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Offline big oil

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #860 on: May 20, 2020, 05:09:36 am »
Entry 19- Spanish Conquistadors 0 Jemez Indians 1
Star date - 10 July 2018
Distance:  296 KM
















I awoke on the morning of 10 July at the butt crack of dawn, rippin' n raring to go.  I had been looking forward to riding through the Jemez Mountain region of New Mexico as I'd heard it was a glorious place to ride prior to leaving da Mitten.  Mitten = Michigan for those of you that have short memories or drink too much.  And oh what a glorious day of riding it turned out to be.  The weather was beautiful, sunny skies, warm temps though not too warm for my polar bear skin.

Allow me to take you through an area rich in history and share how the Jemez Indians expelled Spanish Conquistadors from New Mexico. 

Here I am in the Jemez Mountain region between Jemez Pueblo and Jemez Springs, this is the only time my face looks good.



Kidding, if I removed my helmet, you'd say it should be a crime to be that handsome.  >:D :pot:

The Pueblo of Jemez (pronounced "Hay-mess" or traditionally as "He-mish") is one of the 19 pueblos located in New Mexico. It is a federally recognized American Indian tribe with 3,400 tribal members, most of whom reside in a puebloan village that is known as "'Walatowa" (a Towa word meaning "this is the place"). Walatowa is located in North-Central New Mexico, within the southern end of the majestic Canon de Don Diego. It is located on State Road 4 approximately one hour northwest of Albuquerque (55 miles) and approximately one hour and twenty minutes southwest of Santa Fe.



The Pueblo of Jemez is an independent sovereign nation with an independent government and tribal court system. Our secular Tribal Government includes the Tribal Council, the Jemez Governor, two Lt. Governors, two fiscales, and a sheriff. Interestingly, for reasons discussed later, our 2nd Lt. Governor is also the governor of the Pueblo of Pecos. Traditional matters are still handled through a separate governing body that is rooted in prehistory. This traditional government includes the spiritual and society leaders, a War Captain and Lt. War Captain. Through perseverance, our people have managed to preserve our traditional culture, religion, and knowledge of our ancient traditional ways regardless of outside pressures. We have also preserved our complex traditional language, a language the anthropologists and linguists refer to as "Towa". Jemez is the only culture that speaks this language, and our traditional law forbids our language from being translated into writing in order to prevent exploitation by outside cultures.



Having originated from a place called "Hua-na-tota," our ancestors, the Jemez Nation, migrated to the "Canon de San Diego Region" from the four-corners area in the late 13th century. By the time of European contact in the year 1541, the Jemez Nation was one of the largest and most powerful of the puebloan cultures, occupying numerous puebloan villages that were strategically located on the high mountain mesas and the canyons that surround the present pueblo of Walatowa.




These stone-built fortresses, often located miles apart from one another, were upwards of four stories high and contained as many as 3,000 rooms. They now constitute some of the largest archaeological ruins in the United States. Situated between these "giant pueblos" were literally hundreds of smaller one and two room houses that were used by the Jemez people during spring and summer months as basecamps for hunting, gathering, and agricultural activities. However, our spiritual leaders, medicine people, war chiefs, craftsmen, pregnant women, elderly and disabled lived in the giant pueblo throughout the year, as warriors and visitors could easily reach at least one of the giant pueblos within an hours walk from any of the seasonal homes. In addition, impenetrable barriers were established with cliffs to guard access to springs and religious sites, to monitor strategic trail systems, and to watch for invading enemies. In general, the Jemez Nation resembled a military society that was often called upon by other tribal groups to assist in settling hostile disputes.



Our people experienced their first contact with Europeans in the form of Spanish conquistadors in the year of 1541. When the Coronado Expedition entered into the area, exactly 40 peaceful years went by before contact between the two groups was experienced again. The Rodriquez-Chamuscado Expedition entered the area in 1581, followed by the Espejo Expedition in 1583. In the year 1598, a detachment of the first colonized expedition under the direction of Don Juan de Onate visited the Jemez.




A Franciscan priest by the title of Alonzo de Lugo was assigned to our people and he had our people build the area's first church at the Jemez Pueblo of Guisewa (now Jemez State Monument on State Highway 4 in Jemez Springs). According to our intricate oral history, as well as early written Spanish records (Espejo Expedition 1583), the Jemez nation contained an estimated 30,000 tribal members around the time of the Spanish contact, indicating that the population of the Canon de San Diego was probably three times larger than what it is today. Unfortunately, the peace between our differing cultures did not last long and the Jemez population soon became decimated as a result of warfare and diseases introduced by the Europeans.




During the next 80 years, numerous revolts and uprisings occurred between the Jemez people and Spanish, primarily due to Spanish attempts to Christianize our people by force, and congregate them into just one or two villages, where the Franciscan missions were located. As a result, numerous people were killed on both sides, including many of the Franciscan priests. By the year 1680, the hostilities resulted in the Great Pueblo Revolt, during which the Spanish were expelled from the New Mexico Province through the strategic and collaborative efforts of all the Puebloan Nations.



