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Offline bud500

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #80 on: January 12, 2018, 08:15:12 am »
There's a 500 group in FB and some of the guys cite more than 500 hours with basic maintenance type stuff being done.

Could you please give me that group's name?
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Offline andrew5336

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #81 on: January 12, 2018, 08:20:29 am »
Not sure if this has been shared but http://therollinghobo.com/500exc .

Wealth of first hand experience and some great ideas.

Also, some of the trips this boy has done are just insane.
 

Offline Damaraland

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #82 on: January 12, 2018, 08:43:24 am »
Xpat, I agree, which is why I serviced both my 690 and 701 every 5000kays.

The 500, like the 450's factory quoted service intervals are really for when you hang off those throttle cables like in racing, and the engine works flat-out most of the time.

In fact, I would under normal touring conditions easily stretch the 500's service intervals to 5000kays.

This makes me happy.  I will stick to Xpat's recommendation but very good to know that you can push it out if you need to on longer / more remote trips.
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Offline Rossdog

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #83 on: January 12, 2018, 09:04:37 am »
I saw a Youtube video where Adam Rieman's 500 is stripped down after a full season's racing and other shenanigans. I can't remember the hours/km, but it was substantial, and Rieman doesn't ride like a girl. Everything; piston, rings, valve clearance, bottom end was still in spec.
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Offline Dwerg

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #84 on: January 12, 2018, 09:13:42 am »
I seem to recall that MTP had to rebuilt his after their one trip with something like 6-8k kms on the motor? Although I'm sure his was the exception
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Offline Dwerg

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #85 on: January 12, 2018, 09:14:34 am »
Wait that may have been his 450
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Offline Omninorm

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #86 on: January 12, 2018, 09:35:57 am »
I saw a Youtube video where Adam Rieman's 500 is stripped down after a full season's racing and other shenanigans. I can't remember the hours/km, but it was substantial, and Rieman doesn't ride like a girl. Everything; piston, rings, valve clearance, bottom end was still in spec.

After 75 hours yeah...of his riding.



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Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #87 on: January 12, 2018, 09:46:27 am »
Wait that may have been his 450

Yes, his was 450. Not sure what the difference is apart from stroke, but they have reputation to be more vicious/racy than 500, which is more torqey and relaxed and hence probably better for DS use, including longevity. But that is just my theory - never actually rode 450, so take it as that.

Offline JustBendIt

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #88 on: January 12, 2018, 09:48:46 am »
Wait that may have been his 450

yes it was his 450 ...because it sucked in sand

cleaning and properly greasing and sealing the air filter is critical to the longevity of these engines
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Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #89 on: January 12, 2018, 09:58:30 am »
Xpat you will like Tinus^.
He traded his 1190 in on a 500!

Sure I like Tinus!

I like you as well. I might have leaned into you a bit here with the 500 vs 300 debate, probably crossing the boundaries - sorry if I did.

But I'm not bashing big bikes here - actually in your case I was advocating bigger over smaller (500 vs 300). I just believe that it is best to use best tool for intended purpose. If you want to ride two up, or really fast on easy gravel and tar, long distances in comfort, etc - big bikes are clearly the ticket and I would never recommend 500 or 690 for that. If on the other hand you want to climb rocks in Lesotho - 300 all the way (well I might even look on smaller 2 smoke if it has lower seat).

But if you are interested in the kind of off the beaten track DS riding (DS in the original american sense of the word - i.e plated dirt bike), exploring unkown paths in remote places of Africa, right now I believe 500 is the best bike for the job (at least from the ones still sold new).

Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #90 on: January 12, 2018, 10:05:33 am »
@Omninorm: I think we are on the same page, just one last comment. Maybe I'm wrong but I do get impression that you think 500 is much closer to 690 than to 250. That is not the case IMO - it is exact oposite. It is a dirtbike with absolutely minimum stuff on it and hence much closer in most aspects other than power to 250. Of course it is going to feel a bit heavier because of bigger moving masses in the engine, but it is still a dirt bike, not a dirt-worthy road bike like 690.

Offline Omninorm

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #91 on: January 12, 2018, 10:23:25 am »
@Omninorm: I think we are on the same page, just one last comment. Maybe I'm wrong but I do get impression that you think 500 is much closer to 690 than to 250. That is not the case IMO - it is exact oposite. It is a dirtbike with absolutely minimum stuff on it and hence much closer in most aspects other than power to 250. Of course it is going to feel a bit heavier because of bigger moving masses in the engine, but it is still a dirt bike, not a dirt-worthy road bike like 690.

