Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register

Author Topic: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.  (Read 43839 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #360 on: March 23, 2018, 07:24:40 pm »
Hey you dirty wild dogs, the following few posts will be dedicated to Mackinac Island.  Almost all the pics, if not all pics, are from the web.  I did not go to the island on this trip.  I've stayed or visited extensively in the past.

Mackinac (MACK-in-awe) became one of the nation’s favored summer resort destinations during the Victorian era. Vacationers arrived in large lake excursion boats from Buffalo, Cleveland, Chicago and Detroit seeking the cooler weather on Mackinac Island. They danced to Strauss’ waltzes, listened to Sousa’s stirring marches, dined on whitefish and strolled along the broad decks. To accommodate overnight guests, boat and railroad companies financed the building of Grand Hotel.

Mackinac Island is a true gem in our country.  Whether you're poor, middle class, rich, or mega rich, there's something for everyone on the island.  People from all over the world travel to stay on Mackinac Island during the spring, summer, and fall months.  Motorized travel has been prohibited since 1898, except by emergency vehicles and snowmobiles during winter months.  Snowmobiles can travel to the island on a natural ice bridge connecting the island to the mainland.  The only methods to travel around the island in spring, summer, and autumn are by horse-drawn carriage, bicycle, or foot.  The State of Michigan has a Governor's Mansion on the island for our governor to reside during the summer months!!  Must be nice!!   Allow me to give you a tour through the pics and dialogue. 




First, in order to get to the island, one must park in either St. Ignace North or Mackinac City South of the Mackinac Bridge.






One can fly to the island, though most board a Hydro-jet vessel such as this one from Shepler's Ferry Service.






Or a Hydro-jet Catamaran from Arnold Transit.






When arriving by ferry, the first landmark your eyes are drawn to is the enormity of The Grand Hotel.  The Grant Hotel is one of the most famous hotels and or landmarks in the world.  It has the longest porch of any building on the globe.







Since 1887 Grand Hotel beckons guests to a bygone era of old-world hospitality and charm. Experience the tradition of Afternoon Tea in the Parlor, dressing up for dinner, nightly dancing to the sounds of the Grand Hotel Orchestra, and sitting in a rocking chair on the world’s longest porch with views of the Straits of Mackinac.







Family-owned for three generations, this National Historic Landmark has always embraced its rich history, while keeping up with current times. That means today, guests enjoy modern amenities while the hotel’s original architecture and charm have been tastefully preserved. Contributing greatly to the hotel’s ambiance is the relaxed atmosphere of Mackinac Island, where cars are not allowed and the horse and carriage and bicycle are favored modes of transportation.






The Musser Family

Grand Hotel has been owned for three generations by the Musser family. President R.D. (Dan) Musser III runs the hotel alongside his sister Mimi Cunningham and mother Amelia Musser. Since 1933, the Musser family has made it their mission to give every guest a grand experience.







393 Rooms and No Two Are the Same

Grand Hotel has been decorated by esteemed interior designer, Carleton Varney of Dorothy Draper & Co. Each of the hotel’s 393 guest rooms feature their own unique style and theme.







A Top Destination for Families

Thanks to many activities and children’s programs, the readers of Travel + Leisure Family magazine rate Grand Hotel as one of the 10 kid-friendliest resorts in the U.S. and Canada. Grand Hotel was also recognized as a top resort in the family category in the 2015.







A Distinctive Destination

America’s True Grand Hotel was named by the National Trust for Historic Preservation as One of a Dozen Distinctive Destinations. Grand Hotel has also received a number of distinguished awards.






One of the many gardening events held during the summer months.






Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Online dirtyXT

Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #361 on: March 23, 2018, 09:22:47 pm »
wow.
Bike history:
Ital jet 50 - sold, DT 50 - scrapped - AR80 - sold DT185 - confiscated  KDX250 - sold ZZR400 - sold KX500 - XT660R Swapped for R1 YZF R1 - sold - XT660Z - sold

 

Offline BMWPE

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 4,225
  • Thanked: 77 times
  • Port Elizabeth
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #362 on: March 24, 2018, 10:43:35 am »
 :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:

Impressive 
Rallye
 
The following users thanked this post: big oil

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #363 on: March 24, 2018, 09:16:08 pm »
Grand Hotel front view from garden.  The Grand Hotel is for people and families that want to experience what top tier living was like during the late 1,800's to early 1,900's Victorian stage.






Another frontal view from Lake Huron.






Historic Site Plaque. 






Gardens.











Another garden where these two idiots are taking the plunge.  Kidding!!






Green Velvet Couches in main lobby.






Main lobby.










Hotel main dining rooms.










Ballroom and stage.






Typical room of the Grand Hotel.
Category 1 smaller rooms with interior views cost between $583-$651 per night during peak season plus taxes, fees, children over 9 years old!
Category 2 larger rooms or smaller rooms with lake view cost between $651-$723 per night peak season plus taxes, fees, children over 9 years old!
Category 3 Deluxe larger rooms with lake view and balcony cost between $835-$919 per night peak season plus taxes, fees, children over 9 years old!
One bedroom suites with parlour and fully stocked bar cost around $1,500 per night plus..................!
Two bedroom suites with parlour and fully stocked bar cost between $2,500-$3,000 per night plus...................!






Named suites, such as the Jacqueline Kennedy suite below, cost between $909-$1,070 per night peak season plus taxes, fees, ................!



Vanderbuilt Suite






Tea Store/Room





« Last Edit: March 24, 2018, 09:41:23 pm by big oil »
Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #364 on: March 24, 2018, 09:31:31 pm »
If you can't imagine dealing with other hotel patrons and you want your own residence on Grand Hotel grounds, you can rent the 4 bedroom Masco Cottage for up to 8 people.  The nightly rate includes the following:

  • When staying multiple nights, the option to have dinner served in the Cottage featuring a menu created specifically for you by our personal chef
    Cocktails and hors d’oeuvres in the Cottage before dinner
    Nightly turndown
    Fully stocked refrigerator and bar
    Wii gaming system
    Private outdoor hot tub
    Special discounts on ferry boat tickets
    Charter air service discount
    Round-trip flight included with month-long Masco Cottage rental

Nightly:
$4,250.00
Weekly:
$24,900.00
Monthly:
$88,000.00

Plus fees and taxes :biggrin:






















Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #365 on: March 24, 2018, 10:01:13 pm »
If you want to start a small fire in your mistress's, girlfriend's, or wife's panties  >:D, I'd encourage you to order a horse-drawn carriage ride around the island.  Don't forget her favorite bottle of wine.  ;)






Here's a picture of Minxy and I after a long day's ride.  She couldn't resist my American charm, so we decided to marry.   :peepwall:

I'm dre dre dre..., excuse me, dreaming of course  :imaposer: :pot: :ricky:






If you'd like to have more privacy on your carriage ride, get one of the enclosed carriages, that way you can start nibbling on her appetizer before dinner.   >:D






If dining at one of the many restaurants on the island or the dining hall at the Grand Hotel isn't your bag baby, take your lady to dinner at the Wood's Restaurant.  Fine dining with a Bavarian theme.







« Last Edit: March 24, 2018, 10:03:31 pm by big oil »
Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #366 on: March 27, 2018, 01:14:51 am »
Fort Mackinac, also on the island and established by the British Army in 1780 is a former British and American military outpost garrisoned from the late 18th century to the late 19th century in the city of Mackinac Island, Michigan, on Mackinac Island. The British built the fort during the American Revolutionary War to control the strategic Straits of Mackinac between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, and by extension the fur trade on the Great Lakes. The British did not relinquish the fort until fifteen years after American independence.

Fort Mackinac later became the scene of two strategic battles for control of the Great Lakes during the War of 1812. During most of the 19th century, it served as an outpost of the United States Army. Closed in 1895, the fort has been adapted as a museum on the grounds of Mackinac Island State Park.





American Revolutionary War

Before 1763, the French used Fort Michilimackinac on the mainland south shore of the Straits of Mackinac to control the area. After the Treaty of Paris (1763), the British occupied the French fort but considered the wooden structure too difficult to defend. In 1780/1781, its lieutenant governor Patrick Sinclair constructed a new limestone fort on the 150-foot limestone bluffs of Mackinac Island above the Straits of Mackinac.  The British held the outpost throughout the American Revolutionary War. Captain Daniel Robertson commanded the garrison on Mackinac Island from 1782 to his death in 1787. Despite the terms of the Treaty of Paris (1783), the British did not officially relinquish the fort to the United States until 1796.


War of 1812

In June 1812, at the start of the War of 1812, British General Isaac Brock sent a canoe party 1,200 miles (1,900 km) to confirm that a state of war existed. This party returned with an order to attack Fort Mackinac, then known as Fort Michilimackinac.

A minimal United States garrison of approximately sixty men under the command of Lieutenant Porter Hanks then manned Fort Mackinac. Although a diligent officer, Hanks had received no communication from his superiors for months. On the morning of 17 July 1812, a combined British and Native American force of seventy war canoes and ten bateaux under the command of British Captain Charles Roberts attacked Fort Mackinac. British Captain Roberts came from Fort St. Joseph (Ontario) and landed on the north end of Mackinac Island, 2 miles (3 km) from the fort. The British removed the village inhabitants from their homes and trained two cannons at the fort. The Americans, under Lieutenant Hanks, were taken by surprise and Hanks perceived his garrison was badly outnumbered. The officers and men under Roberts numbered about two hundred; a few hundred Native Americans of various tribes supported him.

