Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register

Author Topic: Redneck Motorcycle Collection  (Read 13130 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Welsh

  • BMW R1150GSV
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 15,548
  • Thanked: 41 times
  • Thunder Twonk. The two legged Twat Monkey.
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #600 on: January 10, 2018, 05:59:17 am »
There was an identical 350 mach 2 parked at my local pub last week, lovely little thing, but I thought it had a single disc on the front. :sip:

Most likely a conversion.

Googled it, the last of them had a single disc, then they made the 400. 8)
the air is cooler and more petroleum-distillate infused in a garage, this clarifies the mind and helps with the understanding of all things mechanical. In contrast, air in the house carries the latent bi-products of sanitation chemicals and room air fresheners. This, in turn, causes the testicles to retreat slightly, reducing mechanical aptitude by an order of magnitude. Then again, maybe it's just that the beer fridge is in the garage.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #601 on: January 10, 2018, 03:01:13 pm »
I can relate to that 2stroke thirst, my rd400 when hammered sucked fuel like crazy.
But it flew! :thumleft:
Makes me think of the rotary cars, small capacity but fast and thirsty.

But, I bet it was worth the extra fuel every time you twisted the throttle and heard that beautiful 2 smoke symphony, did it not?
Yip, but you could not get much satisfaction out of watching the other guys disappear in your rear view mirrors as they were vibrating too much.
I never pillioned on it, but think the chicks would have been spent when they got off. :peepwall:

 :lol8:
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #602 on: January 10, 2018, 03:01:41 pm »
There was an identical 350 mach 2 parked at my local pub last week, lovely little thing, but I thought it had a single disc on the front. :sip:

Most likely a conversion.

Googled it, the last of them had a single disc, then they made the 400. 8)

Thanks for the education  :thumleft:
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #603 on: January 11, 2018, 12:57:41 am »
1990
Honda
NSR 125


Country:       Italy
Engine:       Liquid cooled single 2 stroke
Ignition:       CDI
Power:       24.5 hp @ 9,750 rpm
B x S:          54 x 54.5 mm
Displacement:   124.8 cc
Valves:       None
Fuel:        Dell'Orto 28mm carburetor
Trans:         6-speed
Suspension:     Front Marzocchi 35mm forks, rear single shock
Brakes:        Front Grimeca 316mm disc,  rear 220mm disc
Weight:         284 pounds
Top Speed:       92mph

Built by Honda Italy and only available in that country, the NSR 125 is unusual in using many Italian components such as carburetor, shocks, and brakes.  Small capacity bikes are very popular in Europe, and the NSR 125 was the best seller in 1990.

« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 02:22:43 am by big oil »
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #604 on: January 12, 2018, 01:50:13 pm »
1992
Kawasaki
KR-1S


Country:      Japan
Engine:       Liquid cooled parallel twin 2 stroke
Ignition:       CDI
Power:       60 hp @ 10,500 rpm
B x S:          56 x 50.6 mm
Displacement:   249cc
Valves:       Reed valve induction
Fuel:        Two Keihin 28mm carburetors
Trans:         6-speed
Suspension:     Front telescopic forks, rear twin shock
Brakes:        Front and rear discs
Weight:         288 pounds
Top Speed:       130 mph

The KR-1S was a high performance two stroke, a modern version of the 1970's Kawasaki's that gave this company a reputation of building exciting motorcycles.  Unfortunately these machines were not available in the United States, possibly due to not being able to meet our emission standards.

« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 04:56:59 am by big oil »
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #605 on: January 13, 2018, 05:02:36 am »
1979
Suzuki
GS1000S


Country:      Japan
Engine:       Air cooled inline four cylinder 4 stroke
Ignition:       Battery and coil
Power:       83 hp @ 8,000 rpm
B x S:          70 x 65 mm
Displacement:   997 cc
Valves:       DOHC
Fuel:        Four Mikuni 34mm carburetors
Trans:         5-speed
Suspension:     Front telescopic forks, rear twin shock
Brakes:        Front and rear discs
Weight:        554 pounds
Top Speed:       136 mph

The S model was a super sports variation of the standard GS1000, with a distinctive paint scheme and fairing.  These Suzuki's were noted for their all round performance, a blend of a good chassis and suspension and a powerful yet flexible motor.



« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 01:10:03 am by big oil »
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline jaybiker

Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #606 on: January 13, 2018, 05:57:33 pm »
My GS 1000 was an '82 if I remember, but pretty much identical to that one. Superbike of it's day, but just look at that lovely comfortable seat! That's when my wife really loved riding pillion.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #607 on: January 13, 2018, 11:15:00 pm »
My GS 1000 was an '82 if I remember, but pretty much identical to that one. Superbike of it's day, but just look at that lovely comfortable seat! That's when my wife really loved riding pillion.

I like the fairing design with the single round headlamp.  She looks sneaky fast.
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #608 on: January 14, 2018, 01:14:29 am »
1989
Suzuki
RGV 250


Country:      Japan
Engine:       Liquid cooled 90 degree V-twin cylinder 2 stroke
Ignition:       Electronic
Power:       58 hp @ 11,000 rpm
B x S:          56 x 50.6 mm
Displacement:   249 cc
Valves:       Reed inlet, automatic exhaust power valve
Fuel:        Two Mikuni 32mm carburetors
Trans:         6-speed
Suspension:     Front telescopic forks, rear twin shock
Brakes:        Front and rear discs
Weight:        282 pounds
Top Speed:       120 mph

Clearly based on Suzuki's 500cc Grand Prix motor, the super sporting RGV250, with a claimed 58 hp pushed the quarter liter class into a new dimension.  Its performance often equaled or surpassed 400cc and larger machines.  The RGV 250 was not available for sale in the USA.

« Last Edit: January 15, 2018, 12:13:43 am by big oil »
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline Oubones

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW F650GS / Dakar
    Location: Kwazulu Natal
  • Posts: 1,605
  • Thanked: 56 times
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #609 on: January 14, 2018, 06:56:06 am »
My GS 1000 was an '82 if I remember, but pretty much identical to that one. Superbike of it's day, but just look at that lovely comfortable seat! That's when my wife really loved riding pillion.
That is one thing that I do not understand, why do we sit on planks nowadays?
On those old bikes you could sleep ( and do other interesting things) on the seat, now you need gel seat and padded pants?
Those rgv's also went like clappers, but you needed to bolt your eyballs down or else they would never stop shaking. :imaposer:
Honda hawk400(sold)Yamaha rd400(passed on)Xr200r(sold)Tw200(sold)Sr500(sold to old boet)
Tw200(traded)650 dacar(present)
 

Offline Welsh

  • BMW R1150GSV
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 15,548
  • Thanked: 41 times
  • Thunder Twonk. The two legged Twat Monkey.
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #610 on: January 14, 2018, 07:55:00 am »
My GS 1000 was an '82 if I remember, but pretty much identical to that one. Superbike of it's day, but just look at that lovely comfortable seat! That's when my wife really loved riding pillion.
That is one thing that I do not understand, why do we sit on planks nowadays?
On those old bikes you could sleep ( and do other interesting things) on the seat, now you need gel seat and padded pants?
Those rgv's also went like clappers, but you needed to bolt your eyballs down or else they would never stop shaking. :imaposer:

Nothing vibrates like Norton Commando 750 with shot engine mounts, I rode one and physically couldn't see.  :biggrin:
the air is cooler and more petroleum-distillate infused in a garage, this clarifies the mind and helps with the understanding of all things mechanical. In contrast, air in the house carries the latent bi-products of sanitation chemicals and room air fresheners. This, in turn, causes the testicles to retreat slightly, reducing mechanical aptitude by an order of magnitude. Then again, maybe it's just that the beer fridge is in the garage.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #611 on: January 15, 2018, 12:09:54 am »
My GS 1000 was an '82 if I remember, but pretty much identical to that one. Superbike of it's day, but just look at that lovely comfortable seat! That's when my wife really loved riding pillion.
That is one thing that I do not understand, why do we sit on planks nowadays?
On those old bikes you could sleep ( and do other interesting things) on the seat, now you need gel seat and padded pants?
Those rgv's also went like clappers, but you needed to bolt your eyballs down or else they would never stop shaking. :imaposer:

