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Author Topic: The DRZ Thread  (Read 52677 times)

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Offline MildDog

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1120 on: June 19, 2010, 03:40:25 pm »
I went, well tried to, go for a ride with crossed-up, wes, michiel and A2J. I got there fine, then when they all sped off my bike wouldn't start. Push started it and went through to TMC on Waterkant. Solonoid was dieing. Suzuki wanted to charge R750 for one. So Tim and Krogh suggested buying one from Motomia's service shop just around the corner. That set me back R100 and my bike is now rolling again  :ricky:
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Offline JamesXRV

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1121 on: June 19, 2010, 08:31:56 pm »
Cool. A boer always maak plan. We must still do that potjie. No solonoids needed    ;-)   
If at first you don't succeed, take another swig of whiskey and try again...
 

Offline A2J

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1122 on: June 19, 2010, 08:35:58 pm »
so then we'll see you next time again and you can enjoy the ride with us'
keep well.
 

Offline Crossed-up

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1123 on: June 19, 2010, 08:53:31 pm »
No apologies for sending you home.  It would have been impossible for you to go into the quarry.  You would have had to keep the engine running for 3 hours.

Glad to hear it was so easily fixed. 

Next time.
 

Offline buzzlightyear

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1124 on: June 19, 2010, 08:54:02 pm »
What soleniod was that, one the starter?
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Offline MildDog

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1125 on: June 19, 2010, 09:15:34 pm »
Cool. A boer always maak plan. We must still do that potjie. No solonoids needed    ;-)  

I was thinking of your today, you've been very quiet lately. Let's do the potjie soon :)

No apologies for sending you home.  It would have been impossible for you to go into the quarry.  You would have had to keep the engine running for 3 hours.

I know! When i stopped on waterkant to wait for tim the bike stopped and started just like it should have, the problem had fixed itself, which did make me kinda sad. but i needed to sort it out anyway, so we diagnosed and sorted it then.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2010, 09:17:09 pm by MildDog »
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Offline lecap

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1126 on: June 21, 2010, 07:45:53 am »
Not enough oil in a dry sump engines reservoir on cold start is in almost every single case caused by operator error not by a mechanical fault.

Fix:

NEVER idle the bike on the side stand especially not before switching off and checking oil. The amount of oil that is not picked up by the scavenger pump when the bike is on the side stand increases, in some bikes by as much as half a litre (XT600).

This actually does not cause any problems, not even on a DRZ with a rather mininalistic stockpile of lubricant.

Even if your dipstick does not show any oil (because some of it remained in the sump) there is still about a litre (DRZ) in your oil tank. below the reach of the dipstick.
This oil in the tank is sufficient for startup. Just make sure you start the bike standing UPRIGHT NOT ON THE SIDE STAND as in this case the oil in the tank will immediately get replenished by the scavenger pump.

BTW it's nonsense to wait three minutes after shutdown before pulling the dipstick of a dry sump engine. How should any oil make it into the reservoir over these three minutes? The amount of oil sticking to the walls of the reservoir is rather minimal. Switch off, pull, wipe, dip, check.

BTW: If you have oil draining out of your reservoir overnight you should have a good look at your oil pump. The only way the oil can drain is as leakage past your pressure pump rotor unless there is further serious damage to the system.
Excessive leakage of the pressure pump will decrease pumping pressure and volume and sooner or later cause kark like running the big end. A good oil pump is more crucial to engine health than the ultimate fully synthetic super performance racing oil.
Check oil level after shut down following the correct procedure. Check again next morning before starting. The drop in oil level should not be more than marginal. If your oil is gone in the morning get your pump measured / replaced.
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Offline MildDog

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1127 on: June 21, 2010, 01:17:55 pm »
Mmmm... my oil level had drained RIGHT out between saturday midday when i started removing the radiators and sunday evening when I put them back on and rode the bike again.