 This was the first and only successful revolt in the United States in which a suppressive nation was expelled. By 1688, the Spanish had begun their reconquest in force under General Pedro Reneros de Posada, acting Governor of New Mexico. The Pueblos of Santa Ana and Zia were conquered, and by 1692, Santa Fe was again in Spanish hands under Governor Diego de Vargas. Four more years would pass before the Jemez Nation was completely subdued and placed under clergy and military rule.








Our ancestors were moved and concentrated into the single Village of Walatowa where we presently reside today. As a result, the most significant of our ancestral sites are now located just out of view of the Pueblo on federal lands and are no longer controlled by our people. Regardless, our ancestral lands are still held in the highest esteem by the Jemez people and not a week goes by that they are not paid tribute to through our prayers and religious offerings.




In the year 1838, Jemez culture became diversified when the Towa speaking people from the Pueblo of Pecos (located east of Santa Fe) resettled at the Pueblo of Jemez in order to escape the increasing depredations of the Spanish and Comanche cultures. Readily welcomed by our ancestors, the Pecos culture was rapidly integrated into Jemez Society, and in 1936, both cultural groups were legally merged into one by an Act of Congress. Today, the Pecos culture still survives at Jemez. Its traditions have been preserved, and as previously noted, the Pueblo of Jemez still honorably recognizes a Governor of Pecos.





Our people are internationally known for arts and crafts. Pottery such as bowls, seed pots sgraffitto vessels (elaborately polished and engraved), wedding vases, figurines, holiday ornaments, and our famous storytellers are now in collections throughout the world. In addition, Jemez artisans also create beautiful basketry, embroidery, woven cloths, exquisite stone sculpture, moccasins and jewelry. Our people are also known as "runners" many of whom still hold unbroken records at major national events, and continue to set new records with each generation entering into track and field competition.

Traditional dances are still held throughout the year at Jemez, many of which are not open to the public.





Nice log home in the Jemez Mountain region off New Mexico 4.





« Last Edit: May 20, 2020, 05:32:28 am by big oil »
 

Offline Crankshaft

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #861 on: May 20, 2020, 09:59:40 am »
Entry 18- Sandia
Star date - 09 July 2018
Distance:  152 KM






I spent the remaining days resting and relaxing after only one day in the saddle, the heat was really getting to me, I felt sick from the ridiculously high temps, but I enjoyed myself best I could by trying new things around Albuquerque, I dined on Nepalese food for the first time, definitely an acquired taste.  I ate authentic Mexican food and real Coca-Cola (real sugar), numerous times.  I became addicted to Mexican Coca-Cola.  So much better than the sugar substitute Coke we get here in da Mitten.

Sandia Recreational Area and the famous NM-536 aka Sandia Scenic Byway never did reopen, I tried, but was stopped by forest rangers and had to turn around.  So, the only thing I could do was take the tram to the top.  It's a long video, but here's the ride up.  I recorded it in HD 1080P with my Sony FDRX-3000, so be sure to select 1080P for best quality.

Once we arrived at the top, we were told we'd only have a few minutes to spend, winds were picking up and there was a thunderstorm on its way to the area.  On the way down, we had to stop and wait due to high winds, we were stuck in the sky car for what seemed like eternity.  I'm quite claustrophobic, so it was unbearable to be stuck in one place for so long.  I guess there's worse things.

Anyway, here's some footage and pics.

























Wow, what a view :laughing4:
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Offline big oil

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #862 on: May 20, 2020, 04:24:22 pm »
Thanks @crankshaft, I had more video footage looking down on Albuquerque, it appears I've lost that footage.
 

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #863 on: May 20, 2020, 08:38:48 pm »
Cont'd









I continued riding NM-4, having the time of my life, glorious flowing curves through beautiful countryside, mountains all around, comfortable temperature, man I was having a ball.

Not many pics of this areola, just video footage.  In the following video, you'll see the after effects of the horrible wildfire that devastated this area in 2011. 

Action cam is a Sony FDR-X3000 4K mounted on Feiyutech Gimbal attached to my handlebars.

 

Offline Ian in Great Brak River

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #864 on: May 20, 2020, 09:08:02 pm »
Yep, I do follow this thread ... got lots of good ideas from it too. And it would have been to the Ski Valley ... my boss has a big project on the go up there...

 8)
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Offline big oil

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #865 on: May 20, 2020, 10:15:27 pm »
Yep, I do follow this thread ... got lots of good ideas from it too. And it would have been to the Ski Valley ... my boss has a big project on the go up there...

 8)

What a majestic area.  I have some video footage coming up of the road up to Taos Ski Valley.  Some very interesting architecture I saw up there, one home in particular was unlike anything I'd ever seen prior.

Does your boss need any help on this project he has on the go? I'd love a reason to move to New Mexico, I never would've thought I'd like it so much until I toured the entire state.
 

