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Author Topic: The DR650 thread  (Read 129524 times)

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Offline Kykdaar

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3760 on: February 09, 2016, 09:59:46 pm »
The Mikuni BST is a very simple carb to work on and set up. Plenty of good info on the web and also here on the forum - http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=170372.0

Shout if you need help.
 

Offline lecap

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3761 on: February 10, 2016, 10:22:21 am »
During December and January, I finally managed to sneak into the back door of the SSS.
The little blue steed is not too happy though, and there has been a few niggles.
Firstly, the bike would die if I turned the handle bar left at low speed, such as when I pulled into a parking area. This turned out to be due to the choke cable being routed wrongly, each time I turned the handle, the choke was pulled open and the bike died. Easy enough to fix, but this led to another problem. Now the bike would not run smoothly unless I opened the choke a bit. If not, the bike would cut out even at high speed cruising on the highway. I decided to check the carb, and thus removed the carb from the bike. The first part, removing the piece of plastic at the top, turned out to be quite difficult, as the screws were tightened much too tight. I got them loose though, and checked that everthing at the top looked OK.
I then tried the float bowl screws. These two screws took me 3 weeks to get out, something I only managed tonight. So now begins the big clean, checking which jets the carb has in, and finding out why the bike is cutting out at high speed.
After that will come the easy stuff, like front forks and new tyres.
And hopefully, after that, I will have a little blue bike that will take me across the country as reliably as my KLR did for so many years.


Two things to do to the BST carb if the bike is otherwise standard:

Back out the idle mix screw 1/8 to 1/4 turn further than where it was factory set. This sorts out the stalling on hard deceleration to a stand still. If the bike does not stall leave as is as some one did it already.

Lift the main jet needle by half a groove (fit a 3mm washer between the plastic needle retainer and the clip) or alternatively lift the needle by one groove (clip in the 4th groove from the top. I've tried both modifications they both result in better throttle response and eliminate hesitation at take over. I can't really feel a difference between the two variants.
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Offline Matie spero

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3762 on: February 10, 2016, 04:59:14 pm »
Bliksem ek gaan nou daai DR pakslae gee huis toe!!!!!

hoop ek kry n KLR om te dice!!!!!!! Mhua hahahahaha :ricky: :ricky: :ricky: :ricky: :ricky:
I could agree with you! But then we both would be wrong.....

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Offline Acajou

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3763 on: February 25, 2016, 12:33:42 pm »
Hi guys, just a quick question about modifying the airbox.

When I bought my bike it came with the snorkel in and the airbox cover off. I've put the airbox cover back on and taken the snorkel out, but obviously the bike is not getting enough air any more. I see that a lot of people cut additional holes in the top of the airbox and my logic is telling me that this will get the bike back to normal. Before I go out and irreversibly modify my bike, I want to hear if you guys have anything to recommend? I am not good with carbs and I don't have the means to remove it and check the needles etc, but I assume if it was running well with the airbox cover off that it has been rejetted.
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Offline chopperpilot

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3764 on: February 25, 2016, 02:24:59 pm »
I'm at 3000 feet above sea level.

Snorkel out and additional 50mm hole in top of airbox. Side cover on.

150 main jet. Could go slightly smaller for the reef.

Pilot is 45. Std should be 42.5.

What really changed my DR into a beast is the "Matie Spearo" hand tapered needle, with the D-shelf mod. Circlip you start with the 3/5 position. If it surges under acceleration, you can lift the needle one clip.

It's not a sensitive carb, so even with settings slightly out, it will still run well.

Have fun!


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Offline Acajou

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3765 on: February 25, 2016, 03:52:00 pm »
I'm at 3000 feet above sea level.

Snorkel out and additional 50mm hole in top of airbox. Side cover on.

150 main jet. Could go slightly smaller for the reef.

Pilot is 45. Std should be 42.5.

What really changed my DR into a beast is the "Matie Spearo" hand tapered needle, with the D-shelf mod. Circlip you start with the 3/5 position. If it surges under acceleration, you can lift the needle one clip.

It's not a sensitive carb, so even with settings slightly out, it will still run well.

Have fun!