ALSO: Does anyone have a spare oil dipstick? The thread on mine is badly mangled so I have to use a pair of pliers to get it in or out, and its a mission!
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Offline sidetrack

Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1128 on: June 21, 2010, 05:54:11 pm »
Mmmm... my oil level had drained RIGHT out between saturday midday when i started removing the radiators and sunday evening when I put them back on and rode the bike again.

ALSO: Does anyone have a spare oil dipstick? The thread on mine is badly mangled so I have to use a pair of pliers to get it in or out, and its a mission!
My oil level also dropped even after an hour or two. In fact it has to drain down how else would you get fresh oil in your motor after a service  ???
« Last Edit: June 21, 2010, 09:43:38 pm by sidetrack »
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Ride reports :
http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=134175.0 Penge's pass and the Old Forest http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=9421.0 - Orange Atlantic adventure http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=7514.0 - 805 km day trip http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=20260.0 - East Cape Bash http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=70199.0 - Two KTM thumpers head north
 

Offline lecap

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1129 on: June 22, 2010, 12:25:41 am »
Mmmm... my oil level had drained RIGHT out between saturday midday when i started removing the radiators and sunday evening when I put them back on and rode the bike again.

ALSO: Does anyone have a spare oil dipstick? The thread on mine is badly mangled so I have to use a pair of pliers to get it in or out, and its a mission!
My oil level also dropped even after an hour or two. In fact it has to drain down how else would you get fresh oil in your motor after a service  ???

The pressure pump is doing it for you, and it's fetching the oil from exactly where you fill it. Dry sump, clever boy!
"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." (Red Adair)
 

Offline sidetrack

Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1130 on: June 22, 2010, 07:29:55 am »
Mmmm... my oil level had drained RIGHT out between saturday midday when i started removing the radiators and sunday evening when I put them back on and rode the bike again.

ALSO: Does anyone have a spare oil dipstick? The thread on mine is badly mangled so I have to use a pair of pliers to get it in or out, and its a mission!
My oil level also dropped even after an hour or two. In fact it has to drain down how else would you get fresh oil in your motor after a service  ???

The pressure pump is doing it for you, and it's fetching the oil from exactly where you fill it. Dry sump, clever boy!
Ok but if you drain the oil about 3/4 comes out of the motor and less out of the frame so not oil sits in the frame and the motor is not dry. ANyhow I much prefer a sight glass  :biggrin:
Little by little, one travels far

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Ride reports :
http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=134175.0 Penge's pass and the Old Forest http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=9421.0 - Orange Atlantic adventure http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=7514.0 - 805 km day trip http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=20260.0 - East Cape Bash http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=70199.0 - Two KTM thumpers head north
 

Offline lecap

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1131 on: June 22, 2010, 09:55:14 am »
The oil in the crankcase does bugger all besides sitting there and waiting to be picked up by the scavenger pump.

If leakage of the pressure pump increases to the point that all oil has drained out of the tank into the sump before startup your engine runs without oil pressure until the scavenger has pumped enough oil into the tank to allow the pressure pump to work.
Your crankcase can be as full as you want it yur engine will still seize.

Check your oil pump.

Oil pump R 1.5k, engine rebuild R 15k. A no brainer IMHO
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Offline N[]vA

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1132 on: June 22, 2010, 10:27:52 am »
Check your oil pump.

Oil pump R 1.5k, engine rebuild R 15k. A no brainer IMHO
+1000 have to agree
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Offline MildDog

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1133 on: June 22, 2010, 11:04:38 am »
Check your oil pump.

