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What are you looking for in a good all round ds / adventure bike, if you could only have one bike?

Looks
18 (3%)
Comfort
47 (7.8%)
Versatility / practicality
71 (11.7%)
Ruggedness and durability
104 (17.2%)
Power
26 (4.3%)
Weight / Agility
89 (14.7%)
Fuel consumption
17 (2.8%)
Fuel Range
75 (12.4%)
Latest technology
2 (0.3%)
Dealer network availability and proximity
23 (3.8%)
Ease and cost of maintenance (Parts availability)
76 (12.6%)
Price
25 (4.1%)
Does it retain 2nd hand value
7 (1.2%)
Tubes only
4 (0.7%)
Tubeless only
21 (3.5%)

Total Members Voted: 129

Voting closed: September 05, 2018, 06:08:46 am

Author Topic: What defines a good adventure bike?  (Read 3451 times)

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Offline Hardy de Kock

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Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #120 on: July 11, 2018, 09:38:35 pm »
In a perfect world it would be cool to have a collection of bikes for each occasion , but reality bites and for a lot of us it boils down to one or two , I have two that cover my bases for now but if finances allowed I would probably have a fleet .
My understanding is that Hardy is trying to find out what the market is wanting , and I suspect that is for a one or two bike garage rather than a fleet of bikes .

The problem is that according to the stats posted earlier, people are buying less and less bikes every year. At some point most of us will have to settle with an all rounder it seems.
 

Offline 2StrokeDan

Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #121 on: July 11, 2018, 09:41:30 pm »
To summarise seven pages of debate - no bike can cover all the bases. No matter what you buy, it's a compromise in some way. The SA penchant for BMW GS's has distorted peoples' understanding of just how "dual purpose" ANY bike can be. Just  because some masochistic types took GS1200's up Baboon's Pass in Lesotho doesn't mean it's capable of doing so on a regular basis  You can take a fecken Harley or a Goldwing up it too, if you are willing to  suffer enough.  :lol8: 

Wanna ride 700 or 1200 km to Kaokoland comfortably and reliably, then ride some nasty stuff for 20 km? You'll KAK getting there on  a 450, 500 or even 690 but enjoy the passes tremendously.  However, if your skills are up to it, taking a KTM 950 or 990 or even a 1190 down (or up) Van Zyls Pass will merely add spice to a good ride. Try it  on a GS1200 and that short section will haunt your dreams for years to come.

Wanna ride hike-a-bike shit in Lesotho?  Take anything bigger than a KTM 500 and see how that works out for you. In fact, try it on anything bigger than a 300 two stroke and see. You  WILL be trailering the bike, the sooner you realise that the sooner you'll start enjoying the entire trip.   

Take a modern "adventure" bike with more gee-whizz electronics than a 1980's jet fighter into bumf**k Africa where technical support is baling wire and an axe, and sooner rather than  later you WILL get stuck. For that kind of thing you want kickstart, carburetted, air-cooled and cable brakes and clutch. XR650L or DR 650, finish and klaar.

Things like sidestand cut-out switches, ABS, "mode control", air suspension, iphone charging ports etc do not belong on a bike you plan on taking substantially off the beaten path.

Boutique bikes like Aprillia, SWM, CCM, Sherco etc will multiply your headaches when something goes wrong. KISS......keep it simple, stupid. 

I too, thought that one bike could do four or five things well......and learned otherwise by getting heatstroke fighting it  - a KTM 450 XCF - on a hike-a-bike ride. And from a bleeding arse every time I do our local 120 km mountain pass breakfast run.

That's why you need 4 or 5  bikes in your garage. One simply isn't enough  :biggrin:

You can only ride one at any given time, so fat help you arrive fresh as a spring sparrow in Kaokoland on your GS1200 to do Van Zyl's, and your 450/500/701 is standing 2000kms away at home.

Trips need choices to be made, and a bike chosen to do as much of what you want to do.
 

Offline Dux

Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #122 on: July 11, 2018, 09:49:51 pm »
In a perfect world it would be cool to have a collection of bikes for each occasion , but reality bites and for a lot of us it boils down to one or two , I have two that cover my bases for now but if finances allowed I would probably have a fleet .
My understanding is that Hardy is trying to find out what the market is wanting , and I suspect that is for a one or two bike garage rather than a fleet of bikes .