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Cool  :thumleft: I will drill a hole in the top of the airbox and see how that runs. Hopefully it doesn't run too lean afterwards
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Offline LeonDude

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3766 on: February 25, 2016, 04:03:16 pm »
Got my carb back in the bike and she's running smoothly around town. Will test her for a week or so before taking her out on the highways.
Got to get that suspension sorted, it's way to slack.
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Offline chopperpilot

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3767 on: February 25, 2016, 04:59:00 pm »
The DR is under sprung and under damped.

Speak to Superfoxi for an affordable upgrade to your rear shock.

I'v only serviced the fronts, and inserted a few spacers, to increase the pre load. Slight improvement.




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Offline lecap

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3768 on: February 26, 2016, 09:06:07 am »
Spacers in the front will compress the OEM progressive / twin rate springs to the point where they turn into constant rate springs. Not the best solution as your front end will now be a bit harsh and still a bit under sprung. Better to go for after market progressive springs. I have measured the Wilbers  vs. the OEM. The initial rate is near identical with the Wilbers having a slightly stiffer second spring rate / more progression once you compress the forks past the average ride height.

I personally don't really like linear rate fork springs for a DS bike. Progressive gives more reserves against bottoming out without compromising comfort.

Judging the DR's suspension depends entirely on what you do with the bike:

I am about 90kg with riding gear. Did a 3,500km trip with my 2007 on dirt roads with some 15kg of luggage. Suspension (front Wilbers, rear stock standard, spring preload max minus some 2mm, damper five clicks in. Felt perfect, good traction, comfortable, did not bottom out once.

If you are fat or ride hard it's a different story. The bike is set up as a comfortable and capable green laner for an average (80kg - 90kg) rider and some small luggage. If you try to ride enduro style or worse MX you will be disappointed or you will have to spend money.


It's also important to remember that the rear shocks although externally identical changed over the years looking at the damper valve shimming. The later year model ones tend to perform better.
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Offline LeonDude

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3769 on: February 26, 2016, 09:44:18 am »
Thanks LeCap
I just tour with the bike, mostly good dirt roads, which means I hit the occasional rough patch. I'm also lucky to ride with Cave Girl, so I keep my speed down.
For now I'm just going to replace the oil in the front forks, as the bike seems to be 'walking' at high speed, which I'm worried could turn into a tank slapper.
I don't know how that rear suspension system works, so I'll probably stop at Groenie or Kykdaar or someone to show me.
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Offline chopperpilot

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3770 on: February 26, 2016, 11:37:08 am »
I sold my '99 DR with the Wilber fork springs.

As an interim measure I did the front fork service and shimming on my '07. Don't know if 10mm of shimming can be called a "little"?

I ride with the Power Rangers, as StuartC describes them, in Swaziland. So the going does get tough!

I have a complete DRZ 400 front end for the DR, but am in two minds about fitting it, as I have recently bought a Husky 610 TE. Still to be collected in CT.

I am closer to 100kgs, and about 20 kgs of luggage and tools. The improved Superfoxi rear shock results in very few rear end bottoms.

Slight improvement in the front's performance, but with the carb mods, I mostly blip the throttle to clear the bad patches. Seldom bottom the forks.

If you have a relaxed pace, you should be able to get away with the standard suspension, setting it as LeCap recommends.





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Offline chopperpilot

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3771 on: February 26, 2016, 11:39:01 am »
Superfoxi mentioned to me that the rear shock internals of his DR were different to mine.


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Offline Copius

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3772 on: February 29, 2016, 11:02:09 am »
Morning Guys,

Can someone just confirm the expected lifetime of a DID 525 Chain and sprockets please?
 

Offline LeonDude

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3773 on: February 29, 2016, 11:18:41 am »
Morning Guys,

Can someone just confirm the expected lifetime of a DID 525 Chain and sprockets please?
Difficult to say, because it's always going to depend on your riding style. The harder you ride, the quicker everything will wear. Also, short distance riding will wear things quicker than if you do long trips, especially on tar.

You should get at least 20K out of it, I think.
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Offline Copius

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3774 on: February 29, 2016, 11:44:25 am »
Morning Guys,

Can someone just confirm the expected lifetime of a DID 525 Chain and sprockets please?
Difficult to say, because it's always going to depend on your riding style. The harder you ride, the quicker everything will wear. Also, short distance riding will wear things quicker than if you do long trips, especially on tar.

