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Author Topic: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.  (Read 37206 times)

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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #400 on: April 21, 2018, 10:16:28 am »
Only now read your thread and it's real good info and insight to your part of the world.
Had a bit of nostalgia early on with the your tour on the Street Glide, makes me miss mine, trade for a newer model Fatboy. But it got me kind of wondering why trade the Glide on the KTM, I convinced my wife that I need both the HD and the KTM, different applications and if I have both, I won't be winding and crying about not haveing the one or the other. Mike sence to me at least.
Planning on touring the lower states within the next two years, or ride down from north to south, still ned to deside. Keep your posts coming.

Previous lower back injuries keep me from riding a cruiser type bike. 

In the 11,000 miles I rode the Street Glide, I was never truly comfortable on the bike.

Regardless of make and model, I couldn't ride my dads Yamaha/Star cruiser for more than 50 miles without severe aches and pains.

Too unnatural for me to have my feet in front of me and my knees higher than my rear end.

I'm much more comfortable on bikes with pegs directly below my rear end aka dirt bike position.

@JFE   Are you going to rent or purchase a bike?  Ever head of the Trans American Trail? 
« Last Edit: April 23, 2018, 10:32:28 am by big oil »
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #401 on: April 21, 2018, 10:18:06 am »
Thanks for the updates! For some or other reason I thought youve been banned again!

Not quite a ban this time, I was 'muted'  :imaposer:

I could read posts, but not post anything.
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #402 on: April 23, 2018, 11:11:52 am »
After my deja-vu moment and reminiscing about the trip I'd taken several years prior on a former Ducati I owned, my mind took me back to the good times I had with the young lady I dated from Marquette.  She was a lovely girl, very nice personality, much younger than I, and we never argued about anything.  I eventually broke her warm heart when I told her I loved her dearly, though, only as a friend.  Fortunately, it didn't take her long to get over my dumb ass and she moved to near Dallas, Texas, where she met a nice young man, closer to her age.  They are now married and have two beautiful children.  I contacted her recently, to see if it would be too awkward if her and her husband would join me for dinner on my next trip to Dallas.  She accepted, so if everything works out, I will see her for the first time in several years and get to meet her husband and babies.

Now, back to the ride report, I must stop thinking about her tall slender body walking around in high-heels.

I left Sunset Point and traveled toward the exit of Presque Isle park.  On the way out, I captured the following photo of the mining operation from the north pointing south.






And the sandy beach area where locals and tourists congregate to enjoy the pure cool freshwater, though you would not know that by the following pic.  I'm not sure where everyone is at.  Maybe rumors flew that there was a Ducati hooligan in town.






This, Wilddogs is the Presque Isle Pavillion, where the public can reserve for wedding receptions, birthday parties, etc.  It's kept spotless and fortunately, the public doesn't vandalize much in this town.








I almost forgot to tell you about a local legend that lives here in Marquette.  Some think he's an insane lunatic for surfing Lake Superior in the winter time.  I choose not to judge him, though, if he enjoys himself, why not.  After all, he may think I'm insane for riding motorcycles around curves at high rates of speed.  It is my privilege to introduce you Wilddogs to the legend, Surfer Dan.






Surfer Dan doesn't get his fill for adventure solely surfing during the warm summer months, he likes to surf the frigid waters during the winter months as well.  Nice head-stand, eh?






Ride that wave.  Dan is a very experienced surfer.  He has surfed in Japan and Hawaii, but the U.P. is his home and he's been surfing Lake Superior for over 20 years.






He wears an 8mm wetsuit and 9mm boots if I remember correctly.






Idolized by many.






The legendary Surfer Dan.









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Offline Oubones

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #403 on: April 23, 2018, 07:26:57 pm »
Hehe, it seems that if you are called Dan, your head is cooked!
2SD is looking nearly normal compared to your Dan! :imaposer:
Google Ben Dekker, you will find that uncle of mine interesting! :peepwall:
Guys like them make this world special.
I had an acquaintance who surfed with two hats on and he always wore two shirts and two pants over each other.
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #404 on: April 24, 2018, 07:48:21 am »
Hehe, it seems that if you are called Dan, your head is cooked!
2SD is looking nearly normal compared to your Dan! :imaposer:
Google Ben Dekker, you will find that uncle of mine interesting! :peepwall:
Guys like them make this world special.
I had an acquaintance who surfed with two hats on and he always wore two shirts and two pants over each other.

