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Offline Welsh

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #40 on: August 28, 2019, 02:22:27 pm »
Well it all depends on what she wants to do. Just commute with occasional easy adventure ride or does she want to go do some serious adv riding eventually? She could also buy a small bike first, then sell it later when she is comfy and get something bigger that can handle long distances easier.

I started adv riding on a bigger bike, Aprilia Pegaso Trail 650 (which is a wonderful beginners/commuters bike by the way), but I had ridden a little Honda 125 road bike when I was still in school which gave me a strong foundation. Even though I went over very quickly to a 950 Super Enduro after the 650 (being tall helps) :P , the learning curve was still pretty steep when it came to doing more difficult riding. Eventually I did do a lot of technical riding on the 950, but it felt like I learned the most when I got a second bike, a 450. Technical skills are easier to learn when on a small, light, forgiving bike and also then much easier transferred to the bigger bike.

So in short. If she plans on just doing the easy going stuff and commuting (which most of us do especially in the beginning), a lighter 650 could work. (I always advise ladies to stay clear of GS 650 as first bike as the thing is hugely heavy 190kg, that is 10kg HEAVIER than my KTM 950SE  :o and not as offroad capable :peepwall: ...). If you like the bike, good for you, but I've seen too many hubbies buy the 650GS for their wives as they thought it would go along nicely with their own 1200s, only to have the ladies quit riding soon after they hit the first sand patch and have a bad time.

Good choices for 650 class bike for ladies I'd say are:

BMW G 650 X Country (155kg wet) A very manageable bike especially for shorter ladies.
Suzuki DR 650 (165kg wet)
KTM 640 (154kg dry) Can be lowered, incredible offroad and easy to handle.
KTM 690/Husky 701 (146 dry) This bike can be lowered and is also fantastic offroad! There was an older model 690 that was already a bit lower than the standard, can't remember which exactly.
BMW G 650 X Challenge (156kg wet)
Aprilia Pegaso Trail or Yamaha XT 660 (same motor and both at 170kg dry),

If she wants to do more challenging adv riding I'd say something like the Honda 250 Tornado/Rally/CRF or even the Honda 450L could work. DR 400 also springs to mind. BMW G450X could also work, as long as you remove the pluggie to switch it to 250 mode. There are actually plenty of lovely smaller bikes out there, just not that many of them will make for great commuters unfortunately.

Anyway, get her to ride them all and see what she likes best :D We all have different needs and tastes and she needs to find what will work for her. Always try before you buy!

Minxy, you do not qualify to comment given your 950SE abilities etc, give my regards to the Troll.  :peepwall: :thumleft: 
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Offline chicco

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #41 on: August 28, 2019, 02:36:32 pm »
KLR?
KLR650, KTM 950, KTM 950S, KTM 990, KTM 990S, KTM 990R
 

Offline Ganjora

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #42 on: August 28, 2019, 03:41:44 pm »
KLR?

ha ha ha
a 650,  but without the hassle of any power.
 

Offline Goose

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #43 on: August 28, 2019, 03:42:07 pm »
@Goose try to steer her away from the commuting idea. Look at the xt250/crf250 type. Safer to stay of the road as much as possible, especially for an inexperience rider..

Be the right influence! :thumleft:

 :sip: That, I fully agree with, just too many cars, and too many cars with stupid people at the steering wheel. It takes a long time to become experienced for a new rider.
You need to be sort of an aggressive rider to survive commuting.  :3some:

Boom, I’m surrounded by distracted drivers texting at the wheel.  If it’s the same way there, beginning on a heavy 650 is irrational.  Just like an old friend of mine, had to have her first motorcycle, what does she buy?  A Heritage Softtail Classic weighing in at around 800 pounds.  She’s had numerous close calls, almost hit me from behind because the porker she was straddling can’t brake hard enough.

Start off riding off road!

Goose, quit being el cheapo and go buy her a small dirt bike!

Listen boet - I go buy her a bike and MY WIFE will have something to say about that !!  :imaposer:

Coco has indicated she will be able to negotiate on a price - for now the main issue is to find something she will like & will be comfortable on..........  THAT is the big issue  :biggrin:
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Offline Goose

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #44 on: August 28, 2019, 03:42:32 pm »
"Life is a Waste of Time..... Time is a Waste of Life........ Get Wasted all the Time and have the Time of your Life"  ‹(•¿•)›
 

Offline Minxy

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #45 on: August 28, 2019, 04:15:28 pm »
Well it all depends on what she wants to do. Just commute with occasional easy adventure ride or does she want to go do some serious adv riding eventually? She could also buy a small bike first, then sell it later when she is comfy and get something bigger that can handle long distances easier.

