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Offline Oubones

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #220 on: December 15, 2017, 05:36:55 am »
That is a serious lake, must get nice big waves on it when the wind pumps.
Did you see any marina's or sailing vessels?
Is freshwater sailing big there?
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Online Ri

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #221 on: December 15, 2017, 07:29:57 am »
Enjoying the photo's and descriptions  :thumleft:

What is the purpose of the summer challenge by the community schools? How does it work? Who comes up with it and who all participate?
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #222 on: December 15, 2017, 03:58:35 pm »
That is a serious lake, must get nice big waves on it when the wind pumps.
Did you see any marina's or sailing vessels?
Is freshwater sailing big there?


Big waves for sure, it is like an ocean.  Many vessels lost. 


One can see anything on these enormous lakes, ore freighters, shipping freighters, powerboats, offshore race boats, yachts, large and small commercial fishing vessels, all the way down to small sailboats.


There are 5 Great Lakes:  Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, Lake Huron, Lake Erie, and Lake Ontario.



Lake Huron

Lake Huron (French: Lac Huron) is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. Hydrologically, it comprises the easterly portion of Lake Michigan–Huron, having the same surface elevation as its westerly counterpart, to which it is connected by the 5-mile-wide (8.0 km), 20-fathom-deep (120 ft; 37 m) Straits of Mackinac. It is shared on the north and east by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south and west by the state of Michigan in the United States. The name of the lake is derived from early French explorers who named it for the Huron people inhabiting the region. The Huronian glaciation was named due to evidence collected from Lake Huron region. The northern parts of the lake include the North Channel and Georgian Bay. Across the lake to the southwest is Saginaw Bay. The main inlet is the St. Marys River and the main outlet is the St. Clair.



Geography

By surface area, Lake Huron is the second-largest of the Great Lakes, with a surface area of 23,007 square miles (59,590 km2) — of which 9,103 square miles (23,580 km2) lies in Michigan; and 13,904 square miles (36,010 km2) lies in Ontario — making it the third-largest fresh water lake on Earth (or the fourth-largest lake, if the Caspian Sea is counted as a lake).  By volume however, Lake Huron is only the third largest of the Great Lakes, being surpassed by Lake Michigan and Lake Superior.  When measured at the low water datum, the lake contains a volume of 850 cubic miles (3,500 km3) and a shoreline length (including islands) of 3,827 mi (6,159 km).

The surface of Lake Huron is 577 feet (176 m) above sea level.  The lake's average depth is 32 fathoms 3 feet (195 ft (59 m)), while the maximum depth is 125 fathoms (750 ft (230 m)).  It has a length of 206 statute miles (332 km; 179 nmi) and a greatest breadth of 183 statute miles (295 km; 159 nmi).



Geology

Lake Huron has the largest shore line length of any of the Great Lakes, counting its 30,000 islands.

Lake Huron is separated from Lake Michigan, which lies at the same level, by the 5-mile-wide (8.0 km), 20-fathom-deep (120 ft; 37 m) Straits of Mackinac, making them hydrologically the same body of water (sometimes called Lake Michigan-Huron and sometimes described as two 'lobes of the same lake').   Aggregated, Lake Huron-Michigan, at 45,300 square miles (117,000 km2), "is technically the world's largest freshwater lake."  When counted separately, Lake Superior is 8,700 square miles (23,000 km2) larger than Huron and higher. Lake Superior drains into the St. Marys River at Sault Ste. Marie which then flows southward into Lake Huron. The water then flows south to the St. Clair River, at Port Huron, Michigan and Sarnia, Ontario.

The Great Lakes Waterway continues thence to Lake St. Clair; the Detroit River and Detroit, Michigan; into Lake Erie and thence – via Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River – to the Atlantic Ocean.

Like the other Great Lakes, it was formed by melting ice as the continental glaciers retreated toward the end of the last ice age. Before this, Lake Huron was a low-lying depression through which flowed the now-buried Laurentian and Huronian Rivers; the lake bed was criss-crossed by a large network of tributaries to these ancient waterways, with many of the old channels still evident on bathymetric maps.



History

The extent of development among Eastern Woodlands Native American societies on the eve of European contact is indicated by the archaeological evidence of a town on or near Lake Huron that contained more than one hundred large structures housing a total population of between 4,000 and 6,000.  The French, the first European visitors to the region, often referred to Lake Huron as La Mer Douce, "the fresh-water sea". In 1656, a map by French cartographer Nicolas Sanson refers to the lake by the name Karegnondi, a Wyandot word which has been variously translated as "Freshwater Sea", "Lake of the Hurons", or simply "lake". The lake was generally labeled "Lac des Hurons" (Lake of the Huron) on most early European maps.