I'm not sure who's crazier, it's probably pretty close to a tie between Surfer D and our Wheelchair Express Dan  :pot:
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #405 on: April 24, 2018, 08:03:27 am »
After my ride up Mount Marquette, then down through the coastal roads, and around Presque Isle, I decided to ride up to Big Bay, Michigan (furthest point north on the following map) to go have a beer at one of my favorite little bars in the U.P.  Once out of Marquette traffic, the road to Big Bay is a long stretch of high speed winding curves.  You'd be lucky if you met more than a couple of cars between the outskirts of Marquette and Big Bay, thus allowing for some high speed fun.

« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 08:05:00 am by big oil »
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #406 on: April 24, 2018, 08:04:40 am »
On my way to Big Baby on this stretch of nirvana, I hit an indicated speed of 140 + mph / 225 + kph, having the time of my life.  The Ohlins shock squirming underneath my arse as the shock is under-sprung for me with me still packing some winter weight.  A few miles before Big Bay, I decided to take a detour and ride into town on the sandy snowmobile trail.










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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #407 on: April 24, 2018, 08:05:47 am »
I arrived in Big Bay and had to find a land mark for the obligatory Summer Challenge for our local community school, so I decided the local post office would work.

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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #408 on: April 24, 2018, 08:06:25 am »
Here I am, looking pretty fly in my Arai  :biggrin: ;)

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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #409 on: April 24, 2018, 08:10:24 am »
I arrived to find an outdoor festival filled with locals celebrating the towns rescue squad or fire department, I'm not sure which.  I saw a few badges walking around, no place for an outlaw like me, and I my hands were starting to shake, so to alleviate the shakes, it was time to make my way to the famous Lumberjack Tavern on the outskirts of Big Bay.

« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 08:10:54 am by big oil »
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #410 on: April 24, 2018, 08:15:11 am »
The interior of the Lumberjack Tavern is like stepping back in time, when logging was done by men with axe and if you were lucky, a chainsaw.  It had been quite warm on my ride to Big Bay, so I nearly drank 1/2 the bottle of the Busch Light beer with my first gulp, so I had to order another before the first was gone.

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #411 on: April 24, 2018, 08:16:06 am »
That surfer guy is NUTS.
 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #412 on: April 24, 2018, 08:18:50 am »
The Lumberjack Tavern has been murder free since 1952, luckily.  And this, fellow WD's, is why the landmark is famous.  There was a Hollywood movie made about the murder that took place here, called Anatomy of a Murder, starring James Stewart.

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #413 on: April 24, 2018, 08:51:06 am »
Anatomy of a Murder

Anatomy of a Murder is a 1959 American courtroom drama crime film produced and directed by Otto Preminger. The screenplay by Wendell Mayes was based on the novel of the same name written by Michigan Supreme Court Justice John D. Voelker under the pen name Robert Traver. Voelker based the novel on a 1952 murder case in which he was the defense attorney.

The film stars James Stewart, Lee Remick, Ben Gazzara, Eve Arden, George C. Scott, Arthur O'Connell, Kathryn Grant, Brooks West (Arden's husband), Orson Bean, and Murray Hamilton. The judge was played by Joseph N. Welch, a real-life lawyer famous for berating Joseph McCarthy during the Army-McCarthy hearings. This was one of the first mainstream Hollywood films to address sex and rape in graphic terms. It includes one of Saul Bass's most celebrated title sequences, a musical score by Duke Ellington, who also appears in the film, and has been described by a law professor as "probably the finest pure trial movie ever made".

In 2012, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".




