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Author Topic: The DRZ Thread  (Read 53998 times)

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Offline N[]vA

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1140 on: July 02, 2010, 09:58:31 am »
Anyone fitted a "Goose tube" to their Z's?
Just can't seem to find a place for it.
Have two int he garage will take a look later
So much of win it hurts! ^.^


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Offline MildDog

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1141 on: July 02, 2010, 12:23:26 pm »
Anyone fitted a "Goose tube" to their Z's?
Just can't seem to find a place for it.

I am going to put one on the left, opposite to the exhaust. I just need to bend a piece of metal for a bracket. it seemed to fit when I was holding it there, and needed minimal metal work to make it fit.
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Offline lecap

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1142 on: July 04, 2010, 12:49:05 pm »
1/4" drive socket sets will not make you happy as soon as you dip deeper into mechanics. They are too flimsy for serious work beyond sprocket covers & alternator or clutch covers (Even top of the range like Stahlwille).

Best is to start with a 3/8" of very good quality like Gedore.
Gedore guaratees their stuff and it's widely supported in SA.
Lots of the cheaper brands give warranties that are not worth the glossy cardboard they are printed on. You will have to mail your broken socket to the US of A or (even worse :o ) to the manufacturer  in China. ::)
Also note that NO tool is guaranteed against breakage from abuse such as using excessive force.
Lots of bike engines can only be assembled & disassembled using 3/8" sockets as the drive ends of 1/2" are too fat to fit into recesses.
Some maintenance work is also impossible with 1/2" torque wrenches & sockets. (KLR camshaft journal caps)

Ideally get a 3/8" drive set with hex sockets from 8mm to 19mm and allen key sockets from 3mm to 10mm. Add Torx if you have a Beemer.

Next get a 1/2" ratchet & breaker bar, two extensions 100mm and 250mm and the three or six sockets you need for your bike for axle nuts & suspension bolts. (Usually 12, 14, 17, 19, 22, 24). You can often get this personalised kit in quality like Gedore for roughly the same as you pay for one of those 122 pieces of chromium plated shite sets from the Veri Muck store or Mac Crow.

The difference is that you will break the cheapo stuff you need quick quick and after six months will sit with a set of useless sizes of tools in a cheap plastic box.
The quality stuff will last and if you really manage to burst a socket you can replace single items at any time.

There is numerous other differences between cheap and good tools:
Good ones will NEVER be cheap to buy but cheap to own as they last a lifetime.
They fit well and don't ruin bolts.
They don't rust.
They achieve strength from good materials used, not from plenty of material used. A good socket will reach a bolt in a recess, a cheap one does not.

If you have the choice (you do with quality tool manufactures like Gedore, Hazet & Stahlwille) use hexagonal sockets rather than poly 12. Poly12 are marginally faster and nicer to work with in an industrial environment and have less tendency to seize on mutilated bolt heads but have disadvantages in workshop use as they are faster to slip off damaged bolt heads or to ruin extremely tight bolt heads.

Very few places you can't reach with the 3/8" sockets. Usually only two or three 8mm hex or 5mm allen engine cover bolts on the whole bike. Get a T-handle with the relevant size socket or a loose allen key in the meantime. Get a 1/4" socket set last, it's a luxury item.
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Offline MildDog

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1143 on: July 04, 2010, 09:27:13 pm »
Thanks guys :) This should be made into a sticky of sort or other...

I was fairly relcutant to buy the more expensive brands, and figured I'd try and get away with buying only the sizes that I need and saving fifty or a hundred rand where I could, by buying slightly cheaper stuff. But that fifty or hundred rand is worth it because good tools seem to last 15+ years. And it is my birthday today :)

Which shops are decent in terms of helpful/wellstocked/decent price?
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Offline N[]vA

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1144 on: July 05, 2010, 12:59:50 pm »
Thanks guys :) This should be made into a sticky of sort or other...

I was fairly relcutant to buy the more expensive brands, and figured I'd try and get away with buying only the sizes that I need and saving fifty or a hundred rand where I could, by buying slightly cheaper stuff. But that fifty or hundred rand is worth it because good tools seem to last 15+ years. And it is my birthday today :)

Which shops are decent in terms of helpful/wellstocked/decent price?
When It comes to bike parts and tools generaly saving bucks will cost you bucks further down the line, at least thats the way I feel about it.

Within reason though! right tool/part for the job, simple as that
So much of win it hurts! ^.^


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Offline lecap

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1145 on: July 06, 2010, 09:30:19 am »
Thanks guys :) This should be made into a sticky of sort or other...