Nothing vibrates like Norton Commando 750 with shot engine mounts, I rode one and physically couldn't see:biggrin:

Engines fault or all the whiskey in your bloodstream?  :peepwall:
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #612 on: January 15, 2018, 12:19:04 am »
1987
Suzuki
GSX-R 1100


Country:      Japan
Engine:      Air & Liquid cooled 4 cylinder 4 stroke
Ignition:       Inductive
Power:       90 hp @ 8,500 rpm
B x S:          76 x 58 mm
Displacement:   1052 cc
Valves:       DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder
Fuel:        Four Mikuni C.V. carburetors
Trans:         5-speed
Suspension:     Front telescopic forks with electronic anti-dive, rear single shock
Brakes:        Front and rear discs
Weight:        437 pounds
Top Speed:       155 mph

The advantage that the GSX-R 1100 had over its rivals was weight, or lack thereof.  The Suzuki was between 90 and 160 pounds lighter than its competitors, giving it the best power to weight ratio in its class.  The small, nimble chassis and 90 horsepower motor resulted in an unbeatable combination.




Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline Welsh

  • BMW R1150GSV
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 15,548
  • Thanked: 41 times
  • Thunder Twonk. The two legged Twat Monkey.
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #613 on: January 15, 2018, 06:04:00 am »
My GS 1000 was an '82 if I remember, but pretty much identical to that one. Superbike of it's day, but just look at that lovely comfortable seat! That's when my wife really loved riding pillion.
That is one thing that I do not understand, why do we sit on planks nowadays?
On those old bikes you could sleep ( and do other interesting things) on the seat, now you need gel seat and padded pants?
Those rgv's also went like clappers, but you needed to bolt your eyballs down or else they would never stop shaking. :imaposer:

Nothing vibrates like Norton Commando 750 with shot engine mounts, I rode one and physically couldn't see:biggrin:

Engines fault or all the whiskey in your bloodstream?  :peepwall:

It was back in the UK, so I was a warm beer man back then.  :sip:
the air is cooler and more petroleum-distillate infused in a garage, this clarifies the mind and helps with the understanding of all things mechanical. In contrast, air in the house carries the latent bi-products of sanitation chemicals and room air fresheners. This, in turn, causes the testicles to retreat slightly, reducing mechanical aptitude by an order of magnitude. Then again, maybe it's just that the beer fridge is in the garage.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #614 on: January 15, 2018, 07:59:08 am »
My GS 1000 was an '82 if I remember, but pretty much identical to that one. Superbike of it's day, but just look at that lovely comfortable seat! That's when my wife really loved riding pillion.
That is one thing that I do not understand, why do we sit on planks nowadays?
On those old bikes you could sleep ( and do other interesting things) on the seat, now you need gel seat and padded pants?
Those rgv's also went like clappers, but you needed to bolt your eyballs down or else they would never stop shaking. :imaposer:

Nothing vibrates like Norton Commando 750 with shot engine mounts, I rode one and physically couldn't see:biggrin:

Engines fault or all the whiskey in your bloodstream?  :peepwall:

It was back in the UK, so I was a warm beer man back then.  :sip:

Room temperature Guinness Stout?
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline Welsh

  • BMW R1150GSV
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 15,548
  • Thanked: 41 times
  • Thunder Twonk. The two legged Twat Monkey.
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #615 on: January 15, 2018, 08:01:06 am »
My GS 1000 was an '82 if I remember, but pretty much identical to that one. Superbike of it's day, but just look at that lovely comfortable seat! That's when my wife really loved riding pillion.
That is one thing that I do not understand, why do we sit on planks nowadays?
On those old bikes you could sleep ( and do other interesting things) on the seat, now you need gel seat and padded pants?
Those rgv's also went like clappers, but you needed to bolt your eyballs down or else they would never stop shaking. :imaposer:

Nothing vibrates like Norton Commando 750 with shot engine mounts, I rode one and physically couldn't see:biggrin:

Engines fault or all the whiskey in your bloodstream?  :peepwall:

It was back in the UK, so I was a warm beer man back then.  :sip:

Room temperature Guinness Stout?

