, a few glasses/glass items, a flash and someone to pour... no limit to your imagination, just raid the cupboards...
I'll be doing this shoot again, but with better light...
They call me Judy or Judes...
 

Offline Geriatrix

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1407 on: October 12, 2017, 11:03:59 am »
Lily pollen
 
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Offline Karoo Rider

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1408 on: October 12, 2017, 12:17:31 pm »
Geriatrix, watter laboratorium mikroskoop is daai foto mee geneem?
 

Offline Geriatrix

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1409 on: October 12, 2017, 12:33:49 pm »
Pentax 100mm macro lens.
 

Offline Karoo Rider

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1410 on: October 16, 2017, 12:48:24 pm »
Perhaps a stupid question, but since it’s “Learning Photography” I’ll have a go:  I currently have a Canon 400D with a 10 MP resolution, and a 55-250mm lens.  Say I would like to double my zoom range, in orther words get even “closer” to my object.  Am I correct in saying that my options might, simply put, be as follow:

A)    Upgrade the 10MP camera to a 20MP and keep the 55-250mm lens, and crop/digitally zoom in on the PC, but not to below 10MP which my current camera would have used.

B)    Keep the 10MP camera and get a 500mm lens which certainly will be quite more expensive than the camera upgrade.

Your thoughts will be appreciated.

PS:  and while I’m posting, I often look at camera upgrades and despite a model’s full manual controls, numerous features and the steep price tag, it (almost disappointingly) then mentions what great “Beginners Camera” it is.  What unique features on a camera will make it for experts only and put it beyond that of the beginner’s ability?
 

Offline Xpat

Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1411 on: October 16, 2017, 02:45:06 pm »
Perhaps a stupid question, but since it’s “Learning Photography” I’ll have a go:  I currently have a Canon 400D with a 10 MP resolution, and a 55-250mm lens.  Say I would like to double my zoom range, in orther words get even “closer” to my object.  Am I correct in saying that my options might, simply put, be as follow:

A)    Upgrade the 10MP camera to a 20MP and keep the 55-250mm lens, and crop/digitally zoom in on the PC, but not to below 10MP which my current camera would have used.

B)    Keep the 10MP camera and get a 500mm lens which certainly will be quite more expensive than the camera upgrade.

Your thoughts will be appreciated.

PS:  and while I’m posting, I often look at camera upgrades and despite a model’s full manual controls, numerous features and the steep price tag, it (almost disappointingly) then mentions what great “Beginners Camera” it is.  What unique features on a camera will make it for experts only and put it beyond that of the beginner’s ability?

Yes, the options are generally speaking correct - technically you will achieve the same field of view (i.e. magnification) both ways. Except you are not doing digital zoom, but croping image - i.e. you are still looking at the image captured by individual pixels (in digital zoom camera goes beyond its natural resolution by inserting virtual pixels in  and approximating what would be in those - i.e. shows picture  estimated by camera, not what was really there). The only other option is buying teleconverter, but I wouldn't recommend that unless your lens is really fast (big maximum apperture). And those are also expensive and the more magnification they provide, the more they deteriorate the image (I would probably go maximu 1.4X)

But I think you might be approaching this wrong - or at least you are not giving us enough information to work with. The first question you need to ask yourself is what kind of photography you want to do (we have discussed it at nauseum in this thread, and another one called something like 'To bridge or DSLR' - I strongly recommend you go through those, they are very rich on information, though pretty long). Is it action (sport/wildlife), still life, portraits, landscape? And how big are the images you want to make - if it is just computer screen, you might be able to crop even the current 10 Mpx further and get closer. Do you want to print them, etc.

I personnaly would start with newer body (by that I do not necessarily mean new - there are plenty of great second hand deals on much younger cameras), just because 400D is very very old, and technologically obsolete IMO. Considering that digital cameras has been around commercially only for what - 17 years (and DSLRs probably only 13), 11 year old camera is basically stone age (may still be fine for many people, but the fact that you asking the question indicates that you might have reached its limits for yourself).

