Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register

Author Topic: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country  (Read 24885 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Sam

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda XRV 750 Africa Twin
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 553
  • Thanked: 25 times
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #100 on: October 04, 2017, 10:39:07 am »
Lining up to be another classic RR! Thanks for sharing.....although it's doing severe damage to productivity.

This terrain looks quite a bit like some of the stuff you guys did on your Angola trip, on the way from the river to the beach? (although, my memory isn't that great anymore, so could be mistaken)

What type of fuel range do you get with those tanks? The sand riding must be quite hard on consumption?

Hey Sam! I have to say the riding on this trip was even better than Angola - and that's saying something!!

Gav will have to comment on the 690 - my 500 has the KTM/Acerbis 19/20l tank on and I got 380km on one leg with about 2.5l remaining - and that was a mix of babying it on the open stuff, and a memorable 50km chasing the Midge quite hard up a river bed.

That's actually pretty impressive - I thought the little beasties would be thirstier than that. My old bag gets less than that on 23 litres, with MUCH softer riding. 380would be the absolute max, and that requires some nursing to achieve.

Assuming that the KTM's are EFI and not carbs?
 

Offline Sam

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda XRV 750 Africa Twin
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 553
  • Thanked: 25 times
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #101 on: October 04, 2017, 10:41:21 am »
To pack a spare clutch and throttle cable on a trip is really a no brainer- takes little space and is part of my spares I always carry.

Yup - spare cables and levers are both in the kit that permanently remains on board.
 

Offline Big Harriet

  • Newbie
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS
    Location: Limpopo
  • Posts: 2
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #102 on: October 04, 2017, 11:46:05 am »

One more, just for the ladies:




Oooh. Don't tease us,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, The Midget is super rugged andhansome!!! Is he single??
« Last Edit: October 04, 2017, 11:47:25 am by Big Harriet »
 

Offline Hinksding

  • is beslaan met ligte hoefysters
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda XR125L
    Location: Northern Cape
  • Posts: 2,488
  • Thanked: 38 times
  • Die aai van Loeriesbaai
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #103 on: October 04, 2017, 12:27:34 pm »
Quote:

A big decision had to be made. We were doing our best to stay ahead of a big, noisy crowd of Hondas (more on that later), and were slowly losing that battle.

 :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer:

BTW, lovin your report MTP!
Eet vleis! 'n 1 000 000 jakkalse kan nie verkeerd wees nie.
 

Offline Scalpel

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 3,800
  • Thanked: 10 times
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #104 on: October 04, 2017, 12:45:49 pm »
Quote:

A big decision had to be made. We were doing our best to stay ahead of a big, noisy crowd of Hondas (more on that later), and were slowly losing that battle.

 :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer:

BTW, lovin your report MTP!

You had to take quite a few shortcuts to stay ahead of the Japanese Honda brigade!! Nice report Max!!
BMW R80G/S PD is the original DS bike!!
 

Offline Slim Jim

Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #105 on: October 04, 2017, 01:45:56 pm »
also loving this report ,  :thumleft:
 

Offline MaxThePanda

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Vespa (all models)
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 2,136
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • As in 'Even more Panda'. Also likes sharks.
    • Team 525
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #106 on: October 04, 2017, 04:39:30 pm »
Day 7: Top of the world, down Uncle Ben to the land of Marbles



They call Victoria Falls the smoke that thundersÖ but stop for a moment, put down your coffee cup, and breathe in the smell of petrol and dustÖ and allow your ears to be smothered in the throbbing menace of the powerful single cylinder on morning song.









Weíd made a vow to exit the river bed campsite before dawn, for an early start to a rip-roaring day or motorcycling gloriosity. Today weíd be trekking down the legendary Uncle Ben Van Zylís pass, symbolic pinnacle of a trip through the Kaokveld, and striker of apprehension and fear into offroad enthusiasts the sub-continent over. Excitement was running high, but we still had fifty kilometres or so to get there before we took in the spectacular views over the Marienfluss valley that weíd all seen so many times in photographs.

The sun was just peeking over the horizon as we got on our way, and beauty was all around.





