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Offline MaxThePanda

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Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #160 on: October 08, 2017, 07:50:19 pm »
Hey XPat. We exited at Palwag - they told us we should have passed a hut and guard at Hoanib but we never saw either somehow. He did tell us we shouldnít be there on bikes but didnít have much of an issue - we paid the permit for 4 vehicles (they rip you car price for the bike but itís a silly complaint cause itís not expensive) and one nightís camping and that was that. Itís a spectacular route! You have to do it.

Offline Xpat

Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #161 on: October 08, 2017, 08:06:12 pm »
Hey XPat. We exited at Palwag - they told us we should have passed a hut and guard at Hoanib but we never saw either somehow. He did tell us we shouldnít be there on bikes but didnít have much of an issue - we paid the permit for 4 vehicles (they rip you car price for the bike but itís a silly complaint cause itís not expensive) and one nightís camping and that was that. Itís a spectacular route! You have to do it.

Thanks.  :thumleft:

I know the trail - I have done it in May with my dad, but in 4x4. I am a bit torn about doing it on the bike. I think it is pretty clear, that the bikes are not allowed there - I was told exactly that in Palmwag lodge, by the guard up on the Huarusib turnoff (the guy you missed, and it is written on the leaflet you get when you enter the conservancy at the gate. Hardy in your planning thread (I think) was of an opinion that it is legal to ride the conservancy on the bike which tickled my interest greatly, but I don't believe now that is correct. While I would most probably get away with it, I prefer not to push boundaries too much as it may result in backlash against all bikers - it is small mirracle IMO that they still let you roam there freely with all the game and unique scenery around. I wouldn't want them to get pissed off and close out for example Hoanib river (which is northern boundary of the conservancy and hence either in or out of the conservancy - depending on who you talk to).

I will think about it, but probably will rather focus on plotting routes through areas that are legal but rarely ridden (like following Huarusib all the way up almost to Opuwo - most people cross over to Khumib and go up to Orupembe (the route you did in opposite direction).

Anyway - thanks for the information!

Offline MaxThePanda

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #162 on: October 08, 2017, 09:26:41 pm »
Yeah, I donít disagree with you! We never went through a gate on the northern side - just the southern end when we exited. There are so many brilliant areas to ride in Damaraland and Kaokoveld itís not worth pissing anyone off or breaking rules. More of that in tomorrowís story...

Offline Xpat

Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #163 on: October 08, 2017, 11:23:13 pm »
Yeah, I donít disagree with you! We never went through a gate on the northern side - just the southern end when we exited. There are so many brilliant areas to ride in Damaraland and Kaokoveld itís not worth pissing anyone off or breaking rules. More of that in tomorrowís story...

Just to be sure - I'm not passing any judgements here. I'm just glad that I got the most up to date info from you and outlined how it may drive my decision to ride the trail. Honestly, if it wouldn't be clear whether it is allowed, I would also rather err on the side of exploration (i.e. ride the trail) than caution (follow Hoanib to Sesfontein). And even if its not allowed, but riding it doesn't cause much of aggravation with the locals (as your experience seem to confirm) - I may still decide to do it.

Anyway - I got my answers and will stop poluting your great RR now. Just get on with it already!  :peepwall: :pot:

Offline Professor sprocket

Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #164 on: October 09, 2017, 09:21:21 am »
Hi Gents,

On the subject of whether its cool to be in that conservancy on a bike. I'd say totally no. Its my opinion, and we all choose to ride these bikes where and how we want. But... my biggest downer of the whole trip was being stopped by a guy from Wilderness Safaris in a game viewing vehicle. He was slowly driving some tourists around from a nearby lodge.

"Hi! How are you?" I said very merrily, as I was having a blast on the awesome trail.

"Great, until I saw you..." I'd been in such a cheerful bubble and this was seriously popping it.

"Why....?"

"Because you are on that bike"

"Whats wrong with the bike?" But I knew already - we were clearing the game within a wide radius all around us. These bikes are loud and they freak the animals out. We saw a few animals sprinting away from us - but only the tiny boldest minority I reckon.

"You are scaring all the elephants away, they have moved way up the river... "he said.