The newer camera (successors of the same 'beginer' class as 400D - I'll get to that later) - apart from more Mpx (which is not always a good thing - at least for the cameras of the same generation, which you are not looking at) and resulting cropability/resolution, will most probably give you much better low light performance (ability to take good images in low light, or using faster shutter speed at the similar light - important for action such as sport of wildlife photography), dynamic range (ability to capture wider range of information between total dark and total light), faster autofocus (important for action), more frames per second (again important for action), etc. But - as I said - don't go throwing around money for the latest and greatest model - figure out what kind of photography you want to do, and then look for nice second hand body for good price. If for example resolution is your only criteria (Mpx - which it definitely should not be), look for the oldest body you can get with that resolution and get it at good price (this is extreme oversimplification - just as an example).

Regarding 'beginner vs pro' camera, I wouldn't worry about that too much, it is somewhat arbitrary (there are some 'Pros' now using iPhone). If the beginner camera does what you want, why worry about it not being called Pro? Again, the key is to get clarity on what kind of photography you want to do (and tell us about it if you want advice from us) and get gear appropriate for that. For example, if you want to do portraits and holiday snapshots of your family, or still life, your current camera/lens is probably perfectly fine. On the other hand, if you want to do some hardcore action photography (indoors sport action, or wildlife action - which I suspect you are after because of longer focal length), you may need to get some proper machinery to achieve that.

Generally speaking (very generally) the differences between Beginner and Pro DSLR camera (of the same generation! - your camera is many generations behind) are:
- Manual controls: much more manual controls on Pro cameras so that one can control almost every aspect of photography quickly using buttons/dials and not going into menu
- Viewfinder: Beginner cameras use Penta mirror viewfinder which makes one feel like looking through little dark peephole, Pro cameras have Penta prism, providing much bigger and brighter view.
- Faster autofocus: much faster usually on Pro cameras - important for action
- More autofocus points wide spread accross viewfinder: makes easier to track action. Beginner cameras tend to have fewer autofocus points around center, Pro cameras have more and covering bigger area, which makes keeping moving subject in focus easier.
- More Frames per Second: enables to capture more picture per second when taking picture of action.
- Better image quality: this one I think is diminishing more and more as the modern Beginner cameras often use the same sensor as Pro cameras. Still, I believe that Pro cameras have better processing engines to differentiate them from Beginner ones, which make their image quality better (but only if you really do big prints or very fast action or such). For most amateur purposes this is mute point nowadays IMO.

I'm sure there are some other things I cannot remember now. One thing that many people would consider decisive is sensor size (full frame (Pro), vs APSC and smaller (Beginner/Enthusiast). But I personally believe that is not so nowadays. For example Nikon D500 with APSC sensor (1.5x smaller than fullframe) was probably the best wildlife action camera until introduction of D850 recently (that is full frame). The reason being that with its crop size and high pixel density it allows much closer cropability/magnification with the same lenses as any full frame cameras up to that point (D850 matches it now with FF sensor).

I'm sure I confused you enough by now. If you have specific questions, shout.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2017, 02:46:50 pm by Xpat »
 
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Offline frankmac

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1412 on: October 16, 2017, 02:51:37 pm »
As Xpat said, very important to ascertain what you require the camera and lens for and secondly, look at second hand.

Lots to choose from and quite often at very good prices.
 

Offline Karoo Rider

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1413 on: October 16, 2017, 03:54:52 pm »
Thanks Xpat for your very informative reply, really appreciate it and what you're saying makes sense.  As you've said I've probably realised that the 400D has for the moment perhaps reached its end with me, hence some of my questions.  I got it for a good price here on the forum, it served as a step away from my SX50 Bridge, and the DSLR bug certainly has bitten.  Despite still having a lot to learn, I've by now got a fair understanding of the basics like shutter speed, aperture and ISO and it certainly has reached the point where one no longer has to think about what to do in order to achieve a certain effect.  It's probably been months since I've last taken a picture in Auto mode and don't think I ever will again.

W.r.t. my style of photography I don't have a specific line at the moment, a bit of everything I guess, be that family portraits, macro, landscapes, etc. with the odd garden bird here and there.  Serious wildlife/action will come later (with better equipment!).  I like to (try at least!) make ordinary pictures look exceptional/unique by playing with depth of field, different angles, perhaps black and white or down-tuned saturation, etc. 