Storm of 1913

On November 9, 1913, a great storm in Lake Huron sank ten ships and more than twenty were driven ashore. The storm, which raged for 16 hours, killed 235 seamen.

Matoa had passed between Port Huron, Michigan, and Sarnia, Ontario, just after midnight. On November 9, just after six in the morning, Senator pushed upstream. Less than an hour later, Manola passed through. Captain Frederick W. Light of Manola reported that both the Canadian and the American weather stations had storm flag signals flying from their weather towers.  Following behind at 7:00 a.m. that Sunday, Regina steamed out of Sarnia into the northwest gale. The warnings now had been up for four hours.  Manola passed Regina off Port Sanilac, 22 statute miles (19 nmi; 35 km) up the lake. Captain Light determined that if it continued to deteriorate, he would seek shelter at Harbor Beach, Michigan, another 30 statute miles (26 nmi; 48 km) up the lake. There, he could seek shelter behind the breakwater. Before he reached Harbor Beach, the winds turned to the northeast and the lake began to rise. It would be noon before he reached Harbor Beach and ran for shelter. The waves were so violent that Manola touched bottom entering the harbor. With help from a tugboat, Manola tied up to the break wall with eight lines. It was about 3:00 p.m. when Manola was secured and the crew prepared to drop anchor. As they worked, the cables began to snap from wind pressure against the hull. To keep from being pushed aground, they kept their bow into the wind with the engines running half to full in turns, yet the ship still drifted 800 feet (240 m) before its movement was arrested.  Waves breaking over the ship damaged several windows and the crew reported seeing portions of the concrete break wall peeling off as the waves struck it.

Meanwhile, fifty miles farther up the lake, Matoa and Captain Hugh McLeod had to ride out the storm without a safe harbor.  Matoa would be found stranded on the Port Austin reef when the winds subsided.  It was noon on Monday before the winds let up and not until 11:00 p.m. that night before Captain Light determined it to be safe to continue his journey.



Shipwrecks

More than a thousand wrecks have been recorded in Lake Huron. These purportedly include the first European vessel to sail the Great Lakes, Le Griffon, built in 1679 on the eastern shore of Lake Erie, near Buffalo, New York. Robert Cavalier, Sieur de la Salle navigated across Lake Erie, up the Detroit River, Lake St. Clair and the St. Clair River out into Lake Huron. Passing the Straits of Mackinac, La Salle and Le Griffon made landfall on Washington Island, off the tip of the Door Peninsula on the Wisconsin side of Lake Michigan. Here, La Salle filled Le Griffon with pelts and in late November 1679 sent Le Griffon back to the site of modern-day Buffalo, never to be seen again.

Two wrecks have been identified as Le Griffon, although neither has gained final verification as the actual wreck. Blown by a fierce storm after leaving, Le Griffon ran aground before the storm. The people of Manitoulin Island say that the wreck in Mississagi Straits at the western tip of the island is that of Le Griffon.  Meanwhile, others near Tobermory, say that the wreck on Russell Island, 150 miles (240 km) farther east in Georgian Bay is that of Le Griffon.



Thunder Bay

The 448-square-mile (1,160 km2) Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and Underwater Preserve is home to 116 historically significant shipwrecks. It is the 13th National Marine Sanctuary designated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, established in 2000.[34] Glass-bottom boat tours depart from Alpena, Michigan, providing tourists with views of some of the famous shipwrecks in Thunder Bay.



Saginaw Bay

Within the waters of Saginaw Bay are 185 of 1,000+ wrecks.  Matoa, a propeller freighter weighing 2,311 gross tons, was built in Cleveland in 1890, and was wrecked in 1913 on Port Austin Reef.



Georgian Bay, North Channel

Georgian Bay, the largest bay on Lake Huron, contains 212 of the 1,000 sunken vessels in the lake.

Manola, a propeller freighter of 2,325 gross tons, was built in 1890 by the Globe Shipping Company of Cleveland, Ohio. It was operated by the Minnesota Steamship Company (Cleveland) from 1890 to 1901, and by the Pittsburgh Steamship Company from 1901 to 1918. On January 25, 1918, Manola was sold to the U.S. Shipping Board. It was sold again in 1920 to the Canada Steamship Lines, Ltd., and renamed Mapledawn. The vessel became stranded on November 20, 1924, on Christian Island[38] in Georgian Bay. Headed for Port McNichol, Ontario, it was declared a total loss after two weeks. Salvagers were able to recover approximately 75,000 bushels of barley for delivery to Midland, Ontario
« Last Edit: December 15, 2017, 04:10:17 pm by big oil »
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #223 on: December 15, 2017, 04:06:12 pm »
Enjoying the photo's and descriptions  :thumleft:

What is the purpose of the summer challenge by the community schools? How does it work? Who comes up with it and who all participate?