No no, I know the 500 is closer to the 250. :thumleft: I've had road legal 450. That's also the only reason anyone would think twice on taking a 500 now. Since it's a "race engine" <-- using the term loosely. I mean if it wasn't for that I would have considered it for sure. I might even have one in the garage someday. Even if I do seek out as much dirt as possible, unfortunately tar stretches are a reality for me and to put that mileage on a "Race bike" would have me doing a lot of maintenance work (preventative) because I'm kinda pedantic.
If the engineer said 50 hours i'll do 50 hours. Not push it to 75 because it should do it etc.
Even now, I reckon I'll replace rocker arms on 20 000km - 30 000km as a precaution even if they are fine.

So yeah...KTM 500 EXC - fantastic bike that can cover a lot of ground I think. Just not for me at this stage for those reasons.
Also remember I'm still in a fragile state of KTM trust at this stage. I needed something with a warranty....cause it's not a BMW, Honda, Suzuki  :lol8: :peepwall:



« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 10:24:50 am by Omninorm »
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Offline TinusBez

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #92 on: January 12, 2018, 10:27:18 am »
There's a 500 group in FB and some of the guys cite more than 500 hours with basic maintenance type stuff being done.

Could you please give me that group's name?

Sure

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1075894689185624/

called "ktm500 exc and FE501"
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Offline m0lt3n

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #93 on: January 12, 2018, 10:31:48 am »
Xpat you will like Tinus^.
He traded his 1190 in on a 500!

Sure I like Tinus!

I like you as well. I might have leaned into you a bit here with the 500 vs 300 debate, probably crossing the boundaries - sorry if I did.

But I'm not bashing big bikes here - actually in your case I was advocating bigger over smaller (500 vs 300). I just believe that it is best to use best tool for intended purpose. If you want to ride two up, or really fast on easy gravel and tar, long distances in comfort, etc - big bikes are clearly the ticket and I would never recommend 500 or 690 for that. If on the other hand you want to climb rocks in Lesotho - 300 all the way (well I might even look on smaller 2 smoke if it has lower seat).

But if you are interested in the kind of off the beaten track DS riding (DS in the original american sense of the word - i.e plated dirt bike), exploring unkown paths in remote places of Africa, right now I believe 500 is the best bike for the job (at least from the ones still sold new).


I don't mind.
I also don't mind much which one I get. I believe one adapts to what you have. You will start riding more and make more and more plans to ride the terrain suited to your bike. So there is little in it.
There is a lot of local amature enduro races which I would like to dabble in, I would like to get my skills up so believe that will be easier on 300 as well but still possible on the 500. Its a new area or genre of biking to explore, so there is no way to judge now which would be the more appropriate. The 300 will be the better 2 hour toy for me currently (family logistics) but the 500 as an extreme adv bike will also be good as it can do the 2hr stints with 300/250 2T friends around town but I can also start prepping it for multi day adv trips. There is no right or wrong decision for me on this currently.

Wrong decisions is when you buy a GS to fix up and sell at profit. Then it eats up time and money, so now my money is stuck till the GS sells and I cant buy the flippen dirt bike!
Sorry, another of my off-topic posts.

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Offline TinusBez

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #94 on: January 12, 2018, 10:39:13 am »
The yanks classify the 500 as a DS bike and the FB page you'll a lot of this, none of the supposed magic less than 100 hours sell your bike shit there.

The Enduro training channel on youtube suggest adding stuff to adds weight and their focus is more on training (why I enjoy ti so much) as opposed to like Xpat calls it brand bashing. To prove a point in one race they had an elite guy on some 80's model which no mods done and he did better than most on the modern bikes (can't remember the name of the vid now).

Back to Damaraland's question which has been answered for the most part.

...This means that I'm looking for the items that are both indispensable for adventure riding on a 500 as well as the most economical in their class.  Would prefer to buy from SA distributors if possible, but importing is also not a huge problem.

Essentials in my opinion (would love to hear from other riders also what they think is essential):
- Larger tank (need to cater for about 400km range)
- Bash plate
- Luggage rack
- Possibly touring screen

Looking forward to your input!

