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Offline Ebredenhann

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #60 on: January 11, 2018, 02:57:54 pm »
I have seen all the different remarks on top-end rebuilds and kilometers on the engine etc.  So let me just ask a question viewed from a practicality perspective.

I have just spoken to a KTM dealership, and I appreciate the fact that they advised the following to me.  Awesome bike, and excellent for the purpose of this discussion, and power output versus a 690 is more or less the same even though it is a smaller capacity motor.  But all this is achieved simply because it is a race motor, using less oil and working a bit harder than a 690.  Which is all still fine, but it necessitates more frequent servicing and checking of the valves.  My understanding more or less…open for discussion…

I have not googled the exact detail, but it means the bike has to be serviced every 15 hours (valves checked and oil/filter changes, is that correct?), or at least the oil and filters changed.  And preferably the valve clearances also to be checked on the 15hour intervals, not to say it has to be adjusted, just checked at least.
My question, if you do the long 7 day trip (or longer) how do you manage this?  You can do 15hours in 2 days??  I have seen ride reports and guys doing oil changes in the bundus somewhere, but surely you do not carry 5L oil with you, or you might not find a shop selling any proper oil in the bundus etc.  What is the practical side of this?
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Offline bud500

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #61 on: January 11, 2018, 03:37:32 pm »
Those 10hr or 15hr service intervals are for racing conditions. High revs and high heat.
When you are touring/traveling I believe you can stretch those services way longer.
Anyway, the motor takes very little oil, so you can easily take oil along and do an oil change during the trip.

Btw, I get my 500 serviced every 8-10hrs by a local bike shop. Oil, filters, bike wash and chain lube amounts to around R500 each time. Not bad at all.
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Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #62 on: January 11, 2018, 03:59:53 pm »
I have seen all the different remarks on top-end rebuilds and kilometers on the engine etc.  So let me just ask a question viewed from a practicality perspective.

I have just spoken to a KTM dealership, and I appreciate the fact that they advised the following to me.  Awesome bike, and excellent for the purpose of this discussion, and power output versus a 690 is more or less the same even though it is a smaller capacity motor.  But all this is achieved simply because it is a race motor, using less oil and working a bit harder than a 690.  Which is all still fine, but it necessitates more frequent servicing and checking of the valves.  My understanding more or less…open for discussion…

I have not googled the exact detail, but it means the bike has to be serviced every 15 hours (valves checked and oil/filter changes, is that correct?), or at least the oil and filters changed.  And preferably the valve clearances also to be checked on the 15hour intervals, not to say it has to be adjusted, just checked at least.
My question, if you do the long 7 day trip (or longer) how do you manage this?  You can do 15hours in 2 days??  I have seen ride reports and guys doing oil changes in the bundus somewhere, but surely you do not carry 5L oil with you, or you might not find a shop selling any proper oil in the bundus etc.  What is the practical side of this?

Those service intervals (15 hours oil change, I think valves every 30 hours or so - but not sure) are for race use. I.e. those are the most stringent KTM specs assuming you are going to abuse the machine properly, just be safe on their side should you like to pull Toby Price every weekend (I posted link to a video of his ride at 185kmh on I believe 500 on the prior page).

What are the safe service intervals for bimbo use like mine (but quite frankly also the Motonomad one - I don't think they ride for 9000 km the way you see in selected highlights), is anybody's guess. I have done some research prior to buying my 500 and the general consensus from people who actually use 500 for dual sport or even racing (Amageza) seemed to be that I should be safe to change oil every 1500 km and the valves at about 5k km. And so far so good.

This is from people who do this kind of DS riding (there are tons of people on advrider who love 500 for proper offroad dual sporting - I would say it is no1 modern EFI hard core dual sport there) as well as from people who race them (or their prior incarnation 525) in Amageza (MTP, Just Bend It, etc.). If you look on Amageza 2015 (I think - the one that run through Botswana) - which runs through the kind of terrain I like to ride - they have done 4900 km in less than 7 days if my memory serves me right. Now they probably changed the oil after every stage (i.e. every cca 700 - 800 km), but I doubt many of them bothered to check valves during the race (don't know this for sure - ir there is an Amageza warior here who knows, please chirp in).

