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Offline MildlyWild

Lessons learnt and things to consider for a bike trip
« on: November 12, 2020, 09:44:35 am »
After our recent 3 day, 1300km trip there were a few things I realized, learnt or had confirmed for me regarding planning, what to take, etc.  All of it might not be relevant to everyone, depending on the bike, group size, remoteness of the trip, etc. Some of it might just make your our trip easier or more enjoyable, but some of it may save the trip.
This is it, as randomly as I remember:

1. Always carry a spare tube for both wheels, and enough plugs, glue and/or patches, and know how to use them. Check the glue before every trip - those tubes have a tendency to puncture and dry out. Take a new one if you have opened yours before.
2. A Camelback allows me to coveniently keep sipping water during the ride - on hot days you will lose a lot of water without realizing
3. Carry enough water with you - I'd say 2 L minimum per person
4. Strap or tie down luggage or loose items properly, unless you dont mind losing them
5. With the applicable google maps downloaded for offline use on my phone I've had the need for a dedicated GPS, even though I have one
6. If you use a GoPro or similar, make sure you have enough batteries or means of charging it. And extra memory cards
7. A remote for the action cam, secured close to your left thumb allows you to start and stop recording small segments at will, without using valuable battery and memory card space on long, boring sections
8. Make sure you have set up any tech (action cams, comm devices, drone, etc) correctly and know exactly how to use it properly before the trip, otherwise it just becomes dead weight and a waste of time and peace
9. Check and recheck that everything on your bike works 100% prior to the trip
10. A good day trip where you pack and take most of the stuff you'll use on a longer trip quickly shows what else you need to consider
11. Just exploring at will as you go could be fun, and often plans has to be changed, but for me a relatively well planned route ensures we see and experience the best any area has to offer
12. Make sure you carry the correct tools for your bike, or that a riding partner has those tools if you plan on sharing stuff
13. Don't pack too much stuff - one actually needs very little in terms of extra clothes
14. Unkess you need to impress anyone it is not necessary to have the best/latest/lightest equipment - use what you have
15. For me a Leatherman is indispensable
16. If you're going to be camping and making your own food, eat well - a lekker meal, drink and dessert ends off a long day on the bike perfectly
17. Unless you are after the rush of adrenaline, take your time, ride slowly and enjoy the surroundings, and stop often for pics - those will be your memories in future when details start to fade
18. For me a bluetooth comm system is awesome - it transforms the ride into a shared experience
19. Make sure you and you riding partner/s have at least roughly the same idea and expectation about the trip

Added from comments:
20. Pack tools and any other stuff you might need or want during the ride so that it is easily accessible. Intend stopping to make coffee in the middle of nowhere? Then do not stow the gas stove and other coffee stuff right at the bottom of a tightly packed and tied side pannier bag  :BangHead:


Thats it for now - if I think of anything else I will add it.
And like I said, we are all different, doing different rides on different bikes and wanting different experience, but some things just makes sense
« Last Edit: November 12, 2020, 02:50:39 pm by MildlyWild »
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Offline Lord Knormoer

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Re: Lessons learnt and things to consider for a bike trip
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2020, 12:49:30 pm »
After our recent 3 day, 1300km trip there were a few things I realized, learnt or had confirmed for me regarding planning, what to take, etc.  All of it might not be relevant to everyone, depending on the bike, group size, remoteness of the trip, etc. Some of it might just make your our trip easier or more enjoyable, but some of it may save the trip.
This is it, as randomly as I remember:

1. Always carry a spare tube for both wheels, and enough plugs, glue and/or patches, and know how to use them. Check the glue before every trip - those tubes have a tendency to puncture and dry out. Take a new one if you have opened yours before.
2. A Camelback allows me to coveniently keep sipping water during the ride - on hot days you will lose a lot of water without realizing
3. Carry enough water with you - I'd say 2 L minimum per person
4. Strap or tie down luggage or loose items properly, unless you dont mind losing them
5. With the applicable google maps downloaded for offline use on my phone I've had the need for a dedicated GPS, even though I have one
6. If you use a GoPro or similar, make sure you have enough batteries or means of charging it. And extra memory cards
7. A remote for the action cam, secured close to your left thumb allows you to start and stop recording small segments at will, without using valuable battery and memory card space on long, boring sections
8. Make sure you have set up any tech (action cams, comm devices, drone, etc) correctly and know exactly how to use it properly before the trip, otherwise it just becomes dead weight and a waste of time and peace
9. Check and recheck that everything on your bike works 100% prior to the trip
10. A good day trip where you pack and take most of the stuff you'll use on a longer trip quickly shows what else you need to consider
11. Just exploring at will as you go could be fun, and often plans has to be changed, but for me a relatively well planned route ensures we see and experience the best any area has to offer
12. Make sure you carry the correct tools for your bike, or that a riding partner has those tools if you plan on sharing stuff
13. Don't pack too much stuff - one actually needs very little in terms of extra clothes
14. Unkess you need to impress anyone it is not necessary to have the best/latest/lightest equipment - use what you have
15. For me a Leatherman is indispensable
16. If you're going to be camping and making your own food, eat well - a lekker meal, drink and dessert ends off a long day on the bike perfectly
17. Unless you are after the rush of adrenaline, take your time, ride slowly and enjoy the surroundings, and stop often for pics - those will be your memories in future when details start to fade
18. For me a bluetooth comm system is awesome - it transforms the ride into a shared experience
19. Make sure you and you riding partner/s have at least roughly the same idea and expectation about the trip


Thats it for now - if I think of anything else I will add it.
And like I said, we are all different, doing different rides on different bikes and wanting different experience, but some things just makes sense

Agree on most points with emphasis on 1,2 and 19 based on personal experience apart from the GPS which I prefer above a smart phone for longer trips.
 