Thank you, Ri  :thumleft:

I think the purpose was to get families away from the TV by traveling around our beautiful state, spend time together road tripping, camping, hiking, biking, etc.

Michigan has 533 incorporated municipalities, anyone whom lives or went to school in the community could participate, the only rule was one had to take a photograph of a landmark for each municipality.  I'm not sure whom came up with the idea.  Not to toot my own horn, but this old biker marked off the most municipalities by far, somewhere around 150-200/533  :ricky:   Our community did not reach all 533, I think we ended up with a total of around 450-475.
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Online Ri

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #224 on: December 16, 2017, 10:49:51 pm »
That's not shabby. Interesting initiative. Just in case you needed an excuse to ride  ;)

Also curious: How did you become involved in riding to raise awareness for that cute boy with Down Syndrome? And why did you need to, considering that Europe and America are streets ahead of SA when it comes to integration of and opportunities for people with Down Syndrome ?
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Offline J-dog

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #225 on: December 17, 2017, 12:01:26 pm »
 :sip:
 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #226 on: December 18, 2017, 03:56:46 pm »
That's not shabby. Interesting initiative. Just in case you needed an excuse to ride  ;)

Also curious: How did you become involved in riding to raise awareness for that cute boy with Down Syndrome? And why did you need to, considering that Europe and America are streets ahead of SA when it comes to integration of and opportunities for people with Down Syndrome ?

A woman I graduated high school with was linked to the little boy with DS.  She runs marathons in his honor, so I decided to do the ride last year in his honor.

The reason:  although I cannot disagree with nor do I believe it is my place to judge whether or not parents choose to abort DS babies, I just wanted to give awareness to the mother of the little boys FB page, so parents can see firsthand what it is like to raise such a child.  Unfortunately, OBGYN's in our country recommend abortion 100% of the time when babies are deemed DS through prenatal testing.
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Online Ri

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #227 on: December 18, 2017, 05:50:41 pm »
That's not shabby. Interesting initiative. Just in case you needed an excuse to ride  ;)

Also curious: How did you become involved in riding to raise awareness for that cute boy with Down Syndrome? And why did you need to, considering that Europe and America are streets ahead of SA when it comes to integration of and opportunities for people with Down Syndrome ?

A woman I graduated high school with was linked to the little boy with DS.  She runs marathons in his honor, so I decided to do the ride last year in his honor.

The reason:  although I cannot disagree with nor do I believe it is my place to judge whether or not parents choose to abort DS babies, I just wanted to give awareness to the mother of the little boys FB page, so parents can see firsthand what it is like to raise such a child.  Unfortunately, OBGYN's in our country recommend abortion 100% of the time when babies are deemed DS through prenatal testing.

:thumleft:

Those tests aren't always 100% either :(
My sister, in this day and age, was told by the OBGYN to put her daughter with Down Syndrome into a home and forget about her. Now she's winning athletic medals and training for work.
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #228 on: December 19, 2017, 03:29:54 am »
That's not shabby. Interesting initiative. Just in case you needed an excuse to ride  ;)

Also curious: How did you become involved in riding to raise awareness for that cute boy with Down Syndrome? And why did you need to, considering that Europe and America are streets ahead of SA when it comes to integration of and opportunities for people with Down Syndrome ?

A woman I graduated high school with was linked to the little boy with DS.  She runs marathons in his honor, so I decided to do the ride last year in his honor.

The reason:  although I cannot disagree with nor do I believe it is my place to judge whether or not parents choose to abort DS babies, I just wanted to give awareness to the mother of the little boys FB page, so parents can see firsthand what it is like to raise such a child.  Unfortunately, OBGYN's in our country recommend abortion 100% of the time when babies are deemed DS through prenatal testing.

:thumleft:

Those tests aren't always 100% either :(
My sister, in this day and age, was told by the OBGYN to put her daughter with Down Syndrome into a home and forget about her. Now she's winning athletic medals and training for work.

I love reading stories about DS kids like your niece becoming successful and accomplishing goals.  Sounds like yous love her, DS people grow on ya as they have the purest hearts.
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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #229 on: December 19, 2017, 07:08:26 am »
That's not shabby. Interesting initiative. Just in case you needed an excuse to ride  ;)

Also curious: How did you become involved in riding to raise awareness for that cute boy with Down Syndrome? And why did you need to, considering that Europe and America are streets ahead of SA when it comes to integration of and opportunities for people with Down Syndrome ?