Also look at Dakar (they ride 450s, but those are basically the same engine - roughly speaking - as 500 with different stroke - I think). They run 9000 km of very gruelling race on one engine nowadays and most of them don't end up with busted one. Now I'm sure they all change oil after every stage, but I doubt that Malle Moto guys check valves during the race (well, maybe yes on a rest day - that is still only once in 4500 km). I'm not sure if the top end gets touched on the factory bikes gets touched during the race, but would bet that it doesn't on Malle Moto. And that is proper brutal use of those machines. In other words these modern racing engines can withstand much more than the conservative KTM service specs.

In terms of logistics - I get the bike serviced before any longer trips (so far I've done 2 - Lesotho and Botswana - RRs in those links I posted earlier). In Lesotho I put a lot of hours on the engine and abused it probably more than racers due to lack of skill (i.e. I had to slip clutch a lot). Not so many km though. I had it serviced afterwards right before going to Bots at probably much less km than 1500, fully expecting that i will have to change clutch - yet all was perfectly fine.

Thenk in Botswana I trailered 500 and 690 up to Maun, where I hooked up with my mates who flew in. We then went for a 9 day 1500 km loop from Maun through Makgadikgadi, Hunters road up to Kasane and from there via cutlines along Chobe NP back to Maun. The whole loop was those 1500 km (about 400 km of which tar), and my mates flew out. I still wanted to circumnavigate Okavango delta on 500, so I just bought oil in Maun (they didn't have 10w50, but funnily enough had higher spec 10W60) and changed it myself together with oil filter I brought with me (it is small). And then merrily went for another 1500 km loop in deep sand in the middle of the Bots summer (it was late December).

So yes you need to plan a bit, to be able to change oil every 1500 km (I'm sure it is going to survive 2000 km in pinch as well), but it is not unsurmountable problem, especially if you trailer the bike - hence have car somewhere waiting with all the necessary suplies. And 1500 km in a terrain 500 was designed for is for most weekend warriors 2 years worth of riding.

BTW - in the same time as KTM is very conservative on their 500 service intervals, I believe they may be a bit too gung ho on 690 service intervals. I think if you use 690 properly, servicing every 10k km only is asking for trouble. My is serviced after every major trip (let's say 3000 km or more) or at least every 5000km. And yes, there is difference in oil capacity - if my memory serves me well - KTM 500 1.6 liter of oil, KTM 690 1.7 liter of oil.

Edit: while I was typing bud500 already answered some of it.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 04:00:40 pm by Xpat »
 

Offline 2StrokeDan

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #63 on: January 11, 2018, 04:09:10 pm »
Xpat, I agree, which is why I serviced both my 690 and 701 every 5000kays.

The 500, like the 450's factory quoted service intervals are really for when you hang off those throttle cables like in racing, and the engine works flat-out most of the time.

In fact, I would under normal touring conditions easily stretch the 500's service intervals to 5000kays.
 

Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #64 on: January 11, 2018, 04:15:42 pm »
One more comment just to make sure that you don't think those easy intervals apply only for easy gravel road riding (690 is definitely better for that):

While I do ride as an old lady, I do like to ride quite challenging routes - for me anyway, like that Lesotho trip most of which was completely cross country (i.e. not even single track, just point your bike over the mountains and go) as well as the second part of that Bots trip (which I didn't yet write down in that report). About 160 km out of 220 km between Khwai village and Seronga look mostly like this (and ridden in Bots midday summer heat):











And the beauty of 500 is that I was able to ride about 95% of that sitting while still maintaining around 40 kmh - conserving energy and avoiding heatstroke. On 690 I would have to turn back at the point when I was starting to feel heastroke creeping up on me, as I would have to stand most of the time and the fairing would prevent my cooling. On 500 I just opened up a bit more and cooled down nicely.