A desert landscape it may be, but the range of fauna and flora is still stunning. For instance these massive trees:





The Himba locals build magnificent kraals woven from branches - Iím not sure if itís to keep the animals in or the predators out, but theyíre mightily impressive.



And never knock the rocktree - an uncommon sight in these parts - that we were lucky to spot on the side of the track.





Couldnít help but stop and photograph some of the beautyÖ





I was bringing up the tail for the moment, and revelling in the 500 in these conditions. My regular ride is a 300 2-smoke and the 500 is such a close cousin of that bike that I felt right at home. Despite her leaky fork she was performing admirably, soaking up the weight of tank and bags, and jumping down the steeper descents like a Swiss cow frolicking in an alpine meadow.

Iíd spent so much time stopped for pictures that I was some way behind when I came across this somewhat concerning trail in the dust. It looked really fresh.



Petrol? Water? Oil?

Around the corner another one. Alarm bells started ringing and I upped the pace. What if the rider hadnít noticed his bike was in troubleÖ and who was it? We could ill afford to cook a motor up here in wilderness central. Time to catch upÖ and quickly!

Two hills later I charged a particularly steep ascent and found everyone stopped having a chat. Like no problem dood.



No cause for concern - it was just a herd of pissing cows. Good thing I didnít try taste it! This chap was on a long walk to godaloneknowswhere, but we had a pleasant chat in sign language. He was clearly Angolan from the accent - Iím pretty sure borders are an optional line in the sand up here, since we were so close to the Kunene river.

Midget immediately dumped Buttercup in the sand as we set off. Or maybe she was feeling bitchy and decided to show him who was boss. Always hard to tell with those two.



It was already baking hot at about 9am when we came across a small settlement with some nice looking Nguni and a water trough.







Camel decided it was time to top up since weíd be heading into land of dubious water availability sooner rather than later. I think there was a solar pump filing this water tank in the background, but who knows how clean the water is. Beggars canít be choosers.





This old fellow managed to communicate that he had a headache and wanted an aspirin in return for his water. How the Professor worked that out, I donít know, but Professors are good at that sort of thing.



Did I mention the Professor is a geologist by trade? He was in seventh heaven up here.

I took over the carriage reins now, and gave the five-hunty her head. By god she is a fine thing over the rocky trails. The track was growing markedly steeper and more rugged, which only she only seemed to take as incitement for throttle anger. We passed two 4x4s lumbering down a particularly steep bit, and she whinnied as we rampaged past and disappeared. Happy days for two wheels in these parts.

Soon we were at the famed lookout point, hazy unfortunately, but still a stunning view. Was that Van Zylís done and dusted? Couldnít be, surely?



After a short while the rest of the team rolled in. Everyone had been having a blast.







We were not alone, through. What a truly extraordinary place to set up house!





Eventually the 4x4s rolled in - Dave and Thelma Wassung, a lovely 75 year-old couple from Hermanus, ferreting around the Kaokoveld in an auto Fortuner 4x4 without so much as a winch, a high lift jack or even a GPS! - and a bunch of Dutch tourists in a rented double cab. Strangers are always friends in such remote parts, so we exchanged stories and experiences, looked enviously at their fridges full of ice cold beer and then said our farewells.

It was already beastly hot, but it was time to explore the much-vaunted Marienfluss! We soon discovered that the main part of the pass still lay below us, and English saw a fascinating little lizard on the side of the road, so he went to have a closer look.


 
That sobered everyone up a bit, but 4x4 trails are no match for these light bikes, and everyone sailed down without further incidence.





















The obligatory:


Offline MaxThePanda

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Vespa (all models)
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 2,136
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • As in 'Even more Panda'. Also likes sharks.
    • Team 525
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #107 on: October 04, 2017, 04:49:51 pm »


Iím not sure what Midge was trying to communicate - something about Ďhot as hellí, or ĎIím bloody hotí, or Ďdonít you think Iím incredibly handsomeí. I just simply donít understand what heís on about most of the time.

The Marienfluss looks incredible from the air on Google Maps, and there was no chance we were blasting straight across it. I had plotted an incredible looking route straight south, and over the mountains to join the road from Red Drum.

