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Author Topic: Motorcycle carrier systems . Advice  (Read 1522 times)

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Offline macker

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Re: Motorcycle carrier systems . Advice
« Reply #20 on: April 10, 2020, 06:48:16 am »
Macker, I used one long ago for a YZ. As Kortbroek mentioned, remove the chain and also don't turn to sharp, or try to reverse. Not good for the tyre over long distances. Does your front wheel touch the rear door?

Will definitely take the chain off, and would not try reversing, could end up under the car.
 The front wheel is very close but doesn't touch the car, why do you ask??
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Offline macker

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Re: Motorcycle carrier systems . Advice
« Reply #21 on: April 10, 2020, 06:53:19 am »
If you are going this route, remove the chain before you tow. Also, unnecessary wear on the rear tyre I think.

I'd rather put the rear wheel in, and let the front wheel do the rolling - tied down straight of course.

Never thought of that, I reckon that would improve tight turns as the front wheel would follow the direction of the car.
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Offline Boersoeknbike

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Re: Motorcycle carrier systems . Advice
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2020, 10:34:41 am »
As a student I build a hitch like this on my old Honda Ballade to take my bike up down for holidays. One difference, I took the frontwheel off and put the bolt through my attachment, wheel ride in car. Somewhat of a mission but it was to limit the extension of weight on the small car's towhitch. Did many many km's that way. Just remember to release rear brake and take chain off.

What do you think of this type of carrier?
Bought just before lockdown to tow my Honda XR 400R and have not used it yet.

I am doing a mod to help strengthen the tie down method, but I am still not convinced on the safety for a long trip / tow (+/- 200km).
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Offline zebra - Flying Brick

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Re: Motorcycle carrier systems . Advice
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2020, 10:50:29 am »


Quote from: Boersoeknbike on Today at 10:34:41 am>As a student I build a hitch like this on my old Honda Ballade to take my bike up down for holidays. One difference, I took the frontwheel off and put the bolt through my attachment, wheel ride in car. Somewhat of a mission but it was to limit the extension of weight on the small car's towhitch. Did many many km's that way. Just remember to release rear brake and take chain off.
In addition (since I've owned two different hitch racks), I stored the RAMP inside the car; although it has lugs for attaching it to the rack, it is HEAVY, and just further reduces weight on that hitch.
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Offline Straatkat

Re: Motorcycle carrier systems . Advice
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2020, 11:40:26 am »
Just had a thought, if the bakkie runs out of fuel, you could have some-one sit on the bike, and "push" the car from behind! Very versatile attachment imo. You would just have to put the chain back!
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Offline Sommer Ek

Re: Motorcycle carrier systems . Advice
« Reply #25 on: April 24, 2020, 12:46:02 am »
Ek het in die tagtigs 'n heel paar keer my XT250  ook so gesleep. Kon nie 'n wa bekostig nie.

Neem die volgende in ag:
Natuurlik moet jy die ketting afhaal.
Die Rake angle van jou fiets speel seker die grootste rol in die wyse waarop jy hom vasmaak. 
Sodra jy draai, hoe skerper hoe meer,  gaan le die fiets na die butekant toe.
Die toue moet in lyn met die skokbrekers vasgemaak word anders; Oor 'n bult trek die toue stywer en deur 'n lae punt (soos van die petrolpompe tot op die pad) raak die toue losser. Daarom is dit risiko om die toue aan die handles vas te maak.
Neem in ag dat wanneer jy ry dat die fiets se wiel op die middelmannetjie loop. Slaggate kan nogal lastig wees.
Alles loop gewoonlik lekker tot die eerste koekie begin krummel, wees voorbereid daarop. Vinnige swaai bewegings van jou voertuig het 'n direkte effek op die fiets.

Voorspoed en wees versigtig.


 

Offline macker

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Re: Motorcycle carrier systems . Advice
« Reply #26 on: April 26, 2020, 06:47:47 am »
Ek het in die tagtigs 'n heel paar keer my XT250  ook so gesleep. Kon nie 'n wa bekostig nie.

Neem die volgende in ag:
Natuurlik moet jy die ketting afhaal.
Die Rake angle van jou fiets speel seker die grootste rol in die wyse waarop jy hom vasmaak. 
Sodra jy draai, hoe skerper hoe meer,  gaan le die fiets na die butekant toe.
Die toue moet in lyn met die skokbrekers vasgemaak word anders; Oor 'n bult trek die toue stywer en deur 'n lae punt (soos van die petrolpompe tot op die pad) raak die toue losser. Daarom is dit risiko om die toue aan die handles vas te maak.
Neem in ag dat wanneer jy ry dat die fiets se wiel op die middelmannetjie loop. Slaggate kan nogal lastig wees.
Alles loop gewoonlik lekker tot die eerste koekie begin krummel, wees voorbereid daarop. Vinnige swaai bewegings van jou voertuig het 'n direkte effek op die fiets.

Voorspoed en wees versigtig.



@Sommer Ek, more, thanks for the advice. Ek het die pos 90% verstaan maar my Afrikaans is nie baie goed nie. Could you explain what the highlighted section above means please.....
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Offline Sommer Ek

Re: Motorcycle carrier systems . Advice
« Reply #27 on: April 27, 2020, 12:44:58 pm »
Macker let's hope my English is not worse than your Afrikaans.

If you put two bricks head to head about 5cm apart and you lift the outside end of the one brick the measurement between the bricks at the bottom will still be 5cm but it will measure less than 5cm on top. The same happen when the front of your vehicle is higher than the back of the vehicle. This will shorten the distance between the handles and the fastening point  of the ropes on the towbar.   It will be ideal to only tighten the wheel to the carrier, or if you have a hollow front axle  to use a pin through it as a fastening point.

If I remember correct myprocedure was the following:  Get car and bike on level ground. Put front wheel on Carrier. Ask wife to hold bike upright. Thighten ropes as fast as can. Lift back backwheel of bike on to a can (about 25cm) See to it that the ropes are stil reltively tight, a bit more than only staight.  As I then take out the bucket the bike will tighten up. Make sure that there are still enough play on the shocks,  I tested mine by hooking it in the driveway and then used the little uphill to the garage.

You will never really get rid of Pythagorus but you must try as close as possible. I hope it help. If not Ask again.
 
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