Plot

In the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, small-town lawyer Paul Biegler (Stewart), a former district attorney who lost his re-election bid, spends most of his time fishing, playing the piano, and hanging out with his alcoholic friend and colleague Parnell McCarthy (O'Connell) and sardonic secretary Maida Rutledge (Arden).

One day, Biegler is contacted by Laura Manion (Remick), to defend her husband US Army Lieutenant Frederick "Manny" Manion (Gazzara), who has been arrested for the first-degree murder of innkeeper Bernard "Barney" Quill. Manion does not deny the murder, but claims that Quill raped his wife. Even with such a motivation, getting Manion cleared of murder would be difficult, but Manion claims to have no memory of the event, suggesting that he may be eligible for a defense of irresistible impulse—a version of a temporary insanity defense. Biegler's folksy speech and laid-back demeanor hide a sharp legal mind and a propensity for courtroom theatrics that has the judge busy keeping things under control. However, the case for the defense does not go well, especially since the local district attorney (Brooks West) is assisted by high-powered prosecutor Claude Dancer (Scott) from the Attorney General's office.

Furthermore, the prosecution tries at every instance to block any mention of Manion's motive for killing Quill. Biegler eventually manages to get the rape of Laura Manion into the record and Judge Weaver (Joseph N. Welch) agrees to allow the matter to be part of the deliberations. During cross-examination, Dancer insinuates that Laura openly flirted with other men, including the man she claimed raped her. Psychiatrists give conflicting testimony to Manion's state of mind at the time that he killed Quill. Dancer says that Manion may have suspected Laura of cheating on him because he asked his wife, a Catholic, to swear on a rosary that Quill raped her. This raises doubt as to whether the act was non-consensual.

Quill's estate is to be inherited by Mary Pilant (Kathryn Grant), whom Dancer accuses of being Quill's mistress. McCarthy learns that she is in fact Quill's daughter, a fact she is anxious to keep secret since she was born out of wedlock. Biegler, who is losing the case, tries to persuade Pilant that Al Paquette (Murray Hamilton), the bartender who witnessed the murder, may know if Quill admitted to him of raping Laura but Paquette is covering this up, either because he loves Pilant or out of loyalty to Quill. Through Pilant, Biegler is unable to get Paquette to testify on behalf of Manion.

During the trial, Laura claims that Quill tore off her panties while raping her; the panties were not found where she alleges the rape took place. Pilant, unaware of any details of the case, testifies that she found the panties in the inn's laundry room. Biegler suggests Quill may have attempted to avoid suspicion by dropping the panties down the laundry chute, located next to his room, to avoid suspicion. Dancer tries to establish that Pilant's answers are founded on her jealousy. When Dancer asserts forcibly that Quill was Pilant's lover and that Pilant lied to cover this fact, Pilant shocks everyone by stating that Quill was her father. Manion is found "not guilty by reason of insanity". After the trial, Biegler decides to open a new practice, with a newly sober McCarthy as his partner.

The next day, Biegler and McCarthy travel to the Manions' trailer park home to get Manion's signature on a promissory note which they hope will suffice as collateral for a desperately needed loan. It turns out the Manions have vacated the trailer park, the trailer park superintendent commenting that Laura Manion had been crying. Manion left a note for Biegler, indicating that his flight was "an irresistible impulse", the same justification Biegler used during the trial. Biegler states that Mary Pilant has retained him to execute Quill's estate; McCarthy says that working for her will be "poetic justice".




Inspiration

On July 31, 1952, Lt. Coleman A. Peterson shot and killed Maurice Chenoweth in Big Bay, Michigan.  Voelker was retained as defense attorney a few days later.  The trial started on September 15, 1952,  and Assistant Attorney General Irving Beattie assisted Marquette County Prosecuting Attorney Edward Thomas.   Voelker used a rare version of the insanity defense called irresistible impulse that had not been used in Michigan since 1886.  The jury deliberated for four hours on September 23, 1952, before returning a verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity.  Two days later, after Peterson was examined by a psychiatrist who judged him sane, he was released.  Peterson and his wife were divorced soon after the trial.  Hillsdale Circuit Court Judge Charles O. Arch, Sr. tried the case because of the illness of a local judge.