I started adv riding on a bigger bike, Aprilia Pegaso Trail 650 (which is a wonderful beginners/commuters bike by the way), but I had ridden a little Honda 125 road bike when I was still in school which gave me a strong foundation. Even though I went over very quickly to a 950 Super Enduro after the 650 (being tall helps) :P , the learning curve was still pretty steep when it came to doing more difficult riding. Eventually I did do a lot of technical riding on the 950, but it felt like I learned the most when I got a second bike, a 450. Technical skills are easier to learn when on a small, light, forgiving bike and also then much easier transferred to the bigger bike.

So in short. If she plans on just doing the easy going stuff and commuting (which most of us do especially in the beginning), a lighter 650 could work. (I always advise ladies to stay clear of GS 650 as first bike as the thing is hugely heavy 190kg, that is 10kg HEAVIER than my KTM 950SE  :o and not as offroad capable :peepwall: ...). If you like the bike, good for you, but I've seen too many hubbies buy the 650GS for their wives as they thought it would go along nicely with their own 1200s, only to have the ladies quit riding soon after they hit the first sand patch and have a bad time.

Good choices for 650 class bike for ladies I'd say are:

BMW G 650 X Country (155kg wet) A very manageable bike especially for shorter ladies.
Suzuki DR 650 (165kg wet)
KTM 640 (154kg dry) Can be lowered, incredible offroad and easy to handle.
KTM 690/Husky 701 (146 dry) This bike can be lowered and is also fantastic offroad! There was an older model 690 that was already a bit lower than the standard, can't remember which exactly.
BMW G 650 X Challenge (156kg wet)
Aprilia Pegaso Trail or Yamaha XT 660 (same motor and both at 170kg dry),

If she wants to do more challenging adv riding I'd say something like the Honda 250 Tornado/Rally/CRF or even the Honda 450L could work. DR 400 also springs to mind. BMW G450X could also work, as long as you remove the pluggie to switch it to 250 mode. There are actually plenty of lovely smaller bikes out there, just not that many of them will make for great commuters unfortunately.

Anyway, get her to ride them all and see what she likes best :D We all have different needs and tastes and she needs to find what will work for her. Always try before you buy!

Minxy, you do not qualify to comment given your 950SE abilities etc, give my regards to the Troll.  :peepwall: :thumleft:

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Offline Tiger8

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #46 on: August 28, 2019, 04:44:02 pm »
That little Honda CTX is the business, TechnomadicJim, toured around Southern Africa on one a few years ago and it never let him down. Great everyday bike to live with and cheap as chips to maintain.

Let her read his ride report     http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=137240.msg2637801#msg2637801

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Offline Blou Zebu

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #47 on: August 28, 2019, 05:37:01 pm »
Lady rider vs Rider lady.
Your thoughts?
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Offline Zanie

Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #48 on: August 28, 2019, 09:08:04 pm »
When I started riding, I was advised to get a 650GS, for many reasons mentioned beforehand: keep up with the boyfriend (on his invariably bigger bike) and “you’re going to sell the small bike anyway, so just get the big one to start with.”

I started with zero motorbike riding experience (had mountain biking and electric bicycle experience) on the 650 behemoth, at over 3x my weight. This was massively intimidating, to say the least. I’m talking of diarrhoea while sitting at work, just thinking of how I’m going to reverse the bike out of the parking lot to head home. But it seems Coco has previous experience, so maybe she will be comfier on a bigger bike?

The 650GS is good for open highway and gravel highway, but is not so great the moment you start doing ‘interesting’ riding. Towards the start of my learning curve, I ended up with a crush fracture in my foot, thanks to a fall and the full weight of the bike landing on my foot. Towards the end, I finished almost every multi-day ride with a popped fork seal, no matter if it had only been replaced a month or so earlier by a suspension guru, because those forks can’t take that type of punishment.

I almost quit riding, thanks to that first fracture, but now I cannot imagine life without a bike. As mentioned by others previously, beware of scaring off someone with too much (bike, crazy road, etc.).

