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Author Topic: The Gurkhas and their Kukris  (Read 1280 times)

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Offline Bill the Bong

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Re: The Gurkhas and their Kukris
« Reply #20 on: March 30, 2021, 06:35:41 pm »
Kwaai, dankie. Ek is meer n knipmes ou - Opinels, Mam, Joseph Rogers en Okapis😵
 

Offline KaTooMatt

Re: The Gurkhas and their Kukris
« Reply #21 on: May 19, 2021, 03:46:49 pm »
I found this in some stuff my Dad gave me. He apparantly got this during his travels in the British Navy. Joined when he was 15 - really - left at 22 to join the SADF. He is now just short of 79, so he got this around 60 years ago. Is this legit or is it a presentation piece?
That looks very like one of the Kukri's my father had. He has passed them all down to grandchildren.None for his kids mind you.

He inhherited them from my grandfather who served WW2 as an officer with the 7th Gurkha rifles. My Dad was born in Shillong as a result. Sadly my Grandfather having fought in both wars passed away on Poppy day in the year I was born. Dressed in his uniform ready for the parade.

In terms of Gurkhas. There are 2 proper Gurkhas. The Indian army and the British army both got Gurkha regiments after Indian independence in 1947. Then you get the tribesmane who are also Gurkhas that are normal soldiers in the Nepalese army. The Kukri though is a traditional trbal weapon not the exclusive preserve of these light infantry units.

The birth of the regiments are also interesting. The king of the Gurkha's was so impressed with the braveery of the British soldiers facing a charge of his warriors that he wanted his people to learn this bravery. Hence him gifting 2 regiments to the crown to join the British Army and learn the bravery of the redcoats.

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Offline Spectaitor

Re: The Gurkhas and their Kukris
« Reply #22 on: May 20, 2021, 07:46:02 am »
You guys have the right friends to be getting these as gifts  ;D

Fantastic looking blades and with a truly rich history, it's hard to believe that these knives haven't fallen to the history books since they are no longer as effective in general combat as they used to be.
If you wanted one from https://www.thekhukurihouse.com/ do you still pay import on that?
So much to do, so little time. Better get going then!
 

Offline Bill the Bong

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Re: The Gurkhas and their Kukris
« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2021, 10:14:49 am »
I found this in some stuff my Dad gave me. He apparantly got this during his travels in the British Navy. Joined when he was 15 - really - left at 22 to join the SADF. He is now just short of 79, so he got this around 60 years ago. Is this legit or is it a presentation piece?
That looks very like one of the Kukri's my father had. He has passed them all down to grandchildren.None for his kids mind you.

He inhherited them from my grandfather who served WW2 as an officer with the 7th Gurkha rifles. My Dad was born in Shillong as a result. Sadly my Grandfather having fought in both wars passed away on Poppy day in the year I was born. Dressed in his uniform ready for the parade.

In terms of Gurkhas. There are 2 proper Gurkhas. The Indian army and the British army both got Gurkha regiments after Indian independence in 1947. Then you get the tribesmane who are also Gurkhas that are normal soldiers in the Nepalese army. The Kukri though is a traditional trbal weapon not the exclusive preserve of these light infantry units.

The birth of the regiments are also interesting. The king of the Gurkha's was so impressed with the braveery of the British soldiers facing a charge of his warriors that he wanted his people to learn this bravery. Hence him gifting 2 regiments to the crown to join the British Army and learn the bravery of the redcoats.

Thank you, appreciate it
 

Offline McSack

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Re: The Gurkhas and their Kukris
« Reply #24 on: July 19, 2021, 04:56:42 pm »
Been looking for one for a while and this specimen looks almost brand new...well as brand new as these things can look I guess

Anyone got any idea how one could go about verifying if these are genuine articles or finding out who made a particular  kukri?
« Last Edit: July 19, 2021, 05:02:01 pm by McSack »
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Offline Welsh

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Re: The Gurkhas and their Kukris
« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2021, 05:21:33 pm »
I found this in some stuff my Dad gave me. He apparantly got this during his travels in the British Navy. Joined when he was 15 - really - left at 22 to join the SADF. He is now just short of 79, so he got this around 60 years ago. Is this legit or is it a presentation piece?
That looks very like one of the Kukri's my father had. He has passed them all down to grandchildren.None for his kids mind you.

He inhherited them from my grandfather who served WW2 as an officer with the 7th Gurkha rifles. My Dad was born in Shillong as a result. Sadly my Grandfather having fought in both wars passed away on Poppy day in the year I was born. Dressed in his uniform ready for the parade.

In terms of Gurkhas. There are 2 proper Gurkhas. The Indian army and the British army both got Gurkha regiments after Indian independence in 1947. Then you get the tribesmane who are also Gurkhas that are normal soldiers in the Nepalese army. The Kukri though is a traditional trbal weapon not the exclusive preserve of these light infantry units.

The birth of the regiments are also interesting. The king of the Gurkha's was so impressed with the braveery of the British soldiers facing a charge of his warriors that he wanted his people to learn this bravery. Hence him gifting 2 regiments to the crown to join the British Army and learn the bravery of the redcoats.

The Gurkha Regiment was based in Aldershot, when I was there, they were highly respected and didn't cause shit or get it.

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