Cast


James Stewart as Paul Biegler
Lee Remick as Laura Manion
Ben Gazzara as Lt. Frederick Manion
Arthur O'Connell as Parnell McCarthy
Eve Arden as Maida Rutledge
Kathryn Grant as Mary Pilant
George C. Scott as Claude Dancer
Orson Bean as Dr. Matthew Smith
Russ Brown as George Lemon
Murray Hamilton as Alphonse Paquette
Brooks West as Mitch Lodwick
Ken Lynch as Sgt. James Durgo
John Qualen as Deputy Sheriff Sulo
Howard McNear as Dr. Dompierre
Alexander Campbell as Dr. Gregory Harcourt
Ned Wever as Dr. Raschid
Jimmy Conlin as Madigan
Royal Beal as Sheriff Battisfore
Joseph Kearns as Mr. Burke, crime scene photographer
Don Ross as Duke Miller
Lloyd Le Vasseur as Court clerk
James Waters as Army sergeant
Joseph N. Welch as Judge Weaver

Uncredited
Duke Ellington as "Pie-Eye"
Irv Kupcinet as Distinguished gentleman




Production

The film was shot in several locations in the Upper Peninsula (Big Bay, Marquette, Ishpeming, and Michigamme). Some scenes were filmed in the Thunder Bay Inn in Big Bay, Michigan, one block from the Lumberjack Tavern, the site of the 1952 murder that inspired much of the novel.  Though the film was set in and filmed in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, the world premiere for the 1959 film was held at the United Artists Theater in Detroit.




Legal aspects

The film examines the apparent fallibility of the human factor in jurisprudence.  In various ways all of the human components—the counsels for defense and prosecution, the defendant and his wife, and the witnesses have their own differing positions on what is right or wrong, and varying perspectives on integrity, justice, morality and ethics. It is to be noted that the reliance on credibility of witnesses, and the "finding of facts" based upon those determinations, is the "Achilles heel" of the judicial process.

One controversial legal issue in this film is possible witness coaching, a violation of legal canons. The only plausible legal defense Lt. Manion has—the insanity defense—is virtually spelled out to a befuddled Manion by his prospective counsel, who then temporarily suspends the conversation and suggests that Manion rethink his factual/legal position. Witness coaching by the prosecution is even more blatant as they call in other jail inmates awaiting sentencing to testify against Manion, and is portrayed as subornation of perjury to an extent. The first suggests that the defendant may be concealing the truth and manipulating his story in order to obtain the best possible verdict, and the latter that the prosecution dangled a possible lighter sentence through plea bargain as an incentive to perjury.

Thus, there could be a synergy: compounding the inherent fallible nature of the process with the malleability of memory, the potential mendacity of witnesses, the showmanship and "magic tricks" involved in trials and advocacy, and the self-interest, venality, morality, poor perception and recollection, and ethical standards of the participants.




Critical reception

The language used during the film startled Chicago, Illinois, Mayor Richard J. Daley, and his police commissioner. As a result, the film was temporarily banned in the heavily Catholic city.Preminger filed a motion in federal court in Illinois and the mayor's decision was overturned. The film was allowed to be exhibited after the court determined that the clinical language during the trial was realistic and appropriate within the film's context.  In another federal lawsuit in Chicago, the daughter of the real-life murder victim from the 1952 case sued Dell Publishing and Columbia Pictures in July 1960 for libel over accusations that the book and movie "followed [the actual trial] too closely" and portrayed the two women in an unflattering light; the suit was dismissed less than a year later in May 1961.

Anatomy of a Murder has been well received by members of the legal and educational professions. In 1989, the American Bar Association rated this as one of the 12 best trial films of all time. In addition to its plot and musical score, the article noted: "The film's real highlight is its ability to demonstrate how a legal defense is developed in a difficult case. How many trial films would dare spend so much time watching lawyers do what many lawyers do most (and enjoy least)—research?"  The film has also been used as a teaching tool in law schools, as it encompasses (from the defense standpoint) all of the basic stages in the U.S. criminal justice system from client interview and arraignment through trial. The film was listed as No. 4 of 25 "Greatest Legal Movies" by the American Bar Association.

