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Author Topic: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.  (Read 31219 times)

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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #700 on: July 18, 2019, 04:33:18 pm »
The return of the  prodigal son, great to have you back.

Thank you, cocky................ I think  :imaposer:

Great to be back, I feel like I'm amongst my boets and soets again  >:D
 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #701 on: July 18, 2019, 05:02:05 pm »
big oil, have you seen what's going on in R+P?? :pot: :pot:

Welcome back.
Yeah! They are all saying Big Oil is a liberal!

Thanks, Blou Zebu, I think   :lol8:

Surely the abnormally intelligent, amazingly articulate, fantastically cultured, extraordinarily educated citizenry of this forum wouldn't believe something so preposterous  :pot:
 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #702 on: July 18, 2019, 05:17:37 pm »
What's with the Eastern Cape location?  Really?  ???




Unfortunately no, and I won't be riding with you boets or soets anytime soon  :'(

I can ride, but there's not a snowballs chance in hell I'm coming over there unless I'm on my A game  :pot:

You sons a bit##s would never let me hear the end of it if one of yous got the best of me   :imaposer:

I have to have surgery on my right wrist  :xxbah:

It's Larry Flynt's fault   >:D
« Last Edit: July 18, 2019, 06:00:28 pm by big oil »
 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #703 on: July 18, 2019, 05:28:16 pm »

Yea also want to know  ???

Sorry, won't be anytime soon  :'(

« Last Edit: July 18, 2019, 05:30:23 pm by big oil »
 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #704 on: July 18, 2019, 05:45:37 pm »
Pleasant surprise to see you back sir, and please do continue your RR!!
BTW, I am also off to Kansas soon (maybe end of next week I think) since my agriculture farmworker VISA has been approved.
Looking fw to see a part of your beautiful Country  :thumleft:

Thanks, TVB, surprised and grateful to be back with my online family. I've been humbled, I needed it.

I will be concluding this RR soon.

If I can remain in the good graces of the forum, I will be adding an RR of my recent 11,000 mile, 5-month odyssey on my KTM 1290R, where yet again, I began the trip on the Ready to Race monster, but she just couldn't make it all the way back to the Mitten  :imaposer:  I had to depend on a Chevrolet Camaro to haul my arse the 700 miles to home  :xxbah:  Oh well, that's what makes it an adventure I suppose.

Congrats on the job  :thumleft:  Out of curiosity, why Kansas of all states?

If you've time to do any traveling while here, and would like to tour the most beautiful state of all 50, I'm not biased :peepwall:, I have a bike for you to ride, free of charge, it's a KTM, so there's no guarantee you'll return on the same bike you left with  :pot:, but we'll figure out a plan to get ya back to Kansas, and wait, there's more, a free guide that has ridden to all the secret spots in da Mitten baby  :ricky:
« Last Edit: July 18, 2019, 05:57:56 pm by big oil »
 

Offline Tom van Brits

Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #705 on: July 18, 2019, 06:47:43 pm »
Pleasant surprise to see you back sir, and please do continue your RR!!
BTW, I am also off to Kansas soon (maybe end of next week I think) since my agriculture farmworker VISA has been approved.
Looking fw to see a part of your beautiful Country  :thumleft:

Thanks, TVB, surprised and grateful to be back with my online family. I've been humbled, I needed it.

I will be concluding this RR soon.

If I can remain in the good graces of the forum, I will be adding an RR of my recent 11,000 mile, 5-month odyssey on my KTM 1290R, where yet again, I began the trip on the Ready to Race monster, but she just couldn't make it all the way back to the Mitten  :imaposer:  I had to depend on a Chevrolet Camaro to haul my arse the 700 miles to home  :xxbah:  Oh well, that's what makes it an adventure I suppose.

Congrats on the job  :thumleft:  Out of curiosity, why Kansas of all states?