There seems to be this idea of start small and “upgrade” to a bigger bike later. You only need a large bike if you’re riding in big, fast groups or are trying out for the iron arse contest across the country on national highway. Both don’t sound fun to me. I started on a 650GS and “upgraded” to my Honda 250 Rally.

The Rally may be too tall for many ladies (I have long legs), so something of similar size but a lower seat height would be great. I don’t see why people moan about ground clearance. You only need heaps of it if you are super-skilled and going super-fast. When I had to choose a dirt bike, the low almost-no-suspension Honda CRF230F gave me loads of confidence, in comparison with Lance’s horror-bike wheelie-monster can-only-touch-one-toe-on-the-ground KTM 200 XCW.

Small is beautiful, but I guess it really depends on the type of riding. I have stacks of fun commuting on my little bike (I commute just short of 80km every day), sometimes bouncing up and down pavements, just because they’re there. I didn’t do this with the bigger bike.

On gravel, I used to ride with big groups, but now it’s usually just Lance and I, and sometimes one other couple, or a group ride where you can set your own pace out of the dust cloud (e.g. Hardy’s tours). The GS was holding me back, so I downscaled. Again, you don’t need the big bikes if you keep off the highways – and why wouldn’t you?

You need to be sort of an aggressive rider to survive commuting.  :3some:

Nope. Just be awake and don’t ride like a fast hooligan. I keep the speed differential between myself and the cars relatively low. When lane-splitting in jammed traffic I also tend to slow-hovercraft when I see someone indicating to change lanes, rather than squeeze past. Many give me ‘”thank you” hazards afterwards. I generally get to work feeling awake, and warm and fuzzy. There are indeed idiots on the road, but the biggest one we should watch out for is our own good self. Lance and I have both been commuting for 5 or more years. All the broken bones, torn ligaments and sprains occurred off-road. Speaking of which…

We would also like some of the LADIES on the forum to add their input with regard to a bike and gear.....

With regards to biker kit, I refer to the Afrikaans saying “goedkoop is duurkoop”. I bought my first set of biker kit on the cheap and replaced most of it within a year. Cheap isn’t as comfy or protective. My Richa suit cost me a pretty penny back in the day, but 5 years later I haven’t even needed to replace a zip. Pity they don’t sell Richa anymore, as far as I’m aware. Finding ladies' biker kit was a real pain. My pants are men’s pants, because I couldn’t find the lady version.
 
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Offline the ruffian

Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #49 on: August 29, 2019, 07:21:10 am »
Zanie, your overview is eloquent and insightful, and doesn’t just apply to “lady riders”. I started riding 5 decades ago and everything you say about the psychology of riding, off-road, on highway, and daily commuting,  resonates strongly...
 

Offline Dux

Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #50 on: August 29, 2019, 08:10:09 am »
I know this is worn out old story but a 650 is a big bike for experienced riders.

Back in the 70's/80's only the toughest meanest riders dared riding a 28hp XT500 or XR500.
Today we recommend a 40hp 180kg bike to a learner girl. - CRAZY
To turn a bike on gravel at any cruising speed you have to be able to slide the bike and to get the confidence to to that you must not be intimidated by the machine. She'll be able to ride the big bike, but like 90% of adventure riders that's as far as she'll get and the chances of actually mastering bike riding are slim.

An XT250 is about the best choice at the moment and an ideal tourer for years to come. Honda 250 is also a good call if she has longer legs.

I've seen so many lady riders come and go, often because of poor bike choice.

100% , I am of the school that believes in smaller , lighter bikes to learn on , it is so much easier to correct an error on a lighter bike , and if she can get both feet on the ground the confidence levels increase dramatically .
And having spent years as an instructor I have seen these things first hand , and also seen way too many riders starting off too big and being scared away from what should have been a long term good experience .
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Offline 2StrokeDan

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #51 on: August 29, 2019, 10:36:37 am »
I know this is worn out old story but a 650 is a big bike for experienced riders.

Back in the 70's/80's only the toughest meanest riders dared riding a 28hp XT500 or XR500.
Today we recommend a 40hp 180kg bike to a learner girl. - CRAZY
To turn a bike on gravel at any cruising speed you have to be able to slide the bike and to get the confidence to to that you must not be intimidated by the machine. She'll be able to ride the big bike, but like 90% of adventure riders that's as far as she'll get and the chances of actually mastering bike riding are slim.