You should get at least 20K out of it, I think.


Sorry, makes sense.....

I only commute 100km per day on the N2, once in a blue moon I do a little bit of dirt.
Stock standard DR, no mods.

Currently on 28 000km's previously the chain and sprockets were replaced at 15 000km.
So I guess I'll have to prepare myself for a R2000 replacement every second service?
 

Offline chopperpilot

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3775 on: February 29, 2016, 02:09:53 pm »
I replaced the OEM chain and sprockets on my 2007 at about 14 000km.

Many guys would have left it for a few more kms.

New OEM sprockets, and a pricey EK X-ring chain. Adjusted it twice before it settled.

I always have the chain lubricated, and properly adjusted, double checking the slack with my body hanging over the seat, aiming to align the sprockets and the swing arm pivot.

I'm not the bike's first owner, don't commute, and ride it reasonably hard in Swaziland.



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Offline lecap

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3776 on: March 01, 2016, 09:38:13 am »
Morning Guys,

Can someone just confirm the expected lifetime of a DID 525 Chain and sprockets please?

If you did yourself and your wallet a favour the OEM size (DID 525 VX or VM2 x-ring) chain and sprockets will do between 25,000 and 30,000km.
The generic narrower 520 kits will do 20,000km (same good quality chain type).

The service life of a good quality O-ring chain is often only half of that of the x-ring chain of the same brand. Cheaper materials, lower quality heat treatment, weaker dimensioning.

The OEM chain (DID520V8) is a cheap piece of thrash. It will stretch unevenly after as little as 10,000km and there are numerous cases of these chains which parted with split side plates. I do not recommend to use them at all once they start showing uneven stretch. I threw mine off the bike (the last one I bought) when it was brand new and fitted a DID 525 VX

A cheap Chinese "Jin Jan" "Heavy Duty" motorcycle chain will expire and split after some 2,000km.
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Offline Copius

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3777 on: March 02, 2016, 07:27:52 am »
Thanks Lecap,

You replaced my OEM chain with a DID 525 VX chain, when I had it serviced 13 000km back.
Had the bike at Mavericks Suzuki and I was told that the chain and sprockets had less than 2000km life in them.
I also had 20 000km in my head, and that's why I asked.

What are the tell tale signs when evaluating a chain and sprockets?

Thanks for all the input
 

Offline lecap

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3778 on: March 02, 2016, 07:43:55 am »
Thanks Lecap,

You replaced my OEM chain with a DID 525 VX chain, when I had it serviced 13 000km back.
Had the bike at Mavericks Suzuki and I was told that the chain and sprockets had less than 2000km life in them.
I also had 20 000km in my head, and that's why I asked.

What are the tell tale signs when evaluating a chain and sprockets?

Thanks for all the input

Check for uneven wear.
Check how far you can lift it off the rear sprocket.
Measure the stretched length of the chain over 20 links. 317.5mm is new, 323mm is scrap. The statement made by the Suzuki shop would mean it's well past 320mm.
If they are correct then you really don't look after your stuff.
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Offline Copius

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Re: The DR650 thread
« Reply #3779 on: March 02, 2016, 08:31:03 am »
Thanks Lecap,

You replaced my OEM chain with a DID 525 VX chain, when I had it serviced 13 000km back.
Had the bike at Mavericks Suzuki and I was told that the chain and sprockets had less than 2000km life in them.
I also had 20 000km in my head, and that's why I asked.

What are the tell tale signs when evaluating a chain and sprockets?

Thanks for all the input

Check for uneven wear.
Check how far you can lift it off the rear sprocket.
Measure the stretched length of the chain over 20 links. 317.5mm is new, 323mm is scrap. The statement made by the Suzuki shop would mean it's well past 320mm.
If they are correct then you really don't look after your stuff.

Okay thanks, I'll have a look over the weekend.
Maybe washing my bike and spraying Castrol Chain wax twice a month is not enough........
« Last Edit: March 02, 2016, 08:33:16 am by Copius »