This day was serving up some absolutely sensational riding. Like a massive river bed, the sand snaked south, and it was open as far as the eye could see. Time to play! I jammed on the throttle, whacked it into top gear and bolted off.





Startled springbok danced left and right, ostriches loped along in their odd, jaunty stride and we wove between thorn bushes and large trees dotted around the massive flood plain. The sand was wasnít exactly plain sailing - there were drop-offs and ditches between the wide carving bits, and at one point I had a bit of a sphincter clinching moment as I had to leap a three foot deep ditch at about 80kph. The 500 took it all in her stride though, and strained at her leash, begging for more.

After a while I realised it was only Mike and I left together, and he must have realised the same thing, cause he stopped for a conference.



ďWhere are they?Ē Although the sand bed was very open, it was also extremely wide at this point, and there were dozens of route options - obviously formed by different rivulets that must have coursed down here in a wet season some time in the not too distant past.

ďWhy donít you wait here in case they come past, and Iíll go back and see if I can find them?Ē I suggested.

After five or ten minutes I came across Tom, also stopped in the track, but no sign of Prof or the Midge. I carried on - now five and then perhaps ten kilometres back from where Iíd turned around. It prays on your mind a little, being out here in such a remote place. Motocycling is inherently dangerous, and even if one rides conservatively thereís always the chance of something going wrong.

My brief encounter with that ditch was weighing on me a bit. Like a splinter in the thick part of your heel - just enough to remind you that all is not well. I think we often have these feelings, but most of the time they are proven to be wrongÖ and we forget them. But then, just occasionally, life jumps out and grabs you by the throat.

I came around the corner and saw this:



My heart stopped.

Well, actually that photo was taken a bit later, when Mike had already arrived, and weíd rolled Gav over onto his back. What I saw when I arrived was a motionless body under the shade canopy and the Midge kneeling next to him in the dirt.

Itís the worst fear of these trips - something going truly and catastrophically wrong. Iíd had a pretty bad accident in Angola on our last big trip, and it had made me ride on the cautious side of responsible on this one. When shit goes wrong out here it goes wrong properly, quickly and with severe consequences.

But what was that Fortuner doing there?





By now Iíd ascertained that Gav wasnít dead, and his spine was in one piece, but heíd fallen badly and broken his right leg. Midge had already hit him hard with his private stash of prescription painkillers but he was still feeling woozy and nearly passed out when we tried to move him.

And so began an unlikely and incredible series of coincidence, good fortune, call it what you like.

Dave and Thelma - remember them? Well, the lack of GPS (and perhaps our tracks) had seen them make a strange turn left and drive south down the Marienfluss. Nobody else does this route, and they were a pretty long way from the main track when they came across Gav, just ten minutes or so after his accident.

What are the chances?

Weíve never taken a sat phone on any of our trips before, and flirted briefly with the idea when planning this ride,t before deciding there was safety in numbers and that modern technology messed with adventure. WeeellllÖ letís just say the sheer idiocy of that idea was now on full display. Shit ainít real until shit gets very real, and shit just showed up.

God bless the retirees!









They very kindly bundled the cripple into the back seat, and set off after me in search of a telephone and a place to land a whirlybird. In that order. The 690 was unceremoniously left under a tree. X marked the spot.

We were back on the official trail now, and Red Drum soon appeared. The ambulance was painfully slow in the rough terrain, but the patient must have been thanking his lucky stars more times than a yogi chanting the same irritating mantra.





One part of the trail south is particularly tough, but super guide Thelma just jumped out the front seat and expertly guided Dave over the rocks. Thatís how the septuagenarians roll, baby.



Unfortunately thatís where my photos for the day end. I think the stress and heat got the better of me. Marble campsite is pretty famous in these parts, and itís at a place called ĎOnjuvaí on the T4A map, but there are about a hundred different spellings of the placeÖ something that was soon to cause major problems for our evacuation plan.

The fortune was running strong in this dayÖ the American Embassy has recently sponsored a brand new clinic at Onjuva, which had opened just three months previously! Onjuva is a tiny little hamlet with one spaza shop, an elementary school, and a bunch of huts. And that same clinic happened to have a telephone and just-working wifi!!! What are the chances?

