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Author Topic: Fuel injected Kawasaki OBD2 connection (Versys 4 pin)  (Read 422 times)

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Offline IanTheTooth

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Fuel injected Kawasaki OBD2 connection (Versys 4 pin)
« on: December 30, 2020, 03:54:15 am »
Has anyone had any luck getting their Kawasaki to talk through the OBD plug and does it volunteer very much information? The smaller ones seem to have a 4 pin sumitomo plug with 4 connections and the larger Kwackers a 6 pin also with 4 connections. The trailing lead in the picture can also be earthed to get fault codes. Anyone tried it?
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Offline IanTheTooth

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Re: Fuel injected Kawasaki OBD2 connection (Versys 4 pin)
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2020, 03:58:25 am »
( from the web) This took a bit of mucking around to nut this out but we ended-up with a great solution for clearing codes without having to do the "Kawasaki code clear silly dance 3 times".

Parts needed:
OBD-II socket from a car.

Soldering iron, solder, electrical tape to join 4 wires neatly to the loom.

I went to the local car wrecker and bought an OBD-II (On Board Diagnostics) socket from a random Holden Commodore for $10 but I expect with some searching you could get one for nothing from a wreck and any manufacturer in the last 20 years odd will have an OBD2 in the dash.

Make sure they leave some of the wiring loom attached (150mm or so)
Make sure it has 5 wires coming out of it at least.

Below is a picture of a OBD2 socket pinout, the pins you need for the Ninja 400 are:

Pin 4 - Ground
Pin 5 - Ground
Pin 7 - K-line
Pin 15 - L-Line
Pin 16 - +12v

If the 5 wires on your OBD-2 socket are not those pins don't panic, it's easy enough to insert a small screwdriver in the socket and un-clip a pin, slide it out the back of the plug and put it into the right hole.

Locate the KDS plug under the seat (picture attached below)
It's in a opaque plastic boot with rubber-band holding it in place.
There is a black 6 pin plug (ABS) and a white 4 pin plug (KDS), the KDS is the one you want.

From the back (wire side) of the KDS the wire colours are:

BK/W --- GY/BL
BR/W --- LG/BK

From your OBD-2 socket:

Join the wires from pin 4 and 5 together and connect it to KDS-BK/W
OBD2- pin 7 connected to KDS-GY/BL
OBD2- pin 15 connected to KDS-LG/BK
OBD2- pin 16 connected to KDS-BR/W

From another project I already had some Tyco superseal pins so used the blank KDS cap to make a socket but you could wire direct to the wires in the loom or try and source a matching socket. Don't remove the KDS plug from the loom though as your bike shop will use it during a service.

Picture below of the Commodore OBD2 socket after changing the 4 pins to suit the Ninja.

All you do then is plug-in a simple OBD2 reader ($20 odd on ebay like the MaxiScan below) and you can read the codes and clear them.

Make sure that the OBD2 reader you get does the protocol KWP-2000 (Key Word Protocol). Most but not all readers do KWP, the manual for the reader should show the details in the specs sheet

We mounted it under the pillion seat for easy access on the Ninja 400.

Takes about 3 seconds to plug this in and clear the code from the dash.


Kawasaki Versys self-diagnosis Under the seat, along the right subframe rail is a short orange/black wire with a bullet connector sticking out of the thick loom. This is the self-diagnosis terminal. There is another bullet connector protruding nearby - make sure itís the orange and black which can take some tugging. In order to read out the Service Codes below, ground that connector with a bit of wire with the motor running. The red FI light will begin to flash codes. There will be a 5 second delay and then the codes begin. The first flash is always a LONG (1 sec) followed by either LONG or SHORT (0.5 sec) flashes. LONG flashes indicate TENS and short flashes ONES. One LONG followed by two SHORT = 12. Two LONG, one SHORT = 21. Three LONG, two short = 32, etc. There is an interval of 1.5 seconds between TENS and ONES. There is a 3 second interval between codes. To recover codes set in memory ground the self-diagnosis terminal rapidly more than 5 times within 2 seconds. The lead must remain grounded after 5 groundings for the remainder of the diagnostic session. You can then clear codes from the ECU by pulling the clutch lever in for more than 5 seconds. Malfuntion codes: 11 Main throttle sensor 12 Inlet air pressure sensor 13 Inlet air temperature sensor 14 Water temperature sensor 21 Crankshaft sensor 24 & 25 Speed sensor (24 then 25, repeatedly) 31 Vehicle-down sensor 32 Sub-throttle sensor 33 Oxygen sensor inactive (Europe) 51 Ignition Coil #1 52 Ignition Coil #2 56 Radiator Fan Relay 62 Sub-throttle valve actuator (sensor in range but not responding) 64 Air switching valve 67 Oxygen sensor heater (Europe) 94 Oxygen sensor out-of-range


« Last Edit: December 30, 2020, 03:58:57 am by IanTheTooth »
The dog that caught the car. What now?
 

Offline IanTheTooth

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Re: Fuel injected Kawasaki OBD2 connection (Versys 4 pin)
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2021, 12:41:27 pm »
I made up a four pin adapter to OBD2 16 pin adaptor. The 4 pin sumitomo plug you can get from AliExpress

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4001072855950.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.32dd4c4dhO81kT

but although my OBD readers know there is something there they cannot get any information out of it. Looks like a proprietary code. The K line sits at around 9v and the L line at 4volts.
The dog that caught the car. What now?