Offline Damaraland

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #65 on: January 11, 2018, 05:19:56 pm »
Damaraland, I just remembered: you will most probably need new sprocket straight out of the box. My (new - 2016 model) for some reason came with 13/50 ratio, with which you basically can climb vertical walls, but it maxes out at about 90 kmh - not good for your intended use.

Different people gear them differently. For normal use - i.e. bush trips like DeWilds, Botswana cutlines, Kaokoland and such I use 14/50 (that one I'm comfortable with up to 120kmh - but I"m softie when it comes to mechanical sympathy - they can be geared to 160 kmh from what I've heard), for clutch slipping trips to Lesotho I use 14/52 (but I doubt you will need that in Nam, unless you have some rockfaces you want to climb).

So the guys over on advrider reckons the '18 models come out with 14/50.  Recommendation on there was 14 / 48 for comfortable cruising at 120 km/h,   Your ratio (stock on '18 model) gives a bit less speed (4%) but more torque, which I reckon is better for my application.
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Offline Sycamore

Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #66 on: January 11, 2018, 05:37:55 pm »

Heavy adventure bikes like 690 and 990 are so overrated    :peepwall: :ricky:

There’s a lot of truth in that. But maybe it’s more diplomatic to say that the joys of simple, lean 450s (WR, CRF) and 500’s (EXC) are hugely underrated ..

For me simple goes with Japanese but that’s just my prejudice. EXC is a beauty. Love to see the adventure market embrace the basics again.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 05:40:37 pm by Sycamore »
 

Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #67 on: January 11, 2018, 05:40:23 pm »

Heavy adventure bikes like 690 and 990 are so overrated    :peepwall: :ricky:

There’s a lot of truth in that. But maybe it’s more diplomatic to say that the joys of simple, lean

Come on, that was clearly tongue in the cheek  ;)

I have 690 myself.

Offline Sycamore

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #68 on: January 11, 2018, 05:42:03 pm »

Heavy adventure bikes like 690 and 990 are so overrated    :peepwall: :ricky:

There’s a lot of truth in that. But maybe it’s more diplomatic to say that the joys of simple, lean

Come on, that was clearly tongue in the cheek  ;)

I have 690 myself.

Oops I took it at face value and got all passionate about the lightweights :)

So passionate that I sent my post without finishing it
 

Offline Sycamore

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #69 on: January 11, 2018, 06:00:37 pm »
A friend of mine rode from Abu Dhabi to Sana’a in Yemen and back (5,000 km round trip) solo on the CRF450X on the right. That’s pretty much a race bike but he carried what he needed and I have no idea how. I’ll drink to that. The 450 / 500 class is a world of opportunities. I’ll shut up now :)

 

Offline Sycamore

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #70 on: January 11, 2018, 06:04:57 pm »
Adventurizing  an ex-supermoto 500 EXC ...

http://www.texasadventure.net/bikes-and-gear/the-ktm-500-exc-build/


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Offline Omninorm

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #71 on: January 11, 2018, 07:07:52 pm »
Xpat yeah, I was about to say you could probably do that terrain on the 690 by standing and maybe sitting a bit here and there. BUT....then I remembered you have the extra fairing and probably extra fuel and luggage in that fairing making it a bit more difficult - heavy. A great rider like you and some of the okes here should be able to do that with ease on a 690/701. imho there it won't be the bike but the rider. (NON fairing 690). Also I forget that you carry all the luggage. I reckon so probably 20kg altogether? Thats a lot of extra weight for that sand.
The 500 or better yet a 250 / 300 would breeze through that in comparison. I mean let's put it this way, when I get to that I'd rather be on a 500 than a 690, but i'd rather be on a 300/250 than a 500 in the same situation. All will be able to do it relatively sensibly, unlike something like a 1200GS/1200Tenere/800GS/Triump of course :)

