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Online Tom van Brits

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #40 on: December 26, 2018, 11:40:50 pm »
How do one get the video embedded in the post?

I tried right click and 'copy embed code' but it does not work. Would love to embed the vid and some others here
 

Online Tom van Brits

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #41 on: December 26, 2018, 11:47:14 pm »
« Last Edit: December 26, 2018, 11:58:31 pm by Tom van Brits »
 

Online Tom van Brits

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #42 on: December 27, 2018, 12:05:33 am »
Ok I figured it out  :)

Spoke to a guy who has done this and various other passes in India on a Royal Enfield 500 Bullet - the older model.

I would prefer to use the new RE Himalayan just because it is a lighter with a bit more suspension travel and ground clearance but interesting many people prefer to do it more 'old school' and insist on riding the 500 Bullet.
This video and many other proof that the 500 Bullet is capable.

Must say the Rothang pass looks lekker!!
 

Offline eberhard

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Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #43 on: December 27, 2018, 08:40:07 am »
Myself and a mate spent 5weeks in May and June this year riding the Himalayas of India. Both on Royal Enfield Himalayans. We rode unsupported, fully laden with full on camping gear. The Himalayan is not a bike I would ride in SA but perfect for India and the Himalayas, simple, uncomplicated and tough, 21" front, 18" at the back, fuel injected so handled the high passes well, and we did them all. Definitely underpowered but that is not an issue when you're riding on often incredibly dangerous passes.The bikes handled everything, never missed a beat, and we rode some seriously bad roads. I would hate to have been on the 500cc bullet or classic, their lower suspension would simply not have been up to the task. Bike came with good quality offroad tyres, unfortunately not tubeless but in over 3000kms of mountain passes we didn't have a single puncture, something of a miracle. We hired the bikes for six weeks and that cost only approx R8500. We were fortunate in that we both got almost brand new bikes.

My knowledge about the Enfield is academic. I’ve never ridden one. The points mentioned by zog above ring true with my own experiences and I therefore support his opinions and conclusions.

eberhard
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Offline eberhard

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Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #44 on: December 27, 2018, 09:19:47 am »
Just one aspect, that being the tires – tubed or tubeless. I beg to differ and would ascribe the fact that they did not have any punctures to BECAUSE they had tubes in.

In well over a 120 000km of remote travelling I have never had a puncture. I always have and still do ride with tubes and secondly, I DO NOT deflate. From all the ride reports on this and other sites it has always struck me as strange as to how many punctures those riders have.  Two things they do differently to me – they use tubeless tires and they deflate. Each to his own, but those are my personal experiences.

(I once picked up a very slow puncture. A wire thread of a truck’s tire got into my tire. Was a bit of an irritation. I found and removed the wire and squirted in tire weld. Lasted me for the duration of my trip)
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Online Tom van Brits

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #45 on: December 27, 2018, 10:50:01 am »
I also never deflate when there are ruts and stones.
I  will only deflate when I know I am going to ride a long sandy stretch known to be without ruts and stones.

Like you say each to his own, but one got to ride smart to reduce punctures and tyre choice plays a very important role here. Unfortunately tyre choice in India is not like we know it, most of their tyres are made off a very hard compound to give higher mialage with only some sort of nylon reinforcement.

One of the ambulance men that used to work with me had a 180 Bajaj Pulsar and he constantly complained about grip till he finally listened to me and changed his tyres.

By riding smart; Kurt has told me how many kilometers he also done on his 990 without a single puncture. One got to pay attention, the kak is in some spots at the intersections and then on the sides on a dirt road. Normally on that smooth side where people like to ride. All the debris and kak kies on the side.

I paid attention to the speed the avg guys are doing in die Himalayas and it is between 20 and 40km/h. So yes the 411cc Enfield will have enough power to sustain the speed. I dont think I'll be comfy to ride faster than 40km/h with that drop offs!!  :lol8:
 
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Offline eberhard

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Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #46 on: December 27, 2018, 11:24:40 am »
Riding style is very important. If you look for kak, kak will find you.

As to tire choice I deliberately did not go there. I almost daily read and see questions being asked and opinions being offered in that regard. It is very much like what pap each fisherman uses and why his is the best. I have never used knobblies or anything in that line. I have always used good, ordinary road tires. Gives me a lot more mileage and are easier to replace in far off and backward areas (and as I said – no punctures). It has its drawbacks with certain terrain (e.g. thick sand), but I simply ride accordingly. That little bit of discomfort there is a small price to pay for overall peace of mind. That being said I shall go back to my corner and shut up about tires.
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Offline 2StrokeDan

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #47 on: December 27, 2018, 12:37:14 pm »
Riding style is very important. If you look for kak, kak will find you.

As to tire choice I deliberately did not go there. I almost daily read and see questions being asked and opinions being offered in that regard. It is very much like what pap each fisherman uses and why his is the best. I have never used knobblies or anything in that line. I have always used good, ordinary road tires. Gives me a lot more mileage and are easier to replace in far off and backward areas (and as I said – no punctures). It has its drawbacks with certain terrain (e.g. thick sand), but I simply ride accordingly. That little bit of discomfort there is a small price to pay for overall peace of mind. That being said I shall go back to my corner and shut up about tires.

Rear tyre not that important, but I feel that on the front you need something more grippy, even if you have to sacrifice mileage.

Just that one time when you come into a corner too fast for whatever reason, and you need to turn or run into the rocks/crevice/stonewall/abyss/car/bakkie/Eland.
 
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Offline emperor zog

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Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #48 on: December 27, 2018, 03:00:12 pm »
Well if you really want to you can ride any bike anywhere, like a super bike around the world as has been done, but if we're talking horses for courses, the RE Himalayan is the horse for the Himalayas. No doubt in my mind. Forget about riding a big bike there, just wouldn't work. Try getting around a convey of 50 Indian army trucks going down the Zogli pass.
 