Fearing that the Native Americans on the British side would massacre his men and allies, American Lieutenant Hanks accepted the British offer of surrender without a fight. The British paroled the American forces, essentially allowing them to go free after swearing to not take up arms in the war again. They made the island inhabitants swear an oath of allegiance as subjects of the United Kingdom.

Shortly after the British captured the fort, two American vessels arrived from Ft. Dearborn (Chicago), unaware of the start of the War of 1812, or the fort's capture by British forces. The British raised the American flag and when the vessels tied up at the pier, the British captured the two sloops as prizes of war. The ships were the Erie (Capt. Norton) and Friends Good Will (Capt. Lee), the latter being taken by the British into service as HMS Little Belt. The schooner Mary and the Salina, anchored at port, were sent by the British to Detroit as cartels carrying the prisoners they had taken.

After capturing the island, the British under the command of Colonel Robert McDouall of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment built Fort George, a stockade and blockhouse on the highest point of the island, to prevent the Americans from re-capturing the island using the same strategy. Lieutenant Hanks made his way to Detroit and the American military post there. Upon his arrival, superiors charged him with cowardice in the surrender of Fort Mackinac. Before the court martial of Lieutenant Hanks could begin, British forces attacked Fort Detroit. A British cannonball ripped through the room where Hanks was standing, cutting him in half and killing the officer next to him as well.

United States Army Colonel George Croghan and his superior General William Henry Harrison designed a major campaign to take control of the Great Lakes and sever the fur trade alliance between the British and the tribes of the region; as part of this campaign, the Americans attempted to retake Mackinac Island in July 1814. The two-pronged campaign also included an assault on Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, located on the upper [Mississippi River].






Battle of Mackinac Island (1814)

On 26 July 1814, a squadron of five United States ships arrived off Mackinac Island, carrying a landing force of 700 soldiers under the command of Colonel Croghan. This landing began the Battle of Mackinac Island. To his dismay, Colonel Croghan discovered that the new British blockhouse stood too high for the naval guns to reach, forcing an unprotected assault on the wall of Fort George. The Americans shelled Fort George for two days with most shells falling harmlessly in vegetable gardens around the fort.

A dense fog forced the Americans back from Mackinac Island for a week. Major Andrew Holmes led the American forces in returning; they landed at the north end of the island near the location of the British assault in 1812. The Americans worked their way to the fort through dense woods, which Native American allies of the British protected, finally emerging into a clearing below Fort George.

British Colonel McDouall had placed a small force bearing muskets, rifles, and two field guns behind low breastworks at the opposite end of the clearing. When the Americans emerged from the woods into the clearing, the British guns targeted them easily. British soldiers killed 13 Americans, including Major Holmes and two other officers, and wounded 51 others. The heavy losses compelled US Colonel Croghan to order his men to retreat back through the woods to the beach. The Americans rowed back to their ships and retreated.

The American defeat in the Battle of Mackinac Island left the island and its forts in the hands of the British through the end of the War of 1812. Following the Treaty of Ghent, American forces reoccupied Fort Mackinac in July 1815. They renamed Fort George as Fort Holmes, in honor of Major Holmes, killed in the 1814 attack. After the War of 1812 and settlement of the northern border and tensions with Britain, Fort Mackinac gradually declined in military significance.







Later years

No longer needed as a front line border defense against the British in Canada, the fort was used as a strategic troop reserve. The Army essentially could deploy troops to Fort Mackinac until a need arose to transfer them to other locations of military importance. The Army nearly abandoned Fort Mackinac between such uses. It was also used as a fur trading post, as Mackinac Island was an important fur post. From 1816 to 1821 the post was commanded by Benjamin Kendrick Pierce, the older brother of President Franklin Pierce.  He married the daughter of Magdelaine Laframboise, a prominent fur trader of Ojibwe and French descent.

On 6 June 1822, a fur trader named Alexis St. Martin waited to trade in his furs when a gun accidentally discharged just inches from him, blowing a hole in his abdomen. The post surgeon, Doctor William Beaumont, attended to him. Dr. Beaumont cared for the presumably doomed St. Martin the best he could. To his surprise, the man appeared to make a recovery. Beaumont took St. Martin into his home, caring for him for several years. St. Martin healed although his stomach had a hole. Beaumont seized the opportunity and began observing and conducting experiments on the man. Through these experiments, Beaumont described the process of digestion in detail, unlocking its mysteries. Beaumont wrote a book about his experiments and later became known as "The Father of Gastric Physiology."

The fort developed as an important staging area for US exploration of the northern Michigan Territory, including the expedition in 1832 under the command of Lewis Cass to explore the headwaters of the Mississippi River. Henry Rowe Schoolcraft held the post of United States Indian agent at Fort Mackinac for a time in the 1830s. He did extensive study of the Native American languages and culture of the region, aided by his marriage to Jane Johnston, the Ojibwe-British daughter of Johnston, a wealthy British fur trader at Sault Ste. Marie. Both her parents' families were prominent among the elite of the region.

During the Mexican–American War and for long periods during the Civil War, the Army left the care and upkeep of Fort Mackinac to an ordnance sergeant. Despite these periods of relative inactivity, the fort played a small role in the Civil War, briefly used as a prison for three Confederate political prisoners. Brought to Mackinac Island and the fort during the summer months, these three men enjoyed relative freedom, guarded only by a volunteer militia. When faced with the prospect of enduring a long, harsh winter on the island, two of the prisoners signed loyalty oaths and obtained release. The third Confederate refused, and the Army ultimately transferred him to another post.







Mackinac National Park

To improve conditions and boost morale, the Army constructed a bathhouse at the fort (in which every man at the fort was required to bathe at least once a week), a post toilet (complete with flush toilets), and a post canteen (where the men could read current magazines, play pool, and buy beer and wine). They wanted Fort Mackinac to be a "desirable station." Soldiers also had regular military duties, drilling on the parade ground and taking target practice at least once a week on either a 600- or 1000-yard rifle range. The skills learned at the fort later proved important for many troops who were posted at other locations in the still-dangerous American West.




Decommissioning

State administration

In 1895, Congress closed Fort Mackinac and Mackinac National Park. It transferred the fort and park to the State of Michigan, which created Mackinac Island State Park, the first state park in Michigan. The semi-autonomous Mackinac Island State Park Commission in 1895 began governing Fort Mackinac and the other surrounding historic sites on or near Mackinac Island: Colonial Michilimackinac, Historic Mill Creek, the Old Mackinac Point Lighthouse, and Mackinac Island State Park. The Governor of Michigan appoints members of the Commission, who meet many times during the course of a year to govern Mackinac State Historic Parks. The commission and historic parks preserve, protect, and present the rich and natural history of Mackinac Island and the Straits area.

In the 1950s, Mackinac Island State Park Commission developed a new way of financing its park, based on the system that financed the Mackinac Bridge. Michigan financed construction of Mackinac Bridge through revenue bonds repaid from the cash flow of toll fees from the bridge after it opened in 1957. Mackinac Island State Park Commission modified this idea for park restoration purposes, with Fort Mackinac admission fees serving as the cash flow. More than three-fourths of budget of Mackinac Island State Park Commission now comes from admission fees and other self-generated cash flow. Most United States parks-and-recreation agencies instead depend upon public subsidies. Mackinac Island State Park Commission operates one of the largest parks in United States that generates a significant majority of its own operating budget.








The Fort today

The current museum at the park includes 14 historic buildings.

Today, Fort Mackinac is a popular heritage tourist destination. Situated on 150-foot bluffs above the Straits of Mackinac, it is one of the few surviving American Revolutionary War forts and one of the most complete early forts in the country. In 2015, Fort Mackinac celebrated 235 years standing guard over Mackinac Island.

During the main tourism summer months (June through August), visitors ascend into a bustle of activity within the old British-built stone walls of old Fort Mackinac after entering its weathered gates. Costumed interpreters greet visitors, portray life in the 1880s, answer questions, pose for pictures, and lead tours throughout the day. Some of the "soldiers" carry original 45-70 Springfield Model 1873, the type used at the fort during the 1880s. Others play music or greet and mingle with the crowds of visitors.









Extant buildings

There are 14 original buildings as part of the fort museum:

1. Commissary Building: Once used for food storage; today houses a video program.
2. Post Headquarters: Used for the paymaster and offices.
3. Quartermaster's Storehouse: Held any and all equipment needed by the soldiers during the Fort's history.
4. Post Bathhouse: The newest building, built in 1885, housing 6 baths for the soldiers' comfort.
5. Soldiers Barracks: Used to house the 100+ soldiers stationed there, but today houses a museum and the gift shop called the Sutler's Store.
6. Post Schoolhouse: Provided education for soldiers
7. Hill Quarters: Many lieutenants lived in these officers' quarters. Rank was rewarded.
8. Post Hospital: Where the post doctor/surgeon treated patients until a new hospital was built in 1860.
9. Officer's Stone Quarters: Michigan's oldest building (1780), used to house officers. Today holds the Kids Quarters and the Tea Room.
10. Wood Quarters: Used for various purposes over the life of the building, including officers' quarters and a post canteen that served Schlitz beer, but no whiskey.
11. Post Guardhouse: Prisoners were held on this site for over a century.
12-14: North, East, and West Blockhouses: Stone towers built by the first Americans garrisoning Fort Mackinac.













Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #367 on: March 27, 2018, 01:35:26 am »
If Grand Hotel is not your bag, there are numerous B and B's located on the island near downtown, such as:

Bay View B n B










I can't remember the name B and B







Island House Inn





The Inn at Mackinac






Cottage Inn






All located near downtown






Arch rock is a short hike from downtown.