On the maintenance part of the 500, just a little note. if you buy second hand and have no extended warranty - stretching the intervals are obviously fine.
If you buy new or nearly new and intend to keep a warranty of any kind you will have to stick to their schedules or risk voiding it.
I love the fact that the 500 has a backup kickstart though. This is where the 690 makes me a little nervous and why I carry a jump starter battery pack - just in case. But if the starter / battery  thing wants to pack up...... you can't even push start these new bikes :patch:

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Offline JustBendIt

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #72 on: January 11, 2018, 07:55:51 pm »
I was team manager of Team 525 at Amageza 2015 - we were a team of 6 riders - 4 on 525s , 1 on a 2014 FI 450 and 1 on a 2015 FI 500

My 525 was 8 years old, had 25 000 km and 320 hours on it and had never been opened ...I replaced all the valves with kibblewhites the week before the rally and obviously set the valve clearances and fitted new rings just because the cylinder head was off but used the same piston again because it was still in spec.

All the bikes were properly serviced and had valves checked before the race.

We did 5000 km in 7 days - some of my teammates changed oil and oil filters every day (average 700 km) ... I did my 525 every second day but we all changed air filters every day

Nobody in my team checked valve clearances during the race ... was just too much of a hassle and the pit conditions were not nice

I would guess the average total riding time in the week was 80 - 100 hours per bike ... but this was not all flat out ...there were long liasons at national speed limits where we sat for 100s of kms at 100 kph

I can't speak for the rest of my team but I checked my valves when we got back after the race ... all 4 were perfectly in spec.

I sold that bike at 32 000 km and it was still running strong ...the bottom end had never been touched.

I now have a 2015 KTM 500 that has done 9 000 km and almost 200 hours ...in my opinion the motor is perfect. I change the oil and filter every 1500 km, clean the air filter regularly and check valve clearances every 50 hours.

I am quite confident that my 500 will do the same, if not more, mileage and hours that my 525 did before any major work is required.

I sold my 950SE because I was tired of wrestling with a heavy monster in the rough stuff ...my 500 is 10 times more fun than my SE ever was

I run a 14/48 sprocket combo and have seen 179 kph on a GPS on the R355 gravel road between ceres and Calvinia on my way to Stonehenge in the Tankwa Karoo - the 500 is certainly no slouch

My bikes is stock standard except for the 19 litre Acerbis tank - no screen, no racks, nothing - I run TUBLISS in the wheels and carry everything I need for a multi day trip in a very small backpack - the less the better
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 08:03:24 pm by JustBendIt »
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Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #73 on: January 11, 2018, 08:05:56 pm »
Sorry Omninorm, I differ on most of your points.

Let's start with the easy one - warranty: as far as I know there is no warranty on dirt bikes, so that is a mute point. I may be wrong as I generally don't care about warranty on my bikes, but I don't think I am.

Now for the most suitable bike for that track - or rather Dual Sport trips on those kind of tracks as that is topic of this thread - out of those you mentioned by you of course. I agree that 500 is much more suitable for it than 690. One more aspect of 500 I didn't realize will be so important compared to 690 is that you can turn handlebars much more (sorry don't remember what is the technical term - basically 500 has much tighter turning circle). Not for actualy turning - one can always spin the rear wheel, but for saving dicy situation while riding. In that envirohment you have to ride in the deep sand track, while at the same time dodge constantly overgrowing bushes and trees. And you get thrown around over that middlemani..... (central divide) all the time. And it is just to easy to save it with full lock of handlebars on 500, while on 690 the steering stops would have seen me thrown into the bush many times - I know, I've done it before.