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #866 on: May 20, 2020, 10:31:22 pm »
I like how you find the most interesting places!
Thanks and keep it coming!
Don't crash your bike or yourself off the forum! :pot: :peepwall: :ricky: :ricky:
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Offline big oil

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #867 on: May 21, 2020, 12:12:52 am »
I like how you find the most interesting places!
Thanks and keep it coming!
Don't crash your bike or yourself off the forum! :pot: :peepwall: :ricky: :ricky:

I did my research before taking this trip, lots of amazing places left to show yous. 

I have 8 states and 4 Canadian provinces left to have ridden a motorbike through all. 

Hoping to cross at least 5 more states off my list in the next month or 2.  I have 5 states over on the eastern seaboard that I've yet to ride a motorbike in.  I've visited some of them but I haven't ridden them.

I'm gonna try my best to stay this time, but there's a few mods that get all hot n bothered at the thought of kicking me off the forum. 

Mods lust on that extra power they have, it adds length n girth to their little pee pee's  :imaposer:
 

Offline big oil

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #868 on: May 21, 2020, 01:16:07 am »
Cont'd

Here's some vid footage riding to the Valles Caldera entrance. 




A little reading about Valles Caldera from Whiskey Pedia...

Valles Caldera (or Jemez Caldera) is a 13.7-mile (22.0 km) wide volcanic caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico.  Hot springs, streams, fumaroles, natural gas seeps and volcanic domes dot the caldera floor landscape.  The highest point in the caldera is Redondo Peak, an 11,253-foot (3,430 m) resurgent lava dome located entirely within the caldera. Also within the caldera are several grass valleys, or valles, the largest of which is Valle Grande (locally /ˈvaɪ.eɪ ˈɡrɑːndeɪ/ VY-ay GRAHN-day), the only one accessible by a paved road. Much of the caldera is within the Valles Caldera National Preserve, a unit of the National Park System. In 1975, Valles Caldera was designated as a National Natural Landmark by the National Park Service.

Use of Valles Caldera dates back to the prehistoric times: spear points dating to 11,000 years ago have been discovered.  Several Native American tribes frequented the caldera, often seasonally for hunting and for obsidian, used for spear and arrow points. Obsidian from the caldera was traded by tribes across much of the Southwest. Eventually, Spanish and later Mexican settlers as well as the Navajo and other tribes came to the caldera seasonally for grazing with periodic clashes and raids. Later as the United States acquired New Mexico as part of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, the caldera became the backdrop for the Indian wars with the U.S. Army. Around the same time, the commercial use of the caldera for ranching, and its forest for logging began.

The caldera became part of the Baca Ranch in 1876. The Bacas were a wealthy family given the land as compensation for the termination of a grant given to their family near Las Vegas, in northeastern New Mexico. The family was given several other parcels by the US Government as well, including one in Arizona. This area, 100,000 acres (40,000 ha), was called Baca Location number one. Since then, the land has been through a string of exchanges between private owners and business enterprises. Most notably, it was owned by Frank Bond in the 1930s. Mr. Bond, a businessman based in nearby Española, ran up to 30,000 sheep in the calderas, significantly overgrazing the land and causing damage from which the watersheds of the property are still recovering.

The land was purchased by the Dunigan family from Abilene, Texas in 1963. Pat Dunigan did not obtain the timber rights, however, and the New Mexico Lumber Company logged the property very heavily, leaving the land scarred with roads and removing significant amounts of old-growth douglas fir and ponderosa pine. Mr. Dunigan bought out the timber rights in the 1970s and slowed the logging. He negotiated unsuccessfully with the National Park Service and the US Forest Service for possible sale of the property in the 1980s.

The Valles Caldera Preservation Act of 2000 signed by President Clinton on July 25, 2000, created the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP).   The legislation provided for the federal purchase of this historical ranch nestled inside a volcanic caldera, with funds coming from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) derived from royalties the US government receives from offshore petroleum and natural gas drilling.   The Dunigan family sold the entire surface estate of 95,000 acres (380 km2) and seven-eighths of the geothermal mineral estate to the federal government for $101 million. As some sites of the Baca Ranch are sacred and of cultural significance to the Native Americans, 5,000 acres (20 km2) of the purchase were obtained by the Santa Clara Pueblo, which borders the property to the northeast. This include the headwaters of Santa Clara Creek that is sacred to the pueblo.  On the southwest corner of the land 300 acres (1.2 km2) were to be ceded to Bandelier National Monument.


In July 2011, the Las Conchas Fire started by a power line on nearby private land, burning 30,000 acres (120 km2) of the Valles Caldera National Preserve. The wildfire burned a total of 158,000 acres (640 km2) in the Jemez Mountains, including most of neighboring Bandelier National Monument.

The circular topographic rim of the caldera measures 13.7 miles (22.0 km) in diameter.[1] The caldera and surrounding volcanic structures are one of the most thoroughly studied caldera complexes in the United States. Research studies have concerned the fundamental processes of magmatism, hydrothermal systems, and ore deposition. Nearly 40 deep cores have been examined, resulting in extensive subsurface data.