The extremely helpful nurse welcomed us, and we set up camp on the porch. The phone unfortunately couldnít dial out, but weíd been there about ten minutes when two 4x4 bakkies rolled past. Tourists!! I took a double take and dashed out the gate, waving frantically. Sat phone! Sat phone!

They stopped and out jumped a smiling German with a bunch of geology students on work vacation. Yes, they had a sat phone!

And then things just got weird. Like the Patient Professor, Chief German was also a geologist, and this very same day, one year ago, in this very same place, had had a climbing accident in the nearby mountains and broken his leg.

He also didnít have a sat phone that day.

I called up the Gavís wife Fotini in Cape Town. It wasnít the best call Iíd ever had with her:

ďUm HiiiI! Fotini! Itís Ian.
Iím calling you on a sat phone.
Weíve got a bit of a problem.
Gavís broken his leg.
But heís okÖ donít stressÖ heís going to be absolutely fine, thereís nothing to worry about.
But in case heís not, we need you to get a chopper here - today would be a very good idea.Ē

What else can one say? Luckily the clinic could take incoming calls, and the wifi sort of worked, so we had comms - first part accomplished.

It was 3pm at this point, and now we were going to test Discoveryís remote recovery and medi-vac chops. Scramble a chopper from Windhoek, or fly a small plane in to the landing strip at Orupembe, just 20km or so further south - how hard could it be?

To cut a long story short, between broken telephones, dodgy wifi and a hundred different spellings of the name ĎOnjuvaí - where is that exactly again? - by 7pm we had no idea what was happening. The clinic was staying open for this bunch of helpless Umzungu and things were looking a bit bleak.

After the fourth different Discovery person had started from scratch and didnít sound like they had a fucking clue what was going on, Iíd barked at Fotini down the phone line and made her cry. Ouch. Did we tell them Gav was in mortal danger and get a chopper here now!!!? Or did we take him to the campsite, make him as comfortable as we could and see what the morning would bring?

His wife was now terrified heíd get a thrombosis during the night and die. Weíd left his boot on to stabilise the leg and I honestly had no idea what was going on down there. The clinic werenít equipped to do anything more than call Opuwo and wait 12 hours for a land ambulance to trek the rough and arduous track just to get there and pick him up.

Finally, we spoke to the chopper pilot out of Swakopmund. Discovery had come through, despite the shitty communication. Flying at night was out of the question, so we were going to have to stabilise him for the night. The evac people were incredible - they even offered to send a ground crew from Hentieís Bay to stabilise him if they could get there during the night, but he was doing all right and we decided it wasnít necessary.

And letís not forget the incredible Dave and Thelma, who were still standing by as ambulance. We decamped to Marble campsite, booked out their little hut for the aged and wounded, cooked a hearty dinner, sent the kitty bitch off for beer and settled in for the night.

The chopper would take off as soon as the mist cleared from Swakop in the morning. Hopefully there would be no more dramaÖ




Morale of the story? Be careful what you expect from a day - a cow may just land on your head!

Offline MaxThePanda

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Vespa (all models)
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 2,136
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • As in 'Even more Panda'. Also likes sharks.
    • Team 525
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #108 on: October 04, 2017, 04:54:33 pm »
...
Oops. What is this thing about Opuwo, clutches and the expats?
...

Yes indeed - what is it? As an expat myself I had two of my Kaokoland trips cut short because of the clutch failure. Once because of worn clutch plates half way up VZP (admitedly my limited skills while trying to ride up the pass played role), and once because of snapped clutch cable in Huarusib river about 10 km north of Purros.

Mind you - it was always on Japanese bike. On the Eurotrash Husky with hydraulic clutch I finished the whole loop no problem...



Hey Xpat!!!

Morale of the story? Stick to the Eurotrash??!  ;)

Half way up Van Zyl's without a clutch can't have been much fun - what did you do? Forwards or backwards?

Quote
Anyway - great report, just get on with it please  :pot:

Juuuuuuslllike!! Greedy little bastards! Okay, okay... I'm trying here!!