An XT250 is about the best choice at the moment and an ideal tourer for years to come. Honda 250 is also a good call if she has longer legs.

I've seen so many lady riders come and go, often because of poor bike choice.

100% , I am of the school that believes in smaller , lighter bikes to learn on , it is so much easier to correct an error on a lighter bike , and if she can get both feet on the ground the confidence levels increase dramatically .
And having spent years as an instructor I have seen these things first hand , and also seen way too many riders starting off too big and being scared away from what should have been a long term good experience .

There is reason behind the law limiting under-18 riders to 125, and then onto bigger bikes.
 

Online BuRP

Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #52 on: August 29, 2019, 11:24:01 am »
There is reason behind the law limiting under-18 riders to 125, and then onto bigger bikes.

Yip, and I'm one for writing this into our laws: start small, then after some time move to bigger/faster bikes.
We have been robbed of 50cc bikes/mopeds hence we now 'have' to start learning on 125cc's - which are capable of 100+ km/h hence may kill on first off, contrary to a 50cc which may not even hurt that bad because the speed is way lower - but hardly anyone does because it's considered a moffiebike.
One learns by doing things wrong, and I'll be the first to admit I did.... but I did that on a 50!
« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 11:25:20 am by BuRP »
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Offline Bullet

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #53 on: August 29, 2019, 02:12:26 pm »
I have a lady friend (I've encouraged her to join the forum) that lives in Cape Town, she's recently learnt to ride and has her learners license..... so she's in the market for a bike.... and I've given her some ideas.......

She indicated that she would be doing some commuting - however she'd also like to explore and do trips around the country - starting off with shorter 1 - 2hr rides initially.

She has indicated that she likes the sound of a DS bike...  :sip: - she's around 1.67m tall...............  :ricky:

Her budget is around R40k ........ what say the collective.... what is available that's decent in the Cape area and would some of those exceptionally kind-hearted WD's be willing to assist her to check out some of the bikes available?

We would also like some of the LADIES on the forum to add their input with regard to a bike and gear.....

(I will get Gail to take over this thread as soon as her membership is approved  :deal: :thumleft:


IF ANYONE HAS A BIKE FOR SALE/AVAILABLE..... post pics and price please...  :peepwall:

My wife is also a little lady (smaller than 1.67m) and started on a DR250 a few years ago when I expanded from off road to medium sized DS (XT660). The moment I up-scaled to a 990 Adv she lost interest because she could obviously not do the longer and faster trips. Then about 6 years ago the bug bit again so I got her a 250 again to get the confidence back. She rapidly (3 months) outgrew that and couldn't keep up with everyone else so we tried her on a NC700X. I lowered it a little (15mm) to get her feet firmly on the ground and boy did she enjoy that bike. She rode it for about 3 years to nearly every corner of SA and most of Lesotho - even a lot of Lesotho's dirt road destinations. You wouldn't believe where she has been on an NC. We eventually started doing nearly all of our holidays together by bike (my 1190 and her NC700X) on trips of between 3000km and 7500km on routes that were a mix of tar and good dirt. The only thing I could ever fault the NC for was the limited selection of DS tyres for the 17" rims. So we started looking at an upgrade - RAD lowered a 1050 which she tried and went from tears of fear to tears of joy in a few minutes, but I thought a lowered GS800 would be ideal (please don't tell anyone) so we looked around until we eventually found a 2nd hand lowered GS800. She spent all of 0.5km on it and said she hated it and if she can't have a 1050 she would rather stick with her NC. She has been the proud owner of a lowered KTM1050 for about 18 months now and loves it almost as much as I love my 1190.

OK - the point of this long winded story is.. if the lady is going to be happy poerpoering around on a smallish street scrambler, that's great. BUT if she has ambition to play in the big league, she is very quickly going to outgrow the little bike and either just lose interest or want something more. My view for anyone starting out with commuting and DS, the NC700/750X is a good place to start.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 02:16:14 pm by Bullet »
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Offline Roxtar

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #54 on: August 29, 2019, 03:38:20 pm »
Go for a CRF230 and first learn to really ride on dirt without fear of dropping the bike, only then move onto something bigger(maybe) and attempt to venture onto tar.... imo  ;)

A beginner should not be on a 650  ::)
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Offline Roxtar

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #55 on: August 29, 2019, 03:45:44 pm »
Zanie, your overview is eloquent and insightful, and doesn’t just apply to “lady riders”. I started riding 5 decades ago and everything you say about the psychology of riding, off-road, on highway, and daily commuting,  resonates strongly...