The film earned an estimated $5.5 million in rentals in the U.S. and Canada during its first year of release.

Film critics have noted the moral ambiguity, where a small town lawyer triumphs by guile, stealth and trickery. The film is frank and direct. Language and sexual themes are explicit, at variance with the times (and other films) when it was produced. The black and white palette is seen as a complement to Michigan's harsh Upper Peninsula landscape.  The film is "[m]ade in black-and-white but full of local color".

Bosley Crowther, film critic for The New York Times said, "After watching an endless succession of courtroom melodramas that have more or less transgressed the bounds of human reason and the rules of advocacy, it is cheering and fascinating to see one that hews magnificently to a line of dramatic but reasonable behavior and proper procedure in a court. Such a one is Anatomy of a Murder, which opened at the Criterion and the Plaza yesterday. It is the best courtroom melodrama this old judge has ever seen... . Outside of the fact that this drama gets a little tiring in spots—in its two hours and forty minutes, most of which is spent in court—it is well nigh flawless as a picture of an American court at work, of small-town American characters and of the average sordidness of crime."

Time felt that it was a well-paced, well-acted, and that the explicit language was warranted within the film's context.

In June 2008, the American Film Institute revealed AFI's 10 Top 10, the best 10 films in 10 "classic" American film genres, after polling over 1,500 people from the creative community. Anatomy of a Murder was selected as the seventh best film in the courtroom drama genre.

Rotten Tomatoes, a review aggregator, reports that 100% of 42 surveyed critics gave the film a positive review; the average rating was 8.6/10. The site's consensus states, "One of cinema's greatest courtroom dramas, Anatomy of a Murder is tense, thought-provoking, and brilliantly acted, with great performances from James Stewart and George C. Scott."




Soundtrack

The jazz score of Anatomy of a Murder was composed by Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn and played by Ellington's orchestra. Several of the Ellington band's sidemen, notably Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney, Russell Procope, and William "Cat" Anderson, are heard prominently throughout the film, and Ellington himself appears briefly as "Pie-Eye," the owner of a roadhouse where Paul Biegler (Stewart) and Laura Manion (Remick) have a confrontation.

Despite being heard "in bits and pieces" the score "contains some of his most evocative and eloquent music... and beckons with the alluring scent of a femme fatale." Including small pieces by Billy Strayhorn, film historians recognize it "as a landmark—the first significant Hollywood film music by African Americans comprising non-diegetic music, that is, music whose source is not visible or implied by action in the film, like an on-screen band." The score avoids cultural stereotypes which previously characterized jazz scores and "rejected a strict adherence to visuals in ways that presaged the New Wave cinema of the '60s."

The soundtrack album, containing 13 tracks, was released by Columbia Records on May 29, 1959. A CD was released on April 28, 1995, and reissued by Sony in a deluxe edition in 1999.




Reception

Detroit Free Press music critic Mark Stryker concluded: "Though indispensable, I think the score is too sketchy to rank in the top echelon among Ellington-Strayhorn masterpiece suites like Such Sweet Thunder and The Far East Suite, but its most inspired moments are their equal."   The score employs a "handful of themes, endlessly recombined and re-orchestrated. Ellington never wrote a melody more seductive than the hip-swaying "Flirtibird", featuring the "irresistibly salacious tremor" by Johnny Hodges on the alto saxophone." A stalking back-beat barely contains the simmering violence of the main title music" The score is heavily dipped in "the scent of the blues and Ellington's orchestra bursts with color."  The AllMusic review by Bruce Eder awarded the album 3 stars calling it "a virtuoso jazz score—moody, witty, sexy, and—in its own quiet way—playful".

Ellington's score won three Grammy Awards in 1959, for Best Performance by a Dance Band, Best Musical Composition First Recorded and Released in 1959 and Best Sound Track Album.