Have been thinking about something like the Canon 800D as an affordable upgrade?  (And software like Lightroom perhaps.)

 

Offline Chris_M

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1414 on: October 16, 2017, 04:02:09 pm »

ed
« Last Edit: October 16, 2017, 05:21:24 pm by Chris_M »
 

Offline Chris_M

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1415 on: October 16, 2017, 04:06:48 pm »
Picked it up for R2000.00 with the eos ef adapter. low light battles a bit.
 

Offline Geriatrix

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1416 on: October 16, 2017, 04:20:15 pm »
Consider joining a camera club if you have not already done so.

Think about keeping your old camera and take it on your bike so your new one is not damaged in a fall.
 

Offline Xpat

Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1417 on: October 16, 2017, 04:58:55 pm »
@Karoo Rider: Ok, so let me ask differently. What it is that you find limiting on your current set-up? One of the things is reach - for what, birds (300mm equivalent should be good enough almost for everything except wildlife/sport)? Anything else?

I don't know Canon cameras at all and I know nothing about 800D, but still I wouldn't recommend to go that route. I think you may be making mistake by going for the latest one (it is the newest model) so you will have to buy new and overpay (and this is for the most basic model in Canon range that is not going to hold its value very well). I checked the price and it was something like R9k body only. Quick check on gumtree brought me Nikon D7100 which is considered almost Pro (Enthusiast) only because it has APSC sensor (and that is bigger than Canon) (i.e. (I'm assuming way above the 800D - but admitedly I did not look at the specs in detail) for R7K here: https://www.gumtree.co.za/a-digital-camera/rondebosch/nikon-d7100/1002125905430911133557909.

I'm not saying go buy that Nikon, just showing you that rather than going for the latest and shiniest, first specify what you want (or rather answer those questions I asked at the beginning). Look also beyond Canon - you bought it second hand I assume for good price, so you should be able to sell it almost for the same including lens. Not saying don't buy Canon (as I said I know nothing about their cameras), just look broader and see what is out there. Or look at older Canon models of that class - they may do exactly what you do for less price.

The general rule is get camera that is not going to limit you very soon (so you don't have to replace it), but do not go overboard with the body, and rather save money for lenses, which (provided decent enough body - and the new bodies from whatever - 2013 or so are already good enough for most enthusiasts) will make real difference.


@Chris M: I like the zebra shot, though the perspective is a bit to upwards - but that is given by the fact that you were on the pavement and there was no way to get higher. I'm not sure about the grain in the other shots - that is not low camera performance but you added it there, right? I would rather keep it clean and smooth.

EOS-M (not sure which one) didn't have warm reception on the market - mostly because of typical idiotic Canon stinginess with features - but there is nothing that prevents great image quality in that camera (I think it was mostly handling and new line of lenses people bitched about). APSC sensor is actually the biggest in mirrorless cameras within reasonable enthusiasta price range (FF in Sony and Medioum Forman in Fuji GFX are very expensive - unless they are tax write-off), so there is no reason to expect crap quality. I think the new line of lenses wasn't that good, but I understand you are adopting standard canon lenses, so that shouldn't be limitation either. What is the problem with the camera?

Offline Xpat

Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1418 on: October 16, 2017, 05:57:54 pm »
Here is Canon 70D (the semi Pro canon APSC) with 20 Mps with lens for R6.5k: https://www.gumtree.co.za/a-digital-camera/other/canon-eos-70d-kit-with-18+135-stm-lens-plus-extras/1002129584880911278016509.

Just saying there are options.

Edit: May be scam (the only ad), the fact is I am not in touch with what should be realistic price right now, especially on Canon.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2017, 05:59:11 pm by Xpat »
 

Offline frankmac

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Re: Learning photography
« Reply #1419 on: October 16, 2017, 06:10:38 pm »
That does seem to be an extremely good price. The 70D is better known for its video capability

Here's a few from a reputable classifieds site

http://www.outdoorphoto.community/classifieds/showcat.php?cat=3&stype=1&si=canon+eos+70d+&perpage=12&sort=1&stype=&limit=&cat=3&ppuser=