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Offline Ebredenhann

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2018, 03:03:27 pm »
Guys,

Just been on KTM & Husqvarna sites.  For the Husky it has a composite subframe.  And the KTM has extra-light subframe made of stable aluminum profiles. Both 2018 models.  My question, using luggage systems such as XPat recommends (which I also like although I have never used this), will these types of subframes be able to handle this?  I do not know much about these subframes, I have just copied the wording from the sites now...

XPat, what year model is your bike, what subframe?
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Offline Fransw

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2018, 03:03:58 pm »
Good info thanks Xpat.

I'm buying new, will get the KTM roadworthy kit as well.

It was exactly my Kaokoland VZP Huanib Hoaruseb etc trip on my 990 that convinced me of the merits of smaller bikes for hardcore rides.  Will do VZP on 500 again, didn't break the 990 there so should be OK on 500 without disk protectors.

Surprised that I do not need luggage racks, definitely need to sharpen my research there.  Had a look at Mosko Moto previously, but it's too expensive for my budget now.  Was very happy with my Giant Loop so will probably go that route again.

For bashplate & handguards did you go hardparts route or aftermarket?  What brand fueltank?

Thanks again!

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Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2018, 03:06:16 pm »
...and here is a pic of the ALTRider Hemisphere bag fitted to my 450...

Thanks Chris. I would recommend to get just the holster with the two separate ATG bag - i.e. without the one piece U-bag. That one piece will get in the way IMO while the two separate ones give you much more flexibility. You still sell them like that Chris? I mean just holster with two separate bags as I bought some time ago?

Offline zebra - Flying Brick

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #23 on: January 10, 2018, 03:10:19 pm »
...and the odd customer is buying the Hemisphere holsters - ONLY the holsters, not the 1-piece inner, and then using ultra-light, waterproof dry bags in the left and right 'pocket',


...pics attached, these dry bag pics are illustration only, since they are not seated/pushed all the way down...


Chris
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Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #24 on: January 10, 2018, 03:11:40 pm »
Guys,

Just been on KTM & Husqvarna sites.  For the Husky it has a composite subframe.  And the KTM has extra-light subframe made of stable aluminum profiles. Both 2018 models.  My question, using luggage systems such as XPat recommends (which I also like although I have never used this), will these types of subframes be able to handle this?  I do not know much about these subframes, I have just copied the wording from the sites now...

XPat, what year model is your bike, what subframe?

I have 2016 with standard subframe - whatever it comes with. In my experience it handles the load over rough terrain just fine - ASSUMING you put the weight upfront and low down as much as possible. That is why I strongly recommend those frameless backbone bags that hold themselves. I carry about 20 kg at the back (sometimes maybe more) and try to ride to enjoy myself and so far after 5.5k km of DeWildt, Lesotho and Botswana sand, I had 0 problems.

One principle I would keep in mind Damaraland is - keep it simple!. Get only what you absolutely need and nothing more. Specifically I would steer clear of any windshields, fairings and stuff - you don't need them and in hot weather they are down right dangerous in my experience, promoting heatstroke big time. If you ride in cold, just put one more thermal layer on. You are not going to be riding this bike at 160 kmh for hours - then you doing it wrong and should take 990. You should be actively looking for the most remote/rugged tracks and will have time of your life!

Check also with MTP, he has a lot of experience with these bikes.

Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2018, 03:13:54 pm »
And don't waste on your money on 6days!

Standard is more than enough for what you are looking for and actually - at least in 2016 models (might have changed) - it was the better model because it had simpler suspension that is easier (and cheaper) to set-up and maintain.

Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2018, 03:17:42 pm »
You can also see in the last picture from Chris the handguards with integrated rearview mirror. They are costly (how much you need to ask Chris), but IMO worth it as you dont' have any stalks and stuff for mirrors up on the handlebars. Streamlined and simpler set-up.

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2018, 03:32:10 pm »
must add that I too do not use a screen, and up to 110km/h I have no need for one whatsoever...