Arch Rock is a geologic formation on Mackinac Island in Michigan. It is a natural limestone arch formed during the Nipissing post-glacial period, a period of high Lake Huron levels following the end of the Wisconsin glaciation. To this day Arch Rock stands on the Lake Huron shoreline 146 feet (45 m) above the water.

Limestone breccia is not an ideal material for natural bridges, and this type of formation is quite rare in the North American Great Lakes region. The Native Americans saw Arch Rock as a place of numinous power, and told many stories and legends about it.

Euro-Americans did not share many of the taboos of their Native predecessors, and treated Arch Rock as a curiosity to be admired. One early chronicler was Alexis de Tocqueville who wrote of the "Giant's Arch" "of extraordinary shape" during his visit in August, 1831.

Its presence was a major element in the decisions to create Mackinac National Park in 1875 and its successor, Mackinac Island State Park, in 1895. Arch Rock has been a part of the State Park ever since. Today Arch Rock is a focus of Mackinac Island tourism, and is seen by many visitors to the Island. Several trails and paved roads, including the aptly named Arch Rock Road and Arch Rock Bicycle Trail, lead to the formation.












Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #368 on: March 28, 2018, 09:18:44 pm »
Last post on Mackinac Island, Michigan, I promise, I can't help it, the place holds a special place in my heart for many reasons.  Many a good time I've had there.  Then back to the actual ride report and what happened with my KTM!

For you Saffers that may be interested in retiring in one of the most beautiful places on the globe, there are a couple of homes on the market at this time.  Residences on Mackinac Island rarely come up for sale.  Investing in a home on Mackinac Island is a no lose situation, it's not like property values will decrease.  In my opinion, a purchase would be a no lose investment.  With that said, here are a couple for sale.

Cairngorm Cottage























Cairngorm is a gorgeous Victorian Cottage which was built in 1888 and truly exemplifies the elegance of an earlier time. This classic home has been impeccably restored in every possible way and renovated with modern conveniences included central heat and air conditioning.

The cottage comes completely appointed and professionally decorated with incredible furnishings collect by the previous owner for the last 75 years.  This well respected 8000 sq. ft. West Bluff property includes the fully furnished 7 bedrooms, 6 baths main cottage, plus completely furnished 2 bedroom, 2 bath Carriage house behind ready for horses or caretakers quarters.

The back yard is beautifully landscaped with swimming pool, Jacuzzi, gazebo and stone terraced gardens totally secured and very private.  Excellent location with fine dining, golf, spa, shopping, horses and plenty of amenities all within walking distance of Mackinac’s famous Grand Hotel.

Can be yours for only 68,912,122.50 Rand.




Also for sale at this time is probably my favorite home on Mackinac Island.

















































3821 Cedar Point Lane,  Mackinac Island, MI 49757 

Mackinac Island has been a bucket list destination for over a century. Located just over a mile from the busy downtown area, this immaculate home sits on a small bluff on the southwest part of the island. Views overlook Lake Huron and the Mackinaw Bridge, which provide those million dollar sunsets. Five bedrooms, 3.5 baths, and 4,500sqft of living space create ample room to entertain friends and family. The 60' porch is perfect for enjoying a cocktail or beverage anytime of the day. No detail was missed inside or out.

All for only 30,568,710.75 Rand.






Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline ChrisL - DUSTRIDERS

  • Forum Vendor
  • Castrated Dog
  • ******
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 32,141
  • Thanked: 834 times
    • dustriders.co.za
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #369 on: March 28, 2018, 10:47:46 pm »
Also for sale at this time is probably my favorite home on Mackinac Island.

Love all the wood in that home. :thumleft:
If my calculations is right it's on the market for 2.5 million USD?If so it looks as if it should be more.
MOTORCYCLE ACCESSORIES RETAILER
info@dustriders.co.za
ENDURISTAN SOFTLUGGAGE IMPORTER
www.dustriders.co.za
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #370 on: March 29, 2018, 03:36:52 pm »
Also for sale at this time is probably my favorite home on Mackinac Island.

Love all the wood in that home. :thumleft:
If my calculations is right it's on the market for 2.5 million USD?If so it looks as if it should be more.

Yes, just shy of 2.6 million at 2.595.

The Cairngorm Cottage is listed at 5.85 million.
Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline cocky

  • Ryyyyyy net ASFB.
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 990 Adventure
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 4,396
  • Thanked: 206 times
  • DILLIGAF
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #371 on: March 29, 2018, 04:06:12 pm »

Welcome again back, good to have you here :thumleft:
Just because your past did not turn out like you wanted it to does not mean your marriage will not be better than you ever imagined it could be.
Die Kaapse Hoender!
 
The following users thanked this post: big oil

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #372 on: March 29, 2018, 04:20:05 pm »
Back to the RR.  My destination for the day was Van Riper State Park.  A nice government campground with clean bathroom and shower facilities a short walk from any of the campsites.  I reserved 2 nights at the campground for around $20 usd.

On the way west across the UP, I started to get the shakes, so I had to stop and drink a couple of beers at a small town tavern.  It was like going back in time.  Each beer was only $1.50.  With the shakes now subsided, I decided to make a stop at K.I. Sawyer AFB and shoot some pics for you dogs of some old relics on display.


« Last Edit: July 19, 2019, 03:21:54 am by big oil »
Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #373 on: March 29, 2018, 04:21:36 pm »

Welcome again back, good to have you here :thumleft:

Thanks Mr. Cocky, I appreciate your support. 
Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #374 on: March 29, 2018, 04:23:29 pm »







The McDonnell ADM-20 Quail was a subsonic, jet powered, air-launched decoy cruise missile built by McDonnell Aircraft Corporation. The Quail was designed to be launched by the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber and its original United States Air Force designation was GAM-72 (GAM standing for Guided Aircraft Missile).



Development

In 1955 the USAF started a major effort to construct decoy missiles. The goal of this effort was to improve the ability of strategic bombers to penetrate air-defense systems. The projects initiated under this effort included the MX-2223 which produced the XSM-73 Goose a long range ground-launched jet-powered, decoy cruise missile, MX-2224 which produced the XGAM-71 Buck Duck an air-launched rocket powered decoy missile to equip the Convair B-36.

The USAF was at the same time developing the XQ-4 as a supersonic target drone to support the Bomarc Missile Program. A requirement was established by the USAF Power Plant Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base to support follow-on production of the XQ-4. This requirement called for a small jet engine in the 2,000 lbf (8.9 kN) thrust class with a high thrust-to-weight ratio of 10:1. On November 28, 1954 General Electric was awarded a USAF development contract to construct the XJ-85-GE-1. The USAF designated the XJ85 project MX-2273.

During April 1955, the USAF began a program to develop a short range air-launched decoy missile to simulate the radar cross section of a bomber. On January 18, 1956, the USAF released General Operational Requirement (GOR) 139.



Design

McDonnell Aircraft Corporation submitted a design which included a cropped-delta-wing decoy constructed largely of fiberglass and carried internally within a B-52. The following month on February 1, 1956, the McDonnell Aircraft Corporation was awarded a contract to develop Weapon System 122A which included the GAM-72 Green Quail missile. In June 1956 General Electric was selected as the engine contractor for the GAM-72. Guidance components were built by Summers Gyroscope and the countermeasures equipment by Ramo-Wooldridge Corporation.

The GAM-72 was designed with a high-mounted delta wing and no horizontal stabilizer. A slab-sided fuselage and two sets of vertical stabilizers contributed to the GAM-72s ability to simulate the radar cross section of a bomber. Initially the GAM-72 was powered by a YJ85-GE-3. This jet engine produced 2,450 lbf (10.9 kN) of thrust with a thrust-to-weight ratio goal of (6:1).

The GAM-72s guidance system could be pre-programmed on the ground to execute two turns and one speed change during a flight time of 45 to 55 minutes. Flight duration depended on altitude. The GAM-72 was designed to operate at altitudes between 35,000 ft (10,668 m) to 50,000 ft (15,240 m) at speeds between Mach 0.75 to Mach 0.9. Range varied between 357 nm and 445 nm (661 to 716 km), also depending on altitude.

Two GAM-72s with folded wings and stabilizers were packaged together for mounting in the bomber weapons bay. Before launch the bomber's radar navigator lowered the GAM-72 using a retractable arm from the airplane's weapons bay into the slipstream below the aircraft. The wings and stabilizers of the GAM-72 were unfolded, the jet engine was started, and the missile was launched.

Flight testing of the XGAM-72 began in July 1957 at Holloman Air Force Base and the adjacent White Sands Missile Range. Initially testing involved the XGAM-72 being captively carried by a B-52. The first glide flight of the XGAM-72 occurred in November 1957. Three test launches were completed in 1957. The first successful powered flight of the XGAM-72 occurred in August 1958. This flight lasted 14 minutes and covered 103 nautical miles (191 km). A total of ten test flights occurred in 1958, seventeen flights in 1959, with the final four flights being completed in 1960. Operational testing then moved to Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, United States where the 4135th Strategic Wing launched a GAM-72 on June 8, 1960.

McDonnell Aircraft received a production contract for the GAM-72A on December 31, 1958. Reliability problems encountered during testing resulted in McDonnell replacing the J85-GE-3 with the J85-GE-7 engine in the production GAM-72A. The GAM-72A was also about 200 lb (90 kg) heavier than the GAM-72. This increase in weight when combined with a slightly smaller wing area reduced the maximum range of the GAM-72A to 402 statute miles (647 km). The first production GAM-72A flight was in March 1960. The final GAM-72A was delivered by McDonnell Aircraft on May 28, 1962. A total of 585 GAM-72A missiles were produced by McDonnell Aircraft. The inventory of GAM-72As in the USAF peaked at 492 in 1963.