Tank makes sense, also you don't need to fill it all the way, depends on riding and how technical it'll be.
Bash plate - essential but get those plastic or carbon ones, they're cheap and help keep weight down, the alu ones are tough yeah but heave compared to plastic ones and the plastic ones are pretty tough. Also the 500 has 355mm ground clearance. That is a lot
Luggage rack - skip it, like Xpat said get soft luggage like GL or Mosko (ordering my Mosko in Feb)
Touring screen - give it a skip, yes it looks cool and you can probably go the tower with all the rally gizmo's sometime in future, IMO you hardly to the sustained speed you'd do your 990.

Get the protection bits for discs front and back, swingarm and frame guard, fork guards and obviously hand guards and off you go. I also want to install the tubeliss system but don't have money right now, changing a tyre with rim lock isn't fun especially if it is ultra heavy duty which IMO is a sales gimmick, a nail will go through irrespective so I don't buy ultra HD anymore and easier to change a tyre with standard tubes but tubeliss solves this and you can run ultra low pressure in the gnarly stuff.
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Offline m0lt3n

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #95 on: January 12, 2018, 10:45:22 am »
on topic

Adventurising a 500

1. do you not need wider footpegs or are they fine standard? Or do you sit more than what would be case on bigger bike.
2. Tied to above, handlebar raisers? The little ride I did on a 501 was super tiring to stand in a short time. I know I had to get fitter but I also realised when I was forced to sit that sitting was more comfortable on the single track than on my 1190.
3. Power sources, can the alternator charge extra stuff? GPS and phones.
4. Tubliss conversion wasn't mentioned much. I wouldn't want to go without. How much is it?
5. comfort seat? or do you fit a little pillow? Don't tell me to man up or get saddle fit. it doesn't exist if you spend consecutive 12hour days in the saddle. What do you do to that ironing board on the back of the bike?
6. cost of bashplate? or do you stick with some cheapie plastic thing because the bike never bottoms out?
7. Radiator guards necessary?
8. Aftermarket rims? front only or strong enough OEM not to get bend on rocks?
9. How much is extra brake and gearlever or do they never break? (Xpat do you carry extra levers on your trips? I have never noticed)

AAAAND Edit: Tinus thanks for answering a lot of these already
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Offline MaxThePanda

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #96 on: January 12, 2018, 10:58:42 am »
on topic

Adventurising a 500

1. do you not need wider footpegs or are they fine standard? Or do you sit more than what would be case on bigger bike.
2. Tied to above, handlebar raisers? The little ride I did on a 501 was super tiring to stand in a short time. I know I had to get fitter but I also realised when I was forced to sit that sitting was more comfortable on the single track than on my 1190.
3. Power sources, can the alternator charge extra stuff? GPS and phones.
4. Tubliss conversion wasn't mentioned much. I wouldn't want to go without. How much is it?
5. comfort seat? or do you fit a little pillow? Don't tell me to man up or get saddle fit. it doesn't exist if you spend consecutive 12hour days in the saddle. What do you do to that ironing board on the back of the bike?
6. cost of bashplate? or do you stick with some cheapie plastic thing because the bike never bottoms out?
7. Radiator guards necessary?
8. Aftermarket rims? front only or strong enough OEM not to get bend on rocks?
9. How much is extra brake and gearlever or do they never break? (Xpat do you carry extra levers on your trips? I have never noticed)

AAAAND Edit: Tinus thanks for answering a lot of these already

1. No
2. No - I'm 6'3" and I'm fine without. You can move the bars forward as there are 4 positions. Having the bars in the sky trains you in VERY BAD riding positions.
3. Yes - no problem.
4. I use Tubliss - it's a bit more maintenance than a normal tube or mousses and there are strong arguments both ways but I like it. I think it's about R1500 a wheel.
5. Just did the whole of northern Namibia on the standard seat and it was 100%. I had a Seat Concepts on my previous 450 but I'm not bothering now. 2017/8 model may be a little less comfortable.
6. Go Hyde - solid, quiet and doesn't catch on things.
7. Hmmm. personal preference. I have em, but probably wouldn't have bothered if the bike didn't come with them. Definitely have them on my rock bashing 300 though.
8. Don't aftermarket anything you really don't have to. The rims are 100s and so is everything else. I literally changed only the tank - to the Acerbis/KTM 20l.
9. I've never broken brake or gear pedals on any of my KTM enduros - even the 300 I chuck down mountains. I still carry spares wired into the airbox but never needed them. Hand levers are a good idea unless you have Cycras in which case I'd say they are optional.