Cheers
Chris


PS: around R4K for handguards and integrated mirrors and plastic covers, etc. Ex USA, so pricey, and over-engineered, but they are what they are...


Worth noting that you can get them - the HDB handguards - to integrate with the top clamp - so they clamp not to the bar itself, but rather the Billet top clamp (see pic)
« Last Edit: January 10, 2018, 03:38:26 pm by zebra - Flying Brick »
Chris & Team 021 510 6455 S3354.712 E01828.208

MARINE DRIVE, into NEPTUNE street, 2nd left into SHROPSHIRE street, on the right hand side.
021 510 6455 info@flyingbrick.co.za sales@flyingbrick.co.za  support@flyingbrick.co.za
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Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2018, 03:34:17 pm »
following this closely...
so don't take shortcuts, I want good rigs  >:D 8)

Didn't I read somewhere that you want to buy 300? If so, may I ask why would you take 300 over 500, considering where you are living? If you are near Lesotho, sure its no brainer - 300 all the way. But for open desert like where you live - 500 all the way...

Offline Damaraland

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #29 on: January 10, 2018, 03:36:07 pm »
Guys,

Just been on KTM & Husqvarna sites.  For the Husky it has a composite subframe.  And the KTM has extra-light subframe made of stable aluminum profiles. Both 2018 models.  My question, using luggage systems such as XPat recommends (which I also like although I have never used this), will these types of subframes be able to handle this?  I do not know much about these subframes, I have just copied the wording from the sites now...

XPat, what year model is your bike, what subframe?

I have 2016 with standard subframe - whatever it comes with. In my experience it handles the load over rough terrain just fine - ASSUMING you put the weight upfront and low down as much as possible. That is why I strongly recommend those frameless backbone bags that hold themselves. I carry about 20 kg at the back (sometimes maybe more) and try to ride to enjoy myself and so far after 5.5k km of DeWildt, Lesotho and Botswana sand, I had 0 problems.

One principle I would keep in mind Damaraland is - keep it simple!. Get only what you absolutely need and nothing more. Specifically I would steer clear of any windshields, fairings and stuff - you don't need them and in hot weather they are down right dangerous in my experience, promoting heatstroke big time. If you ride in cold, just put one more thermal layer on. You are not going to be riding this bike at 160 kmh for hours - then you doing it wrong and should take 990. You should be actively looking for the most remote/rugged tracks and will have time of your life!

Check also with MTP, he has a lot of experience with these bikes.

Great question and answer, was worried about the subframe also.  My packing comes in @ about 17kg with Giant Loop.  The Altrider solutions seems a lot more lightweight.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2018, 03:44:03 pm by Damaraland »
RR - Angola (https://goo.gl/BzFy7Y) / Video RR - Kaokoland (https://youtu.be/-c-Zespa2No)
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Offline Damaraland

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #30 on: January 10, 2018, 03:45:49 pm »
must add that I too do not use a screen, and up to 110km/h I have no need for one whatsoever...


Cheers
Chris


PS: around R4K for handguards and integrated mirrors and plastic covers, etc. Ex USA, so pricey, and over-engineered, but they are what they are...


Worth noting that you can get them - the HDB handguards - to integrate with the top clamp - so they clamp not to the bar itself, but rather the Billet top clamp (see pic)

Shot thanks Chris - sent your team a mail.
RR - Angola (https://goo.gl/BzFy7Y) / Video RR - Kaokoland (https://youtu.be/-c-Zespa2No)
Video RR - Messum & Ugab (https://goo.gl/Uhd1vb)  / Video RR - Southern Namibia (http://goo.gl/WpRdRE)
Video RR - Ugab (http://goo.gl/dr57i9) / Video RR - Omaruru River (http://goo.gl/RCTajv)
 

Offline zebra - Flying Brick

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #31 on: January 10, 2018, 03:48:55 pm »
...and on SOME bikes, you can fabricate a simple part to tie-together/join any 'stub' of sub-frame, to further strengthen what little sub-frame there is...