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Offline 2StrokeDan

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #49 on: December 27, 2018, 03:14:35 pm »
Well if you really want to you can ride any bike anywhere, like a super bike around the world as has been done, but if we're talking horses for courses, the RE Himalayan is the horse for the Himalayas. No doubt in my mind. Forget about riding a big bike there, just wouldn't work. Try getting around a convey of 50 Indian army trucks going down the Zogli pass.

A big bike is definitely out, but there is a gaggle of bikes better for the job than the tragic Himalayan.

CRF250, in both guises, XT250, etc.

 

Offline emperor zog

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Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #50 on: December 27, 2018, 03:18:47 pm »
Not sure what's "tragic" about the Himalayan but the point is that in India, Royal Enfield is everywhere so help is readily available, that's another reason why its "the horse for the course". Of course I could give a list of 20 bikes just as capable, if not more.
 

Offline emperor zog

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Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #51 on: December 27, 2018, 03:35:46 pm »
Himalayan work horses
 

Offline 2StrokeDan

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #52 on: December 27, 2018, 03:51:57 pm »
Not sure what's "tragic" about the Himalayan but the point is that in India, Royal Enfield is everywhere so help is readily available, that's another reason why its "the horse for the course". Of course I could give a list of 20 bikes just as capable, if not more.

This is a common line running through Indian bikes, in India they're great, outside not.

Read the MCN test on the Himalayan. :imaposer: :imaposer:
 

Offline jaybiker

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Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #53 on: December 27, 2018, 05:06:31 pm »
To some degree at least what makes a bike the right horse for the course, from the owner's viewpoint must be the price factor.

And I'm speaking in ignorance, but I imagine that in India an Enfield is a bit more affordable than a premium Japanese or European brand?
 

Offline 2StrokeDan

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #54 on: December 27, 2018, 05:09:47 pm »
To some degree at least what makes a bike the right horse for the course, from the owner's viewpoint must be the price factor.

And I'm speaking in ignorance, but I imagine that in India an Enfield is a bit more affordable than a premium Japanese or European brand?

Exactly why Chinese bikes are to be found in droves throughout Africa, and every town has a Chinese bike graveyard/parts pool.
 

Online Tom van Brits

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #55 on: December 27, 2018, 08:15:33 pm »
To some degree at least what makes a bike the right horse for the course, from the owner's viewpoint must be the price factor.

And I'm speaking in ignorance, but I imagine that in India an Enfield is a bit more affordable than a premium Japanese or European brand?

Exactly why Chinese bikes are to be found in droves throughout Africa, and every town has a Chinese bike graveyard/parts pool.

Yes Africa is Chinese 125's all over the show, and the only Indian bikes I have seen running in great numbers in the Congo and Uganda was EVS and in Ethiopia and Sudan many Bajaj

You can get parts for any Chinese bike or TVS up in Africa

There are a few exceptions; I did see some new 2T Yamaha DT's, and also a few KTM's in Kenya. New and by the looks doing good even with the NGO's getting medicine to rural areas
 

Offline 2StrokeDan

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #56 on: December 27, 2018, 08:35:24 pm »
In the end regardless of what I think of Enfields, doing the high altitude Indian passes on an Enfield just seem right.
 

Offline eberhard

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Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #57 on: December 27, 2018, 09:57:37 pm »
When In Rome, do as the Romans do.
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Offline Xpat

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #58 on: December 28, 2018, 12:14:06 am »
Well if you really want to you can ride any bike anywhere, like a super bike around the world as has been done, but if we're talking horses for courses, the RE Himalayan is the horse for the Himalayas. No doubt in my mind. Forget about riding a big bike there, just wouldn't work. Try getting around a convey of 50 Indian army trucks going down the Zogli pass.

I have overtaken that convoy down Zoji La pass on Africa Twin (which was big heavy pig) no problem. In my third month total on any motorcycle. That said smaller bike is of course better.

I think There is too much romantic hyperboly on this thread - one can find plenty of similar riding down here as well, it is not like riding there is that special in terms of terrain - i can find much tougher ‘roads l’ in lesotho. It is definitely worth doing for scenery and especially people/culture, but lets not pretend its Mars.

Is this thread about RE bikes in general or specifically about riding tgem in India because Tom may or may not go for trip there? As said many times, if this is only for india, sure go for it, its part of experience. Reliability doesnt matter theee as there are people everywhere and one will be able to ger help easily.

If we are talking about dropping 80k for this bike for use in SA with wide open spaces and much less population, then unless one has serious case of hipsterism (and correspondigly rides mostly around town), i cannot fathom why they would not rather get old school jap thumper with less electronics (no efi, no not switchoffable abs) for much less money and with more power. XT500 is much better tyan this.

Offline Vintage_Mania

Re: Royal Enfield talk
« Reply #59 on: December 28, 2018, 05:24:02 am »
@Xpat - I think it has been explained more than once what Tom’s intentions are. Yes, it is “romantic hyperboly” and I think that most, if not all, replying here knows there are better alternatives out there. But so what? Same can be said for the Ural, or even classic Vespa. It really is all about what makes the individual happy.

I can see a very nice tour right here in SA with RE’s. B-roads through the North West -> Nothern Cape -> Western Cape -> Eastern Cape -> Natal -> Gauteng. No more than 350km per day dodging potholes in all the bankrupted small towns, avoiding the municipal water and staying over in interesting B&B’s and drinking beer in dodgy pubs. Who needs India.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2018, 05:30:56 am by Vintage_Mania »
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