If you've time to do any traveling while here, and would like to tour the most beautiful state of all 50, I'm not biased :peepwall:, I have a bike for you to ride, free of charge, it's a KTM, so there's no guarantee you'll return on the same bike you left with  :pot:, but we'll figure out a plan to get ya back to Kansas, and wait, there's more, a free guide that has ridden to all the secret spots in da Mitten baby  :ricky:

 :spitcoffee:  :imaposer:  :imaposer: Nothing has changed, I love your healthy sense of humor!!  :laughing4:

My son is also farming there, started off in Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, now South Dakota and later North and then eventually Illinois Chicago.
He has some friends in Kansas at the farm where I am going, and happened to be around when they needed 3 more guys for the remainder of the season.
Unfortunately there will be no time for travel, the farming is basically a 24/7 contract and I plan depending on Visa to give Mr Zog and his Missus a quick visit after.
However; you did not spook me with the KTM  :lol8: , I am sure there are enough 'Comaro's around to depend on  :deal:  :imaposer:
I am sure my time will come to explore the States 'hope! ......as to the best or most beautiful State I have no idea since I have seen so much great footage. of the exceptions on the rule; I can be happy anywhere.
Have seen the most beautiful pictures of Colorado, even awesome scenes in Arizona...California and the never ending list goes on!!
So where would your favorite place be in the States?
 

Offline Oubones

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #706 on: July 19, 2019, 12:17:02 am »
Glad you are back safely from your trip and looking forward to catching up on your exploits!
You really need to come to our country at some stage!
Dakar 650
KLR650
 
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #707 on: July 19, 2019, 12:18:39 am »
:spitcoffee:  :imaposer:  :imaposer: Nothing has changed, I love your healthy sense of humor!!  :laughing4:

My son is also farming there, started off in Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, now South Dakota and later North and then eventually Illinois Chicago.
He has some friends in Kansas at the farm where I am going, and happened to be around when they needed 3 more guys for the remainder of the season.
Unfortunately there will be no time for travel, the farming is basically a 24/7 contract and I plan depending on Visa to give Mr Zog and his Missus a quick visit after.
However; you did not spook me with the KTM  :lol8: , I am sure there are enough 'Comaro's around to depend on  :deal:  :imaposer:
I am sure my time will come to explore the States 'hope! ......as to the best or most beautiful State I have no idea since I have seen so much great footage. of the exceptions on the rule; I can be happy anywhere.
Have seen the most beautiful pictures of Colorado, even awesome scenes in Arizona...California and the never ending list goes on!!
So where would your favorite place be in the States?

Sounds like you're going to have quite an experience, hope to read a report of America from your perspective.

Hmm, it's an enormous country, I've lived in my country for over 4 decades and I've still only toured 42/50 states.

After my next trip, I will have 47/50, with North Dakota, Alaska, and Hawaii left to reach my goal of having toured all 50 via motorbike.

Choosing a favorite is difficult, admittedly I'm biased, so my fave place would be my home state of Michigan, specifically the Upper Peninsula and the Leelanau Peninsula, it's a magical and very wild place.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2019, 12:21:28 am by big oil »
 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #708 on: July 22, 2019, 06:36:55 pm »
From Miner's Castle, I proceeded North Northeast via H-58 towards Grand Marais, Michigan, an old 1800's logging town. 

Along the route there's a turnoff for Sable Falls and Grand Sable Dunes.

 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #709 on: July 22, 2019, 06:40:02 pm »
The access road to Sable Falls and Grand Sable Dunes is narrow freshly paved curved nirvana, traversing through a tunnel of trees.

 

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #710 on: July 22, 2019, 06:50:47 pm »
Once parked, I began the short hike to Grand Sable Dunes to the Log Slide Overlook.  On the way, the National Park Service, apparently since my previous visit, had erected a barn with tools used back in the 1800's logging operations.


In the 1840’s, traditional supplies of New England white pine had been exhausted and new sources were sought for the growing nation. The next state with large forests of the valuable white pine was Michigan.

The state’s early lumber industry was strongly influenced by its geography. Like the lower peninsula, the Upper Peninsula had a network of creeks and streams which played a crucial part in trans- porting logs to the mills.

Waterways also transported the  nished product from the mills to markets on the lower lakes. The lumber would be piled high on the decks of modi ed sailing ships known as “barges” or lumber “hookers.” Later, railroads transported much of the lumber.