Valles Caldera is the younger of two calderas known at this location, having collapsed over and buried the older Toledo Caldera, which in turn may have collapsed over yet older calderas. The associated Cerros del Rio volcanic field, which forms the eastern Pajarito Plateau and the Caja del Rio, is older than the Toledo Caldera. The Toledo and Valles Calderas formed during eruptions 1.61 million and 1.2 million years ago, respectively.[7][8] The caldera forming Toledo eruption formed the Otowi member of the Bandelier Tuff at 1.61 million years ago, which can be seen along canyon walls west of Valles Caldera, including San Diego Canyon. The younger Tshirege member of the Bandelier Tuff was formed during the Valles Caldera forming eruption at 1.25 million years ago.[9] The now eroded and exposed orange-tan, light-colored Bandelier tuff from these events creates the stunning mesas of the Pajarito Plateau.

Valles Caldera is the type locality for a resurgent dome caldera, the formation of which was first developed by C.S. Ross, R.L. Smith, and R.A. Bailey during field work at Valles in the 1960s.  After the initial caldera forming eruption at Valles, the Redondo Peak resurgent dome was uplifted beginning around 1 million years ago.   Eruption of moat rhyolitic lava domes occurred from approximately 1.04 million years ago to 0.13 million years ago along a structural ring fracture zone.  The El Cajete Pumice, Battleship Rock Ignimbrite, and the Banco Bonito obsidian flow were emplaced during the youngest eruption of Valles Caldera, about 68,300 ± 1,500 years ago. The caldera and surrounding area continue to be shaped by ongoing volcanic activity. Seismic investigations show that a low-velocity zone lies beneath the caldera, suggesting the presence of partial melt within a remaining magma chamber at between 5 and 15 km depth.  An active geothermal system with hot springs and fumaroles exists today.  These calderas and associated volcanic structures lie within the Jemez Volcanic Field. This volcanic field lies at the intersection of the Rio Grande Rift, which runs north-south through New Mexico, and the Jemez Lineament, which extends from southeastern Arizona northeast to western Oklahoma. The volcanic activity here is related to the tectonic movements of this intersection.

NASA used the caldera in October to November 1964 and again in September 1966 to geologically train the Apollo Astronauts in recognizing volcanic features, such as ash flow tuffs, pumice air falls, and rhyolite domes. Notable geologist instructors included Roy Bailey.

The volcanic properties of Valles Caldera make it a likely source for renewable and nonpolluting geothermal energy. However, some people oppose the development of geothermal energy, considering it destructive to its scenic beauty, recreational and grazing use. Its impact on the hot springs and supplying aquifers is unknown as experiences from other past geothermal projects proved that production of reservoir fluids had dramatic impacts to the surface thermal features.[17]

Valles caldera was home to the first experiments into development of an Enhanced geothermal system (EGS) or Hot-dry-rock (HDR) geothermal system, beginning in 1974 by the Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Fenton Hill reservoir, approximately 3 km west of Valles caldera. Originally, the Fenton Hill site was chosen as an EGS laboratory in hopes that the proximity to Valles caldera would increase the temperature of the bedrock, thus requiring shallower drill depths. However, the abundance of hydrothermal fluids discharged from the nearby caldera resulted in hydrothermal alteration of the rocks at depth, weakening the sealed nature of the reservoir.  The Fenton Hill HDR experiment was finally abandoned in 1998.  The Fenton Hill experiments demonstrated that a potential EGS reservoir must be characterized by low permeability, crystalline basement rock with no active faults or joints.

From 1959 to 1983, approximately 40 exploratory geothermal wells were drilled into the Redondo Creek Graben as part of the Baca geothermal field, a joint operation by the United States Department of Energy and the Union Oil Company of California.   Despite measuring a maximum temperature of 342 °C and having a likely production capacity of 20 MWe, the geothermal field was too small to be economic.  Three scientific cores were drilled in Valles Caldera during the mid-1980s as part of the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program in order to analyze the chemistry of geothermal fluids and the presence of a vapor-dominated cap in the Sulphur Springs region. The maximum bottom hole temperature measured during drilling was 295 °C.  Overall, the geothermal reservoir at Valles Caldera is liquid-dominated rather than vapor-dominated and has a neutral-chloride fluid chemistry with a maximum temperature below 300 °C.

A number of recreational and/or historical uses take place in Valles Caldera. Many of these uses involve trails. Valles Caldera has many miles of ranch roads, livestock and game trails. These include a network of trails currently designated for horse riding.
 Historically, Valles Caldera was a location for equestrian endurance races. After establishment of VCNP, the first race in the caldera was held in 2009. The largest grass valley, Valle Grande, is a venue for ski orienteering. Activities are open to the public, though some require reservations. Customer service and concierge services are provided by the Public Lands Interpretive Association.

Throughout the caldera, the grass valleys appear groomed: there are few saplings and mature trees lack lower branches. This is due to heavy browsing by elk and cattle and because of frequent grass fires of human and natural origin which kill the lower branches on the Engelmann spruce, Douglas-fir and Ponderosa pine that populate the uplands around the grasslands dominating the bottoms of the calderas. Extreme cold in winter prevents tree growth in the bottoms of the calderas. The grasslands were native perennial bunch grass maintained by frequent fire before sheep and cattle grazing. Although the grass appears abundant, it is a limited resource. Its growing season is short. Through the VCNP's limited grazing program, it feeds hundreds of cattle in the summer and thousands more of elk in the warm seasons and in drought winters, and during most of the year. Its nutritional value is low.