During 1963 all remaining GAM-72A missiles were modified to the GAM-72B configuration.

In 1963 the GAM-72 was re-designated the ADM-20




Operational history

Although originally planned for deployment with the B-47 and the B-52, the GAM-72A was only deployed with the B-52.

The first production GAM-72A was delivered to the 4135th Strategic Wing, at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, on September 13, 1960. Initial operational capability was reached on February 1, 1961, when the first squadron of the 4135th Strategic Wing was equipped with the GAM-72A. On January 1, 1962 B-52 aircraft carried the GAM-72A decoy on airborne alert for the first time. Full operational capability was reached when the GAM-72A was deployed with the fourteenth and final B-52 squadron on April 15, 1962.

The operational version of the GAM-72 carried internal radar reflectors facing forward and to each side of the aircraft. Up to 100 lb (45 kg) of payload could be accommodated internally by the GAM-72. This internal space could be used to house a radar repeater or a chaff dispenser. An infrared burner in the tail could produce intense heat to simulate the heat signature of a bomber. The GAM-72 was not armed.

Eight GAM-72A decoys could be accommodated in the B-52s weapons bay but the normal decoy load was two.

Ground radar continued to improve, and the effectiveness of the GAM-72B, redesignated in 1963 as the ADM-20C, decreased over time. The AGM-69 Short Range Attack Missile (SRAM) allowed bombers to attack air-defense systems from a distance. By 1971, the USAF no longer considered the ADM-20C a credible decoy. The commander of the Strategic Air Command wrote the Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force "that the Quail was only slightly better than nothing." The last ADM-20C operational test was flown at Eglin Air Force Base on July 13, 1972. On June 30, 1978, the last ADM-20C came off alert status. The last ADM-20C was removed from the United States Air Force inventory on December 15, 1978.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2018, 04:46:16 pm by big oil »
Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #375 on: March 29, 2018, 04:31:21 pm »









General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark

The General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark was a supersonic, medium-range interdictor and tactical attack aircraft that also filled the roles of strategic nuclear bomber, aerial reconnaissance, and electronic-warfare aircraft in its various versions. Developed in the 1960s by General Dynamics, it first entered service in 1967 with the United States Air Force. The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) also ordered the type and began operating F-111Cs in 1973.

The F-111 pioneered several technologies for production aircraft, including variable-sweep wings, afterburning turbofan engines, and automated terrain-following radar for low-level, high-speed flight. Its design influenced later variable-sweep wing aircraft, and some of its advanced features have since become commonplace. The F-111 suffered a variety of problems during initial development. Several of its intended roles, such as an aircraft carrier-based naval interceptor with the F-111B, failed to materialize.

USAF F-111 variants were retired in the 1990s, with the F-111Fs in 1996 and EF-111s in 1998. The F-111 was replaced in USAF service by the F-15E Strike Eagle for medium-range precision strike missions, while the supersonic bomber role has been assumed by the B-1B Lancer. The RAAF was the last operator of the F-111, with its aircraft serving until December 2010.




Early requirements

The May 1960 U-2 incident, in which an American CIA U-2 spy plane was shot down over the USSR, stunned the United States government. Besides greatly damaging US-Soviet relations, the incident showed that the Soviet Union had developed a surface-to-air missile that could reach aircraft above 60,000 feet. The United States Air Force Strategic Air Command (SAC) and the RAF Bomber Command's plans to send subsonic, high-altitude B-47 and V bomber formations into the USSR were now much less viable.

By 1960, SAC had begun moving to low-level penetration which greatly reduced radar detection distances. At the time, SAMs were ineffective against low-flying aircraft, and interceptor aircraft had less of a speed advantage at low altitudes.   The Air Force's Tactical Air Command (TAC) was largely concerned with the fighter-bomber and deep strike/interdiction roles. TAC was in the process of receiving its latest design, the Republic F-105 Thunderchief, which was designed to deliver nuclear weapons fast and far, but required long runways.   A simpler variable geometry wing configuration with the pivot points farther out from the aircraft's centerline was reported by NASA in 1958, which made swing-wings viable.   This led Air Force leaders to encourage its use.   In June 1960, the USAF issued specification SOR 183 for a long-range interdiction/strike aircraft able to penetrate Soviet air defenses at very low altitudes and high speeds.  The specification also called for the aircraft to operate from short, unprepared airstrips.

In the 1950s, the United States Navy sought a long-range, high-endurance interceptor aircraft to protect its carrier battle groups against long-range anti-ship missiles launched from Soviet jet bombers and submarines. The Navy needed a fleet air defense (FAD) fighter with a more powerful radar, and longer range missiles than the F-4 Phantom II to intercept both enemy bombers and missiles.  Seeking a FAD fighter, the Navy started with the subsonic, straight-winged aircraft, the Douglas F6D Missileer in the late 1950s. The Missileer was designed to carry six long-range missiles and loiter for five hours, but would be defenseless after firing its missiles.   The program was formally canceled in 1961.  The Navy had tried variable geometry wings with the XF10F Jaguar, but abandoned it in the early 1950s. It was NASA's simplification which made the variable geometry wings practical.  By 1960, increases in aircraft weights required improved high-lift devices, such as variable geometry wings.  Variable geometry offered high speeds, and maneuverability with heavier payloads, long range, and the ability to takeoff and land in shorter distances.




Tactical Fighter Experimental (TFX)

The U.S. Air Force and Navy were both seeking new aircraft when Robert McNamara was appointed Secretary of Defense in January 1961.  The aircraft sought by the two armed services shared the need to carry heavy armament and fuel loads, feature high supersonic speed, twin engines and two seats, and probably use variable geometry wings.  On 14 February 1961, McNamara formally directed the services to study the development of a single aircraft that would satisfy both requirements. Early studies indicated that the best option was to base the design on the Air Force requirement, and use a modified version for the Navy.   In June 1961, Secretary McNamara ordered the go ahead of Tactical Fighter Experimental (TFX), despite Air Force and Navy efforts to keep their programs separate.

The Air Force and the Navy could agree only on swing-wing, two-seat, twin-engine design features. The Air Force wanted a tandem-seat aircraft for low-level penetration ground-attack, while the Navy wanted a shorter, high altitude interceptor with side-by-side seating to allow the pilot and radar operator to share the radar display.  Also, the Air Force wanted the aircraft designed for 7.33 g with Mach 2.5 speed at altitude and Mach 1.2 speed at low level with an approximate length of 70 ft (21.3 m). The Navy had less strenuous requirements of 6 g with Mach 2 speed at altitude and high subsonic speed (approx. Mach 0.9) at low level with a length of 56 ft (17.1 m). The Navy also wanted the aircraft with a nose large enough for a 48 in (1.2 m) diameter radar dish.

McNamara developed a basic set of requirements for TFX based largely on the Air Force's requirements and, on 1 September 1961, ordered the Air Force to develop it.   A request for proposals (RFP) for the TFX was provided to industry in October 1961. In December, proposals were received from Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell, North American and Republic. The evaluation group found all the proposals lacking, but Boeing and General Dynamics were selected to submit enhanced designs. Boeing's proposal was recommended by the selection board in January 1962, with the exception of the engine, which was not considered acceptable. Switching to a crew escape capsule, instead of ejection seats and alterations to radar and missile storage were also needed. Both companies provided updated proposals in April 1962. Air Force reviewers favored Boeing's offering, while the Navy found both submissions unacceptable for its operations. Two more rounds of updates to the proposals were conducted, with Boeing being picked by the selection board.

In November 1962, McNamara selected General Dynamics' proposal due to its greater commonality between Air Force and Navy versions. The Boeing aircraft shared less than half of the major structural components. General Dynamics signed the TFX contract in December 1962. A Congressional investigation followed, but could not change the selection.




Design phase

The F-111A and B variants used the same airframe structural components and Pratt & Whitney TF30-P-1 turbofan engines. They featured side-by-side crew seating in an escape capsule as required by the Navy. The F-111B's nose was 8.5 feet (2.59 m) shorter so as to fit on existing carrier elevator decks, and had 3.5 feet (1.07 m) longer wingtips to improve on-station endurance time. The Navy version would carry an AN/AWG-9 Pulse-Doppler radar and AIM-54 Phoenix missiles. The Air Force version would carry the AN/APQ-113 attack radar and the AN/APQ-110 terrain-following radar and air-to-ground armament.   A team of engineers at General Dynamics was led by Robert H. Widmer.

Lacking experience with carrier-based fighters, General Dynamics teamed with Grumman for the assembly and testing of the F-111B aircraft. In addition, Grumman would also build the F-111A's aft fuselage and the landing gear.  The General Dynamics and Grumman team faced ambitious requirements for range, weapons load, and aircraft weight.   The F-111 design also included new features on a production military aircraft, such as variable-geometry wings and afterburning turbofan engines.

The F-111A mockup was inspected in September 1963. The first test F-111A was rolled out of Plant 4 of General Dynamics' Fort Worth, Texas facility on 15 October 1964. It was powered by YTF30-P-1 turbofans and used a set of ejector seats as the escape capsule was not yet available.   The F-111A first flew on 21 December 1964 from Carswell Air Force Base, Texas, U.S.  The first F-111B was also equipped with ejector seats and first flew on 18 May 1965.

Initially there were compressor surge and stall issues in certain parts of the flight regime. NASA, the Air Force, and General Dynamics studies resulted in the engine inlet design being modified in 1965-66, ending with the "Triple Plow I" and "Triple Plow II" designs.

