Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register

Author Topic: Show us what you made  (Read 7993 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline WeeStrom

  • Member
  • **
  • Bike: Suzuki DL 650 V-Strom
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 216
  • Thanked: 10 times
  • Weeeeee!
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #140 on: March 17, 2020, 09:07:43 am »
Handle build for a rat-tail tang blade.

 

Offline Mr Zog

  • Well fuck me, I'm a
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Honda XL500S
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 7,929
  • Thanked: 454 times
  • Without the gutter my mind would be homeless...
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #141 on: March 23, 2020, 03:00:31 am »
I spent a whole lot more time today polishing the blade with 800 and then 1500 grit waterpaper using light oil (3-in-1) as a lube.


Finally got it as good as I can, hopefully I can get a buffing wheel for my bench grinder soon and give it that final polish that I would like to see.

Then I started on the handle. Got the two sides cut, drilled, and used a 5mm brass rod I had lying around for the pins. Used epoxy to glue it all together, but made a big boo-boo by using the 60-second epoxy instead of the slower one. I'm really hoping that I got the second side on in time and clamped...

Time will tell.....  :sip:
Young enough to know I can, old enough to know I shouldn't, stupid enough to do it anyway.
 

Offline Rossdog

Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #142 on: March 23, 2020, 11:49:33 am »
Made this yesterday. Blade forged out of very old, rusted plough shear. Handle made out of burned hickory. The harmon came out very clearly. Light was bad when I took the pic.
'69 Model.
 

Offline Tampan

Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #143 on: March 28, 2020, 05:23:13 pm »
My son has an agreement with a guy in town who owns a biltong shop and he buys various types of game from my son, on order. We supply the carcasses slaughtered, so at times, it can get rather busy and quite a lot of slaughtering needs to be done. This results in the need for proper slaughter knifes for the workers and this always seems to be an issue.
I just can't find decent enough slaughter knives at a decent enough price, so this morning i decided to make a proto-type. Once it's done, they must test it and tell me whether I need to make any changes to it and once everyone is happy, I'll make five or so and hopefully sort the knife issue out.

I used a very tough steel from an old fertilizer coulter off my maize planter and it should last very well. The way these coulters work in the field, while staying sharp and not bending or breaking, is absolutely amazing. Even before I hardened the blade, I was not able to drill the holes in the handle, with normal HSS drills. Still figuring out how I'm going to to it now, after the blade has been hardened. I'm sure a cobalt drill will do the job though, otherwise I'll heat the only handle to try and soften it - without damaging the blade, of course.

I still need to finish the handle and do the final grinding and cleaning up, but it's sharpened and it cuts ferociously. Here's a pic or two:

« Last Edit: March 28, 2020, 05:24:05 pm by Tampan »
 

Offline Mr Zog

  • Well fuck me, I'm a
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Honda XL500S
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 7,929
  • Thanked: 454 times
  • Without the gutter my mind would be homeless...
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #144 on: March 29, 2020, 02:12:13 am »
I mentioned that the knife I am making had a boo-boo...  :peepwall:

I used an epoxy that dried waaaay too fast, and it set up just before I could get the two handles fitted properly.

Here you can see how there is a small gap between the one handle and the blade...









So unfortunately the only way to fix this was to cut the handles off and start over again. I used my little bandsaw to cut the handles off, and I found that the epoxy hadn't adhered to the steel very well.





I did clean it properly with denatured alcohol before gluing, so this time I drilled a whole bunch of extra holes into the handle so that the epoxy can grip through the holes. I also roughed up the steel on the belt sander to give the epoxy a bit more purchase.

Then I drilled the new handles, cleaned everything up again with the denatured alcohol, and glued it again using new brass pins.

This time it looks like I got it right  :thumleft:  I'll leave it to set properly overnight, and have a look tomorrow  :thumleft:
Young enough to know I can, old enough to know I shouldn't, stupid enough to do it anyway.
 

Offline roxenz

  • rocks make sense
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Yamaha Super Tenere
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 4,973
  • Thanked: 246 times
  • cheerful yesterdays and confident tomorrows
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #145 on: March 30, 2020, 06:39:25 pm »
Righteeoh. All the beautiful creations on this fred, together with some free time over the weekend, combined with some thinking that has been crawling around in the darker recesses of my mind.

Checking out all the beautiful cutting tools on the knife fred, and the drool-worthy cutters on The Knife Guy's website, it struck me that (to my eye) there are a lot of arty, yet very uncomfortable-looking handles. that idea brooded back-of-mind for quite some time.

I even googled knife handle design. Surprisingly little that was really good. Found one good article.

So over the weekend I decided to play around a little bit. I love cooking, and good chef knives interest me, but most are a bit expensive in good old ZARs... My thoughts eventually crystalised around a few principles/concepts (refer to piccie below:

1. Tilting the long (horizontal) axis of the handle a bit upward. I'm tallish and I tend to stand over the cutting board a bit. Farting around with cardboard cutout models got me to the point where an upward tilt of between 8 - 10 degrees felt comfortable.