"Sorry......" I said, shrinking down into my neck brace.

"I dont even know how you got in here. Bikes are not allowed..." He was a kind of old gnarly game warden. Looked like he really loved and knew the place.

And we had seen a sign saying bikes were not allowed, just by our elephant siting a few hours up the trail.

I apologised again, feeling really bad for the tourists paying the big eco-bucks that keep that conservancy functioning and who, because of me, were not seeing anything in the back of the game vehicle. And feeling worse about all the animals we were disturbing. Then I just mumbled something about getting ahead of him to mitigate the impact and then I zoomed off.

Its a fragile environment up there. Those conservancies need conserving. Its also not allowed - according to the wardens and the signs. I loved our whole route, except for that bit. Much better on a 4 by 4 and at 30kms an hour. Then you'd actually see stuff, too.

Anyway - its just my opinion. But I personally am not ever going back through one of those eco-conservancies on a bike.

 

Offline MaxThePanda

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #165 on: October 09, 2017, 10:54:20 am »
Professor Sprocket (aka English, aka Thomas, aka Kitty Bitch - he won it so often the title is now his) beat me to it. His game ranger encounter happened in today's story, which I haven't got to yet.

Just to throw in a 2c of divergent view here... our little party was a bit divided on the subject. None of the rest of us saw that game ranger or his car - Sprocket was racing ahead at this point, trying to overcome the leaking radiator by force of reverse timewarp that would counteract gravity. I must honestly say I'm confused what this game ranger was talking about.

When he accosted Tom he was 50km south of the Hoanib river in huge, big wide open stony desert, and there were definitely no elephants anywhere near there, and they certainly hadn't been frightened off by bikes. After our initial elephant encounter in the Hoanib (actually shown to us by the Wilderness Safari guides, and that ellie didn't seem the least bit phased by the motorbikes either time we saw him) we went back down to the riverbed and travelled east for 10km before turning off to the south. We hadn't seen any further elephants, and we certainly weren't racing around causing havoc.

I think it's possible the ranger may have confused us with someone else. I really don't think we scared any elephants, and what evidence he had for blaming us that he wasn't seeing elephants with his tourists, I don't know. Personally I think he was taking a bit of a flyer.

Regarding the conservancy as a whole, we were generally a lot more respectful of the terrain then many of the 4x4's (from track evidence). There is no fence or gate that we passed through, and no place to get permits (other than the exit gate to the south). The only sign we saw was half way in that mentioned camping and had "no quads or bikes" sign but it wasn't exactly clear which area or in which direction it covered. It seems there may be a bit of a grey area about bikes in this region.

I think there is a tendency for extremely expensive, exclusive lodges to become quite sanctimonious about 'their' property and automatically want to exclude anyone who isn't from their club. Either the land is open, or it isn't, and while I think all users should pay permits and contribute to looking after the land, I personally hate it when vast tracks of land become locked off for the exclusive use of the highly privileged.

Generally, the entire north-west area of Namibia is crawling with wildlife, whether proclaimed conservancy or not, and hunters, motorcycles, 4x4s, tourists, locals, and everyone else need to coexist and both enjoy and respect it together. It's an incredible privilege to be able to tour this area by bike, and I really hope that continues for a long time. I think we should make the respectful most of it while we can, cause it's surely not going to last forever.

Offline Xpat

Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #166 on: October 09, 2017, 12:44:40 pm »
I'm 100% with you on the private lodges appropriating surrounding area like it belongs to them, which it doesn't. You will bump into guides (I suspect from the Purros lodge) who will tell you that Purros canyon is off the limits for the bikes, and I was told by a guide in Wildlife Safari car that Hoanib is also off limits (though to be fair at the beginning of the Crowther trail - where it meets Hoanib - and he may have thought I came from there, which I didn't). I asked around and believe that is not true.

And I was wondering where your encounter with guide happened. Paradoxically, his comments would make some sense in the Hoanib river (which as far as I was able to find out is open area) as that is the game rich area which may get potentially spooked by bikes reving by, but do not make sense on Crowther trail (which is for some reason off limits to bikes), which is more or less entirely Martian stony desert, which very little wildlife and whatever there is can be easily avoided.