I was fairly relcutant to buy the more expensive brands, and figured I'd try and get away with buying only the sizes that I need and saving fifty or a hundred rand where I could, by buying slightly cheaper stuff. But that fifty or hundred rand is worth it because good tools seem to last 15+ years. And it is my birthday today :)

Which shops are decent in terms of helpful/wellstocked/decent price?

Pro tools nothing beats Stahlwille & Hazet. Lekker expensive but remember it's a lifetime investment.

Next best is Gedore. There is a few others which might be similar quality but I have not used them.

My comprehensive list of local quality tool suppliers
« Last Edit: July 06, 2010, 09:31:05 am by lecap »
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Offline Poffmuis

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1146 on: July 06, 2010, 08:54:30 pm »
When It comes to bike parts and tools generaly saving bucks will cost you bucks further down the line, at least thats the way I feel about it.

Don't let those guys that were giving you kak about cheap HID's read that sentence  :biggrin:

The orange guys just scored a cool goal...
« Last Edit: July 06, 2010, 08:55:25 pm by Newguy »
 

Offline wrench

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1147 on: July 06, 2010, 09:35:15 pm »
Quite honestly, I don't think anything beats Snap-on, Beta and S-K and  1/4 inch socket sets are invaluable tools in my workshop.
 

Offline N[]vA

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1148 on: July 06, 2010, 11:14:43 pm »
When It comes to bike parts and tools generaly saving bucks will cost you bucks further down the line, at least thats the way I feel about it.

Don't let those guys that were giving you kak about cheap HID's read that sentence  :biggrin:

The orange guys just scored a cool goal...

they are the same HID's that get re-branded and sold for top prices
So much of win it hurts! ^.^


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Offline lecap

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1149 on: July 07, 2010, 09:41:49 am »
...1/4 inch socket sets are invaluable tools in my workshop.

That's for a pro, yes and you also have 3/8", right?

A DIY mechanic armed with a 1/2" and a 1/4" set only will ruin the small ones in no time.
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Offline grego

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1150 on: July 07, 2010, 01:47:16 pm »
...1/4 inch socket sets are invaluable tools in my workshop.

That's for a pro, yes and you also have 3/8", right?

A DIY mechanic armed with a 1/2" and a 1/4" set only will ruin the small ones in no time.
i did my entire XR build with only a 1/4 and a 1/2 inch set!  ;D 
i agree with you though... 3/8'' is probably better as a start as the 1/4'' did take a bit of strain on some of the tighter bolts (didn't break anything tho).
 

Offline Etienne2T

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1151 on: July 08, 2010, 11:19:40 pm »
Those are some big ass handguards!
 

Offline AntonDP

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1152 on: July 09, 2010, 10:51:02 am »
Cool
 

Offline Jules

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1153 on: July 09, 2010, 01:06:32 pm »
Gotta love guys that work on their bikes "inside" the house

Ill get Bliksemd if I try that!



 :thumleft:

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Offline backwheelbandit

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1154 on: July 09, 2010, 02:06:22 pm »
looks awesome
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Offline MildDog

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1155 on: July 09, 2010, 02:29:52 pm »
Gotta love guys that work on their bikes "inside" the house

Ill get Bliksemd if I try that!



 :thumleft:



I am house-sitting for someone else  :o hehehe...
I crash test all of my safety gear. Do you?
 

Offline Jules

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1156 on: July 09, 2010, 04:31:10 pm »
Gotta love guys that work on their bikes "inside" the house

Ill get Bliksemd if I try that!



 :thumleft:



I am house-sitting for someone else  :o hehehe...

Even Better

Hope you leave them some burnouts to remember you by!!!
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Offline LouisXander

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1157 on: July 09, 2010, 05:15:11 pm »
Cover up not to get wet? The ballast I mean.
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Offline MildDog

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1158 on: July 09, 2010, 05:39:17 pm »
Cover up not to get wet? The ballast I mean.

OOPS! hadn't considered that it may not be waterproof. mmmm.... Rookie error. Will maak a plan. probably a plastic bag type of plan.
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Offline Moondog

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1159 on: July 09, 2010, 06:16:07 pm »
Cover up not to get wet? The ballast I mean.

OOPS! hadn't considered that it may not be waterproof. mmmm.... Rookie error. Will maak a plan. probably a plastic bag type of plan.

My HIDs have been through plenty rain, and the ocasional wash with a hose - connectors are generally water resistant (rubber gators) and balast seems to handle it. I've not had a problem (yet?) - but I would not suggest submerging them  :o
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