2. The bolster. I don't like a full bolster - it prevents heavy cutting where you can put your weight on the back end of the blade, with your hand almost on top of the cutting action (think leverage). On the other hand, no bolster causes my front finger (index finger) to ride forward and then work against the narrow blade steel which usually have sharp edges. This means discomfort or blisters with extended uses. So, half bolster it will be then. With the bolster tilted a bit forward on top of the balde to allow better leverage when cutting with heavy downward pressure.

3. Bulges. Getting the concept from the article mentioned, a top bulge in the back half of the handle (to fit the natural shape of a fisted hand), slanting down in a dropped rear bolster. The down slant on the rear end is to spare the thicker, bottom part of the palm of your hand, and the bolster itself to give something for your little finger to find resistance against when applying a bit of force. Note the comment in the article that most of the grip on a knife handle is generated by the last to fingers (ring and little fingers). The combination of thumb, index and middle fingers is not nearly as strong. Then a bulge on lower part of handle, position a bit forward on the handle to match the natural shape of a clenched hand.

4. Finally the front part getting up to the bolster needs to be fairly slim - took me some time to figure that out (enlightenment only came through playing with the cardboard models).

More to follow...
 

Offline roxenz

  • rocks make sense
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Yamaha Super Tenere
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 4,973
  • Thanked: 246 times
  • cheerful yesterdays and confident tomorrows
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #146 on: March 30, 2020, 06:41:38 pm »
Some evidence of the playing around.
 

Offline roxenz

  • rocks make sense
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Yamaha Super Tenere
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 4,973
  • Thanked: 246 times
  • cheerful yesterdays and confident tomorrows
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #147 on: March 30, 2020, 06:48:26 pm »
To make it easier for myself (after all, this was just a proof-of-concept lark), I use some sheet alu to simulate the steel part of a real knife.  Cut out the metal part and shaped it. Sequence of jigsaw, bench grinder and hand file involved. Somewhere during all that, a band-aid was also needed on my left ring finger...  :-[

Cut scales from soft pine brandering and epoxied onto metal part.

End of Saturday it was, time for a beer. Yoh, beer stash ain't gonna make it through the lockdown!  :eek7:
 

Offline roxenz

  • rocks make sense
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Yamaha Super Tenere
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 4,973
  • Thanked: 246 times
  • cheerful yesterdays and confident tomorrows
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #148 on: March 30, 2020, 06:55:09 pm »
Sunday came around. Only remaining work was to shape the handle, based on my wonderful ideas.

Started with a rasp to get rid of excess wood. Then onto the rough stone of the bench grinder (love the smell of burning pine). Final shaping with various hand files. It felt good so I decided the experiment was successful. Just to make it look better (before showing off my skills to my lovely wife), I dipped the handle in stain and varnish. Diminished my dwindling beer stash a bit more while the varnish dried out in the sunshine.

Sanded it down lightly to give it a working knife look. Voila. I even gave the alu a bit of an edge on the grinder!  :biggrin:
« Last Edit: March 30, 2020, 06:56:01 pm by roxenz »
 

Offline roxenz

  • rocks make sense
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Yamaha Super Tenere
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 4,973
  • Thanked: 246 times
  • cheerful yesterdays and confident tomorrows
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #149 on: March 30, 2020, 07:05:58 pm »
So, what is the verdict? I find the handle a lot more comfy than any of my other kitchen knives. It feels good when simulating both cutting and chopping.

The half bolster gives a good confident forward grip (first picture below) when applying a bit more force. The second picture shows how well the handle fits into my hand.

The last picture compares the handle with a common garden variety kitchen knife. Here you can see how my handle differs from the usual.

It was a fun exercise. Perhaps I'll have this made at some stage. I won't do it myself, don't have the tools to do good steel justice.

Next? Well I have an Asian cleaver style knife. It cuts fantastically, but the handle arrangement is not well thought out. Doesn't take long for my index finger to get really sore when using it in anger. But that's for another day (and they'll have to lift the restrictions on buying beer first!).
 

Offline Mr Zog

  • Well fuck me, I'm a
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Honda XL500S
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 7,929
  • Thanked: 454 times
  • Without the gutter my mind would be homeless...
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #150 on: March 31, 2020, 03:08:29 am »
It took a whole lot of shaping and sanding and polishing... but finally I think it's done. Well, as good as I'm going to get it without special tools (like a buffer).

The numbers you can see stamped into the steel are just the old part numbers from the mower blade I used  :deal:  :thumleft:

I know, the knife is too small, the handle is too short, etc. But this is just my first attempt, and I wanted to try all the stuff I have seen on the YouTube videos I have studied. I do still want to get a buffing wheel for my grinder, and I won't use mower blades for knives like this again either. I'll keep my eyes open for old files at the pawn shops  :sip:
Young enough to know I can, old enough to know I shouldn't, stupid enough to do it anyway.
 