Awards and honors

Wins

New York Film Critics Circle Awards: NYFCC Award Best Actor, James Stewart, Best Screenplay, Wendell Mayes; 1959.

Venice International Film Festival: Volpi Cup; Best Actor, James Stewart; 1959.

Three Grammy Awards

Producers Guild of America Awards: PGA Award; Top Drama; Top Male Dramatic Performance, James Stewart; Top Male Supporting Performance, Arthur O'Connell; 1960.
Michigan Product of the Year.


Nominations

Academy Awards:

Best Actor in a Leading Role: James Stewart

Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Arthur O'Connell

Best Actor in a Supporting Role: George C. Scott

Best Cinematography, Black-and-White: Sam Leavitt

Best Film Editing: Louis R. Loeffler

Best Picture: Otto Preminger

Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium: Wendell Mayes; 1960



British Academy Film Awards:

Best Film from any Source Otto Preminger, USA

Best Foreign Actor James Stewart, USA

Most Promising Newcomer Joseph N. Welch, USA; 1960.


Directors Guild of America Awards:

DGA Award Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film, Otto Preminger; 1960.


Golden Globe Awards:

Best Motion Picture, Drama

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama: Lee Remick

Best Director, Motion Picture: Otto Preminger

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture: Joseph N. Welch; 1960.


American Film Institute Lists:

AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies: Nominated

AFI's 100 Years...100 Thrills: Nominated

AFI's 100 Years of Film Scores: Nominated

AFI's 10 Top 10: #7 Courtroom Drama

Anatomy of a Murder was one of 25 films added to the National Film Registry in 2012. "The annual selections by the Library of Congress span more than a century of American filmmaking."




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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #414 on: April 24, 2018, 09:02:38 am »
And here is where the alleged rapist took his last breath.










Although, according to local legend, he was shot and killed behind the bar.  The movie people changed the location of the death to out on the main floor.  Also according to local legend, the woman was not raped, she was having an affair, and when her husband confronted her about the affair, she claimed she was raped.
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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #415 on: April 24, 2018, 09:11:07 am »
After enjoying a few cold ones at the Lumberjack Tavern, I decided to mount my Italian mistress and head south back to camp.  With the liquid courage I'd just consumed, I rode like a bat out of hell on the way back to Marquette.  I love high speed, it's intoxicating to me to fly through the wind as fast as possible.  Nearing Marquette, I slowed my speed in fear of police presence.  I then rode West on U.S. 41 towards camp, I was thinking how great an afternoon nap would feel back at camp.  On the way, I decided to shoot a few pics of Teal Lake facing West.











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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #416 on: April 24, 2018, 09:11:39 am »
Near downtown Negaunee, I shot this pic for you Dogs.  It is home to the United States National Hall of Fame and Museum.  Downhill, Cross-Country, and Ski Jump are very popular forms of skiing in this part of the country.

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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #417 on: April 24, 2018, 09:17:39 am »
Upon arriving back at camp, the beers and the noise from the loud Fast by Feracci exhaust I have mounted on my Duc, had made me sleepy, so I took a nap for a couple of hours.  I awoke feeling lazy, didn't feel like riding much anymore, so I drove my bakkie to the nearest convenience store to get some more ice for my ice chest, some diesel for the bakkie, and the most important thing, more beer.  I decided I was just going to relax for the rest of the evening after loading up the Duc on the bakkie, so I could get on the road early the next morning. 


Here's how I relaxed, cooked some brats over an open fire, and a few more cold cold Pabst Blue Ribbon sleep medication and pain reliever!

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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #418 on: April 24, 2018, 09:20:33 am »
Not a bad day, I had lots of fun riding my old Duc, and she handled some off road riding quite well.  Total mileage for the day wasn't far, only about 213km, but it wasn't the distance that counted, it was the quality of the riding. 

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Offline landieman

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #419 on: April 26, 2018, 10:35:31 am »
thanks for sharing BO,i like the use of bakkie,you sound like a boer seuntjie now
don't worry about things you can't change,change the things you can.
 
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