I don't think it is too big deal for the animals - a thunderstorm or lion trying to snatch baby elephant/giraffe probably causes much more havoc than that - as long as the traffic there is relatively limited (a bike or few once in a week or so). But I still prefer to give locals (be it local population or those fat cats owning the lodges, who are way more influential) as little excuse as possible to close the area down for the bikes. So I prefer not to ride in the clearly off limits areas - even though logically it doesn' not make sense for them to be closed (e.g. Crowther trail).

That said, one needs to be particularly sensitive (not a strong point for most bikers) when riding these constrained game rich areas, in order to not spooke the animals more than absolutely necessary and not put other visitors at risk. Which is quite a difficult act on the bike where one needs to keep momentum in deep sand with corresponding noise and speed that animals are not used to. When I rode Ugab river few years back I started from Brandberg White Lady lodge early in the morning and returned about 1 pm due to some technical issues. The manager asked me if I rode in the river, and then told me looking at me intensely  that their safari vehicle has just been badly damaged, and the guide inside almost killed (I talked to the guide later - luckily he wasnt hurt just scarred) by elephants (most of whom he knew for decade or longer), who got spooked by a biker who gunned it upriver full throttle through the middle of the herd (the do take to graze on both sides of the river). As they couldn't get the biker, the animals dispaced their aggresion on the nearby safari car (luckily the tourists were sitting on the nearby koppie when the accident happened).

I raked my brain if I could have caused that - I have followed the herd up the river, but passed them on the opposite bank of the river with good 100m between us and them being aware of me properly (so not giving them fright), and then - when I got stuck with flat tyre and they caught up with me, I just left the bike in the river to its fate and run into the safety of the koppie and let them pass. I was very relieved when it turned out it wasn't me - I was there between 7- 9 in the morning, while the incident happened about noon, but still wasn't sure what to thing about that biker whom I never met. He may have been just so focused on battling the sand that may not have even noticed the elephants (quite plausible - if the sun and shadows are just right), or he may have been just an idiot who just couldn't resist gunning it through the middle of the herd.

Anyway - understandably that incident didn't raise bikers credit in the lodge on that day.

Here is me being the pillar of society (or rather coward) watching the elephants pass in peace from the safety of koppie on that day:

« Last Edit: October 09, 2017, 12:47:43 pm by Xpat »
 

Offline Orangeswifty

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #167 on: October 09, 2017, 01:09:29 pm »
how the hell did I miss this one!!
Ja Toppie
Nou moet jy opvang :biggrin: :snorting:

Great storytelling guys :thumleft:
sorry to hear of all your misfortunes and the rider having to retire from the trip.
Not good but better than nothing
« Last Edit: October 09, 2017, 02:16:23 pm by Orangeswifty »
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Offline Sam

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #168 on: October 09, 2017, 02:09:57 pm »
I notice that, through all the mechanical carnage of broken radiators, stuffed fuel pumps, slime emiting fuel hoses, leaking forks,etc etc, Buttercup seems to continue waddling along with nary a care in the world....

Is there a lesson here?
 

Offline Sam

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #169 on: October 09, 2017, 02:14:10 pm »
Was discussing this report, as well as some of your other legendary ones, with another WD yesterday. If you ever put these to video, the general feeling was that Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" would be the ideal soundtrack - ala Wayne's World......heh.
 

Offline MaxThePanda

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #170 on: October 09, 2017, 02:15:34 pm »
Hey XPat - great story, and you seemed to have had much more 'exciting' interactions than we did! We had one close encounter with an elephant and I stopped about 50m away, waited for a while and he limbered off into the bush slowly. No drama!

Our interaction with the guide happened 50km south of the Hoanib. He literally told Tom that we had spooked the elephant and scared them all away for his guests. But it was odd all round - if he was from Wilderness Safari's camp on the Hoanib I've no idea what he was doing 50km south at about 9 in the morning, and as you say that area is all martian stony desert - no elephant remotely in the vicinity. If he was talking about the day before, we certainly didn't spook the elephant we saw, which was super relaxed and didn't even move. From there we headed east in the river bed for only about 10km, and it is super wide and open there. I'm pretty sure we would have seen any elephant that were in the river bed there, so that doesn't make sense either.