It was Michigan white pine that provided the lumber for the building of the Midwest and prairie towns, and frequently was exported to European markets. It was also Michigan pine that rebuilt Chicago after its great fire.

Pine was popular with the loggers because it oated easily and thus could be driven down rivers and streams to the mills, or assembled into rafts and transported over the open lakes. Denser hardwoods like maple could not easily be felled and rapidly dulled the saws in the mills. The unmarketable hardwoods were often burned in local kilns to make charcoal for iron production.

Three Michigan inventions of the 1870s were responsible for increasing the transportation of logs regardless of the weather. The largest of the innovations called “big wheels,” was invented by Cyrus Overpack of downstate Manistee. These ten feet diameter wheels were pulled by a team of oxen or horses and allowed rapid move- ment of logs without the need for snow cover. The high axle clear- ance easily allowed the wheels to move over stumps and rough clear cut ground.

Prior to the big wheels, the logs were normally “skidded out” with oxen or horse teams to the main logging road. There they were loaded onto sleighs and hauled over ice roads to river banks where they were stored until spring. The ice roads were also primarily a Michigan innovation. The unique roads were made by running a sprinkler over a logging road during frigid nights. By morning, the normally rutted and rough trails were turned into sheets of ice. During the day heavy sleighs loaded with logs could rapidly move over them.

The third innovation was the use of a narrow gauge railway to haul the logs instead of sleds or big wheels. First tried in Clare County, Michigan, during the winter of 1876-77 by Win eld Scott Gerrish, the narrow guage railroad rapidly became an industry standard.





« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 06:51:44 pm by big oil »
 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #711 on: July 22, 2019, 07:02:32 pm »
Upper Peninsula Cruising

When the first surveyors walked the area of the park, the major forest type was the upland mesic, comprised of sugar maple, beech, yellow birch and hemlock. In the eastern area, north of Kingston Lake and along the lakeshore west to Beaver Lake, white pine and hemlock were predominant. Swamps were generally cedar, black spruce and hemlock. But it was the stands of large white and red pine that attracted the rugged early lumberjacks.

William Burt, a noted Upper Peninsula surveyor, established the majority of the exterior township lines in 1841. The interior lines were established by William Ives and George Adair from 1850 to 1855. The township and section lines were vital for any logging operation. Without them it was impossible to establish proper ownership.



Logging in the Pictured Rocks Area

The first logging activity in Alger County occurred in 1877 when Joseph Weller began logging operations in the western area of Pictured Rocks. The logs were rafted to Munising Bay and Au Train Bay where they were assembled into booms and towed to Garden Island, Ontario. The logs were then squared and shipped to Liver- pool, England. In 1879, Weller, operating on the mainland opposite Grand Island, was expected to ship 150,000 cubic feet of lumber, much of it squared.


Sullivan’s Operations

The first extensive logging activity started in the park about 1880 in the vicinity of the Hurricane River and the Kingston Plains, also known as the “white rat plains” for a team of white horses used there.

Extensive white pine areas were high-graded in 1882 by Thomas G. Sullivan. He logged both in Sanilac and later in Alpena for the Prentiss Lumber Company, one of the state’s largest operators. Sullivan’s U.P. camp operations eventually involved two groups of 150 men each, three yokes of oxen and 20 teams of horses.

The oxen and horse teams were generally used for the skidding of the logs to the decking areas. The Sullivan operation lasted for three years as his crews cut 50 million feet of white pine from the forests within the lakeshore and in the Kingston Plains. The plains were logged over several times - over 3,000 acres of white pine were cut between 1882 and 1909. The plains also burned over several times, the latest in 1936. Sullivan’s logging was carried on mostly during the winter months, when the massive logs were hauled out on sleighs to the decking areas on the shore of Lake Superior. During the early spring, when the ice left the lake, the logs were rolled into the lake, assembled into rafts bound for either Grand Marais, Sault Ste. Marie or further down the lakes.





Rafting

Rafting presented special problems on the Great Lakes, especially when they had to be towed some 200 miles of treacherous and storm swept water. To solve the di culty, an entirely new type of log boom was developed. It consisted of threading a series of large pine logs, three or four feet in diameter on a heavy logging chain passed through holes drilled in the logs.