Offline Tom van Brits

Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #151 on: March 31, 2020, 04:28:34 am »
Well done Gary, can see there was a lot of elbow grease involved to get that blade as shiny!  :thumleft:
 

Offline Vis Arend

  • It's not how fast you start, it's how long you endure.
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: Honda XR650L
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 8,462
  • Thanked: 311 times
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #152 on: March 31, 2020, 07:14:04 am »
I think that is very well made Gary, as Tom said, you can see there is a lot of elbow grease in that blade and handle.   :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:
No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the the couch
Honda XL125  -  Sold,    Honda XR200R  -  Sold,     Yamaha TT500  -  Sold,     Honda Transalp700  -  Sold,       Yamaha S10 Fast Blue  -  Sold,   Yamaha S10 Slow White  -  Sold,   Honda CRF250 Rally - To be Sold, XR650L..
 

Offline Kaboef

  • Jedi Knight
  • Forum Whore
  • ****
  • Bike: KTM 950 Adventure S
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 5,649
  • Thanked: 420 times
    • CFO Consult SA
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #153 on: March 31, 2020, 08:19:38 am »
My son has an agreement with a guy in town who owns a biltong shop and he buys various types of game from my son, on order. We supply the carcasses slaughtered, so at times, it can get rather busy and quite a lot of slaughtering needs to be done. This results in the need for proper slaughter knifes for the workers and this always seems to be an issue.
I just can't find decent enough slaughter knives at a decent enough price, so this morning i decided to make a proto-type. Once it's done, they must test it and tell me whether I need to make any changes to it and once everyone is happy, I'll make five or so and hopefully sort the knife issue out.

I used a very tough steel from an old fertilizer coulter off my maize planter and it should last very well. The way these coulters work in the field, while staying sharp and not bending or breaking, is absolutely amazing. Even before I hardened the blade, I was not able to drill the holes in the handle, with normal HSS drills. Still figuring out how I'm going to to it now, after the blade has been hardened. I'm sure a cobalt drill will do the job though, otherwise I'll heat the only handle to try and soften it - without damaging the blade, of course.

I still need to finish the handle and do the final grinding and cleaning up, but it's sharpened and it cuts ferociously. Here's a pic or two:

Tampan, how did you cut and shape the steel if it's so hard? What tools?

I love the shape of the blade.
And Saint Attila raised the hand grenade up on high, saying, "O Lord, bless this thy hand grenade, that with it thou mayst blow thine enemies to tiny bits, in thy mercy."

www.cfoconsult.co.za
 

Offline Tampan

Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #154 on: March 31, 2020, 06:10:30 pm »
Hi Kaboef, thanks.
The disk actually isnít all that hard to cut. I used a normal angle grinder and cut out a rectangular piece of about 28 x 3 cm. I drew the shape I had in mind roughly on the blank and did the initial, rough grinding on a normal bench grinder until I was happy with the overall shape of the blade and handle.
This also included a large part of the bevels on the blade. I then heat treated it - had to do it three times before I was happy with result of the file test.

The final grinding of the blade was done on my belt grinder. That took some time, but all looks good at this stage. Once the handle is done, the knife will be put to work and only then will I see whether this steel is good enough for work knife.
The shape was just thought out as I went along, keeping in mind that it would primarily be used for skinning carcasses.
 

Offline Takashi

Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #155 on: March 31, 2020, 07:54:37 pm »
So after the little utility knife I updated my jig a bit to make getting the angles I want easier.

I cheated with this one as I bought a pre-cut blank from KMTS.

The kudu cutout will be filled after heat treatment with some black epoxy.
I am looking for a nice piece of wood for the handle.

Pictures show the jig and knife with the rough cut from the file and after putting some 400 grit over the one side quickly.

 

Online Wayne

Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #156 on: March 31, 2020, 08:29:21 pm »
Ingenious and simple looking jig. How do you set the angle?

Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk

May the best of your today be the worst of your tomorrow.
 

Offline Takashi

Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #157 on: March 31, 2020, 08:54:50 pm »
Ingenious and simple looking jig. How do you set the angle?

The grey plastic part that fits around the square tubing is a 3D printed part and can be released and slides up and down to change the angles.
Initially I set my angles with some basic Pythagorean theory but found it easier using an APP on my phone.
Calibrate phone on flat surface and place on the linear rod to get the angle correct.
 

Offline Exploratio

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda VFR1200 CrossTourer
    Location: North West
  • Posts: 708
  • Thanked: 50 times
  • Deo, patriae, amicus
Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #158 on: March 31, 2020, 10:09:03 pm »
Just a question.
The blank you are using, hardened already?
If not, do not go too thin on the edge. Warpage a real danger.


Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk

XL700V Transalp
XL1000V Varadero
VFR1200X Crosstourer
 

Offline Takashi

Re: Show us what you made
« Reply #159 on: March 31, 2020, 10:40:46 pm »
Just a question.
The blank you are using, hardened already?
If not, do not go too thin on the edge. Warpage a real danger.

Nope not hardened yet, and I have left about 0.7mm on the edge, I am aware of warping during the hardening.
On my previous utility knife I left about 1mm before hardening and it took me a ton of work to get the last edge done.

I still want to make a little soup can furnace but with the lockdown I need some refractory cement.
On the utility I struggled to get the blade to non magnetic with only my MAPP torch. I had to use my gas camping stove from the bottom and the MAPP from the top.