Honestly, I don't know - it didn't make sense to me, but I didn't even see or speak to the guide. He was pretty aggressive so he was pissed about something - maybe his tourists had been giving him a hard time for not showing them any elephant!

I think we see this the same way - and I agree with your sentiments. Look - there will always be people who ruin it for the rest, whether bikes, 4x4s or anything else.

Offline MaxThePanda

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #171 on: October 09, 2017, 02:18:54 pm »
I notice that, through all the mechanical carnage of broken radiators, stuffed fuel pumps, slime emiting fuel hoses, leaking forks,etc etc, Buttercup seems to continue waddling along with nary a care in the world....

Is there a lesson here?

Undoubtedly!!! If you can stomach riding such brilliant terrain on a wheezy, anaemic carthorse with a bad temper there really is no doubt. As Hardy said to me on the phone, "All you okes who aren't on DRs are going to be very sorry by the end of this trip!"

Offline Omninorm

Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #172 on: October 09, 2017, 03:35:28 pm »

Gav had already been carted down to the clinic on one of the bikes, and the paramedic was checking him out. We seemed a lot more concerned than Gav did....


Yeah, I think there was a good deal of suspicion floating around that I might have just sprained my ankle, and that this was all a bit over dramatic. I too was surprised that it wasn't more painful, and I did have a twinge of embarrassment at all the drama that was going on around me. But there was no messing around on the part of my wife and Discovery International. Between them, they took charge, and things were going to be done properly.  I kept the boot on until arrival at Swakop Mediclinic, and I think this was absolutely the right thing to do. What better splint could you ask for.

A minor spiral fracture of the Fibula is nothing really, and will heal itself without intervention



The ankle however, is another matter. Some screws and a cable-tie are now holding the bones together. The ligament damage is going to take time....



Keeping the boot on was exactly the right thing to do.
We had a similar situation with a mate. He broke his leg in 3 places really bad on a ride into the sticks. According to the specialist surgeon if we removed the boot there was a very real chance of us having severed the main artery. Keeping the boot on potentially saved his life.

Glad to see you didn't have that kind of injury.

Fantastic RR.
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Offline Sam

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #173 on: October 09, 2017, 03:42:54 pm »
I notice that, through all the mechanical carnage of broken radiators, stuffed fuel pumps, slime emiting fuel hoses, leaking forks,etc etc, Buttercup seems to continue waddling along with nary a care in the world....

Is there a lesson here?

Undoubtedly!!! If you can stomach riding such brilliant terrain on a wheezy, anaemic carthorse with a bad temper there really is no doubt. As Hardy said to me on the phone, "All you okes who aren't on DRs are going to be very sorry by the end of this trip!"

Ah - so definitely more about the journey than the destination....

Ag, if Ganjora is to be believed, its gearbox will explode in a spectacular fashion at some stage...
 

Offline MaxThePanda

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #174 on: October 09, 2017, 06:26:54 pm »
Day 11: More Crowther Trail: to Palmwag



Somehow the gods spared us from the rock munchers and we all saw daylight. The soft, pink hues of dawn, that is.



We were an hour or two in when Tom had an encounter with an angry game ranger in a tourist landy. Donít ask me what they were doing here - itís bloody far from any camp or habitation as far as I can see. But he was spooked.

Slowly, the stark, red, rock-encrusted earth moderated to more of a conventional desert landscape, and I surprised a small herd of gemsbok, who bolted across the trail.



There was another, bigger herd over the next rise, so clearly they like this place. 40km or so into the day, we turned eastward and dropped down into an arid valley. The mountains framing the eastern side of the desert were suddenly closer and we rode into a fierce wall of heat, like an oven door that had been left open. I think it was partly the effect of leaving the band of sea air that drifts in - I dunno - 40 or 80km from the ocean.

It was so hot and arid I didnít even consider stopping to get my camera out. Until Mike ran out petrol, that is.