The problem is that according to the stats posted earlier, people are buying less and less bikes every year. At some point most of us will have to settle with an all rounder it seems.

Exactly , my feeling is that more riders will want or only be able to afford one bike to do it all , and admittedly the economy worldwide doesn't allow the factories to build 5 or 6 different versions of a bike , one or two maybe that can cover all those bases , so I really don't envy them .
As I mentioned earlier , in discussions with people from the KTM factory , we were asking when they would release a 690 Adventure and they didn't seem to think there was a market for such a bike , but if I look at the demand worldwide for kits to convert the 690 Enduro into a more Adventure type bike then I can't help but think that they missed the mark and I am certain that they would have sold more Adventure models than Enduro models .
My feeling is that a bike in the 650/700 single cylinder class is more than capable of doing distance but can also be light enough for really technical sections that may be encountered on a trip , sure a 250 can also cover long distances but I think it might become a bit tedious .
« Last Edit: July 11, 2018, 09:58:01 pm by Dux »
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Offline Zanie

Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #123 on: July 11, 2018, 10:04:19 pm »
This...

But there is another thing that is vitally important and that is seat height , a segment of the market that is growing is the female sector , more and more women are entering the market
The bottom line is that the majority of the females tend to have much less riding experience than their average male counterpart and the lack of confidence when they can only put one foot on the ground is amazing , but let them have both feet on the ground and the confidence and consequent riding ability improves dramatically .
When hunting for a new bike a few weeks ago my wife was very annoyed about how tall some of the bikes were.

I've heard some ladies moan that even the little 310GS is still on the tall side. When I started off I was told that the only low DS bikes available was the 650GS. Even the 650 twin felt too intimidating, but I half-died of fright learning on the 650 single anyway. It toughened me up, but many would have dropped the idea right there.

Now I have the Honda Rally, which is taller, but I'm more confident and it doesn't bother me - I actually do have longish legs. Yet it would have been intimidating to start on such a tall bike (though the weight would have been far easier to manage - I think this would have been a far better starter bike overall).

When I started trying out dirt bikes, I tried a tall bike (KTM200 XC-W I think). Reaction ranged from "meh" to "I'm going to die!" Everyone suggested the little Honda CRF230F. I'm glad I listened. I sat on this little tractor and was immediately comfortable and having a blast. My skill level increased quickly thanks to the confidence boost.

The irony: Both bikes that were recommended to me as lady-friendly I had to buy second-hand, because both had been discontinued...  :scratch:
 

Offline Dux

Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #124 on: July 11, 2018, 10:20:52 pm »
The CRF230F hasn't been discontinued , just not sold here , actually it is the top selling bike in Australia . But agree that it is a great bike .
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Online blauth

Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #125 on: July 11, 2018, 10:24:23 pm »
The problem isn't the bikes. It's us. We've become such little princesses that only the best will do for a particular terrain. "Oh my god, I can't cruise all day at 160km/h and then go do baboons, the bike must be shit!".

It's amazing how cool simple bikes become when we let the ego slide just enough to enjoy the adventure.

Offline Bensien

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Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #126 on: July 11, 2018, 10:27:49 pm »
After many years of experimentation, testing, research and ignoring evaluating the opinions of others I have come to the conclusion that what defines a good adventure bike is a KTM logo
Why do things that only happen to stupid people always happen to me?
 
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Online Oubones

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Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #127 on: July 11, 2018, 11:23:01 pm »
I just got my good adventure bike!
Cheap, delivered, untested,started easily and rode it first time in the dark and had a blast, literally!
Predictable, steady and no surprises.
Carb, basic electrics, normal key etc.
Dakar 650
KLR650
 

Offline Hardy de Kock

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Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #128 on: July 12, 2018, 04:50:07 am »
I just got my good adventure bike!
Cheap, delivered, untested,started easily and rode it first time in the dark and had a blast, literally!
Predictable, steady and no surprises.
Carb, basic electrics, normal key etc.

Die' was lekker om te lees Hennie. :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:
 
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Offline m0lt3n

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Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #129 on: July 12, 2018, 07:48:59 am »
I just got my good adventure bike!
Cheap, delivered, untested,started easily and rode it first time in the dark and had a blast, literally!
Predictable, steady and no surprises.
Carb, basic electrics, normal key etc.