On occasion yes, but mainly Bitter.  :thumleft: 8)
the air is cooler and more petroleum-distillate infused in a garage, this clarifies the mind and helps with the understanding of all things mechanical. In contrast, air in the house carries the latent bi-products of sanitation chemicals and room air fresheners. This, in turn, causes the testicles to retreat slightly, reducing mechanical aptitude by an order of magnitude. Then again, maybe it's just that the beer fridge is in the garage.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #616 on: January 16, 2018, 01:58:44 am »
1982
Kawasaki
KZ 1000R

Country:      Japan
Engine:     Air-cooled, inline 4 cylinder 4-stroke
Ignition:     Electronic
Power:      79 bhp @ 8,500 rpm
Bore x Stroke:      69.4 x 66 mm
Displacement:      998 cc
Valves:     DOHC, chain driven
Fueling:     4-Mikuni 34mm Constant Velocity carburetors
Transmission:     5-speed
Suspension:      Front telescopic forks, rear twin shock
Brakes:     Front twin disc, rear single disc
Weight:      543 lbs  /  246 kg
Top Speed:     135 mph   /   217 kmh

This bike has been listed previously, but I found another pic of the bike, so I'm relisting. 

Limited production replica of the championship winning Superbike ridden by Eddie Lawson.  Special equipment includes gold painted alloy wheels,
Kerker exhaust, resevoir shocks, cut down seat, air adjustable forks, oil cooler and drilled disc brakes.  The ELR (Eddie Lawson Replica) is a very
 desirable model, sought after by collectors.  This machine is in original condition and has been autographed by Eddie Lawson.





« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 01:59:40 am by big oil »
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #617 on: January 16, 2018, 02:29:23 am »
1997
Ducati
916 SE


Country:       Italy
Engine:       Liquid cooled 90 degree V twin 4 stroke
Ignition:       Electronic
Power:       105 hp @ 9,000 rpm
B x S:          94 x 66 mm
Displacement:   916 cc
Valves:       DOHC, four valves per cylinder, desmodromic valve operation
Fuel:        Electronic fuel injection
Trans:         6-speed
Suspension:     Front inverted telescopic forks, rear single shock
Brakes:        Front and rear disc
Weight:         436 pounds
Top Speed:       162 mph

The 916 is a typical offering from this famous Italian manufacturer of V-twins.  These machines do not offer much in creature comfort, but offer race bike standards of performance, plus eye appeal second to none.  Ducati has dominated World Superbike racing over a long period with machines similar to this.

 :drif: :drif: :drif: :drif: :drif: :drif: :drif: :drif: :drif: :drif: :drif: :drif:



« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 06:09:09 am by big oil »
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.
 

Offline Tony the Boney

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Husqvarna (all models)
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 1,343
  • Thanked: 8 times
  • Threw away the key and locked the door
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #618 on: January 16, 2018, 07:16:05 pm »
This was the machine that became an icon and moved away from the conventional!!
A joke is like sex.
Neither is any good if you don't get it.
 

Offline big oil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 901
  • Thanked: 61 times
  • Location: Mitten
    • View Profile
Re: Redneck Motorcycle Collection
« Reply #619 on: January 17, 2018, 06:06:52 am »
This was the machine that became an icon and moved away from the conventional!!

Sure was.  Tamburini's creation is timeless.  Single sided swingarm and under seat exhaust looks great.
Whatsdabigdebateaboutalready.