The massive oating fence would surround a free mass of  oat- ing logs covering from ten to twenty acres and resembling a large balloon. In 1885, three million feet of logs were successfully towed to Bay City on Lake Huron from Lake Superior. In 1887, thirty million feet of logs were rafted down from Superior to Lake Michigan. Sullivan once rafted an eight million foot raft to Alpena, MI.


Over The Edge

Chutes for sending decked logs into the lake for rafting were fairly common. Besides the most famous at Devil’s Slide, east of Au Sable Point, there were slides at Miners Castle and one other location. The mammoth wood slide was built into the slope of the Grand Sable Dunes at a point approximately 300 feet above the lake surface. The angle of the slide would have been about 35 degrees.

It isn’t clear which logging company used the slide, but it is most commonly associated with the operations of “daylight Johnny” Gillece, known for his e orts to maximize production from his crews. The logs were decked near the present parking area and then sent down the slide in the spring and worked into booms for the raft trip to the mills in Grand Marais. Today, there is no evidence of the slide

 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #712 on: July 22, 2019, 07:14:08 pm »
Grand Marais

In 1897, Grand Marais sawmills were being supplied by 40 miles of temporary logging railroads. As soon as the timber in one area was exhausted the rails were shifted to a new, yet uncut area. Grand Marais also used the railroad as a method of transporting the  nished lumber south to markets in the major cities. Grand Marais’ major products were in the form of square timbers, shingles or lumber. A number of di erent  rms were involved in logging in the area, the biggest being the Alger-Smith Company which owned the Manistique Railroad and the Manistique Lumber Company.



Grand Marais fell on hard times in 1885 when the pine mill closed due to a lack of logs. By 1890 the population was down to 177 people. Six years before, 300 people lived and worked in the thriving mill town. In 1893, however, Grand Marais went through a rebirth when the Manistique Railroad ran a 25 mile spur north from the town from Seney. By 1896, one mill alone was shipping 40 million feet a year and the population had boomed to 2,000. The good times didn’t last. With the last of the pine  nally depleted, the Marais Lumber Company, closed in 1909. A year later the railroad abandoned the line, and the Grand Marais slipped into a depression.




Beaver Basin Area

Our knowledge of logging in the Beaver Lake area comes primarily from the Columbus Hall journals, which cover his travels in the area from 1883 to 1912. Hall was a Baptist minister and college professor from Indiana who vacationed in the Pictured Rocks area. As was common during the time, he dutifully recorded his experi- ences gained during his summer visits. Hall mentions a logging camp nine miles east of Beaver Lake and a Thurber’s camp. Hall also made frequent notes of members of his party eating at various logging camps.

Hall referred to the use of Beaver Lake as a log storage site. The logs would be held behind a small dam on Beaver Creek prior to being sent downstream to Lake Superior where they would be rafted or loaded onto a waiting ship. According to Hall, when a vessel was expected, the loggers would open a sluice at the head of the dam, permitting both water and logs to slide down to Lake Superior. The logs would then be worked into booms and rafted away.

In 1902, he noted that men were using horse drawn scoops to repair damage to the dam done during winter storms. The dam was still in use in 1904 and Hall mentioned opening it himself to spill some excess water from Beaver Lake. The Beaver Lake dam was identi ed as late as 1928 on a Michigan Department of Conserva- tion map as the “old dam and footbridge.” A logging camp also existed at Beaver Lake from 1883-1906.




No Place Like Home

The logging camps located in isolated areas of the region were self-contained communities. Normally, the camps consisted of an o ce, company store (operated part time only with sales charged against pay due), bunk house, mess hall and kitchen, blacksmith shop and barn. The normal size for such camps was between 75 to 125 men, although larger camps were not uncommon. These camps usually lasted for between three to six years. When an area was logged out, the camps were simply abandoned or torn down and moved.