DITTO :thumleft:

If there is a lack of confidence you will always struggle, that's why important to start right... same reason a lady colleague here stopped riding as her "beginner " bike was a 650GS and she was shortish... just always felt vulnerable and not in control... psychology of riding, your best and worst friend ;)
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Offline Fuzzy Muzzy

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #56 on: August 29, 2019, 03:47:01 pm »
Go for a CRF230 and first learn to really ride on dirt without fear of dropping the bike, only then move onto something bigger(maybe) and attempt to venture onto tar.... imo  ;)

A beginner should not be on a 650  ::)

My 1st bike was a 650.. although I agree in principle that a 650 is not the best idea, there is nothing wrong with it if they focused on the riding

250cc, anything off road orientated and let her tackle that for a year then move up.. done

« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 03:52:29 pm by Fuzzy Muzzy »
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Offline Kortbroek

Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #57 on: August 29, 2019, 06:07:15 pm »
I have a lady friend (I've encouraged her to join the forum) that lives in Cape Town, she's recently learnt to ride and has her learners license..... so she's in the market for a bike.... and I've given her some ideas.......

She indicated that she would be doing some commuting - however she'd also like to explore and do trips around the country - starting off with shorter 1 - 2hr rides initially.

She has indicated that she likes the sound of a DS bike...  :sip: - she's around 1.67m tall...............  :ricky:

Her budget is around R40k ........ what say the collective.... what is available that's decent in the Cape area and would some of those exceptionally kind-hearted WD's be willing to assist her to check out some of the bikes available?

We would also like some of the LADIES on the forum to add their input with regard to a bike and gear.....

(I will get Gail to take over this thread as soon as her membership is approved  :deal: :thumleft:


IF ANYONE HAS A BIKE FOR SALE/AVAILABLE..... post pics and price please...  :peepwall:

My wife is also a little lady (smaller than 1.67m) and started on a DR250 a few years ago when I expanded from off road to medium sized DS (XT660). The moment I up-scaled to a 990 Adv she lost interest because she could obviously not do the longer and faster trips. Then about 6 years ago the bug bit again so I got her a 250 again to get the confidence back. She rapidly (3 months) outgrew that and couldn't keep up with everyone else so we tried her on a NC700X. I lowered it a little (15mm) to get her feet firmly on the ground and boy did she enjoy that bike. She rode it for about 3 years to nearly every corner of SA and most of Lesotho - even a lot of Lesotho's dirt road destinations. You wouldn't believe where she has been on an NC. We eventually started doing nearly all of our holidays together by bike (my 1190 and her NC700X) on trips of between 3000km and 7500km on routes that were a mix of tar and good dirt. The only thing I could ever fault the NC for was the limited selection of DS tyres for the 17" rims. So we started looking at an upgrade - RAD lowered a 1050 which she tried and went from tears of fear to tears of joy in a few minutes, but I thought a lowered GS800 would be ideal (please don't tell anyone) so we looked around until we eventually found a 2nd hand lowered GS800. She spent all of 0.5km on it and said she hated it and if she can't have a 1050 she would rather stick with her NC. She has been the proud owner of a lowered KTM1050 for about 18 months now and loves it almost as much as I love my 1190.

OK - the point of this long winded story is.. if the lady is going to be happy poerpoering around on a smallish street scrambler, that's great. BUT if she has ambition to play in the big league, she is very quickly going to outgrow the little bike and either just lose interest or want something more. My view for anyone starting out with commuting and DS, the NC700/750X is a good place to start.

I am willing to put money on it that if you're wife had started out way back when on a KTM1050 she would not have progressed even nearly as well. In fact your post is the best example here of why people should start small. Sure you're wife maybe just progressed fast, but if you do it the other way around you might not see the same progression at all.
- you reckon that thing will pop a wheelie? We're about to find out, SLAP that pig!
 

Offline Fransw

Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #58 on: September 12, 2019, 06:14:17 pm »
 

Offline Hardy de Kock

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Re: Advice for a new Lady Rider...?
« Reply #59 on: September 12, 2019, 06:30:31 pm »
When I started riding, I was advised to get a 650GS, for many reasons mentioned beforehand: keep up with the boyfriend (on his invariably bigger bike) and “you’re going to sell the small bike anyway, so just get the big one to start with.”