/

nee vrek, klink of daai bike saam met n koppie tee moet gaan!

After many years of experimentation, testing, research and ignoring evaluating the opinions of others I have come to the conclusion that what defines a good adventure bike is a KTM logo

ek is ook nou hier, maar dit sal seker later verander as ek moeg raak vir spanner swaai
Dooie visse gaan saam met die stroom...
 

Offline 2StrokeDan

Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #130 on: July 12, 2018, 08:04:56 am »
After many years of experimentation, testing, research and ignoring evaluating the opinions of others I have come to the conclusion that what defines a good adventure bike is a KTM logo


This is why I want Yamaha to simply make a WR700.

The adventure blended in with Yamaha reliability and parts supply. :thumleft: :thumleft:
 

Offline Clint_G

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Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #131 on: July 12, 2018, 09:16:01 am »

ek is ook nou hier, maar dit sal seker later verander as ek moeg raak vir spanner swaai

Ek dink jy sal tot n Africa Twin deur jou gat kan trek as ek jou threads lees.  :peepwall: :pot: :ricky:
 

Offline Lou1

Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #132 on: July 12, 2018, 09:34:30 am »
The problem isn't the bikes. It's us. We've become such little princesses that only the best will do for a particular terrain. "Oh my god, I can't cruise all day at 160km/h and then go do baboons, the bike must be shit!".

It's amazing how cool simple bikes become when we let the ego slide just enough to enjoy the adventure.

Strew!!  :thumleft:
 

Offline m0lt3n

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Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #133 on: July 12, 2018, 09:44:36 am »

ek is ook nou hier, maar dit sal seker later verander as ek moeg raak vir spanner swaai

Ek dink jy sal tot n Africa Twin deur jou gat kan trek as ek jou threads lees.  :peepwall: :pot: :ricky:

issie
jy al gesien hoeveel abuse kan n Yaris of Carolla vat. Onbreekbaar gedetune... nou maar net so....
Dooie visse gaan saam met die stroom...
 
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Offline Fransw

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Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #134 on: July 12, 2018, 09:48:16 am »
The problem isn't the bikes. It's us. We've become such little princesses that only the best will do for a particular terrain. "Oh my god, I can't cruise all day at 160km/h and then go do baboons, the bike must be shit!".

It's amazing how cool simple bikes become when we let the ego slide just enough to enjoy the adventure.

Strew!!  :thumleft:

Agree Blauth! Its suppose to be more about the adventure and less about the bike! ..

That's why I like it when guys take a small bike like crf250/Vespa , etc and do a RTW. I always read their blogs with interest. Never the 1200gs/AT/big KTM blogs, those are boring most of the time!..

 

Offline Lou1

Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #135 on: July 12, 2018, 09:54:51 am »
The problem isn't the bikes. It's us. We've become such little princesses that only the best will do for a particular terrain. "Oh my god, I can't cruise all day at 160km/h and then go do baboons, the bike must be shit!".

It's amazing how cool simple bikes become when we let the ego slide just enough to enjoy the adventure.

Strew!!  :thumleft:

Agree Blauth! Its suppose to be more about the adventure and less about the bike! ..

That's why I like it when guys take a small bike like crf250/Vespa , etc and do a RTW. I always read their blogs with interest. Never the 1200gs/AT/big KTM blogs, those are boring most of the time!..

Like this laaitie doing a Africa trip on a XR 150 at the moment, Sunboyy 1 (facebook) I think.
 

Offline Fransw

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Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #136 on: July 12, 2018, 10:03:44 am »
The problem isn't the bikes. It's us. We've become such little princesses that only the best will do for a particular terrain. "Oh my god, I can't cruise all day at 160km/h and then go do baboons, the bike must be shit!".

It's amazing how cool simple bikes become when we let the ego slide just enough to enjoy the adventure.

Strew!!  :thumleft:

Agree Blauth! Its suppose to be more about the adventure and less about the bike! ..

That's why I like it when guys take a small bike like crf250/Vespa , etc and do a RTW. I always read their blogs with interest. Never the 1200gs/AT/big KTM blogs, those are boring most of the time!..