Oil pump R 1.5k, engine rebuild R 15k. A no brainer IMHO
+1000 have to agree

So where and how do I have my oil pump checked?? :(
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Offline sidetrack

Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1134 on: June 28, 2010, 09:19:52 pm »
Throttle cables routed wrong, some wiring in the way etc etc.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2010, 09:20:14 pm by sidetrack »
Little by little, one travels far

J.R.R Tolkien
Ride reports :
http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=134175.0 Penge's pass and the Old Forest http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=9421.0 - Orange Atlantic adventure http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=7514.0 - 805 km day trip http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=20260.0 - East Cape Bash http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=70199.0 - Two KTM thumpers head north
 

Offline MildDog

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1135 on: July 01, 2010, 09:36:12 am »
What implement do I use to remove the front sprocket? I have a 24 spanner for the back, and my shifting spanner (which goes to 25 or 27 I think) doesn't fit over the front nut.
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Offline letsgofishing

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1136 on: July 01, 2010, 10:09:29 am »
What implement do I use to remove the front sprocket? I have a 24 spanner for the back, and my shifting spanner (which goes to 25 or 27 I think) doesn't fit over the front nut.

30mm socket and power bar
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Offline N[]vA

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1137 on: July 01, 2010, 10:55:44 am »
I just use a big monkey wrench and hold the rear brake down :-p
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Offline letsgofishing

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1138 on: July 02, 2010, 08:45:32 am »
Anyone fitted a "Goose tube" to their Z's?
Just can't seem to find a place for it.
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Offline lecap

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Re: The DRZ Thread
« Reply #1139 on: July 02, 2010, 09:57:37 am »
T-bar is a part of a socket wrench kit.
You use it for crude application of raw force.
That's why it's also sometimnes called breaker bar.
Breaks stubborn bolts loose. Sometimes breaks stubborn bolts. Cheaper to replace than the ratchet wrench if the breaker bar breaks ;D

Bolts: (Can't find the original thread)
The first digit of the x.x mark on non stainless bolts stands for the ultimate tensile strength of the bolt x100MPa
the second digit gives the factor to calculate the yield tensile strength of the bolt.

The ultimate tensile strength gives the force that ruptures the bolt.
The yield tensile strength gives the force that will permanently deform the bolt.

Examples:
Your 4.6 bolt: T&he ultimate strength is 400 MPa
The yield strength is: 0.6 x 400MPa = 240MPa
This lies anywhere between wet spaghetti and quality chewing gum.
The bolts will readily snap if you only show them a spanner.
They are made by children in Chinese backyard sweatshops using a 90% recycled cardboard 10% zinc alloy that only visibly resembles steel ::)

Compare: A decent 8.8 (pretty much an industry standard) bolt:
The ultimate strength is 800MPa
The yield strength is 0.8 x 800MPa = 640MPa
It is almost three times as strong as the rubbish they sold you :o

And now a high tensile 12.9 (highest grade commercialy available) bolt:
The ultimate strength is 1200MPa
The yield strength is 1080MPa
4.5 times stronger than your Chinese zinc cardboard fasteners ;D

Stainless (actually corrosion resistant) bolts only give a quality grade ranging from A1 (lowest) to A5 (highest) and the ultimate strength in x10 MPa to tell them apart from the others. A typical denomination would be A2-70.
It's important to know a few things about these stainles steels before wildly bolting a bike together using them:
The quality grading refers to corrosion resistance and NOT necessarily to strength of the bolts although higher quality grade corrosion resistant bolts usually have a higher ultimate strength too.
Commercially widespread are the qualities A2 and A4. A2 is permanently resistant to corrosion at room temperature if exposed to the elements (NOT sea water, it will show surface corrosion). A4 is often dubbed "acid resistant" and does not corrode if exposed to  sea water or weak acids.
Typical quality stainless bolts would be A2-70 and A4-80
The yield strength of the corrosion resistant steels used is only about 60% of their ultimate strength.
Means although an A4-80 bolt has the same ultimate strength as an 8.8 it has considerably less yield strength (480MPa vs. 640MPa) which obviously is much the more important figure.
A further important issue of stainless bolts is their increased tendency to develop fatigue failures. A good reason not to replace any structural fasteners (brakes, chassis, suspension, engine mounts, handlebar clamps etc.) on your bike with stainless bolts.
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