The F-111A achieved a speed of Mach 1.3 in February 1965 with an interim intake design.  Cracks in the F-111's wing attach points were first discovered in 1968 during ground fatigue testing - an F-111 crashed the following year due to this issue. The attach structure required redesign and testing to ensure adequate design and workmanship.  Flight testing of the F-111A ran through 1973.

The F-111B was canceled by the Navy in 1968 due to weight and performance issues, along with the need for additional fighter requirements.  The F-111C model was developed for Australia. Subsequently, the improved F-111E, F-111D, F-111F models were developed for the US Air Force. The strategic bomber FB-111A and the EF-111 electronic warfare versions were later developed for the USAF.  Production ended in 1976  after 563 F-111 aircraft were built





Armament

Weapons bay

The F-111 featured an internal weapons bay that could carry bombs, a removable 20 mm M61 cannon, or auxiliary fuel tanks.  For bombs, the bay could hold two 750 lb (340 kg) M117 conventional bombs, one nuclear bomb or practice bombs. The F-111B for the US Navy was to carry two AIM-54 Phoenix long-range air-to-air missiles in the bay. The cannon had a large 2,084-round ammunition tank, and its muzzle was covered by a fairing; however, it was rarely fitted on F-111s.

The F-111C and F-111F were equipped to carry the AN/AVQ-26 Pave Tack targeting system on a rotating carriage that kept the pod protected within the weapons bay when not in use. Pave Tack featured a forward looking infrared (FLIR) sensor, optical camera and laser rangefinder/designator. The Pave Tack pod allowed the F-111 to designate targets and drop laser-guided bombs on them.  Australian RF-111Cs carried a pallet of sensors and cameras for aerial reconnaissance use.

The FB-111 could carry two AGM-69 SRAM air-to-surface nuclear missiles in its weapons bay.   General Dynamics trialed an arrangement with two AIM-9 Sidewinder air-to-air missiles carried on rails in a trapeze arrangement from the bay, but this was not adopted.   Early F-111 models had radars equipped to guide the AIM-7 Sparrow medium-range air-to-air missile, but it was never fitted.


External ordnance

Each wing was equipped with four underwing pylons. The inner two pylons on each wing rotated to align with the fuselage, while the outer two were fixed. Each pylon had a capacity of 5,000 pounds (2,300 kilograms). Various bombs and missiles could be carried on the pylons. Auxiliary fuel drop tanks with 600 US gallons (2,300 litres) capacity each could be fitted.

The design of the F-111's fuselage prevented the carriage of external weapons under the fuselage, but two stations were available on the underside for electronic countermeasures (ECM) pods and/or datalink pods; one station was on the weapons bay, and the other on the rear fuselage between the engines.  The F-111's maximum practical weapons load was limited, since the fixed pylons could not be used with the wings fully swept.

Tactical F-111s were fitted with shoulder rails on the four inner swiveling pylons to mount AIM-9 Sidewinder air-to-air missiles for self-defense.   Australian F-111Cs were equipped to launch the Harpoon anti-ship missile, and the Popeye stand-off missile.  FB-111As could carry the same conventional ordnance as the tactical variants, but their wing pylons were more commonly used for either fuel tanks or strategic nuclear gravity bombs. They could carry up to four AGM-69 SRAM nuclear missiles on the pylons.





Operational history

U.S. Air Force

The first of six initial production F-111s was delivered on 17 July 1967 to fighter squadrons at Nellis Air Force Base.  These aircraft were used for crew training. 428th Tactical Fighter Squadron achieved initial operational capability on 28 April 1968.

After early testing, a detachment of six aircraft were sent in March 1968 to Southeast Asia for Combat Lancer testing in real combat conditions in Vietnam. In little over a month, three aircraft were lost and the combat tests were halted. It turned out that all three had been lost through a malfunction in the horizontal stabilizer, not by enemy action.  This caused a storm of criticism in the U.S. It was not until 1971 that 474 TFW was fully operational. 

September 1972 saw the F-111 back in Southeast Asia, stationed at Takhli Air Base, Thailand. F-111As from Nellis AFB participated in the final month of Operation Linebacker and later the Operation Linebacker II aerial offensive against the North Vietnamese.  They also supported regional aerial operations against other communist forces such as Operation Phou Phiang III during the Laotian Civil War in Laos.  F-111 missions did not require tankers or ECM support, and they could operate in weather that grounded most other aircraft. One F-111 could carry the bomb load of four McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom IIs. The worth of the new aircraft was beginning to show; F-111s flew more than 4,000 combat missions in Vietnam with only six combat losses.

From 30 July 1973 F-111As of the 347th Tactical Fighter Wing (347th TFW) were stationed at Takhli Air Base. The 347th TFW conducted bombing missions in Cambodia in support of Khmer Republic forces until 15 August 1973 when US combat support ceased in accordance with the Case–Church Amendment.[57] The 347th TFW was stationed at Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base from 12 July 1974 until 30 June 1975. In May 1975 347th TFW F-111s provided air support during the Mayaguez incident. 

On 14 April 1986, 18 F-111s and approximately 25 Navy aircraft conducted air strikes against Libya under Operation El Dorado Canyon. The 18 F-111s of the 48th Tactical Fighter Wing and the 20th Tactical Fighter Wing flew what turned out to be the longest fighter combat mission in history.[61] The round-trip flight between RAF Lakenheath/RAF Upper Heyford, United Kingdom and Libya of 6,400 miles (10,300 km) spanned 13 hours. One F-111 was lost over Libya, probably shot down.

F-111s participated in the Gulf War (Operation Desert Storm) in 1991. During Desert Storm, F-111Fs completed 3.2 successful strike missions for every unsuccessful one, better than any other U.S. strike aircraft used in the operation.  The group of 66 F-111Fs dropped almost 80% of the war's laser-guided bombs, including the GBU-15 and the penetrating, bunker-buster GBU-28.
 Eighteen F-111Es were also deployed during the operation.  The F-111s were credited with destroying more than 1,500 Iraqi tanks and armored vehicles.  Their use in the anti-armor role was dubbed "tank plinking".

The F-111[N 1] was in service with the USAF from 1967 through 1998. The Strategic Air Command had FB-111s in service from 1969 through 1992. At a ceremony marking the F-111's USAF retirement, on 27 July 1996, it was officially named Aardvark, its long-standing unofficial name.[67] The USAF retired the EF-111 electronic warfare variant in 1998.




Royal Australian Air Force

The Australian government ordered 24 F-111C aircraft to replace the RAAF's English Electric Canberras in the bombing and tactical strike role.[  While the first aircraft was officially handed over in September 1968, structural issues delayed the entry into service.  The first F-111C was accepted at Nellis Air Force Base on 15 March 1973.  The RAAF's first six F-111Cs arrived at Amberley on 1 July 1973, and three subsequent flights of six F-111s arrived on 27 July, 28 September and 4 December.   F-111Cs were allocated to No. 1 Squadron and No. 6 Squadron, under the control of No. 82 Wing. In Australia, the F-111 was affectionately known as the "Pig", due to its long snout and terrain-following ability.



The purchase proved to be highly successful for the RAAF. Although it never saw combat, the F-111C was the fastest, longest range combat aircraft in Southeast Asia.   Aviation historian Alan Stephens has written that they were "the preeminent weapons system in the Asia-Pacific region" throughout their service and provided Australia with "a genuine, independent strike capability". Benny Murdani, Indonesian defense minister in the 1980s, told his Australian counterpart Kim Beazley that when others became upset with Australia during Indonesian cabinet meetings, Murdani told them "Do you realise the Australians have a bomber that can put a bomb through that window on to the table here in front of us?"

Australian F-111s were bombed-up at RAAF Base Tindal ready to attack Indonesian forces and command systems during the tension in 1999 during the establishment of East Timor's independence and the deployment of the Australian-led International Force for East Timor.

In 2006, an RAAF F-111 was chosen to scuttle the North Korean ship Pong Su that had been seized in 2003 in one of the largest drug hauls in Australia. The Pong Su was sunk on 23 March 2006 by two GBU-10 Paveway II laser-guided bombs. 

The draw-down of the RAAF's F-111 fleet began with the retirement of the F-111G models operated by No. 6 Squadron in late 2007. There was controversial procurement of 24 F/A-18F Super Hornets as an interim replacement for the F-111s while the F-35 program suffered delays.  One of the reasons given for the F-111s' retirement was the high maintenance time required for every flight hour.  The last F-111s were retired on 3 December 2010.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2018, 05:15:26 pm by big oil »
Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #376 on: March 29, 2018, 04:40:48 pm »







McDonnell F-101 Voodoo

The McDonnell F-101 Voodoo was a supersonic jet fighter which served the United States Air Force (USAF) and the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF).

Initially designed by McDonnell Aircraft as a long-range bomber escort (known as a penetration fighter) for the Strategic Air Command (SAC), the Voodoo was instead developed as a nuclear-armed fighter-bomber for the Tactical Air Command (TAC), and as a photo reconnaissance aircraft based on the same airframe. An F-101A set a number of world speed records for jet powered aircraft, including fastest airspeed, attaining 1,207.6 miles (1,943.4 km) per hour on 12 December 1957.  They operated in the reconnaissance role until 1979.

Delays in the 1954 interceptor project led to demands for an interim interceptor aircraft design, a role that was eventually won by the B model of the Voodoo. This required extensive modifications to add a large radar to the nose of the aircraft, a second crewmember to operate it, and a new weapons bay using a rotating door that kept its four AIM-4 Falcon missiles or two AIR-2 Genie rockets hidden within the airframe until it was time to be fired. The F-101B entered service with Air Defense Command in 1959 and the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1961. US examples were handed off to the Air National Guard where they served until 1982. Canadian examples remained in service until 1984.