Now for the other two - there is no chance in the world they would be better there. I think you are looking at those tracks in isolation and comparing them probably to something like Atlantis (sorry I don't know the place but am under impression that that is favourite sand riding place near CT). I can understand that for joyride there 300 or 250 may seem like better option.m

However this track is really remote with nobody around for at least 160 km, requires at least 400 km range, need to carry full camping gear, lots of water (I was carrying 9 litres i think), tools, spares, yada-yada. The track from Maun included 150 km of dirt road along Moremi boundary to Khwai Village, the sand in the pictures for another 160km then 170 km of another dirt road before you get to Mohembo ferry over Okavango and then to Shakawe where you are back to civilizaiton (i.e. first petrol station from Maun).

In other words nice Dual Sport trip (there was more riding there afterwards, but let's keep it simple). 300 would be just useless there because of limited range (I do not believe anybody makes a tank that would give it 400 km range) and I would go bonkers on those 320 km of dirt road on 2T. They just suck at it.

250 on the other hand - even if one could get big enough tank (which I don't know if it is available) would be just too pap for that sand. The grunt and luggability of the 500 just made this so much easier and I would definitely not want to ride this on underpowered 250. This is not to say that it would be slow - I was riding mostly 40 kmh anyway, but you would have to be in the right gear all the time and it would just be so much more work.

So for DS purposes (i.e. riding off the beaten track with minimalistic luggage enabling to survive for day or three out there strapped to the back) - which is what Damaraland wants to do, in my opinion none of those bikes holds candle to 500.

For a rocky technical riding like Lesotho, that would be completely different story of course (but I have witnessed myself how limited range of 300 was seriously limiting exploring out there as well).

Offline Fransw

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #74 on: January 11, 2018, 08:31:57 pm »
I was team manager of Team 525 at Amageza 2015 - we were a team of 6 riders - 4 on 525s , 1 on a 2014 FI 450 and 1 on a 2015 FI 500

My 525 was 8 years old, had 25 000 km and 320 hours on it and had never been opened ...I replaced all the valves with kibblewhites the week before the rally and obviously set the valve clearances and fitted new rings just because the cylinder head was off but used the same piston again because it was still in spec.

All the bikes were properly serviced and had valves checked before the race.

We did 5000 km in 7 days - some of my teammates changed oil and oil filters every day (average 700 km) ... I did my 525 every second day but we all changed air filters every day

Nobody in my team checked valve clearances during the race ... was just too much of a hassle and the pit conditions were not nice

I would guess the average total riding time in the week was 80 - 100 hours per bike ... but this was not all flat out ...there were long liasons at national speed limits where we sat for 100s of kms at 100 kph

I can't speak for the rest of my team but I checked my valves when we got back after the race ... all 4 were perfectly in spec.

I sold that bike at 32 000 km and it was still running strong ...the bottom end had never been touched.

I now have a 2015 KTM 500 that has done 9 000 km and almost 200 hours ...in my opinion the motor is perfect. I change the oil and filter every 1500 km, clean the air filter regularly and check valve clearances every 50 hours.

I am quite confident that my 500 will do the same, if not more, mileage and hours that my 525 did before any major work is required.

I sold my 950SE because I was tired of wrestling with a heavy monster in the rough stuff ...my 500 is 10 times more fun than my SE ever was

I run a 14/48 sprocket combo and have seen 179 kph on a GPS on the R355 gravel road between ceres and Calvinia on my way to Stonehenge in the Tankwa Karoo - the 500 is certainly no slouch

My bikes is stock standard except for the 19 litre Acerbis tank - no screen, no racks, nothing - I run TUBLISS in the wheels and carry everything I need for a multi day trip in a very small backpack - the less the better

Bendit, how difficult is it to do a valve clearance check? Can one do it in the field? Sorry for the silly questions, I'm no tech fundi..
 

Offline JustBendIt

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #75 on: January 11, 2018, 08:39:15 pm »
A valve clearance check can be done anywhere

Seat off, tank off, tappet cover off, feeler gauge out and check the clearances

Changing or adjusting the valve clearances is another story ... the 500 has under bucket shims - this means the camchain must be split and the camshaft must come out to be able to access the shims and change them ...and of course you need to have the right new shims to replace the ones that are coming out

A 525 is much easier - it has old style overhead adjustable tappets - no shims required - loosen the locknut, adjust the clearance and nip up the locknut again.