Turning to Hardwoods

While the pine provided the initial impetus for logging in the park, the hardwoods later became an important asset. Forests on the western edge of the park were cut from the early 1900’s until 1938, with the logs being taken to mills in either Marquette or Munising. Those in the eastern portion were cut on a large scale after 1940, primarily by the Cleveland Cli s Iron Company for saw logs and pulp.



In 1912 the company acquired an interest in the Great Lakes Veneer Company, and changed the name to the Munising Wooden- ware Company. This company produced a variety of woodenware and veneer products, all manufactured from local hardwoods. Today these are collector’s items.
Most of the cedar in the park was selectively cut for railroad ties, shingles, posts and poles. In 1905 a cedar mill was built south of Grand Sable Lake by the Lombard and Rittenhouse Company.

The mill produced products from the turn of the century until the 1930’s. Small cutting by contractors for cedar railroad ties was done throughout the park. The ties were for use by the Lake Superior and Ishpeming Railroad, employed in hauling iron ore from the Marquette Range mines to the lake docks.




Munising Mills

Towards the early part of the twentieth century several mills were built in Munising. Prominent among them was the Jackson Tindall Sawmill (1910). This mill was eventually purchased in 1944 by Ford interests, but wartime shortages caused an eventual aban- donment.  The Munising Paper Company was constructed in 1904 and by 1911 the plant was producing 70 tons of paper per day. In 1952 the company was purchased by the Kimberly Clark Corporation and is still in operation.


 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #713 on: July 22, 2019, 07:26:42 pm »
From Log Slide Overlook, I then made the hike back to Sable Falls. 

Hikers hike back to this area to photograph the falls, picnic, and other backwoods shenanigans   >:D
















« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 07:47:22 pm by big oil »
 
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #714 on: July 22, 2019, 07:29:46 pm »
After relaxing in the cool mist at Sable Falls, I made the long hike back to the Duck. 

Rode the same curved tunnel of trees access road back to H-58, aka Ausable Point Trail.

I stopped and shot a couple of pics of Grand Sable Lake.



« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 07:45:31 pm by big oil »
 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #715 on: July 22, 2019, 07:34:29 pm »
I get near Lake Superior, the largest inland freshwater lake, by volume, iirc, in the world.

It appears I have a Thunderstorm brewing North Northwest of me and North Northeast of me. 

« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 07:48:01 pm by big oil »
 

Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #716 on: July 22, 2019, 07:45:07 pm »
I arrive in the old mining town of Grand Marais, Michigan.  I'm pondering whether or not to fill up with gasoline. 

My Italian Mistress likes to drink some fuel, but I don't have very far to go to get to the next fuel station, which has Hi-test gasoline.

Ahh, I can make it!!

A few miles east of Grand Marais, Mother Nature used Lake Superior to stick it deep in my rectum.  The sky was a lake and I was
underneath trying to come up for air.  The roads turned to nasty slippery mud and clay, treacherous conditions on a bike with no traction
control riding on worn out Michelin Pilot Road street tires. 




The other thing on my mind was dropping my Italian Mistress and scratching her side panels. 

Side panels for my bike are unobtanium, unless you get lucky finding a scratch free pair on Fleabay.




« Last Edit: July 23, 2019, 04:04:04 am by big oil »
 

Offline eberhard

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #717 on: July 22, 2019, 08:36:52 pm »
Some very good pictures you have taken there. Must be a real pleasure to ride there. Also interesting information. :thumleft:
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Offline big oil

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #718 on: July 23, 2019, 04:28:18 am »
Some very good pictures you have taken there. Must be a real pleasure to ride there. Also interesting information. :thumleft:

Thanks, certainly not Captain Zef quality pics, but I try!

It's a beautiful and wild place, I'm sure your country has the same wild places.  That's why I want to come ride in your country.

Info, yeah, just trying to give a little background history to the areas I'm riding.
 

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Re: A Dirty Wild Dog Rides to God's Country to Visit Da Yoopers, Eh.
« Reply #719 on: July 23, 2019, 04:37:22 am »
I was now somewhere between Grand Marais and Pine Stump Junction. 

I was riding through a deluge of rain, which was just making conditions worse. 



« Last Edit: July 23, 2019, 04:43:43 am by big oil »