Vid 360 of Yours truly sitting on the Eastern rim of the Valles Caldera, damn I look amazing on camera.......with my helmet on. 







So after leaving Valles Caldera, I continued on to visit Bandalier National Monument.  People were everywhere, line to get some food, I was so hungry I could've eaten the rump outta skunk by then, batteries were dead, I really wasn't feeling like hiking to see any more Cliff Dwellings. 

I ended up leaving Bandalier and continuing towards Taos, NM.  I stopped in White Rock for a sammich n fries, got robbed, but it was delicious.  No, not the robbed that happens there thousands of times a day, just robbed on the price of the sammich.  :peepwall:

I then rode into Taos, stopped at a motel, asked if they had a cheap room for a dirty tired old biker for a few days.  Motel lady responded she had just what I needed, the electronic door lock wasn't working on one of the rooms, if I wanted it she'd rent it to me cheap.  I said great, I'll rent it at that price for 4 days. 

I got a goods night sleep, but the heat was really affecting me, I'd not ever experienced temps like these in my life.  So I didn't ride the next day, except to the restaurant that evening.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 01:35:07 pm by big oil »
 

Offline Crankshaft

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #869 on: May 21, 2020, 09:14:55 am »
I like how you find the most interesting places!
Thanks and keep it coming!
Don't crash your bike or yourself off the forum! :pot: :peepwall: :ricky: :ricky:

I did my research before taking this trip, lots of amazing places left to show yous. 

I have 8 states and 4 Canadian provinces left to have ridden a motorbike through all. 

Hoping to cross at least 5 more states off my list in the next month or 2.  I have 5 states over on the eastern seaboard that I've yet to ride a motorbike in.  I've visited some of them but I haven't ridden them.

I'm gonna try my best to stay this time, but there's a few mods that get all hot n bothered at the thought of kicking me off the forum. 

Mods lust on that extra power they have, it adds length n girth to their little pee pee's  :imaposer:

B.O. i enjoy your ride report :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:  When you talk about new mexico, i'm thinking of this dry dusty, sandy, red clay'ish landscape with not a lot of water.  But oh man, have you proved me wrong.  What a beautiful country state to travel in. 

I've also noticed that there's not a lot of traffic or even bikes on there remotely areas that you travel.  What assistance do you have in the case of a break down? 
It doesn't seem like the adventure bike riding is big in the US?
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Offline Crankshaft

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #870 on: May 21, 2020, 09:30:25 am »
Definitely one of my dreams to travel the US on a adventure bike :drif: :drif: :drif:
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Offline big oil

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #871 on: May 21, 2020, 10:44:13 am »
I like how you find the most interesting places!
Thanks and keep it coming!
Don't crash your bike or yourself off the forum! :pot: :peepwall: :ricky: :ricky:

I did my research before taking this trip, lots of amazing places left to show yous. 

I have 8 states and 4 Canadian provinces left to have ridden a motorbike through all. 

Hoping to cross at least 5 more states off my list in the next month or 2.  I have 5 states over on the eastern seaboard that I've yet to ride a motorbike in.  I've visited some of them but I haven't ridden them.

I'm gonna try my best to stay this time, but there's a few mods that get all hot n bothered at the thought of kicking me off the forum. 

Mods lust on that extra power they have, it adds length n girth to their little pee pee's  :imaposer:

B.O. i enjoy your ride report :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:  When you talk about new mexico, i'm thinking of this dry dusty, sandy, red clay'ish landscape with not a lot of water.  But oh man, have you proved me wrong.  What a beautiful country state to travel in. 

I've also noticed that there's not a lot of traffic or even bikes on there remotely areas that you travel.  What assistance do you have in the case of a break down? 
It doesn't seem like the adventure bike riding is big in the US?

It's quite hot n dusty, the southern portion of the state is low elevation desert, the northern half is high elevation desert.  Man made lakes have been created over time, a few rivers, streams, and creeks here and there, but it's definitely desert. 

In case of a break down, I carry a locator beacon with tow service.  If I need rescued from injury, I press a button and hopefully the proper authorities will be alerted of my coordinates.  If I press the tow service button, a wrecker/flatbed will be ordered on my behalf and sent to my coordinates.  If my bike breaks down and is unrideable, I would have it towed to the nearest bike shop for repairs or have it shipped via Uship.com back home and then fly home or take a train.  I've only suffered one breakdown in all of my trips where I had to abandon my bike, this trip  :imaposer:  as you will read later on in the report.

Adventure biking is gaining in popularity, but the cruiser market is huge here.  HD's are everywhere and what you'd see the most of. Second would be sport bikes in my opinion, then adventure bikes 3rd from my perspective.


Northern New Mexico receives more moisture, they get tons of snow in the winter.  Taos Ski Valley, Red River, Angel Fire, etc. are popular ski destinations in winter.
 