Everybody is making a mountain out of a molehill ... for me the valve clearance check is a non issue - I ride like a granny and do it every 50 hours - if I go a few hours over then so what ...the bike is not gonna blow up or just stop dead all of a sudden
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 08:40:52 pm by JustBendIt »
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Offline Omninorm

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #76 on: January 11, 2018, 08:49:04 pm »
Sorry Omninorm, I differ on most of your points.

Let's start with the easy one - warranty: as far as I know there is no warranty on dirt bikes, so that is a mute point. I may be wrong as I generally don't care about warranty on my bikes, but I don't think I am.

Now for the most suitable bike for that track - or rather Dual Sport trips on those kind of tracks as that is topic of this thread - out of those you mentioned by you of course. I agree that 500 is much more suitable for it than 690. One more aspect of 500 I didn't realize will be so important compared to 690 is that you can turn handlebars much more (sorry don't remember what is the technical term - basically 500 has much tighter turning circle). Not for actualy turning - one can always spin the rear wheel, but for saving dicy situation while riding. In that envirohment you have to ride in the deep sand track, while at the same time dodge constantly overgrowing bushes and trees. And you get thrown around over that middlemani..... (central divide) all the time. And it is just to easy to save it with full lock of handlebars on 500, while on 690 the steering stops would have seen me thrown into the bush many times - I know, I've done it before.

Now for the other two - there is no chance in the world they would be better there. I think you are looking at those tracks in isolation and comparing them probably to something like Atlantis (sorry I don't know the place but am under impression that that is favourite sand riding place near CT). I can understand that for joyride there 300 or 250 may seem like better option.m

However this track is really remote with nobody around for at least 160 km, requires at least 400 km range, need to carry full camping gear, lots of water (I was carrying 9 litres i think), tools, spares, yada-yada. The track from Maun included 150 km of dirt road along Moremi boundary to Khwai Village, the sand in the pictures for another 160km then 170 km of another dirt road before you get to Mohembo ferry over Okavango and then to Shakawe where you are back to civilizaiton (i.e. first petrol station from Maun).

In other words nice Dual Sport trip (there was more riding there afterwards, but let's keep it simple). 300 would be just useless there because of limited range (I do not believe anybody makes a tank that would give it 400 km range) and I would go bonkers on those 320 km of dirt road on 2T. They just suck at it.

250 on the other hand - even if one could get big enough tank (which I don't know if it is available) would be just too pap for that sand. The grunt and luggability of the 500 just made this so much easier and I would definitely not want to ride this on underpowered 250. This is not to say that it would be slow - I was riding mostly 40 kmh anyway, but you would have to be in the right gear all the time and it would just be so much more work.

So for DS purposes (i.e. riding off the beaten track with minimalistic luggage enabling to survive for day or three out there strapped to the back) - which is what Damaraland wants to do, in my opinion none of those bikes holds candle to 500.

For a rocky technical riding like Lesotho, that would be completely different story of course (but I have witnessed myself how limited range of 300 was seriously limiting exploring out there as well).

Xpat we are in agreement actually. Maybe I explained my points incorrectly.