Like this laaitie doing a Africa trip on a XR 150 at the moment, Sunboyy 1 (facebook) I think.

Ja, he is a REal adventurer riding a real adventure bike! Thanks, I'll try to find his blogs(didn't know about him)

I never bother to read the big bike 'adventures'...boring!
 

Offline m0lt3n

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Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #137 on: July 12, 2018, 10:32:52 am »
I do the other way round.
It must be crazy boring doing a RTW trip on a 150cc
Your only excitement will be surviving the next crosswind! All that excites these guys are getting some food for free, getting bike spares for cheap or some such things. How do you stay sane doing those long tar stretches at 80kmph all the way, or not sliding the back out on some gravel.

Also, I think you guys have a big misperception on what big bikes can do and how much fun they can be when the going gets rough.

Can I also add something here..
Hipothesis:
50% of roads are good
25% are good gravel
10% are slightly exciting gravel like Baviaans
5% are technical riding, VZP or old mill drift types
5% are roof of Africa 2T country
5% are unmapped 2T types, the type where you can easily take the whole day to do 3km only to come to a dead end and have to turn around.

The only reason to do a RTW trip with a sub 800cc bike is to do/enjoy the bottom 10 - 15%. the top 75% is torture. while the big bikes are perfectly capable of doing and enjoying 85% of the roads. Why then call some dude on a Vespa an adventurer and someone on a 1200 not? Its equally as admirable
Furthermore, you cant do the bottom 10% or even 15% on a RTW trip as you will simply get nowhere. So not only does it not make sense, its sommer stupid.
Dooie visse gaan saam met die stroom...
 

Offline BabyBeemer

Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #138 on: July 12, 2018, 10:39:04 am »
I am sure this has been mentioned - maybe in a different way - but what defines an adventure bike for the individual is based on the individuals definition of adventure riding.  Mine are 2 up trips on the back roads of our country so comfort, dealer back-up, range (not fuel consumption) and I see I am the only one that voted for the tech gadgets. Short version - your adventure will point to your adventure bike.
 

Offline Clint_G

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Re: What defines a good adventure bike?
« Reply #139 on: July 12, 2018, 10:41:33 am »
I do the other way round.
It must be crazy boring doing a RTW trip on a 150cc
Your only excitement will be surviving the next crosswind! All that excites these guys are getting some food for free, getting bike spares for cheap or some such things. How do you stay sane doing those long tar stretches at 80kmph all the way, or not sliding the back out on some gravel.

Also, I think you guys have a big misperception on what big bikes can do and how much fun they can be when the going gets rough.

Can I also add something here..
Hipothesis:
50% of roads are good
25% are good gravel
10% are slightly exciting gravel like Baviaans
5% are technical riding, VZP or old mill drift types
5% are roof of Africa 2T country
5% are unmapped 2T types, the type where you can easily take the whole day to do 3km only to come to a dead end and have to turn around.

The only reason to do a RTW trip with a sub 800cc bike is to do/enjoy the bottom 10 - 15%. the top 75% is torture. while the big bikes are perfectly capable of doing and enjoying 85% of the roads. Why then call some dude on a Vespa an adventurer and someone on a 1200 not? Its equally as admirable
Furthermore, you cant do the bottom 10% or even 15% on a RTW trip as you will simply get nowhere. So not only does it not make sense, its sommer stupid.

I think the biggest motivator to do a RTW trip on a small bike is cost. That 19 year old kid probably can't afford to buy a R200k bike, kit it out, and maintain it, for a RTW trip. His 150cc is going to make it through the whole of Africa on one set of tyres. He will spend R200 on oil for the entire trip. Add up just the service and tyre cost for an 1190 on his trip, and he could buy another 150cc bike as backup.  :lol8:

Other than that, I agree with everything you said. I personally wouldn't want to do that trip on a small bike. The best part of a bike trip is usually the hooligan moments, so putting along at 80km/h for a few months would be soul crushing, even if it's through the most amazing terrain in the world. I would constantly be thinking, "Shit, the 1190 would be so awesome here." For the 5% of the time when a small, light bike would be better, I'd still be grinning like an idiot in my helmet on the 1190.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 10:43:04 am by Clint_G »