A woman I graduated high school with was linked to the little boy with DS.  She runs marathons in his honor, so I decided to do the ride last year in his honor.

The reason:  although I cannot disagree with nor do I believe it is my place to judge whether or not parents choose to abort DS babies, I just wanted to give awareness to the mother of the little boys FB page, so parents can see firsthand what it is like to raise such a child.  Unfortunately, OBGYN's in our country recommend abortion 100% of the time when babies are deemed DS through prenatal testing.

:thumleft:

Those tests aren't always 100% either :(
My sister, in this day and age, was told by the OBGYN to put her daughter with Down Syndrome into a home and forget about her. Now she's winning athletic medals and training for work.

I love reading stories about DS kids like your niece becoming successful and accomplishing goals.  Sounds like yous love her, DS people grow on ya as they have the purest hearts.

Ours is stubborn as a mule, can't tell her anything - nothing like her biddable aunt ::)  She has plans to become an actress and play in an award-winning local soapie (dear Lord preserve us!) but I suspect domestic bliss will claim her first. She's decided to marry her boyfriend, and will inform him soon :lol8:

So proud of her :biggrin:
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #230 on: December 19, 2017, 07:18:07 am »
That's not shabby. Interesting initiative. Just in case you needed an excuse to ride  ;)

Also curious: How did you become involved in riding to raise awareness for that cute boy with Down Syndrome? And why did you need to, considering that Europe and America are streets ahead of SA when it comes to integration of and opportunities for people with Down Syndrome ?

A woman I graduated high school with was linked to the little boy with DS.  She runs marathons in his honor, so I decided to do the ride last year in his honor.

The reason:  although I cannot disagree with nor do I believe it is my place to judge whether or not parents choose to abort DS babies, I just wanted to give awareness to the mother of the little boys FB page, so parents can see firsthand what it is like to raise such a child.  Unfortunately, OBGYN's in our country recommend abortion 100% of the time when babies are deemed DS through prenatal testing.

:thumleft:

Those tests aren't always 100% either :(
My sister, in this day and age, was told by the OBGYN to put her daughter with Down Syndrome into a home and forget about her. Now she's winning athletic medals and training for work.

I love reading stories about DS kids like your niece becoming successful and accomplishing goals.  Sounds like yous love her, DS people grow on ya as they have the purest hearts.

Ours is stubborn as a mule, can't tell her anything - nothing like her biddable aunt ::)  She has plans to become an actress and play in an award-winning local soapie (dear Lord preserve us!) but I suspect domestic bliss will claim her first. She's decided to marry her boyfriend, and will inform him soon :lol8:

So proud of her :biggrin:

 :imaposer: :imaposer:
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #231 on: December 20, 2017, 05:19:40 am »
From East Tawas, I continued north on Hwy 23 following the Lake Huron shoreline.  A beautiful ride with the incredible blue waters.  I was riding along in the zone when I saw a sign out by the road that said Althaver on it.  Not a very common surname, I was quite surprised to see this name.  I went to school from pre-school to graduating high school with a lovely girl with the same surname.  She was my partner during Homecoming week, where a male student and female student are crowned King and Queen from students voting.

I photographed the sign and posted the pic on FB asking the girl I attended school with if she knew who these people were.  She said yes, that's is my parents  :imaposer:.  Small world.  When her parents saw on FB that I was in the area, they commented to feel free to stop in the next time I'm in the area.  Man, I probably missed out on some amazing cookies.






I rode for awhile heading north, when I noticed the water turning a lovely shade of blue, so I stopped and took some time admiring this incredibly beautiful high quality H2O. 






I decided to turn in land on Hwy 72 as I used to visit a cabin west of my position for canoeing, kayaking, fishing, and snowmobiling.  But as you can see the road is straight as an arrow for miles and miles, so I quickly turned north in a search for sand or gravel.






I saw Lost Lake Woods on my map and thought to myself sounds like a nice place to ride and check out.  Unfortunately upon arrival I quickly determined LLW is a private club.






Same story with Canada Creek Ranch.  Saw the place on my map, so I went to scope it out.  I turned onto the entrance road which was quite sandy.  I was having a ball until a few miles later I came to this sign and not much further a gate and booth without anyone manning the booth.  It appeared to be a hunting club.  I decided not to chance my encounter, so I turned around and rode back to the main road.