About 10km before Palmwag we hit the exit gate to the conservancy. The Sesfontein Communal Conservancy is a semi-protected area running west of Palmwag and north to the Hoanib. Entrance fees, or some portion of them, benefit the community, which is cool. The guard at the gate was surprised we didnít have permits, but there had been no sign of the gate and guard he said we should have passed when crossing the Hoanib. Apparently bikes arenít really supposed to be there, but he didnít seem too phased about that - we just paid the park and camping fees with the absolute last of our cash, and left through the gate.

Palmwag was destined to be our oasis in the desert - we had run out of cash, fuel, food and water. Tomís bike now had a catastrophic radiator leak and there was no way we were leaving south without that sorted. We were hoping for the best.

The Palmwag lodge is a great place that makes an excellent base for trips in the area. Hundreds of tourists pour through there and itís well run. But they couldnít advance us any cash and had just used their last radiator sealant. We had a hearty steak and Tom manned up to the nasty job of having to ride east to Kamajab and get his bike fixed. It was baking hot and I didnít begrudge him the dastardly job of beating it 200km through that furnace. We filled up his bike on the credit card, he took as much water as he could carry and our ATM cards and left. When would we see him again?

There was nothing to do except decamp to the bar and drink as much beer as we could pour down our gullets. Late afternoon an elephant wandered into the reeds next to the bar. He was literally 3m from the walkway - what a privileged encounter:















Awesome! Thereís not much else to say - we pigged out, drowned ourselves at the bar and washed everything. We went to bed at about 8pm - everyone was a bit knackered - in our tents due to the super dangerous zebra snakes!





Offline MaxThePanda

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #175 on: October 09, 2017, 06:28:17 pm »
I notice that, through all the mechanical carnage of broken radiators, stuffed fuel pumps, slime emiting fuel hoses, leaking forks,etc etc, Buttercup seems to continue waddling along with nary a care in the world....

Is there a lesson here?

Undoubtedly!!! If you can stomach riding such brilliant terrain on a wheezy, anaemic carthorse with a bad temper there really is no doubt. As Hardy said to me on the phone, "All you okes who aren't on DRs are going to be very sorry by the end of this trip!"

Ah - so definitely more about the journey than the destination....

Ag, if Ganjora is to be believed, its gearbox will explode in a spectacular fashion at some stage...

Haha! I can't believe a DR's engine is strong enough to destroy a gearbox!!  :laughing4:

Offline Sam

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #176 on: October 10, 2017, 01:34:37 pm »
heh - Touche!
 

Offline MaxThePanda

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #177 on: October 10, 2017, 03:50:34 pm »
Day 12: Into the lair of the Fearsome Face-Eater: Palmwag to Torra Conservancy



So much had happened on this trip already that it kind of felt like we were done, even though we had most of a week still to go. When planning the route Iíd kind of run out of steam a bit at Palmwag. There was Desolation Valley to come, but that didnít sound very appealing at all, after suffering through the beastly furnace of the day before.

Camel had climbed into my tent during the night. As you would have noticed in the previous pictures, his had a slight little hole or two after being jammed into his back wheel at 70kph, and when the mozzies kicked off their assault in the middle of the night he gave up and crammed in with me. Two 6í2Ē-plus beasts in the most miniature Ďtwo maní hiking tent ainít fun, I can tell you! By dawn I was desperate to escape, so I left him to it and went for a walk. This is what I found:



This is the walkway to the bar, right where Iíd seen the ellie yesterday, and clearly heíd been in to cause some havoc overnight.



Apparently there had also been a bit of a bar fight. You never know, with a room full of drunk german tourists. I saw some camp staff and told them what had happened. UmÖ no! That was actually a juvenile male leopard whoíd taken a particular liking to messing up their bar overnight. Apparently heís particularly partial to this handily placed tree branch, and despises the wall clock, cause heís already wrecked that:



We know this because he appears on the nightly CCTV feed! Hilarious. I was super keen to see the footage, but unfortunately the office was too busy. Not your average Protea Hotel on the Square, is it?

We had a super hearty English breakfast and lounged around, waiting for English to arrive. Eventually the DRZ roared into view, a triumphant Thomas bearing cash, and aboard a fully functioning motorcycle. Well, sort of, at least. The young man is prone to the irresistible temptations of a bargain, and when the bike was overheating about a year back, he bought an old second hand fan at Craigís Used Parts and had it fitted at some dodgy backyard mechanic on Voortrekker Road. The blades of the fan were now hitting the radiator, and sliced open a nice cut in the fins at the back. Lovely.