Background


The Voodoo's career as a fighter-bomber was relatively brief, but the reconnaissance versions served for some time. Along with the US Air Force's Lockheed U-2 and US Navy's Vought RF-8 Crusaders, the RF-101 reconnaissance variant of the Voodoo was instrumental during the Cuban Missile Crisis and saw extensive service during the Vietnam War.[4] Interceptor versions served with the Air National Guard until 1982, and in Canadian service they were a front line part of NORAD until their replacement with the CF-18 Hornet in the 1980s.

While the Voodoo was a moderate success, it may have been more important as an evolutionary step towards its replacement in most roles, the F-4 Phantom II, one of the most successful Western fighter designs of the 1960s. The Phantom would retain the twin engines, twin crew for interception duties, and a tail mounted well above and behind the jet exhaust but was an evolution of the F3H Demon while the Voodoo was developed from the earlier XF-88 Voodoo.




Design and development

Initial design on what would eventually become the Voodoo began just after World War II in response to a USAAF Penetration Fighter Competition in 1946. This called for a long-range, high-performance fighter to escort a new generation of bombers, much as the North American P-51 Mustang had escorted the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortresses and Consolidated B-24 Liberators in World War II. Several companies responded with designs, and the Air Force provided funds for several of them to produce prototypes.

After being awarded a contract (AC-14582) on 14 February 1947, McDonnell built two prototypes, designated the XF-88 Voodoo.  The first prototype (serial number 46-6525), powered by two 3,000 lbf (13.3 kN) Westinghouse XJ34-WE-13 turbojets, flew from Muroc on 20 October 1948.[6] Preliminary testing revealed that while handling and range was adequate, the top speed was a disappointing 641 mph (1,032 km/h) at sea level.  After fitting McDonnell-designed afterburners to the second prototype, thrust was increased to 3,600 lbf (16.1 kN) with corresponding performance increases in top speed, initial rate of climb and reduced takeoff distance. Fuel consumption was greatly increased by use of the afterburners, however, reducing the range.

Although the XF-88 won the "fly-off" competition against the competing Lockheed XF-90 and North American YF-93, the detonation of the first nuclear weapon by the Soviet Union resulted in the USAF (created in 1947) re-evaluating its fighter needs, with interceptors being more important and bomber escorts being of reduced priority, and it terminated the Penetration Fighter program in 1950.  Analysis of Korean War missions, however, revealed that contemporary USAF strategic bombers were vulnerable to fighter interception. In 1951, the USAF issued a new requirement for a bomber escort with all major US manufacturers submitting designs. The McDonnell design was a larger and higher powered version of the XF-88, and won the bid in May 1951. The F-88 was redesignated the F-101 Voodoo in November 1951.





Operational history

F-101A / RF-101G

Despite SAC's loss of interest, the aircraft attracted the attention of Tactical Air Command (TAC), and the F-101 was reconfigured as a fighter bomber, intended to carry a single nuclear weapon for use against tactical targets such as airfields. With the support of TAC, testing was resumed, with Category II flight tests beginning in early 1955. A number of problems were identified during development, with many of these fixed. The aircraft had a dangerous tendency toward severe pitch-up at high angle of attack that was never entirely solved.  Around 2,300 improvements were made to the aircraft in 1955–56 before full production was resumed in November 1956.



The first F-101A was delivered on 2 May 1957 to the 27th Strategic Fighter Wing, which transferred to TAC in July that year,[13] replacing their F-84F Thunderstreak. The F-101A was powered by two Pratt & Whitney J57-P-13 turbojets,   allowing good acceleration, climb-performance, ease in penetrating the sound barrier in level flight, and a maximum performance of Mach 1.52. The F-101's large internal fuel capacity allowed a range of approximately 3,000 mi (4,828 km) nonstop.[18] The aircraft was fitted with an MA-7 fire-control radar for both air-to-air and air-to-ground use, augmented by a Low Altitude Bombing System (LABS) system for delivering nuclear weapons,[12] and was designed to carry a Mk 28 nuclear bomb. The original intended payload for the F-101A was the McDonnell Model 96 store, a large fuel/weapons pod similar in concept to that of the Convair B-58 Hustler, but was cancelled in March 1956 before the F-101 entered service. Other operational nuclear payloads included the Mk 7, Mk 43, and Mk 57 weapons. While theoretically capable of carrying conventional bombs, rockets, or Falcon air-to-air missiles, the Voodoo never used such weapons operationally.  It was fitted with four 20mm M39 cannon, with one cannon often removed in service to make room for a TACAN beacon-receiver.

The F-101 set a number of speed records, including: a JF-101A (the ninth F-101A modified as a testbed for the more powerful J-57-P-53 engines of the F-101B) setting a world speed record of 1,207.6 mph (1,943.4 km/h) on 12 December 1957 during "Operation Firewall",   beating the previous record of 1,132 mph (1,811 km/h) set by the Fairey Delta 2 in March the previous year. The record was then subsequently taken in May 1958 by a Lockheed F-104 Starfighter. On 27 November 1957, during "Operation Sun Run," an RF-101C set the Los Angeles-New York City-Los Angeles record in 6 hours 46 minutes, the New York to Los Angeles record in 3 hours, 36 minutes, and the Los Angeles to New York record in 3 hours 7 minutes.

A total of 77 F-101As were built. They were gradually withdrawn from service starting in 1966.   Twenty-nine survivors were converted to RF-101G specifications with a modified nose, housing reconnaissance cameras in place of cannons and radar. These served with the Air National Guard through 1972.




RF-101A

In October 1953, the USAF requested that two F-101As be built as prototype YRF-101A tactical reconnaissance aircraft. These were followed by 35 RF-101A production aircraft.   The RF-101A shared the airframe of the F-101A, including its 6.33 g (62 m/s²) limit, but replaced the radar and cannons with up to six cameras in the reshaped nose.  Like all other models of the F-101, it had provision for both flying boom and probe-and-drogue in-flight refueling capability, as well as for a buddy tank that allowed it to refuel other aircraft.  It entered service in May 1957, replacing the RB-57 Canberra.

USAF RF-101As from the 363d Tactical Reconnaissance Wing at Shaw AFB, SC flew reconnaissance sorties over Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962.

In October 1959, eight RF-101As were transferred to Taiwan, which used them for overflights of the Chinese mainland. These ROCAF RF-101A with modified C-model vertical fins with air intake. The intake is used to cool the drag chute compartment and eliminates the 5-minute limit on using the afterburners on the A model.  Two were reportedly shot down.




F-101C / RF-101H

The F-101A fighter-bomber had been accepted into Tactical Air Command (TAC) service despite a number of problems. Among others, its airframe had proven to be capable of withstanding only 6.33 g (62 m/s²) maneuvers, rather than the intended 7.33 g (72 m/s²).   An improved model, the F-101C, was introduced in 1957. It had a 500 lb (227 kg) heavier structure to allow 7.33-g maneuvers as well as a revised fuel system to increase the maximum flight time in afterburner.  Like the F-101A it was also fitted with an underfuselage pylon for carrying atomic weapons, as well as two hardpoints for 450-gallon drop tanks.   A total of 47 were produced.

Originally serving with the 27th Tactical Fighter Wing at Bergstrom AFB, Texas, the aircraft were transferred in 1958 from TAC to the 81st Tactical Fighter Wing, part of United States Air Forces in Europe (USAFE) which operated three squadrons from the twin RAF air stations Bentwaters & Woodbridge. The 78th Tactical Fighter Squadron was stationed at Woodbridge, while the 91st and 92nd were stationed at Bentwaters. The 81st TFW served as a strategic nuclear deterrent force, the Voodoo's long range putting almost all of the Warsaw Pact countries, and targets up to 500 miles deep into the Soviet Union within reach.

Both the A and C model aircraft were assigned to the 81st TFW, and were used interchangeably within the three squadrons. Operational F-101A/C were upgraded in service with Low Angle Drogued Delivery (LADD) and Low Altitude Bombing System (LABS) equipment for its primary mission of delivering nuclear weapons at extremely low altitudes. Pilots were trained for high speed, low level missions into Soviet or Eastern Bloc territory, with primary targets being airfields. These missions were expected to be one-way, with the pilots having to eject behind Soviet lines.

The F-101C never saw combat and was replaced in 1966 with the F-4C Phantom II.[13] Thirty-two aircraft were later converted for unarmed reconnaissance use under the RF-101H designation. They served with Air National Guard units until 1972.




RF-101C

Using the reinforced airframe of the F-101C, the RF-101C first flew on 12 July 1957,[13] entering service in 1958. Like the RF-101A, the RF-101C had up to six cameras in place of radar and cannons in the reshaped nose and retained the bombing ability of the fighter-bomber versions. 166 RF-101Cs were built, including 96 originally scheduled to be F-101C fighter-bombers.

The 1964 Project "Toy Tiger" fitted some RF-101C with a new camera package and a centerline pod for photo-flash cartridges. Some were further upgraded under the Mod 1181 program with automatic control for the cameras.