I rode north and found a small village named Ossineke.  For a small village it had some cool antique looking buildings like this one here with Paul Bunyan at the top.






For those of you not familiar with the myth, Paul Bunyan was a logger, a giant of a man with his blue oxen named Babe.  Several cities around Michigan, Minnesota, Maine, and Wisconsin claim to be the birthplace of Paul Bunyan!  Ossineke, Michigan is one of these cities!

Paul Bunyan is a giant lumberjack in American folklore.  His exploits revolve around the tall tales of his superhuman labors,  and he is customarily accompanied by Babe the Blue Ox. The character originated in the oral tradition of North American loggers, and was later popularized by freelance writer William B. Laughead (1882–1958) in a 1916 promotional pamphlet for the Red River Lumber Company.  He has been the subject of various literary compositions, musical pieces, commercial works, and theatrical productions.  His likeness is displayed in several statues across North America

Etymology

There are many hypotheses about the etymology of the name Paul Bunyan. Much of the commentary focuses on a Franco-Canadian origin for the name. Phonetically Bunyan is similar to the Québécois expression "bon yenne!" expressing surprise or astonishment. The English surname Bunyan is derived from the same root as bunion in the Old French bugne, referring to a large lump or swelling. Several researchers have attempted to trace Paul Bunyan to the character of Bon Jean of French Canadian folklore.

In all of these tales, Paul Bunyan is made out to be of incredible size and strength and his lumberjack skills unrivaled.

Here's a statue in Bangor, Maine.






Or a restaurant in Wisconsin.






What a large man, it is said he could fell an acre of trees per hour.







There are statues of Paul Bunyan all across our land in the lumber producing states.  Although I have not yet traveled to California or the Pacific Northwest, I've read there are statues in those states as well.





Kids in northern lumber states all love Mr. Paul Bunyan.  Just look at how he could handle enormous pine trees.






Rode through a little town called Posen.  Apparently this is where a potato festival is held annually.  We Americans love our potatoes.






And our Blue Gill as can be eaten at an annual festival in St. Helen annually.







Blue Gills fresh out of ice cold water





Pan fried to perfection with some fresh veggies makes me happier than a pig in shit.






I rode through a small town called Lewiston, which brought back memories of one of the coldest nights of my life.  As a group we would leave the cabin in Lovells, MI and snowmobile over to Lewiston, MI to eat at an incredible buffet called Charboneaux's.  They had an array of delicious foods including fish, crab legs, lobster, prime rib, etc.  While eating and drinking for a couple of hours one evening, a cold front was heading in an easterly direction across Lake Michigan to our west.  Unbeknownst to us, the temperature dropped to around -35F or -37C.  Although the ride wasn't incredibly far, about 20 miles by trail, it was unbearable.  I'll never forget the ride, it is permanently burned into my brain.  Luckily, cold weather clothing has come along ways since then.






I then headed towards the Mackinaw Bridge, so I could enter the Upper Peninsula and begin searching for a reasonable priced place to camp.  I found a nice privately owned campground on the shores of Lake Huron for $12 a night.  After setting up camp, I rode back south to St. Ignace, Michigan near the Mackinaw Bridge to acquire a few beers.  While there, I decided to go photograph the bridge.






Zoomed in to give you an idea on the size of this man made structure.  Notice how small the semi-trucks pulling 80 foot trailers look traversing the bridge.






A Jet boat (impeller) shoots a rooster tail under the bridge en route to ferry passengers to Mackinaw Island.





A photograph of the bay near the bridge near dusk.






Five men died during the construction of the bridge back in the 1950's.






A statue of an iron worker from the era.





Here is a link to a historical construction album:  http://www.mackinacbridge.org/history/historical-construction-album/







The Mackinac Bridge (/ˈmækɪnɔː/ MAK-in-aw) is a suspension bridge spanning the Straits of Mackinac to connect the Upper and Lower Peninsulas of the U.S. state of Michigan. Opened in 1957, the 26,372-foot (4.995 mi; 8.038 km) bridge (familiarly known as "Big Mac" and "Mighty Mac")  is the world's 19th-longest main span and the longest suspension bridge between anchorages in the Western Hemisphere.  The Mackinac Bridge is part of Interstate 75 and the Lakes Michigan and Huron components of the Great Lakes Circle Tours across the straits; it is also a segment of the U.S. North Country National Scenic Trail. The bridge connects the city of St. Ignace on the north end with the village of Mackinaw City on the south.

Envisioned since the 1880s, the bridge was designed by the engineer David B. Steinman and completed in 1957 only after many decades of struggles to begin construction.