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #872 on: May 21, 2020, 10:46:14 am »
Definitely one of my dreams to travel the US on a adventure bike :drif: :drif: :drif:

Make it happen, you'll never forget it.  Keep in mind it's an enormous country, you couldn't see everything in 2 lifetimes, but the National Parks are amazing places to visit along with a few must see places in between.
 

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #873 on: May 22, 2020, 10:04:01 am »
I like how you find the most interesting places!
Thanks and keep it coming!
Don't crash your bike or yourself off the forum! :pot: :peepwall: :ricky: :ricky:

I did my research before taking this trip, lots of amazing places left to show yous. 

I have 8 states and 4 Canadian provinces left to have ridden a motorbike through all. 

Hoping to cross at least 5 more states off my list in the next month or 2.  I have 5 states over on the eastern seaboard that I've yet to ride a motorbike in.  I've visited some of them but I haven't ridden them.

I'm gonna try my best to stay this time, but there's a few mods that get all hot n bothered at the thought of kicking me off the forum. 

Mods lust on that extra power they have, it adds length n girth to their little pee pee's  :imaposer:

B.O. i enjoy your ride report :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:  When you talk about new mexico, i'm thinking of this dry dusty, sandy, red clay'ish landscape with not a lot of water.  But oh man, have you proved me wrong.  What a beautiful country state to travel in. 

I've also noticed that there's not a lot of traffic or even bikes on there remotely areas that you travel.  What assistance do you have in the case of a break down? 
It doesn't seem like the adventure bike riding is big in the US?

It's quite hot n dusty, the southern portion of the state is low elevation desert, the northern half is high elevation desert.  Man made lakes have been created over time, a few rivers, streams, and creeks here and there, but it's definitely desert. 

In case of a break down, I carry a locator beacon with tow service.  If I need rescued from injury, I press a button and hopefully the proper authorities will be alerted of my coordinates.  If I press the tow service button, a wrecker/flatbed will be ordered on my behalf and sent to my coordinates.  If my bike breaks down and is unrideable, I would have it towed to the nearest bike shop for repairs or have it shipped via Uship.com back home and then fly home or take a train.  I've only suffered one breakdown in all of my trips where I had to abandon my bike, this trip  :imaposer:  as you will read later on in the report.

Adventure biking is gaining in popularity, but the cruiser market is huge here.  HD's are everywhere and what you'd see the most of. Second would be sport bikes in my opinion, then adventure bikes 3rd from my perspective.


Northern New Mexico receives more moisture, they get tons of snow in the winter.  Taos Ski Valley, Red River, Angel Fire, etc. are popular ski destinations in winter.

Sounds like an amazing place to ride.  One thing that i've noticed before is the Yanks are very loyal to their brand like the HD's.  HD is popular in SA as well, but I think the adventure bikes is leading buy a huge margin overhere.  I honestly can't say what is so nice about the HD's.  They are shit heavy and you are bound to only asphalt roads....  With the adv bikes you can still take the dirt road and explore.  I here that Utah has some beautifull places and dirt roads to ride as well.

My next door neighbour was in the states last year September for 4 weeks on a holiday trip.  He also mentioned that i want to travel and visit all the beautiful places, you need to be there for at least 2 months.
KDX 200, YFZ 450, YZ 250F, YZ 450F, WR 450F, R1200GS LC, R1200GS ADV LC, 2nd R1200GS ADV LC
Current: WR 450F & KTM 1290 Sup Adv R
 

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #874 on: May 22, 2020, 10:06:48 am »
Definitely one of my dreams to travel the US on a adventure bike :drif: :drif: :drif:

Make it happen, you'll never forget it.  Keep in mind it's an enormous country, you couldn't see everything in 2 lifetimes, but the National Parks are amazing places to visit along with a few must see places in between.

Would love to.  The only downside for us is the exchange rate.  US$1 = ZAR17.86 today, so a nice vacation trip will be a bit expensive at this stage :deal:
KDX 200, YFZ 450, YZ 250F, YZ 450F, WR 450F, R1200GS LC, R1200GS ADV LC, 2nd R1200GS ADV LC
Current: WR 450F & KTM 1290 Sup Adv R
 

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #875 on: May 22, 2020, 12:22:46 pm »
Well, PhotoPhuket notified me that they’re having issues with their system though assured me my images are safe and they’re working diligently to fix the problem.  Therefore, the RR is on hold as I’m unable to link any peekchas.

Hope all yous are staying safe and well.  Don’t worry yourselves sick over the virus, this to will come to pass and everything will be back to normal soon.

Love yous all!
 

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #876 on: May 23, 2020, 01:26:41 pm »

Sounds like an amazing place to ride.  One thing that i've noticed before is the Yanks are very loyal to their brand like the HD's.  HD is popular in SA as well, but I think the adventure bikes is leading buy a huge margin overhere.  I honestly can't say what is so nice about the HD's.  They are shit heavy and you are bound to only asphalt roads....  With the adv bikes you can still take the dirt road and explore.  I here that Utah has some beautifull places and dirt roads to ride as well.