Offline MaxThePanda

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Vespa (all models)
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 2,136
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • As in 'Even more Panda'. Also likes sharks.
    • Team 525
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #109 on: October 04, 2017, 04:58:27 pm »

One more, just for the ladies:




Oooh. Don't tease us,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, The Midget is super rugged andhansome!!! Is he single??

Harriet!! You naughty little minx you! I will notify you that although the Midge is small of stature, legend follows him, much like the Tokolosh. In the inner circle we call him 'The Coverer' - he's already sired three little ponies and has an appetite for more. Don't say I didn't warn you!!!

Offline MaxThePanda

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Vespa (all models)
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 2,136
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • As in 'Even more Panda'. Also likes sharks.
    • Team 525
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #110 on: October 04, 2017, 05:00:39 pm »
Lining up to be another classic RR! Thanks for sharing.....although it's doing severe damage to productivity.

This terrain looks quite a bit like some of the stuff you guys did on your Angola trip, on the way from the river to the beach? (although, my memory isn't that great anymore, so could be mistaken)

What type of fuel range do you get with those tanks? The sand riding must be quite hard on consumption?

Hey Sam! I have to say the riding on this trip was even better than Angola - and that's saying something!!

Gav will have to comment on the 690 - my 500 has the KTM/Acerbis 19/20l tank on and I got 380km on one leg with about 2.5l remaining - and that was a mix of babying it on the open stuff, and a memorable 50km chasing the Midge quite hard up a river bed.

That's actually pretty impressive - I thought the little beasties would be thirstier than that. My old bag gets less than that on 23 litres, with MUCH softer riding. 380would be the absolute max, and that requires some nursing to achieve.

Assuming that the KTM's are EFI and not carbs?

Yeah - from my experience on Amagezas the 450/500 KTMs (yes, FI since 2012) will use up the tank in about 270km (13-15km/l) if you hammer them in sand, but you can stretch to 400km (22/23km/l) plus if you baby them. Really impressive!

Gav or Mike will have to chip in on the 690s but I think they will do about 20km/l if you're not racing them.

Offline MaxThePanda

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Vespa (all models)
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 2,136
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • As in 'Even more Panda'. Also likes sharks.
    • Team 525
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #111 on: October 04, 2017, 05:03:07 pm »
To pack a spare clutch and throttle cable on a trip is really a no brainer- takes little space and is part of my spares I always carry.

Yup... I think that's a lesson learned the hard way!

Offline Sam

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda XRV 750 Africa Twin
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 553
  • Thanked: 25 times
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #112 on: October 04, 2017, 05:42:36 pm »
Jeeeeezzz - what a terrible thing to happen man! Bloody hell, that must have been painful.

You guys are really lucky that the old's were around to help out.

Makes me ponder the advisability of going solo.........one would be well and truly stuffed if that happend.

 

Offline isiTututu

Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #113 on: October 04, 2017, 07:23:24 pm »

One more, just for the ladies:




Oooh. Don't tease us,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, The Midget is super rugged andhansome!!! Is he single??

Harriet!! You naughty little minx you! I will notify you that although the Midge is small of stature, legend follows him, much like the Tokolosh. In the inner circle we call him 'The Coverer' - he's already sired three little ponies and has an appetite for more. Don't say I didn't warn you!!!

Yeah, he's eager, that's for sure...

 

Online katana

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 4,467
  • Thanked: 54 times
  • Sheer Smiling Pleasure
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #114 on: October 04, 2017, 08:04:10 pm »
If you can enjoy someone breaking a leg, then I am seriously enjoying the read.  Respect guys!
"The only man that has to remember anything, is the man who tells a lie" Mark Twain
 

Offline Oubones

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW F650GS / Dakar
    Location: Kwazulu Natal
  • Posts: 2,526
  • Thanked: 273 times
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #115 on: October 04, 2017, 08:41:30 pm »
Thanks, I am devouring your RR
Interesting point from a safety aspect, Levi the american that was at the bash and came back with me so we could get his bikes clutch fixed, uses spot as it has a help and sos function and includes recovery and repatriation in the subscription!
It also updates position on the net sothat those at home can follow progress.
I can check where he is and give him advice on interesting things or routes and also know his gps position if he needs to be assisted.
As I understand it is not reliant on celphone reception as it uses satelite comms.
Dakar 650
KLR650
 