Length

The bridge opened on November 1, 1957,  connecting two peninsulas linked for decades by ferries. A year later, the bridge was formally dedicated as the "world's longest suspension bridge between anchorages", allowing a superlative comparison to the Golden Gate Bridge, which had a longer center span between towers, and the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge, which had an anchorage in the middle.

It remains the longest suspension bridge with two towers between anchorages in the Western Hemisphere.   Much longer anchorage-to-anchorage spans have been built in the Eastern Hemisphere, including the Akashi Kaikyō Bridge in Japan (12,826 ft or 3,909 m). But the long leadups to the anchorages on the Mackinac make its total shoreline-to-shoreline length of 5 miles (8 km) longer than the Akashi-Kaikyo (2.4 mi or 3.9 km).

The length of the bridge's main span is 3,800 feet (1,158 m), which makes it the third-longest suspension span in the United States and 19th longest suspension span worldwide. It is also one of the world's longest bridges overall.





Early History

The Algonquian peoples who lived in the straits area prior to the arrival of Europeans in the 17th century called this region Michilimackinac, which is widely understood to mean the Great Turtle. This is thought to refer to the shape of what is now called Mackinac Island. This interpretation of the word is debated by scholars. Trading posts at the Straits of Mackinac attracted peak populations during th
e summer trading season; they also developed as intertribal meeting places.

As exploitation of the state's mineral and timber resources increased during the 19th century, the area became an important transport hub. In 1881 the three railroads that reached the Straits, the Michigan Central, Grand Rapids & Indiana, and the Detroit, Mackinac & Marquette, jointly established the Mackinac Transportation Company to operate a railroad car ferry service across the straits and connect the two peninsulas.

Improved highways along the eastern shores of the Lower Peninsula brought increased automobile traffic to the Straits region starting in the 1910s. The state of Michigan initiated an automobile ferry service between Mackinaw City and St. Ignace in 1923; it eventually operated nine ferry boats that would carry as many as 9,000 vehicles per day. Traffic backups could stretch as long as 16 miles (26 km).










« Last Edit: December 20, 2017, 05:28:24 am by big oil »
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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #232 on: December 20, 2017, 05:22:37 am »



Plans for the bridge

After the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge in 1883, local residents began to imagine that such a structure could span the straits. In 1884, a store owner in St. Ignace published a newspaper advertisement that included a reprint of an artist's conception of the Brooklyn Bridge with the caption "Proposed bridge across the Straits of Mackinac".

The idea of the bridge was discussed in the Michigan Legislature as early as the 1880s. At the time, the Straits of Mackinac area was becoming a popular tourist destination, especially following the creation of Mackinac National Park on Mackinac Island in 1875.



At a July 1888 meeting of the board of directors of the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island, Cornelius Vanderbilt II proposed that a bridge be built across the straits, of a design similar to the one then under construction across the Firth of Forth in Scotland. This would advance commerce in the region and help lengthen the resort season of the hotel.

Decades went by with no formal action. In 1920, the Michigan state highway commissioner advocated construction of a floating tunnel across the Straits. At the invitation of the state legislature, C. E. Fowler of New York City put forth a plan for a long series of causeways and bridges across the straits from Cheboygan, 17 miles (27 km) southeast of Mackinaw City, to St. Ignace, using Bois Blanc, Round, and Mackinac islands as intermediate steps.







Formal planning

In 1923, the state legislature ordered the State Highway Department to establish ferry service across the strait. More and more people used ferries to cross the straits each year, and as they did, the movement to build a bridge increased. Chase Osborn, a former governor, wrote,

"Michigan is unifying itself, and a magnificent new route through Michigan to Lake Superior and the Northwest United States is developing, via the Straits of Mackinac. It cannot continue to grow as it ought with clumsy and inadequate ferries for any portion of the year."



By 1928, the ferry service had become so popular and so expensive to operate that Michigan Governor Fred W. Green ordered the department to study the feasibility of building a bridge across the strait. The department deemed the idea feasible, estimating the cost at $30 million (equivalent to $2.11 billion in 2016).

In 1934, the Michigan Legislature created the Mackinac Straits Bridge Authority to explore possible methods of constructing and funding the proposed bridge. The Legislature authorized the Authority to seek financing for the project. In the mid-1930s, during the Great Depression, when numerous infrastructure projects received federal aid, the Authority twice attempted to obtain federal funds for the project but was unsuccessful. The United States Army Corps of Engineers and President Franklin D. Roosevelt endorsed the project but Congress never appropriated funds. Between 1936 and 1940, the Authority selected a route for the bridge based on preliminary studies. Borings were made for a detailed geological study of the route.