My next door neighbour was in the states last year September for 4 weeks on a holiday trip.  He also mentioned that i want to travel and visit all the beautiful places, you need to be there for at least 2 months.

Agreed, lots of brand loyal Americans to HD and Indian.  Some of my friends wouldn't be caught dead on anything but an HD.  Sad really, there's so much fun to be had on other brands.  Don't get me wrong, I love HD's as well even if I don't own one presently,  but I love my Ducati and BMW just as much.

Oh yes, UTAH offers some incredible off-road riding, especially near Moab, UT.

Yeah, I'd imagine you'd need all of 2 months to see the National Parks.

I see you have a KDX200 in your profile, there's one for sale between me and Cleveland with less than 100 original miles on it.  I'll try to find the advertisement.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 01:28:30 pm by big oil »
 

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #877 on: May 24, 2020, 10:11:40 am »

Sounds like an amazing place to ride.  One thing that i've noticed before is the Yanks are very loyal to their brand like the HD's.  HD is popular in SA as well, but I think the adventure bikes is leading buy a huge margin overhere.  I honestly can't say what is so nice about the HD's.  They are shit heavy and you are bound to only asphalt roads....  With the adv bikes you can still take the dirt road and explore.  I here that Utah has some beautifull places and dirt roads to ride as well.

My next door neighbour was in the states last year September for 4 weeks on a holiday trip.  He also mentioned that i want to travel and visit all the beautiful places, you need to be there for at least 2 months.

Agreed, lots of brand loyal Americans to HD and Indian.  Some of my friends wouldn't be caught dead on anything but an HD.  Sad really, there's so much fun to be had on other brands.  Don't get me wrong, I love HD's as well even if I don't own one presently,  but I love my Ducati and BMW just as much.

Oh yes, UTAH offers some incredible off-road riding, especially near Moab, UT.

Yeah, I'd imagine you'd need all of 2 months to see the National Parks.

I see you have a KDX200 in your profile, there's one for sale between me and Cleveland with less than 100 original miles on it.  I'll try to find the advertisement.

Yeah a lot of people are like that.  I was the same in a way.  Loved my BMW GS Adv and was sworn to it, untill I came to a point in my life that I wanted to try something else.  There was nothing wrong with the GS, just felt like there's something missing....  So I have tested and tried a few different makes and models and took a few HD's for a test ride and I just couldn't get one that I can say was comfy enough to justify the purchase of the move from the GS to the HD.  The big ones was always shit heavy and you need to fight the bike and counter steer to turn.  Then moved to the smaller HD's, but to me it was pointless because it was also not as comfy as the GS. 

On my way home I stopped at the local KTM dealer.  Now in SA the BMW and KTM guys always give each other shit, but in a good way and then there's always the dispute of which one is better, the BMW or the KTM.
So, never owned a KTM or even been on one, I decided to take the 1290 SAR for a quick test ride.  This unit had the Akrapovic pipe on as well as quick shifter.  I'm use to having a quick shifter on the GS and knew what to expect, but when riding the 1290 it was just unbelievable. The throttle response, the smooth shifting.... it just glided over the asphalt and in a very fast way.  Never before have I taken a bike for a test ride and came back with such a huge grin on my face.   :ricky: :ricky: :ricky:  I was just there and then that i decided to sell the GS and move over to the dark side to get the KTM.

Here and there is a few small things that i liked on the GS that is not on the KTM, but man oh man, I enjoy this bike.

'Yeah, I sold the KDX a long time ago. Was my very first dirt bike.  There's still a lot of them running in SA.  Very reliable and a pitty that they stopped the production.

On youtube I've seen some knarly dirt roads and single tracks that the okes are rding in Utah with their dirt bikes.   :ricky:
KDX 200, YFZ 450, YZ 250F, YZ 450F, WR 450F, R1200GS LC, R1200GS ADV LC, 2nd R1200GS ADV LC
Current: WR 450F & KTM 1290 Sup Adv R
 

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #878 on: May 24, 2020, 11:04:11 am »

Yeah a lot of people are like that.  I was the same in a way.  Loved my BMW GS Adv and was sworn to it, untill I came to a point in my life that I wanted to try something else.  There was nothing wrong with the GS, just felt like there's something missing....  So I have tested and tried a few different makes and models and took a few HD's for a test ride and I just couldn't get one that I can say was comfy enough to justify the purchase of the move from the GS to the HD.  The big ones was always shit heavy and you need to fight the bike and counter steer to turn.  Then moved to the smaller HD's, but to me it was pointless because it was also not as comfy as the GS. 

On my way home I stopped at the local KTM dealer.  Now in SA the BMW and KTM guys always give each other shit, but in a good way and then there's always the dispute of which one is better, the BMW or the KTM.
So, never owned a KTM or even been on one, I decided to take the 1290 SAR for a quick test ride.  This unit had the Akrapovic pipe on as well as quick shifter.  I'm use to having a quick shifter on the GS and knew what to expect, but when riding the 1290 it was just unbelievable. The throttle response, the smooth shifting.... it just glided over the asphalt and in a very fast way.  Never before have I taken a bike for a test ride and came back with such a huge grin on my face.   :ricky: :ricky: :ricky:  I was just there and then that i decided to sell the GS and move over to the dark side to get the KTM.