I did look at that sand bit in isolation when I made my reply, that's why I also said the 690 would be able to do it relatively easily (ALSO in isolation other than a few bits of tools and water.)). i.e The 690 without all the gear would do it ok ish, but now add the extra 20KG and it becomes heavy, where the 500 would then effectively be the weight of the 690 without gear.
Regarding the  300's and 250. No way I was saying that they will ride there and do the trip. Just, in that specific sand terrain they will imho be better than the 500 (not having ridden a 500 but a 450 or 2).
Where we don't agree maybe is that a well geared 250 would sail over that terrain. it wont be too pap at all. Again..in isolation, not getting there on the bike with 5 days of gear and stuff.
Having ridden Atlantis Dunes with 250 4t's and 2t's and other sand tracks with 250 4t's,  2t's 450's and then my Xchallenge, 690 a 800gs and a Vstrom (Yeah very stupid indeed but what did I know). Unless the 500 is a way different beast than other 450's I've ridden, Imho the 250's was better than all over that sand except for climbing the big dunes. It's not even something to think about. Ride off the road onto the sand...just go! On the 690 hitting deep sand like in your pics off dirt or road I'm like ....shit better get my shit together and saying to the bike and myself... "please dont fall on the whoops" I hate whoops on the 690. If its flatish its ok.  :)
But I digress.
For your riding the 500 seems to be the weapon of choice.
For me, although I seek out the 1 spoor or 2 spoor effectively on every ride, in the exploration of those you do sometimes have to do either tar or just regular old dirt roads.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 08:59:21 pm by Omninorm »
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Offline Fransw

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #77 on: January 11, 2018, 08:49:04 pm »
A valve clearance check can be done anywhere

Seat off, tank off, tappet cover off, feeler gauge out and check the clearances

Changing or adjusting the valve clearances is another story ... the 500 has under bucket shims - this means the camchain must be split and the camshaft must come out to be able to access the shims and change them ...and of course you need to have the right new shims to replace the ones that are coming out

A 525 is much easier - it has old style overhead adjustable tappets - no shims required - loosen the locknut, adjust the clearance and nip up the locknut again.

Everybody is making a mountain out of a molehill ... for me the valve clearance check is a non issue - I ride like a granny and do it every 50 hours - if I go a few hours over then so what ...the bike is not gonna blow up or just stop dead all of a sudden

Thanks! Also on your last sentence! :thumleft:
 

Offline TinusBez

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #78 on: January 12, 2018, 06:47:00 am »
Damaraland, I just remembered: you will most probably need new sprocket straight out of the box. My (new - 2016 model) for some reason came with 13/50 ratio, with which you basically can climb vertical walls, but it maxes out at about 90 kmh - not good for your intended use.

Different people gear them differently. For normal use - i.e. bush trips like DeWilds, Botswana cutlines, Kaokoland and such I use 14/50 (that one I'm comfortable with up to 120kmh - but I"m softie when it comes to mechanical sympathy - they can be geared to 160 kmh from what I've heard), for clutch slipping trips to Lesotho I use 14/52 (but I doubt you will need that in Nam, unless you have some rockfaces you want to climb).

So the guys over on advrider reckons the '18 models come out with 14/50.  Recommendation on there was 14 / 48 for comfortable cruising at 120 km/h,   Your ratio (stock on '18 model) gives a bit less speed (4%) but more torque, which I reckon is better for my application.

Mine stock was 13/48 and will change to 14/50 purely to see what it feels like. Pulls like a tractor but certainly not a bike for cruising at 120, on a dirt highway yes sure but that gets boring after a while. See someone here clocked 170, I chicken out at 150 but yeah the bike can do it.

There's been many points of discussion on the "Cross training Enduro" channel on youtube for those following it. The author says take it as it comes out of the factory but then they also rave about the Beta and DR650 as an unprecedented training cheap do it all kinda bike.

Was thinking of suspension on the rear because I'm 100kg but I've never bottomed it out even after a 4ft drop/jump (don't know how they get that right) but will leave it. There's a 500 group in FB and some of the guys cite more than 500 hours with basic maintenance type stuff being done.
KTM: 500 EXC-F current
KTM: 1190 Adv R Sold
Sweat dries, blood clots and bones heal, Suck it up princess
 

Offline m0lt3n

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #79 on: January 12, 2018, 07:55:42 am »
Xpat you will like Tinus^.
He traded his 1190 in on a 500!
Dooie visse gaan saam met die stroom...