The preliminary plans for the bridge featured a 3-lane roadway, a railroad crossing on the underdeck of the span, and a center-anchorage double-suspension bridge configuration similar to the design of the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge. Because this would have required sinking an anchorage pier in the deepest area of the Straits, the practicality of this design may have been questionable.[citation needed] A concrete causeway, approximately 4,000 feet (1,219 m), extending from the northern shore, was constructed in shallow water from 1939 to 1941. However, a unique engineering challenge was created by the tremendous forces that operate against the base of the bridge, because the lakes freeze during the winter, causing large icebergs to place enormous stress on the bridge.



At that time, with funding for the project still uncertain, further work was put on hold because of the outbreak of World War II. The Mackinac Straits Bridge Authority was abolished by the state legislature in 1947, but the same body created a new Mackinac Bridge Authority three years later in 1950. In June 1950, engineers were retained for the project. By then, it was reported that cars queuing for the ferry at Mackinaw City did not reach St. Ignace until five hours later, and the typical capacity of 460 vehicles per hour could not match the estimated 1600 for a bridge.

After a report by the engineers in January 1951,[14] the state legislature authorized the sale of $85 million (equivalent to $2.08 billion in 2016) in bonds for bridge construction on April 30, 1952. However, a weak bond market in 1953 forced a delay of more than a year before the bonds could be issued.




Engineering and construction

David B. Steinman was appointed as the design engineer in January 1953 and by the end of 1953, estimates and contracts had been negotiated. A Civil Engineer at the firm, Abul Hasnat, did the preliminary plans for the bridge. Total cost estimate at that time was $95 million (equivalent to $2.23 billion in 2016[12]) with estimated completion by November 1, 1956. Tolls collected were to pay for the bridge in 20 years.[15] Construction began on May 7, 1954. The American Bridge Division of United States Steel Corporation was awarded a contract of more than $44 million (equivalent to $1.05 billion in 2016[12]) to build the steel superstructure.



Construction, staged using the 1939–41 causeway, took three and a half years (four summers, no winter construction) at a total cost of $100 million and the lives of five workers. Contrary to popular belief, none of them are entombed in the Bridge.  It opened to traffic on schedule on November 1, 1957, and the ferry service was discontinued on the same day. The Bridge was formally dedicated on June 25, 1958.

G. Mennen Williams was governor during the construction of the Mackinac Bridge. He began the tradition of the governor leading the Mackinac Bridge Walk across it every Labor Day.  U.S. Senator Prentiss M. Brown has been called the "father of the Mackinac Bridge,"  and was honored with a special memorial bridge token created by the Mackinac Bridge Authority.

The bridge officially achieved its 100 millionth crossing exactly forty years after its dedication, on June 25, 1998.   The 50th anniversary of the bridge's opening was celebrated on November 1, 2007 in a ceremony hosted by the Mackinac Bridge Authority at the viewing park adjacent to the St. Ignace causeway.




History of the bridge design

The design of the Mackinac Bridge was directly influenced by the lessons from the first Tacoma Narrows Bridge, which failed in 1940 because of its instability in high winds. Three years after that disaster, Steinman had published a theoretical analysis of suspension-bridge stability problems, which recommended that future bridge designs include deep stiffening trusses to support the bridge deck and an open-grid roadway to reduce its wind resistance. Both of these features were incorporated into the design of the Mackinac Bridge. The stiffening truss is open to reduce wind resistance. The road deck is shaped as an airfoil to provide lift in a cross wind, and the center two lanes are open grid to allow vertical (upward) air flow, which fairly precisely cancels the lift, making the roadway stable in design in winds of up to 150 miles per hour (240 km/h)


This area can also be a great spot to see the Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights)









Facts & Figures


The Mackinac Bridge is currently the fifth longest suspension bridge in the world.  The bridge opened to traffic on November 1, 1957.  The following facts and figures are quoted from David Steinman’s book “Miracle Bridge at Mackinac”.