Here and there is a few small things that i liked on the GS that is not on the KTM, but man oh man, I enjoy this bike.

'Yeah, I sold the KDX a long time ago. Was my very first dirt bike.  There's still a lot of them running in SA.  Very reliable and a pitty that they stopped the production.

On youtube I've seen some knarly dirt roads and single tracks that the okes are rding in Utah with their dirt bikes.   :ricky:

It's as if you're in my head  :patch: :imaposer:  What you just said is exactly what I've gone through in my mind time and time again.

I've owned a lot of bikes in my life, I'm of the belief if a man can own just one bike, the GSA is it.  Yet, after selling my 1290 SAR last year and am now on a 2004 GSA, there's something I miss about my 1290.  Don't get me wrong, I love my old GSA, it's so smooth and rides beautifully and comfortable, but man do I miss the engine of the 1290 and the quick shifter was tits.

I rode up mountains in Colorado on my 1290 I wouldn't attempt on my GSA, the 1290 made the rocky climbs easy.  One climb in particular comes to mind as you'll read later in this report...Clear Lake.  Stay tuned!

Yes, Moab, UT and especially the White Rim Trail was planned in this trip, unfortunately, with the way the 1290's penchant for eating rear rubber, I had to make the difficult decision to skip Moab and the WRT because my rear tire was nearly bald, and I had new tires waiting for me near Phoenix, Arizona. 
 

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Re: Nasty Austrian🇦🇹 Conquers da 🇺🇸 & 🇨🇦
« Reply #879 on: May 24, 2020, 11:17:11 am »

Yeah a lot of people are like that.  I was the same in a way.  Loved my BMW GS Adv and was sworn to it, untill I came to a point in my life that I wanted to try something else.  There was nothing wrong with the GS, just felt like there's something missing....  So I have tested and tried a few different makes and models and took a few HD's for a test ride and I just couldn't get one that I can say was comfy enough to justify the purchase of the move from the GS to the HD.  The big ones was always shit heavy and you need to fight the bike and counter steer to turn.  Then moved to the smaller HD's, but to me it was pointless because it was also not as comfy as the GS. 

On my way home I stopped at the local KTM dealer.  Now in SA the BMW and KTM guys always give each other shit, but in a good way and then there's always the dispute of which one is better, the BMW or the KTM.
So, never owned a KTM or even been on one, I decided to take the 1290 SAR for a quick test ride.  This unit had the Akrapovic pipe on as well as quick shifter.  I'm use to having a quick shifter on the GS and knew what to expect, but when riding the 1290 it was just unbelievable. The throttle response, the smooth shifting.... it just glided over the asphalt and in a very fast way.  Never before have I taken a bike for a test ride and came back with such a huge grin on my face.   :ricky: :ricky: :ricky:  I was just there and then that i decided to sell the GS and move over to the dark side to get the KTM.

Here and there is a few small things that i liked on the GS that is not on the KTM, but man oh man, I enjoy this bike.

'Yeah, I sold the KDX a long time ago. Was my very first dirt bike.  There's still a lot of them running in SA.  Very reliable and a pitty that they stopped the production.

On youtube I've seen some knarly dirt roads and single tracks that the okes are rding in Utah with their dirt bikes.   :ricky:

It's as if you're in my head  :patch: :imaposer:  What you just said is exactly what I've gone through in my mind time and time again.

I've owned a lot of bikes in my life, I'm of the belief if a man can own just one bike, the GSA is it.  Yet, after selling my 1290 SAR last year and am now on a 2004 GSA, there's something I miss about my 1290.  Don't get me wrong, I love my old GSA, it's so smooth and rides beautifully and comfortable, but man do I miss the engine of the 1290 and the quick shifter was tits.

I rode up mountains in Colorado on my 1290 I wouldn't attempt on my GSA, the 1290 made the rocky climbs easy.  One climb in particular comes to mind as you'll read later in this report...Clear Lake.  Stay tuned!

Yes, Moab, UT and especially the White Rim Trail was planned in this trip, unfortunately, with the way the 1290's penchant for eating rear rubber, I had to make the difficult decision to skip Moab and the WRT because my rear tire was nearly bald, and I had new tires waiting for me near Phoenix, Arizona.


Yeah when you have the power and the grunt of the 1290, i think it can be difficult to get use to it if and when you ride with something else.  The GSA was very comfy and even for the wife as well as a pillion.  This is not the case with her on the 1290.  Will I ever own a GSA again, I don't know... but for now I'm enjoying the ride of the KTM.  Also, the BMW 1250's is very expensive VS the new 1290's.

hahahaha looking forward to your report on the next phase of your trip.  Stay safe. O0 :thumleft:
KDX 200, YFZ 450, YZ 250F, YZ 450F, WR 450F, R1200GS LC, R1200GS ADV LC, 2nd R1200GS ADV LC
Current: WR 450F & KTM 1290 Sup Adv R
 
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