The RF-101C saw service during the Cuban Missile Crisis and soon followed the North American F-100 Super Sabres in October 1961, into combat when RF-101s from the 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing deployed to Vietnam. The RF-101C was deployed operationally during the Vietnam War, sustaining losses with the first F-101 being lost in November 1964 to ground fire. From 1965 through November 1970, its role was gradually taken over by the RF-4C Phantom II. In some 35,000 sorties, 39 aircraft were lost, 33 in combat, including five to SAMs, one to an airfield attack, and one in air combat to a MiG-21 in September 1967. The RF-101C's speed made it largely immune to MiG interception. 27 of the combat losses occurred on reconnaissance missions over North Vietnam. In April 1967, ALQ-71 ECM pods were fitted to provide some protection against SAMs. Although the Voodoo was again able to operate at medium altitudes, the added drag and weight decreased the speed enough to make RF-101 vulnerable to the maneuverable (and cannon-equipped) MiGs and thus requiring fighter escort.

On 27 November 1957 during Operation Sun Run, an RF-101C piloted by then-Captain Robert Sweet set the Los Angeles-New York City-Los Angeles record in 6 hours 46 minutes, and the New York to Los Angeles record in 3 hours, 36 minutes. Another RF-101C, piloted by then-Lieutenant Gustav Klatt, set a Los Angeles to New York record of 3 hours 7 minutes.

After withdrawal from Vietnam, the RF-101C continued to serve with USAF units through 1979.

In service, the RF-101C was nicknamed the "Long Bird;" it was the only version of the Voodoo to see combat.




F-101B / CF-101B / EF-101B

In the late 1940s, the Air Force had started a research project into future interceptor aircraft that eventually settled on an advanced specification known as the 1954 interceptor. Contracts for this specification eventually resulted in the selection of the F-102 Delta Dagger, but by 1952 it was becoming clear that none of the parts of the specification other than the airframe would be ready by 1954; the engines, weapons and fire control systems were all going to take too long to get into service. An effort was then started to quickly produce an interim supersonic design to replace the various subsonic interceptors then in service, and the F-101 airframe was selected as a starting point.

Although McDonnell proposed the designation F-109 for the new aircraft (which was to be a substantial departure from the basic Voodoo),[35] the USAF assigned the designation F-101B. It was first deployed into service on 5 January 1959, with the 60th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron. The production ended in March 1961.[2] The Voodoo featured a modified cockpit to carry a crew of two, with a larger and more rounded forward fuselage to hold the Hughes MG-13 fire control radar of the F-102. It had a data link to the Semi-Automatic Ground Environment (SAGE) system, allowing ground controllers to steer the aircraft towards its targets by making adjustments through the plane's autopilot. The F-101B had more powerful Pratt & Whitney J57-P-55 engines, making it the only Voodoo not using the −13 engines. The new engines featured a substantially longer afterburner than J57-P-13s. To avoid a major redesign, the extended afterburners were simply allowed to extend out of the fuselage by almost 8 ft (2.4 m). The more powerful engines and aerodynamic refinements allowed an increased speed of Mach 1.85.

The F-101B was stripped of the four M39 cannons and carried four AIM-4 Falcon air-to-air missiles instead, arranged two apiece on a rotating pallet in the fuselage weapons bay.  The initial load was two GAR-1 (AIM-4A) semi-active radar homing and two GAR-2 (AIM-4B) infrared-guided weapons with one of each carried on each side of the rotating pallet.  After the first two missiles were fired, the door turned over to expose the second pair. Standard practice was to fire the weapons in SARH/IR pairs to increase the likelihood of a hit. Late-production models had provision for two 1.7-kiloton MB-1/AIR-2 Genie nuclear rockets on one side of the pallet with IR-guided GAR-2A (AIM-4C) on the other side. "Project Kitty Car" upgraded most earlier F-101Bs to this standard beginning in 1961.

-101B missile doorFrom 1963–66, F-101Bs were upgraded under the Interceptor Improvement Program (IIP; also known as "Project Bold Journey"), with a fire control system enhancement against hostile ECM and an infrared sighting and tracking (IRST) system in the nose in place of the in-flight refueling probe.

The F-101B was made in greater numbers than the F-101A and C, with a total of 479 being delivered by the end of production in 1961.   Most of these were delivered to the Air Defense Command (ADC) beginning in January 1959.  The only foreign customer for the F-101B was Canada.  For more details on the history of the Voodoo in Canada, see McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo.

The F-101B was withdrawn from ADC service from 1969 to 1972, with many surviving USAF aircraft transferred to the Air National Guard (replacing F-102s), serving until 1982. The last Voodoo in US service (F-101B-105-MC, AF Ser. No. 58-300) was finally retired by the 2nd Fighter Weapons Squadron at Tyndall AFB, Florida on 21 September 1982.




TF-101B / F-101F / CF-101F

Some of the F-101Bs were completed as dual-control operational trainer aircraft initially dubbed TF-101B, but later redesignated F-101F. Seventy-nine new-build F-101Fs were manufactured, and 152 more existing aircraft were later modified with dual controls. Ten of these were supplied to Canada under the designation CF-101F. These were later replaced with 10 updated aircraft in 1971.




RF-101B

In the early 1970s, a batch of 22 former Royal Canadian CF-101Bs were returned to the US Air Force and converted to RF-101B reconnaissance aircraft with their radar and weapons bay replaced with a set of three KS-87B cameras and two AXQ-2 TV cameras. An in-flight refueling boom receptacle was also fitted. These aircraft served with the 192d Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron of the Nevada Air National Guard through 1975. They were expensive to operate and maintain and had a short service life.

« Last Edit: March 29, 2018, 05:39:30 pm by big oil »
Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 3,938
  • Thanked: 353 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #377 on: April 02, 2018, 12:55:37 am »









Role:   Interceptor
Manufacturer:      Convair
First flight:   26 December 1956
Introduction:         June 1959
Retired:      August 1988 (ANG); 1998 (NASA)
Primary users:       United States Air Force and Air National Guard
Number built:   342 (2 prototypes, 277 F-106A, 63 F-106B)
Unit cost:      US$4.7 million (1973)  $25.1 million (2014)
Developed from:   Convair F-102 Delta Dagger



The Convair F-106 Delta Dart was the primary all-weather interceptor aircraft of the United States Air Force from the 1960s through the 1980s. Designed as the so-called "Ultimate Interceptor", it proved to be the last dedicated interceptor in U.S. Air Force service to date. It was gradually retired during the 1980s, with the QF-106 drone conversions of the aircraft being used until 1998 under the Pacer Six Program.





Design and development

The F-106 was the ultimate development of the USAF's 1954 interceptor program of the early 1950s. The initial winner of this competition had been the F-102 Delta Dagger, but early versions of this aircraft had demonstrated extremely poor performance, limited to subsonic speeds and relatively low altitudes. During the testing program the F-102 underwent numerous changes to improve its performance, notably the application of the area rule to the fuselage shaping and a change of engine, and the dropping of the advanced MX-1179 fire control system and its replacement with a slightly upgraded version of the MX-1 already in use on subsonic designs. The resulting aircraft became the F-102A, and in spite of being considered barely suitable for its mission, the Air Force sent out a production contract in March 1954, with the first deliveries expected the next year.

By December 1951 the Air Force had already turned its attention to a further improved version, the F-102B. Initially the main planned change was the replacement of the A-model's Pratt & Whitney J57 (itself replacing the original J40) with the more powerful Bristol Olympus, produced under license as the Wright J67. By the time this would be available, the MX-1179 was expected to be available, and was selected as well. The result would be the "ultimate interceptor" the Air Force wanted originally. However, while initial work on the Olympus appeared to go well, by August 1953 Wright was already a full year behind schedule in development. Continued development did not resolve problems with the engine, and in early 1955 the Air Force approved the switch to the Pratt & Whitney J75.

The J75 was somewhat larger than the J57 in the F-102A, and had greater mass flow. This demanded changes to the inlets to allow more airflow, and this led to the further refinement of using a variable-geometry inlet duct to allow the intakes to be tuned to best performance across a wide range of supersonic speeds. This change also led to the ducts being somewhat shorter. The fuselage grew slightly longer, and was cleaned up and simplified in many ways. The wing was slightly enlarged in area, and a redesigned vertical tail surface was used. The engine's 2-position afterburner exhaust nozzle was also used for idle thrust control. The nozzle was held open reducing idle thrust by 40% giving slower taxiing and less brake wear.

A mock-up with the expected layout of the MX-1179, now known as the MA-1, was inspected and approved in December 1955. With growing confidence that the aircraft was now improving, an extended production contract for 17 F-102Bs was sent out on 18 April 1956. On 17 June, the aircraft was officially re-designated as the F-106A.

The first prototype F-106, an aerodynamic test bed, flew on 26 December 1956 from Edwards Air Force Base, with the second, fitted with a fuller set of equipment, following 26 February 1957.
 Initial flight tests at the end of 1956 and beginning of 1957 were disappointing, with performance less than anticipated, while the engine and avionics proved unreliable. These problems, and the delays associated with them, nearly led to the abandoning of the program, but the Air Force decided to order 350 F-106s instead of the planned 1,000. After some minor redesign, the new aircraft, designated F-106A, were delivered to 15 fighter interceptor squadrons along with the F-106B two-seat combat-capable trainer variant, starting in October 1959.

On 15 December 1959, Major Joseph W. Rogers set a world speed record of 1,525.96 mph (2,455.79 km/h) in a Delta Dart at 40,500 ft (12,300 m).  That year, Charles E. Myers flew the same model aircraft at 1,544 mph (2484 km/h).  Nevertheless, Major Rogers received the award because cold war pressures dictated that a military pilot should be recognized.

The F-106 was envisaged as a specialized all-weather missile-armed interceptor to shoot down bombers. It was complemented by other Century Series fighters for other roles such as daylight air superiority or fighter-bombing. To support its role, the F-106 was equipped with the Hughes MA-1 integrated fire-control system, which could be linked to the Semi-Automatic Ground Environment (SAGE) network for ground control interception (GCI) missions, allowing the aircraft to be steered by controllers. The MA-1 proved extremely troublesome and was eventually upgraded more than 60 times in service.