Offline isiTututu

Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #116 on: October 04, 2017, 09:07:07 pm »
It was exactly the sort of ditch that nearly undid Ian, that was my undoing. I wasn't going quite as fast as 80. It was more like 50 or 60, but it was too fast to stop, and too slow to leapfrog the ditch. I opened the throttle wide in an attempt at getting the front wheel over the lip, but it just wasn't going to work. Down I came, with a very distinctive crunching sensation in my leg, followed by a bit of pain lower down in the ankle region. The thought that went through my mind just at that moment was "oh, so that's what a broken leg feels like", and I then proceeded to say a few words that don't bare repeating. This was inconvenient to say the least, but I must say, I was quite pleased to have an opportunity to lie down and rest. I was absolutely exhausted from the morning's riding (word of advice to everyone - "fitness"!  Fitness will change your whole experience of a trip like this).

The bike had had a soft landing on me, and I ended up facing backwards, with my right leg under it, and while I tried to kick it off with my left leg, and to pull the damaged one out from under it, it became very apparent that I was only going to do more damage in the process. Luckily the Mighty Midge was right behind me, and was over in a jiffy to assist with extraction. The efficiency with which he moved the bike, erected a tarpaulin for shade, and administered some fine narcotics, was quite astounding. Actually, the whole affair was handled with military precision by my comrades and our friends from Hermanus (coincidentally just an hour's drive from home).

The incredible luck, and the efforts and kindness of all the good people around me is something that will stick with me forever.

Having been loaded into the back seat of Dave & Thelma's Fortuna, it was now a matter of preventing the effects of the rough track from beating up the fractured leg even more. Well, I almost forgot about it as we rocked & rolled and chatted on the way to Onjuva. It turns out that Dave had spent much of his working life in the mining industry, so we had stuff to talk about (another coincidence). And what an interesting chap he is. On the way, he was telling me about the land surveyor after whom van Zyl's pass is named, and that his son, Japie van Zyl is high up in Nasa. As it turns out, I've actually met Japie a few times, and one of his side-kicks at JPL was the external examiner of my MSc many years ago (another coincidence).

There were to be many coincidences along the way. Stars and planets aligned. Sometimes there's magic in the air.
 

Offline isiTututu

Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #117 on: October 04, 2017, 09:15:50 pm »
Thanks, I am devouring your RR
Interesting point from a safety aspect, Levi the american that was at the bash and came back with me so we could get his bikes clutch fixed, uses spot as it has a help and sos function and includes recovery and repatriation in the subscription!
It also updates position on the net sothat those at home can follow progress.
I can check where he is and give him advice on interesting things or routes and also know his gps position if he needs to be assisted.
As I understand it is not reliant on celphone reception as it uses satelite comms.

I think Spot is great for all the reasons that you state, but when the poo really hits the turbine, there's no substitute for being able to communicate exactly what the situation is, and what is required. An Iridium phone does the job. Good medical insurance that includes evacuation insurance is essential too.
 

Offline armpump

Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #118 on: October 05, 2017, 05:29:36 am »
Eina
 

Online ClimbingTurtle

  • Forum Vendor
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS Adventure
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 5,576
  • Thanked: 98 times
  • Give It Horns - Save Our Rhino's
    • Majita Tool Supplies
Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #119 on: October 05, 2017, 07:45:38 am »
Lawdy...... I have to imagine it turned out OK, due to the fact IsiTututu is contributing...

The only thing I can say about the thread is that I am glad that the instalments are not longer, as I REALLY have to get to work today.....

Gripping stuff!
www.majita.co.za - we sell tools!

"And if I knew I was going to be this thirsty, I would have drunk more last night"

2010 R1200GS Adventure - 2007 G650x - 1981 XT500 x2 - 1980 XT500 - Gone to Mud Island for a better life with Roadcat the Lordly, Keeper of the Mead...!