I started with zero motorbike riding experience (had mountain biking and electric bicycle experience) on the 650 behemoth, at over 3x my weight. This was massively intimidating, to say the least. I’m talking of diarrhoea while sitting at work, just thinking of how I’m going to reverse the bike out of the parking lot to head home. But it seems Coco has previous experience, so maybe she will be comfier on a bigger bike?

The 650GS is good for open highway and gravel highway, but is not so great the moment you start doing ‘interesting’ riding. Towards the start of my learning curve, I ended up with a crush fracture in my foot, thanks to a fall and the full weight of the bike landing on my foot. Towards the end, I finished almost every multi-day ride with a popped fork seal, no matter if it had only been replaced a month or so earlier by a suspension guru, because those forks can’t take that type of punishment.

I almost quit riding, thanks to that first fracture, but now I cannot imagine life without a bike. As mentioned by others previously, beware of scaring off someone with too much (bike, crazy road, etc.).

There seems to be this idea of start small and “upgrade” to a bigger bike later. You only need a large bike if you’re riding in big, fast groups or are trying out for the iron arse contest across the country on national highway. Both don’t sound fun to me. I started on a 650GS and “upgraded” to my Honda 250 Rally.

The Rally may be too tall for many ladies (I have long legs), so something of similar size but a lower seat height would be great. I don’t see why people moan about ground clearance. You only need heaps of it if you are super-skilled and going super-fast. When I had to choose a dirt bike, the low almost-no-suspension Honda CRF230F gave me loads of confidence, in comparison with Lance’s horror-bike wheelie-monster can-only-touch-one-toe-on-the-ground KTM 200 XCW.

Small is beautiful, but I guess it really depends on the type of riding. I have stacks of fun commuting on my little bike (I commute just short of 80km every day), sometimes bouncing up and down pavements, just because they’re there. I didn’t do this with the bigger bike.

On gravel, I used to ride with big groups, but now it’s usually just Lance and I, and sometimes one other couple, or a group ride where you can set your own pace out of the dust cloud (e.g. Hardy’s tours). The GS was holding me back, so I downscaled. Again, you don’t need the big bikes if you keep off the highways – and why wouldn’t you?

You need to be sort of an aggressive rider to survive commuting.  :3some:

Nope. Just be awake and don’t ride like a fast hooligan. I keep the speed differential between myself and the cars relatively low. When lane-splitting in jammed traffic I also tend to slow-hovercraft when I see someone indicating to change lanes, rather than squeeze past. Many give me ‘”thank you” hazards afterwards. I generally get to work feeling awake, and warm and fuzzy. There are indeed idiots on the road, but the biggest one we should watch out for is our own good self. Lance and I have both been commuting for 5 or more years. All the broken bones, torn ligaments and sprains occurred off-road. Speaking of which…

We would also like some of the LADIES on the forum to add their input with regard to a bike and gear.....

With regards to biker kit, I refer to the Afrikaans saying “goedkoop is duurkoop”. I bought my first set of biker kit on the cheap and replaced most of it within a year. Cheap isn’t as comfy or protective. My Richa suit cost me a pretty penny back in the day, but 5 years later I haven’t even needed to replace a zip. Pity they don’t sell Richa anymore, as far as I’m aware. Finding ladies' biker kit was a real pain. My pants are men’s pants, because I couldn’t find the lady version.

Really were impressed by this girl's riding in Namibia. Zanie did everything the more experienced riders did on their bigger, stronger bikes and she did it with half the fuel bill, and half the fall marks, at more or less the same speeds. She had EXACTLY the right bike.
There is something else that comes to mind. Zanie had Lance. You would go a long way before you find a riding partner that is more patient, and more willing to adapt than this guy.
@Goose - My advice to you is the following.

a Lot of guys purchase bikes so that their wives can keep up with the pace. Instead of helping this usually has the opposite effect, where the lady rider over-extend in order not to dissapoint. This usually results in that "too big" bike being sold after the first two trips, and the initial interest and passion and confidence being destroyed.
Decide what is important, and buy accordingly. In most cases it would be a bike that does not intimidate.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2019, 02:29:02 pm by Hardy de Kock »
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