(see pic)
Chris
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Offline m0lt3n

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #32 on: January 10, 2018, 03:53:09 pm »
following this closely...
so don't take shortcuts, I want good rigs  >:D 8)

Didn't I read somewhere that you want to buy 300? If so, may I ask why would you take 300 over 500, considering where you are living? If you are near Lesotho, sure its no brainer - 300 all the way. But for open desert like where you live - 500 all the way...

a buddy has a 300. we can do a quick ride in the children's nap time and be back before mama gets difficult.
Yap, that is bread crumbs but we are taking it!

a 500 or 701 will be on the cards after I have eventually seen my ass in Namibia on the bigger bike.
Planning Namakwa 4x4 as soon as I can get logistics sorted.
Dooie visse gaan saam met die stroom...
 

Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #33 on: January 10, 2018, 04:02:01 pm »
following this closely...
so don't take shortcuts, I want good rigs  >:D 8)

Didn't I read somewhere that you want to buy 300? If so, may I ask why would you take 300 over 500, considering where you are living? If you are near Lesotho, sure its no brainer - 300 all the way. But for open desert like where you live - 500 all the way...

a buddy has a 300. we can do a quick ride in the children's nap time and be back before mama gets difficult.
Yap, that is bread crumbs but we are taking it!

a 500 or 701 will be on the cards after I have eventually seen my ass in Namibia on the bigger bike.
Planning Namakwa 4x4 as soon as I can get logistics sorted.

And why you would not be able to catch quick ride on 500? Probably easier than 300 as it can be plated so you don't need to trailer anywhere. 4 stroke plated 500 would just increase your area of operation greatly - even for quick rides.

But of course it is your decision and I respect it.

Offline Rossdog

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #34 on: January 10, 2018, 04:02:46 pm »
Xpat, you have helped me make up my mind. I'm going to get a 500!  :thumleft:
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Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #35 on: January 10, 2018, 04:09:20 pm »
Xpat, you have helped me make up my mind. I'm going to get a 500!  :thumleft:

I think for your kind of riding - at least the one you were doing up here, you will like it definitely better than 690. Just few months back I was singing praises on 690 to MTP who was deciding what to buy, but I have to say - if one is really deliberately looking for off the beaten track riding - the 500 is just so much better. To be fair, my 690 has rally fairing which in a hindsight was a dumb move and I'm getting it removed now. But even so the lightness and simplicity of 500, just inspires so much confidence, which is very welcome and needed by average bimbo like me.

But you have to be really looking for off the beaten track riding (not you Rossdog - I know you are - speaking generally here). If you want the Swiss knife that does everything well including tar passes and such (like for example Omninorm in his thread), 690 is better.

Offline Offshore

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #36 on: January 10, 2018, 04:37:25 pm »
What about Oil changes under normal Riding, forget about the 10 Hrs Stuff, what would be reasonable km's?
 

Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #37 on: January 10, 2018, 04:52:20 pm »
What about Oil changes under normal Riding, forget about the 10 Hrs Stuff, what would be reasonable km's?

I do oil every 1500 km. Valve check every 5k km.

Offline Offshore

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #38 on: January 10, 2018, 04:56:54 pm »
What about Oil changes under normal Riding, forget about the 10 Hrs Stuff, what would be reasonable km's?

I do oil every 1500 km. Valve check every 5k km.
Interesting Thread this, thank you for all the info.
 

Offline IanTheTooth

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #39 on: January 10, 2018, 05:36:02 pm »
I am over 6 foot and I agree with Xpat, there is no shame in winding down the suspension. Both feet on the ground is a wonderful thing. If you are going to be on a bike all day plush is nice too. If I bottom out more than a couple of times in a ride I wind it up a click and check next time, once I ignore.  A screen, you only need it when you are riding home into driving rain just above zero, then you will do anything to have one! I have a piece of poly-carbonate that fits in my backpack that I can zip tie to the bike in such conditions. Best place for petrol is in a petrol tank, every other solution is a pain in the arse.

Rossdog. We all want one.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2018, 05:37:01 pm by IanTheTooth »
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