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Author Topic: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin  (Read 1812 times)

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Offline Dux

Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2018, 06:04:30 pm »
John , you know my old saying , the best bike is the one in your garage  :thumleft:
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Offline jaybiker

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Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2018, 09:22:55 am »
I can't tell you what to do, I don't have the disadvantage of being a 'shorty". But I do have the disadvantage of being a slowed down, weakening, deacaying 73 year old.

And yet my preference would still be for the bigger bike. Even if you don't want to ride particularly fast, it's still greatly satisfying and often advantageous to have plenty of 'grunt' available.
The size and weight of the Africa Twin does not seem to be a drawback to anyone who has written or reported on it, so for what my advice is worth it would be, "if you're gonna have one, have a big one".  :)
 

Offline wilfwalk

Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #22 on: February 01, 2018, 09:32:09 am »
Thanks a lot jaybiker, thats sure encouraging ! Go safely !
 

Offline wilfwalk

Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #23 on: February 01, 2018, 09:35:16 am »
Buy it if you want it.

Just remember that small bikes are so much less effort and much cheaper when they fall over.

The AT would be brilliant on the longer rides and a bit of a pain going to the cafe.

Both very valid points, making the decision even more difficult !
 

Offline wilfwalk

Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #24 on: February 09, 2018, 11:11:56 am »
I went and had another look at a 2nd hand AT at the local dealer. We lowered the seat setting but even then only my toes were on the ground, not able to flat foot. So even on the level showroom floor I wasn't confident that I could handle this bike with its size & weight etc. so I've canned the idea of an AT.

So those guys who are tall enough to safely and confidently ride an AT, know how lucky you are, and how envious I am !!

I could take a risk and buy one, but I don't want end up a cripple at this stage of my life, as a result of being reckless. A scaled down AT (around 450cc) for us short folk would be ideal.

 

Offline m0lt3n

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Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #25 on: February 09, 2018, 11:44:52 am »
I went and had another look at a 2nd hand AT at the local dealer. We lowered the seat setting but even then only my toes were on the ground, not able to flat foot. So even on the level showroom floor I wasn't confident that I could handle this bike with its size & weight etc. so I've canned the idea of an AT.

So those guys who are tall enough to safely and confidently ride an AT, know how lucky you are, and how envious I am !!

I could take a risk and buy one, but I don't want end up a cripple at this stage of my life, as a result of being reckless. A scaled down AT (around 450cc) for us short folk would be ideal.



not reaching the ground would increase the risk of falling OVER, not falling. Not making you a cripple. Get fit and adapt your riding style if you really want the bike?
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Online Ri

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Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #26 on: February 09, 2018, 04:04:27 pm »

I agree, having your feet touch the ground firmly is a great confidence boost. I tippy toed on my DR, and had to choose a side when coming to a stop. All good, but over rougher terrain where a toe down would've helped a lot, I had to put the bike down - unnecessary damage to bike and limb  :-[

Since dropping to lowest link and lowering the front, I haven't fallen over yet. Even caught my bike in some hairy situations, like a steep slanted dirt road turn on a plantation road.

I'm sure there's a lower seat option (not just a low setting on the current seat) for us short folk. A friend of mine who rides a DR650 met a short guy on an AT and had the opportunity to sit on his bike. He told me it was lower than the DR! But mentioned that it was a low seat option.

But I could be wrong.
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Online Omninorm

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Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #27 on: February 09, 2018, 04:11:18 pm »
My one mate is a short shit as well, when the bike starts going he just lets go. He mostly always lands on his feet with the bike laying on its side. Laughter ensues and we help him back up.

I do however agree that a light/ nimble bike is just more fun in 90% of the situations than a big bike. But don't let apparent size be the only motivator. Go test ride it.
A 1200GS is a lot less of a behemoth than it looks like when you are pushing it around, picking it up or riding it. The Africa Twin doubly so by what I've heard.


« Last Edit: February 09, 2018, 04:12:02 pm by Omninorm »
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Offline DavidMorrisXp

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Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #28 on: February 09, 2018, 04:35:02 pm »
My one mate is a short shit as well, when the bike starts going he just lets go. He mostly always lands on his feet with the bike laying on its side. Laughter ensues and we help him back up.

I do however agree that a light/ nimble bike is just more fun in 90% of the situations than a big bike. But don't let apparent size be the only motivator. Go test ride it.
A 1200GS is a lot less of a behemoth than it looks like when you are pushing it around, picking it up or riding it. The Africa Twin doubly so by what I've heard.

Have owned various GS's and I must say there is not much in it between the AT & a standard GS whether it be LC or Oil cooled
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Online Omninorm

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Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #29 on: February 24, 2018, 06:52:01 pm »
My one mate is a short shit as well, when the bike starts going he just lets go. He mostly always lands on his feet with the bike laying on its side. Laughter ensues and we help him back up.

I do however agree that a light/ nimble bike is just more fun in 90% of the situations than a big bike. But don't let apparent size be the only motivator. Go test ride it.
A 1200GS is a lot less of a behemoth than it looks like when you are pushing it around, picking it up or riding it. The Africa Twin doubly so by what I've heard.