Offline Xpat

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #97 on: January 12, 2018, 11:04:34 am »
on topic

Adventurising a 500

1. do you not need wider footpegs or are they fine standard? Or do you sit more than what would be case on bigger bike. I'm on standard pegs, no issue. And yes you will sit much more on this bike in tough terrain - you need to stand only for really gnarly fast stuff
2. Tied to above, handlebar raisers? The little ride I did on a 501 was super tiring to stand in a short time. I know I had to get fitter but I also realised when I was forced to sit that sitting was more comfortable on the single track than on my 1190. I have steering damper so they are probably raised little bit because of that. But nowadays I stay clear off raisers - my experience now is that you should either sit or stand in full attack position with bent knees and back almost horizontal to the seat. None of that merkat straight up standing for 100 km. But that is me - and I'm 179cm
3. Power sources, can the alternator charge extra stuff? GPS and phones. Yes I had one installed on the handlebars with cigarette lighter plug and USB plug. Works 100%
4. Tubliss conversion wasn't mentioned much. I wouldn't want to go without. How much is it? Don't know, I ride tubes
5. comfort seat? or do you fit a little pillow? Don't tell me to man up or get saddle fit. it doesn't exist if you spend consecutive 12hour days in the saddle. What do you do to that ironing board on the back of the bike? I ride standard. I think you might put exagerated importance to this because of your iron butt races. If you ride 12 hours on 500 you either doing it completely wrong - i.e. riding too easy route like tar or easy dirt for 12 hours, or if you are using it right and ride 12 hours - e.g. you are stuck in some dune field - the sore butt is going to be least of your problem, because you will be standing a lot or moving on the seat. My experience is that on my 690 with crap seat I can do easily 600 - 700 km a day in dirt, but on tar I'm hurting bad within 70 km - the reason, you move on the seat in dirt, while you static on tar. But again, that is me, you have to do what suits you - I'm sure somebody can adjust your seat in SA
6. cost of bashplate? or do you stick with some cheapie plastic thing because the bike never bottoms out? I have metal one from Power parts - sorry don't remember the cost. I'm sure some plastic Hyde product will also do good job - maybe check with Losper if it can withstand Lesotho rock bashing
7. Radiator guards necessary? Not for me - I have big tanks that protects them enough so far
8. Aftermarket rims? front only or strong enough OEM not to get bend on rocks? This is offroad bike with proper components. None of that cheap stuff they put on road bikes. In other words - strong enough  8)
9. How much is extra brake and gearlever or do they never break? (Xpat do you carry extra levers on your trips? I have never noticed) I do carry spare leveers - sorry don't remember the costs, check on Runners website or whoever sells them. Mine didn't break so far after 5,5k km, but as I said - I ride like old lady

AAAAND Edit: Tinus thanks for answering a lot of these already

Answers up in red.

Edit: Sorry, not sure why the red came up all glowing and stuff.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 11:20:31 am by Xpat »
 

Offline bud500

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Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #98 on: January 12, 2018, 11:05:06 am »
I agree with MTP, apart from point 1.
IMHO, for consecutive long days on the bike with lots of standing, bigger foot pegs make a massive difference. Just look at the pegs the Dakar bikes come with.

Oh, and I have bar raisers. I know of all the bad habits it teaches you, but I'm no pro and anything that makes me stand easier helps.
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Offline TinusBez

Re: Economically adventurizing a EXC 500
« Reply #99 on: January 12, 2018, 11:32:15 am »
Pegs - My standard pegs are almost the same as the standard ones I had on my 1190.
Tubes - Tubeliss system last I checked was R 1500 for one, think saw them at Flyingbrick and being a whore looking for best prices they are pretty much the same all over.
Radiator - Called radiator braces are bloody expensive at around 7k, don't know if you need to lose them when installing a bigger tank but I do know you lose the shrouds (cosmetic plastic piece running from the seat are to front of the radiator

KTM sold me a protection kit, effectively a box with all the protection bits for I think around 7k. Item for item it made a lot more sense buying the box then individual parts. That said I don't know whether it is a thing KTM offers or just the dealer I bought it from.



KTM: 500 EXC-F current
KTM: 1190 Adv R Sold
Sweat dries, blood clots and bones heal, Suck it up princess