Anyway, fan was chucked and radiator was now plastered closed with some kind of gummy sealant that would hopefully get us home. Iím prepared to lay serious money thatís exactly how it still is next time we go riding together.

We immediately loaded up and left before anything else could go wrong.





I was hoping we could head west again into the Achab river area, but I had a chat to the son of the owner of Palmwag Lodge and apparently the veterinary gate at the Wereldsend airstrip is permanently locked. That blank section on the map is is a rhino research area, and Iím sure they are understandably jumpy about people travelling through there. He said heíd only been down there once in all the time heíd been at Palmwag.

So it was back on the C43 to Bersig and then we hooked a right and headed for the very rough track through the Torra Conservancy. Literally as we turned off the road into the grasslands I made a really nasty discovery - Iíd failed to do up my sleep roll bag super tight and it had dropped down and burnt a hole on the exhaust pipe. Fuck. Shit. Bugger. BUGGER!!!!!! For all the wonder of Rox Straps, they do loosen progressively over rough ground, and mine had slipped just enough to allow the roll bag to drop down a few centimetres and melt through.

I was immediately in a super foul mood. Six weeks before we departed I tore a shoulder tendon at the Impi enduro, and it had been giving me a world of trouble. I was hocked up to the eyeballs on cortisone, which made riding bearable, but at night it aches and pains deep in the joint and makes sleeping terribly uncomfortable.

Iíd already had one nightís poor sleep due to my nocturnal visitor, and going without sleep on a trip like this really messes with my vibe. A man needs his napÖ and with my sleeping mat smouldered to smithereens I had severe doubts Iíd now be getting any the next few nights.

It was my worst afternoon of the trip. I was deep in a horrible fog, and couldnít get my head out of it. Furious with myself for not having triple checked the straps, and generally just being a bit of a SOB. In sympathy at my predicament, Tomís bike threw a hissy fit and finally sheered the soldered ball right off the end of the clutch cable. Trust a bike to kick you when youíre down.

A furious mechanic is a great mechanicÖ I grabbed a hose clamp, jammed the sodding bloody cable into the mechanism, and clamped it down tight. Squashed it flat and instructed the damn thing to behave itself. It worked!!





Itís a shame I was moping through the mist curtain of misery, because the terrain was utterly unlike anything weíd seen before. Golden grasses covering the rocky ground in a rich matt, waving slowly in the afternoon breeze and lending a whimsical charm to the place.



We startled a small herd of zebra, and then minutes later my companions saw first a couple of jackal and then one of the sightings of the trip - the hunched over, lumbering figure of a massive old face-eater, scowling as the trundled off with his lop-sided lope. Unfortunately I missed him.





Mostly I was keeping my eye on the ground. Anything not to be sleeping on stones. Eventually we happened on a nice river bed and I dismounted immediately and declared the day over.



As we set up camp I made a bizarre discovery. My pillow and mat had been rolled up tight, and burned through in just on area - for a row of holes.





Astoundingly they both seemed that they might be holding air, which brightened my mood considerably. There were a hell of a lot of game signs everywhere, and a quick reconnoitre of our campsite revealed these two:





Iím pretty sure the first one is a rhino midden. The other? God alone knows. It looks like the lair of an elephant-size face eater! The camp descended into a scene of mild panic. This was definitely the night we felt most vulnerable on the trip. Far too much had already gone wrong, and that face-eater was definitely not a good sign. We parked the tents right up against each other, and in a somewhat pitiful attempt at security, surrounded them with bikes and an utterly ridiculous attempt at a Himba kraal.





It was going to be a extremely fitful nightís sleep, that is for sure!

Offline armpump

Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #178 on: October 10, 2017, 04:19:12 pm »
awesome
 

Offline Pistonpete

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Re: Travels through Godís own motorcycle country
« Reply #179 on: October 10, 2017, 06:13:54 pm »
 :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer:
'Routine is the thief of time'