Have owned various GS's and I must say there is not much in it between the AT & a standard GS whether it be LC or Oil cooled

Thought as much. Good to know thanks.  Pretty equal weights and I think both have very good center of gravity and weight distribution.
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Offline wilfwalk

Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #30 on: March 05, 2018, 03:04:42 pm »
To conclude the thread, seeing I started it, let me give an update.
I decided to get a CRF 250 Rally. Will help me get back into the biking way, its light, easy to handle (compared to an AT),  light of fuel, and if I decide the adventure biking "thing" isn't what I'd hoped it was, will loose less to get rid of it all again.
Did my "first" ride on Sunday morning early(ish) - cool, roads dust free from a light shower on Saturday night. Getting used to the bike jacket was an experience in itself. Really enjoyed the bike even at running-in speeds.

Thanks to all for your inputs, much appreciated.
 

Offline zebra - Flying Brick

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Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #31 on: March 05, 2018, 03:18:04 pm »


Quote from: Crossed-up on January 31, 2018, 05:30:14 pm


>" You can knock panel pins in with a four-pounder, but it's just easier with a little upholstery hammer...."

very nice analogy, John; this shows the benefit of a 'University' education (no, I did not go... ;D )
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Offline sidetrack

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Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #32 on: March 05, 2018, 03:29:40 pm »
From what I have heard, is that the new AT feels like a 650 for the balance and light feeling.
I went from a 650 XRL to a 1200 GSA and I must say it feels lighter on gravel and handles better.

just my 2 bob's worth
Light single comes into it's own on more technical terrain. On good gravel a heavy bike is more stable and more comfortable. Off course the shock comes when you have to pick it up  :biggrin:
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Offline m0lt3n

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Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #33 on: March 05, 2018, 03:41:38 pm »
To conclude the thread, seeing I started it, let me give an update.
I decided to get a CRF 250 Rally. Will help me get back into the biking way, its light, easy to handle (compared to an AT),  light of fuel, and if I decide the adventure biking "thing" isn't what I'd hoped it was, will loose less to get rid of it all again.
Did my "first" ride on Sunday morning early(ish) - cool, roads dust free from a light shower on Saturday night. Getting used to the bike jacket was an experience in itself. Really enjoyed the bike even at running-in speeds.

Thanks to all for your inputs, much appreciated.

Thanks for the feedback

and solid reasoning.

I had a short friend interested into getting on a bike. no prior experience. Salesman tried hard to sell him a 1200GSA. I advied against. I advised for a 700 or 650 but that was also not cool enough so he ended up getting a new 800. 6 months later it was sold with little a few new scratches and even less mileage.
Oh, and adventure biking was dubbed as being not worth the money.

This 250 would have been perfect for him as well
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Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #34 on: March 05, 2018, 06:10:21 pm »
My one mate is a short shit as well, when the bike starts going he just lets go. He mostly always lands on his feet with the bike laying on its side. Laughter ensues and we help him back up.

You know, I do read the forum from time to time ;)

But yeah, that is what crash bars are for. That said, Ill soon be switching to a smaller bike (though not really lower).

It is actually quite disappointing to find almost all bikes are suitable for taller riders only. Like the OP said, a scaled-down single cylinder version of the big ones would be grand, but they tend to be just as high. I wonder why?
 
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Online Omninorm

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Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #35 on: March 06, 2018, 03:17:50 pm »
My one mate is a short shit as well, when the bike starts going he just lets go. He mostly always lands on his feet with the bike laying on its side. Laughter ensues and we help him back up.

You know, I do read the forum from time to time ;)

But yeah, that is what crash bars are for. That said, Ill soon be switching to a smaller bike (though not really lower).

It is actually quite disappointing to find almost all bikes are suitable for taller riders only. Like the OP said, a scaled-down single cylinder version of the big ones would be grand, but they tend to be just as high. I wonder why?

 :imaposer:

To conclude the thread, seeing I started it, let me give an update.
I decided to get a CRF 250 Rally. Will help me get back into the biking way, its light, easy to handle (compared to an AT),  light of fuel, and if I decide the adventure biking "thing" isn't what I'd hoped it was, will loose less to get rid of it all again.
Did my "first" ride on Sunday morning early(ish) - cool, roads dust free from a light shower on Saturday night. Getting used to the bike jacket was an experience in itself. Really enjoyed the bike even at running-in speeds.

Thanks to all for your inputs, much appreciated.

Fantastic choice. Enjoy it.  :thumleft:
« Last Edit: March 06, 2018, 03:21:36 pm by Omninorm »
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Offline Tom van Brits

Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #36 on: March 06, 2018, 03:45:21 pm »
To conclude the thread, seeing I started it, let me give an update.
I decided to get a CRF 250 Rally. Will help me get back into the biking way, its light, easy to handle (compared to an AT),  light of fuel, and if I decide the adventure biking "thing" isn't what I'd hoped it was, will loose less to get rid of it all again.
Did my "first" ride on Sunday morning early(ish) - cool, roads dust free from a light shower on Saturday night. Getting used to the bike jacket was an experience in itself. Really enjoyed the bike even at running-in speeds.

Thanks to all for your inputs, much appreciated.

Sensible choice I'd say, much easier to handle and you can do some lekker trail riding on the 250. I am around 174 and have short legs. Had a lot of difficulty trying to handle a 1200 Triumph at some stage of my life on more technical sections. Left leg not as strong due to an old accident, and topped over often. Picking up a heavy bike a couple of times on a ride and the damage to the bike is not fun. Many guys fracture ankles when the bike falls over. Given your age, weight and height you have made a sensible decision. Once ver 40 the bones just doesn't mend that quick and well anymore and you are just never the same again.

Enjoy your Rally!  :thumleft:
 
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Offline wilfwalk

Re: Advice about coping with an Africa Twin
« Reply #37 on: March 08, 2018, 09:24:43 am »
Thanks Tom, appreciated !