LENGTHS

Total Length of Bridge (5 Miles)          26,372 Ft   8,038 Meters
Total Length of Steel Superstructure          19,243 Ft.   5,865 Meters
Length of Suspension Bridge (including Anchorages)     8,614 Ft.   
Total Length of North Approach         7,129 Ft.   2,173 Meters
Length of Main Span (between Main Towers)        3,800 Ft.   1,158 Meters



HEIGHTS AND DEPTHS

Height of Main Towers above Water          552 Ft   168.25 Meters
Maximum Depth to Rock at Midspan         Unknown   Unknown
Maximum Depth of Water at Midspan        295 Ft.   90 Meters
Maximum Depth of Tower Piers below Water    210 Ft.   64 Meters
Height of Roadway above Water at Midspan     199 Ft.   61 Meters
Underclearance at Midspan for Ships        155 Ft.   47 Meters
Maximum Depth of Water at Piers           142 Ft.   43 Meters
Maximum Depth of Piers Sunk through Overburden          105 Ft.   32 Meters



CABLES

Total Length of Wire in Main Cables           42,000 Miles   67,592 km
Maximum Tension in Each Cable        16,000 Tons   14,515,995 kg
Number of Wires in Each Cable       12,580   
Weight of Cables         11,840 Tons   10,741,067 kg
Diameter of Main Cables           24 1/2 Inches   62.23 cm
Diameter of Each Wire        0.196 Inches   .498 cm



WEIGHTS

Total Weight of Bridge          1,024,500 Tons   929,410,766 kg
Total Weight of Concrete     931,000 Tons   844,589 kg
Total Weight of Substructure       919,100 Tons   326,931,237 kg
Total Weight of Two Anchorages       360,380 Tons   326,931,237 kg
Total Weight of Two Main Piers          318,000 Tons   288,484,747 kg
Total Weight of Superstructure     104,400 Tons   94,710,087 kg
Total Weight of Structural Steel          71,300 Tons   64,682,272 kg
Weight of Steel in Each Main Tower          6,500 Tons   5,896,701 kg
Total Weight of Cable Wire        11,840 Tons   10,741,067 kg
Total Weight of Concrete Roadway         6,660 Tons   6,041,850 kg
Total Weight of Reinforcing Steel        3,700 Tons   3,356,584 kg



RIVETS AND BOLTS

Total Number of Steel Rivets      4,851,700
Total Number of Steel Bolts       1,016,600



DESIGN AND DETAIL DRAWINGS

Total Number of Engineering Drawings      4,000
Total Number of Blueprints      85,000



MEN EMPLOYED

Total, at the Bridge Site       3,500
At Quarries, Shops, Mills, etc.     7,500
Total Number of Engineers      350



IMPORTANT DATES

Mackinac Bridge Authority Appointed        June, 1950
Board of Three Engineers Retained          June, 1950
Report of Board of Engineers      January, 1951
Financing and Construction Authorized by Legislature       April 30, 1952
D.B. Steinman Selected as Engineer           January, 1953
Preliminary Plans and Estimates Completed      March, 1953
Construction Contracts Negotiated    March, 1953
Bids Received for Sale of Bonds       December 17, 1953
Began Construction           May 7, 1954
Open to traffic       November 1, 1957
Formal dedication        June 25-28, 1958
50 millionth crossing           September 25, 1984
40th Anniversary Celebration     November 1, 1997
100 millionth crossing        June 25, 1998

« Last Edit: December 20, 2017, 05:56:41 am by big oil »
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Offline Oubones

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #233 on: December 20, 2017, 05:33:03 am »
Another very interesting bit of history.
Those bluegills, do they not have a lot of bones?
Our "Kurpers" here are full of small bones that makes them suitable for curry fish but not panfried?
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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #234 on: December 20, 2017, 05:41:44 am »
Another very interesting bit of history.
Those bluegills, do they not have a lot of bones?
Our "Kurpers" here are full of small bones that makes them suitable for curry fish but not panfried?


Thanks  :thumleft:

Some filet them to remove bones, some don't.  If you pan fry them with skin and bones, they increase moisture and flavor some say.  I prefer mine filet with a skin on one side.
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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #235 on: December 20, 2017, 06:25:03 am »
Wow! What a great read with my first morning coffee.  :thumleft:




.............and magnificent pictures too!!
« Last Edit: December 20, 2017, 07:41:33 am by jaybiker »
 
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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #236 on: December 20, 2017, 07:48:38 am »
Wow , the northen lights is on my bucket list one day,awsome read budd ,  :thumleft:
 
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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #237 on: December 20, 2017, 08:51:01 am »
Very interesting read, thanks!
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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #238 on: December 20, 2017, 07:45:54 pm »
Thanks for posting very interesting  :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:
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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #239 on: December 20, 2017, 08:43:18 pm »
Wow , the northen lights is on my bucket list one day,awsome read budd ,  :thumleft:

Good, make it happen Slim Jim  :thumleft:

Bring along your favorite bottle of Scotch and add a few pulls off a Mary Jane cigarette for a magical experience viewing the northern lights  :lol8:


« Last Edit: December 20, 2017, 08:46:56 pm by big oil »
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