Similar to the F-102, the F-106 was designed without a gun, or provision for carrying bombs, but it carried its missiles in an internal weapons bay for clean supersonic flight. It was armed with four Hughes AIM-4 Falcon air-to-air missiles, along with a single GAR-11/AIM-26A Falcon nuclear-tipped semi-active radar homing (SARH) missile (which detected reflected radar signals), or a 1.5 kiloton-warhead AIR-2 (MB-2) Genie air-to-air rocket intended to be fired into enemy bomber formations.  Like its predecessor, the F-102 Delta Dagger, it could carry a drop tank under each wing.  Later fighters such as the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II and McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle carried missiles recessed in the fuselage or externally, but stealth aircraft would re-adopt the idea of carrying missiles or bombs internally for reduced radar signature.





Ejection seats

The first ejection seat fitted to early F-106s was a variation of the seat used by the F-102 and was called the Weber interim seat. It was a catapult seat which used an explosive charge to propel it clear of the aircraft. This seat was not a zero-zero seat and was inadequate for ejections at supersonic speeds as well as ground level ejections and ejections at speeds below 120 knots (140 miles per hour; 220 kilometres per hour) and 2,000 feet (610 metres). The second seat that replaced the Weber interim seat was the Convair/ICESC (Industry Crew Escape System Committee) Supersonic Rotational B-seat, called the supersonic "bobsled", hence the B designation.  It was designed with supersonic ejection as the primary criterion since the F-106 was capable of Mach-2 performance. Fighter pilots viewed high speed ejections as the most important. Seat designers viewed an ejection at low altitude and slow speed as the most likely possibility. The ejection sequence with the B-seat was quite complicated and there were some unsuccessful ejections that resulted in pilot fatalities. The third seat, that replaced the Convair B-seat, was the Weber Zero-Zero ROCAT (for ROcket CATapult) seat. Weber Aircraft Corporation designed a "zero-zero" seat to operate at up to 600 knots (690 miles per hour; 1,100 kilometres per hour). High-altitude supersonic ejections were rare and ejections at relatively low altitudes and low speeds were more likely. The Weber “zero-zero” seat was satisfactory and was retrofitted to the F-106 after 1965.





Operational history

The F-106 served in the continental US, Alaska, and Iceland, as well as for brief periods in Germany and South Korea. The F-106 was the second highest sequentially numbered P/F- aircraft to enter service under the old number sequence (the F-111 was highest), before the system was reset under the 1962 United States Tri-Service aircraft designation system. In service, the F-106's official name, "Delta Dart," was rarely used, and the aircraft was universally known simply as "The Six."

Although contemplated for use in the Vietnam War the F-106 never saw combat, nor was it exported to foreign users. Following the resolution of initial teething problems – in particular an ejection seat that killed the first 12 pilots to eject from the aircraft   – its exceptional performance made it very popular with its pilots. After the cancellation of their own Avro Arrow, the Canadian government briefly considered purchasing the F-106C/D.

In an effort to standardize aircraft types, the USAF was directed to conduct Operation Highspeed, a flyoff competition between the USAF F-106A and the U.S. Navy F4H-1 (F-4B) Phantom, which was not only as capable as the F-106 as a missile-armed interceptor, but could also carry as large a bomb load as the Republic F-105 Thunderchief fighter-bomber.  The Phantom was the winner, but would first be tasked to escort and later replace the F-105 fighter-bomber in the late 1960s before replacing older interceptors in Air Defense Command in the 1970s.

The F-106 was progressively updated in service, with improved avionics, a modified wing featuring a noticeable conical camber, an infrared search and track system, streamlined supersonic wing tanks which provided virtually no degradation to overall aircraft performance, better instrumentation, and features like an inflight refuelling receptacle and an arrestor hook for landing emergencies.

Air-to-air combat testing suggested "The Six" was a reasonable match for the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II in a dogfight, with superior high-altitude turn performance and overall maneuverability (aided by the aircraft's lower wing loading). However, the Phantom had better radar – operated by an additional crewman – and could carry a load of up to four radar-guided Sparrow and four infrared Sidewinder missiles, while the Falcon missiles proved a disappointment for dogfighting over Vietnam.   The F-4 had a higher thrust/weight ratio, superior climb performance, and better high speed/low-altitude maneuverability, and could be used as a fighter-bomber. Air combat experience over Vietnam showed the need for increased pilot visibility and the utility of a built-in gun, which had been added to the "E" variant of USAF Phantoms.

In 1972, some F-106As were upgraded in Project Six Shooter that involved fitting the F-106 with a new bubble canopy, a canopy without the metal bracing along the top.  This greatly improved pilot visibility. Also added was an optical gunsight, and provision for a single M61 Vulcan 20 mm cannon. The M61 Vulcan had 650 rounds of ammunition in the center weapons bay and it replaced the AIM-26 Super Falcon or Genie.

The F-15A started replacing the F-106 in 1981, with "The Sixes" typically passed on to Air National Guard units. The F-106 remained in service in various USAF and ANG units until 1988.





Retirement and conversion into drones

Between 1 June 1983 and 1 August 1988 the Delta Darts were incrementally retired and sent to the Military Storage and Disposition Center in Arizona.  When the need for a high performance Full Scaled Aerial Target Drone was required the USAF began withdrawing Delta Darts from storage. Starting in 1986, 194 of the surviving surplus aircraft were converted into target drones and these were designated QF-106As and used for target practice vehicles under the Pacer Six Program by the Aerial Targets Squadron.  The last was destroyed in January 1998.  The drones were still capable of being flown as manned aircraft, such as for ferrying to a test; during the test they were flown unmanned.  The QF-106 replaced the QF-100 Super Sabre drone; the last shoot down of a QF-106 (57-2524) took place at Holloman AFB on 20 February 1997 after which the QF-106 was superseded by the QF-4S and QF-4E Phantom II drone.



NASA research and test aircraft

Six F-106s were retained by NASA for test purposes through 1998. An F-106B two-seat trainer was operated by NASA Langley Research Center between 1979 and 1991.   This Delta Dart was used in research programs ranging from testing supersonic engines to improving maneuverability of fighters. Between 1980 and 1986 the aircraft was modified for the purpose of lightning strike research and became known as the Lightning Strike Plane and was struck 714 times without damage.   On one hour-long flight at 38,000 feet (12,000 metres) in 1984, lightning struck the research aircraft 72 times.   One significant modification was the replacement of the composite nose radome by a metallic radome. Although the maximum speed of the F-106 was Mach 2.3, during the lightning experiments it was flown at subsonic speeds into clouds at 300 knots (350 miles per hour; 560 kilometres per hour) from 5,000 feet (1,500 metres) to 40,000 feet (12,000 metres).  The aircraft was equipped with optical sensors which consisted of a video camera and a light detector. Data acquisition was performed with 1980’s state of the art digital waveform recorders.





Eclipse project

NASA used six drones in its Eclipse Project which ran from 1997-1998.   The Dryden Flight Research Center supported project Eclipse which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable Aerotow-launch vehicle. The objective was to tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 aircraft with a C-141A transport aircraft. The test demonstrated the possibility of towing and launching a space launch vehicle from behind a tow plane.



The Cornfield Bomber

On 2 February 1970, an F-106 of the 71st Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, piloted by Captain Gary Foust, entered a flat spin over Montana. Foust followed procedures and ejected from the aircraft. The resulting change of balance caused the aircraft to stabilize and later land "wheels up" in a snow-covered field, suffering only minor damage. The aircraft, promptly nicknamed "The Cornfield Bomber", was then sent back to base by rail, repaired and returned to service, and is now on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.  :imaposer: :imaposer:
« Last Edit: April 02, 2018, 01:00:29 am by big oil »
Prepare yourself for four more years 😎
 

Offline Mr Zog

  • Well fuck me, I'm a
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Honda XL500S
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 7,929
  • Thanked: 454 times
  • Without the gutter my mind would be homeless...
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #378 on: April 02, 2018, 04:51:34 am »
Quote
The Cornfield Bomber

On 2 February 1970, an F-106 of the 71st Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, piloted by Captain Gary Foust, entered a flat spin over Montana. Foust followed procedures and ejected from the aircraft. The resulting change of balance caused the aircraft to stabilize and later land "wheels up" in a snow-covered field, suffering only minor damage. The aircraft, promptly nicknamed "The Cornfield Bomber", was then sent back to base by rail, repaired and returned to service, and is now on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.  :imaposer: :imaposer:

 :eek7:   :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer:
Young enough to know I can, old enough to know I shouldn't, stupid enough to do it anyway.
 
The following users thanked this post: big oil

Online Oubones

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW F650GS / Dakar
    Location: Kwazulu Natal
  • Posts: 3,442
  • Thanked: 599 times
Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #379 on: April 02, 2018, 07:08:30 am »
Quote
The Cornfield Bomber

On 2 February 1970, an F-106 of the 71st Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, piloted by Captain Gary Foust, entered a flat spin over Montana. Foust followed procedures and ejected from the aircraft. The resulting change of balance caused the aircraft to stabilize and later land "wheels up" in a snow-covered field, suffering only minor damage. The aircraft, promptly nicknamed "The Cornfield Bomber", was then sent back to base by rail, repaired and returned to service, and is now on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.  :imaposer: :imaposer:

 :eek7:   :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer: :imaposer:
Maybe we need to buy some of those for our airforce. :imaposer:
Dakar 650
SR 500