Offline jaybiker

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Re: Lessons learnt and things to consider for a bike trip
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2020, 01:40:29 pm »
A lesson I should have learned many years ago, or maybe I did learn it and failed to remember. So bloody obvious really. When you are packed with gear, don't have your essential tools stashed in an inaccessible place, like under the seat buried under all your gear securely strapped to the bike and requiring loads of unbundling and re-packing. Take 'em out and pack 'em right on top where they are the first things to hand. This is particularly appreciated when you're on the home stretch after a couple of days arduous riding and all you can think of is getting out of your stifling kit and under the shower.
On my last weekend ride, my front brake lever/master cyl/mirror assembly came loose and I could watch the two bolts unscrewing themselves as I rode. All it required was a minute's application of a 5mm allen key. Of course I had one, as inaccessible as it was possible to get. Fortunately a riding mate had a mini tool kit right in his pocket. I could almost have kissed him, er no, well hugged him anyway, covid notwithstanding.

59,9 years riding experience, and I'm still learning the bloody basics!  ::)
« Last Edit: November 12, 2020, 01:42:48 pm by jaybiker »
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Offline MildlyWild

Re: Lessons learnt and things to consider for a bike trip
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2020, 02:43:33 pm »
A lesson I should have learned many years ago, or maybe I did learn it and failed to remember. So bloody obvious really. When you are packed with gear, don't have your essential tools stashed in an inaccessible place, like under the seat buried under all your gear securely strapped to the bike and requiring loads of unbundling and re-packing. Take 'em out and pack 'em right on top where they are the first things to hand. This is particularly appreciated when you're on the home stretch after a couple of days arduous riding and all you can think of is getting out of your stifling kit and under the shower.
On my last weekend ride, my front brake lever/master cyl/mirror assembly came loose and I could watch the two bolts unscrewing themselves as I rode. All it required was a minute's application of a 5mm allen key. Of course I had one, as inaccessible as it was possible to get. Fortunately a riding mate had a mini tool kit right in his pocket. I could almost have kissed him, er no, well hugged him anyway, covid notwithstanding.

59,9 years riding experience, and I'm still learning the bloody basics!  ::)

Good point this - I am going to edit the list above
As a man thinketh, so he becomes...
 

Offline Mpandla

Re: Lessons learnt and things to consider for a bike trip
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2020, 02:56:30 pm »

Agree on most points with emphasis on 1,2 and 19 based on personal experience apart from the GPS which I prefer above a smart phone for longer trips.

Same here, though I take a GPS and good old fashioned paper map as backup. I tend to switch my phone off when on a trip and only use it to keep loved ones in the loop
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Online RobC

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Re: Lessons learnt and things to consider for a bike trip
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2020, 03:03:25 pm »
A lesson I should have learned many years ago, or maybe I did learn it and failed to remember. So bloody obvious really. When you are packed with gear, don't have your essential tools stashed in an inaccessible place, like under the seat buried under all your gear securely strapped to the bike and requiring loads of unbundling and re-packing. Take 'em out and pack 'em right on top where they are the first things to hand. This is particularly appreciated when you're on the home stretch after a couple of days arduous riding and all you can think of is getting out of your stifling kit and under the shower.
On my last weekend ride, my front brake lever/master cyl/mirror assembly came loose and I could watch the two bolts unscrewing themselves as I rode. All it required was a minute's application of a 5mm allen key. Of course I had one, as inaccessible as it was possible to get. Fortunately a riding mate had a mini tool kit right in his pocket. I could almost have kissed him, er no, well hugged him anyway, covid notwithstanding.

59,9 years riding experience, and I'm still learning the bloody basics!  ::)

Good point this - I am going to edit the list above
That is why us KLR riders have a tool tube... :sip:
 

Offline MildlyWild

Re: Lessons learnt and things to consider for a bike trip
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2020, 07:52:17 pm »
A lesson I should have learned many years ago, or maybe I did learn it and failed to remember. So bloody obvious really. When you are packed with gear, don't have your essential tools stashed in an inaccessible place, like under the seat buried under all your gear securely strapped to the bike and requiring loads of unbundling and re-packing. Take 'em out and pack 'em right on top where they are the first things to hand. This is particularly appreciated when you're on the home stretch after a couple of days arduous riding and all you can think of is getting out of your stifling kit and under the shower.
On my last weekend ride, my front brake lever/master cyl/mirror assembly came loose and I could watch the two bolts unscrewing themselves as I rode. All it required was a minute's application of a 5mm allen key. Of course I had one, as inaccessible as it was possible to get. Fortunately a riding mate had a mini tool kit right in his pocket. I could almost have kissed him, er no, well hugged him anyway, covid notwithstanding.

59,9 years riding experience, and I'm still learning the bloody basics!  ::)

Good point this - I am going to edit the list above
That is why us KLR riders have a tool tube... :sip:

Jip, got that myself  :thumleft: But I had to dig out extra patches for Tiaan. And they were not in there :-\
As a man thinketh, so he becomes...
 

Offline Jaakmh

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Re: Lessons learnt and things to consider for a bike trip
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2020, 08:47:24 pm »
Thanks for sharing!


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